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moltke

moltke

moltke Sentence Examples

  • Adam Gottlob, Count Moltke >>

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  • Nisibis (Nezib) appeared for the last time in history in 1839, when the Egyptians under Ibrahim Pasha defeated the Turkish army under Hafiz Pasha on the 24th of June in a battle at which von Moltke was present.

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  • Marash passed with the rest of Syria into Egyptian hands in 1832, and in 1839 received fugitives from the defeat of Nizib, among whom was Moltke.

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  • of their day, were immeasurably ahead of their times, and both also understood to the full the strategic art of binding and restraining the independent will power of their opponents, an art of which Marlborough and Frederick, Wellington, Lee and Moltke do not seem ever even to have grasped the fringe.

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  • The number of field battalions was nearly doubled, two-thirds of the artillery received breech-loading rifled guns, the infantry had for some years had the breech-loading "needlegun," and steps were initiated to train an adequate number of staff officers to a uniform appreciation of strategical problems, based on Moltke's personal interpretation of Clausewitz's Vom Kriege.

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  • The occasion for war was engineered entirely by Bismarck; and it is doubtful how far Moltke was in Bismarck's confidence, though as a far-seeing general he took advantage of every opening which the latter's diplomacy secured for him.

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  • The original scheme for the strategic deployment worked out by Moltke as part of the routine of his office contemplated a defence of the kingdom against not only the whole standing army of Austria, but against 35,000 Saxons, 95,000 unorganized Bavarians and other South Germans, and 60,000 Hanoverians, Hessians, &c., and to meet these he had two corps (VII.

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  • Moltke thereupon brought the VIII.

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  • Moltke took three days to solve the new problem, then, on the 22nd, he ordered the I.

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  • But Moltke, wishing to preserve full freedom for manoeuvre for each army, determined to preserve the interval between them, and began his dispositions to manoeuvre the Austrians out of the position he had selected as the best for them to take up, on the left or farther bank of the Elbe.

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  • This is so characteristic of von Moltke's methods and of the tactical preconceptions of the time that it deserves more detailed notice.

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  • Moltke, knowing well the danger for a great army of being forced into a battle with an unfordable river behind it, and with his naturally strong bent towards the defensive in tactics, concluded that Benedek would elect to hold the left bank of the Elbe, between the fortified towns of Josephstadt and Kiiniggra,tz, with his right thrown back and covered by the lower courses of the Aupa and the Mettau.

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  • As an eminent French critic (General Bonnal) says, this was but to repeat Frederick the Great's manoeuvre at Kolin, and, the Austrians being where they actually were and not where Moltke decided they ought to be, the result might have been equally disastrous.

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  • Meanwhile the duplicates had reached Moltke, and he, knowing well the temperament of the "Red Prince" and the impossibility of arresting the intended movement, obtained the royal sanction to a letter addressed to the crown prince, in which the latter was ordered to co-operate with his whole command.

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  • The battle of Langensalza (June 27th) showed that the risks Moltke deliberately accepted when he transferred so many of the western troops to the Bohemian frontier were by no means imaginary, for v.

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  • With his single aim in view he busied himself with the creation of a national militia, with the aid of Moltke and other German officers.

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  • The next years were spent in military duties and in travels, in which he was accompanied by Moltke.

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  • Moltke, still under the impression that the French right extended no farther than La Folie (2 m.

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  • Corps was now rapidly approaching (about 6 p.m.), and the king, against Moltke's advice, now ordered von Steinmetz (to whom the II.

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  • Meanwhile the king, Moltke, and Bismarck, had ridden back behind Gravelotte where they passed two hours of intense anxiety.

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  • It was the birthplace of Moltke, to whom a monument was erected in 1876.

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  • But, as the event was to prove, the military policy of Japan had failed to produce the requisite number of men for the desired Sedan, and so, instead of boldly pushing out the 1st Army to such a distance that it could manoeuvre, as Moltke did in 1866 and 1870, he attached it to the general line of battle.

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  • The retirement of the Russian Southern Force into its entrenchments emboldened the Japanese commanderin-chief to imitate Moltke's method to the full.

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  • The place was no longer tenable" (Moltke, Franco-German War).

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  • Moltke in March 1848, and was employed on diplomatic missions to London and Berlin in connexion with the Schleswig-Holstein question.

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  • It was in 1879 granted to Count von Moltke as a special distinction.

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  • There are also monuments to Moltke (1881), to Count Johann von.

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  • Moltke, and highly respected by Frederick V., he occupied for twenty-one years the highest positionin the government,andin the council of state his opinion was decisive.

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  • These did not include any prominent parliamentary leaders, but many of the most important ministers and officials, including Moltke and some of the great nobles.

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  • Changes were made in the higher posts of the army and civil service, and Moltke resigned the office of chief of the staff, which for thirty years he had held with such great distinction.

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  • supreme command was obtained by the emperor for Count von Waldersee, who bad succeeded Moltke as chief of the staff.

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  • In the promenades are monuments to Moltke, Bismarck and Karl Wilhelm, the composer of the Wacht am Rhein.

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  • ADAM WILHELM MOLTKE, Count (1785-1864), Danish statesman, son of the minister Joachim Godske Moltke (1746-1818), and grandson of Adam Goctlob Moltke, was born at Einsiedelsborg in Funen, on the 25th of August 1785.

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  • The services which Count Moltke rendered to Denmark cannot be too highly appreciated.

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  • Moltke continued to take part in public life as a member of the Landsting, or Upper House, but henceforth kept in the background.

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  • Helmuth Carl Bernhard, Count Von Moltke >>

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  • The work of Moltke, who with other German officers who had been engaged in organizing the Turkish army, threatened to destroy his superiority in the field; the commercial treaty signed by the Ottoman government with Great Britain (Aug.

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  • Entering the Prussian army in 1857, he won considerable distinction in the Danish war of 1864, and received instruction in strategy from General von Moltke.

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  • Among the most important public squares are the Opern-platz, around or near which stand the opera house, the royal library, the university and the armoury; the Gendarmenmarkt, with the royal theatre in its centre, the Schloss-platz; the Lustgarten, between the north side of the royal palace, the cathedral and the old and new museums; the Pariser-platz with the French embassy, at the Brandenburg Gate; the KBnigs-platz, with the column of Victory, the Reichstagsgebaude and the Bismarck and Moltke monuments; the Wilhelms-platz; the circular Belle-Alliance-platz, with a column commemorating the battle of Waterloo; and, in the western district, the spacious Liitzow-platz.

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  • There are several high-grade schools, monuments to the emperor William I., Bismarck and Moltke, and, in the town-hall, a collection of antiquities.

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  • ADAM GOTTLOB MOLTKE, Count (1710-1792), Danish courtier, was born on the 10th of November 1710, at Riesenhof in Mecklenburg.

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  • Though of German origin, many of the Moltkes were at this time in the Danish service, which was considered a more important and promising opening for the young north German noblemen than the service of any of the native principalities; and through one of his uncles, young Moltke became a page at the Danish court, in which capacity he formed a life-long friendship with the crown prince Frederick, afterwards Frederick V.

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  • Especially interesting is Moltke's attitude towards the two distinguished statesmen who played the leading parts during the reign of Frederick V., Johan Sigismund Schulin and the elder Bernstorff.

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  • But though a Prussian intrigue was set up for the supersession of Bernstorff by Moltke, the latter, convinced that Bernstorff was the right man in the right place, supported him with unswerving loyalty.

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  • Moltke was far less liberal in his views than many of his contemporaries.

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  • On the death of Queen Louisa the king would even have married one of Moltke's daughters had he not peremptorily declined the dangerous honour.

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  • 14, 1766), Moltke's dominion was at an end.

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  • Adam Wilhelm, Count Moltke >>

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  • army corps, his immediate superior being Major von Moltke.

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  • In this square are monuments to the emperor William I., Bismarck and Moltke.

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  • Hasse, Geschichte der Leipziger Messen (Leipzig, 1885); Tille, Die Anfdnge der hohen Landstrasse (Gotha, 1906); Biedermann, Geschichte der Leipziger Kramerinnung (Leipzig, 1881); and Moltke, Die Leipziger Kramerinnung im 15 and 16 Jahrhundert (Leipzig, 1901).

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  • Moltke drafts german ultimatum to Belgium, sent to Brussels Ambassador (29) to be delivered when instructed.

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  • Adam Gottlob, Count Moltke >>

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  • Nisibis (Nezib) appeared for the last time in history in 1839, when the Egyptians under Ibrahim Pasha defeated the Turkish army under Hafiz Pasha on the 24th of June in a battle at which von Moltke was present.

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  • Marash passed with the rest of Syria into Egyptian hands in 1832, and in 1839 received fugitives from the defeat of Nizib, among whom was Moltke.

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  • of their day, were immeasurably ahead of their times, and both also understood to the full the strategic art of binding and restraining the independent will power of their opponents, an art of which Marlborough and Frederick, Wellington, Lee and Moltke do not seem ever even to have grasped the fringe.

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  • Preparation was begun in earnest after the accession of King William I., who selected Bismarck as his chancellor, Moltke as his chief of staff and Roon as his minister of war, and gave them a free hand to create the political situation and prepare the military machinery necessary to exploit it.

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  • The number of field battalions was nearly doubled, two-thirds of the artillery received breech-loading rifled guns, the infantry had for some years had the breech-loading "needlegun," and steps were initiated to train an adequate number of staff officers to a uniform appreciation of strategical problems, based on Moltke's personal interpretation of Clausewitz's Vom Kriege.

    0
    0
  • The occasion for war was engineered entirely by Bismarck; and it is doubtful how far Moltke was in Bismarck's confidence, though as a far-seeing general he took advantage of every opening which the latter's diplomacy secured for him.

    0
    0
  • The original scheme for the strategic deployment worked out by Moltke as part of the routine of his office contemplated a defence of the kingdom against not only the whole standing army of Austria, but against 35,000 Saxons, 95,000 unorganized Bavarians and other South Germans, and 60,000 Hanoverians, Hessians, &c., and to meet these he had two corps (VII.

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  • Moltke thereupon brought the VIII.

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  • Of the lines of concentration open to the Austrians, the direction of the roads and railways favoured that of Olmiitz so markedly that Moltke felt reasonably certain that it would be chosen, and the receipt of the complete ordre de bataille of the Austrian army of the north secured by the Prussian secret service on the 11th of June set all doubts at rest.

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  • This was one of the gravest crises in Moltke's career.

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  • Moltke took three days to solve the new problem, then, on the 22nd, he ordered the I.

    0
    0
  • But Moltke, wishing to preserve full freedom for manoeuvre for each army, determined to preserve the interval between them, and began his dispositions to manoeuvre the Austrians out of the position he had selected as the best for them to take up, on the left or farther bank of the Elbe.

    0
    0
  • This is so characteristic of von Moltke's methods and of the tactical preconceptions of the time that it deserves more detailed notice.

    0
    0
  • Moltke, knowing well the danger for a great army of being forced into a battle with an unfordable river behind it, and with his naturally strong bent towards the defensive in tactics, concluded that Benedek would elect to hold the left bank of the Elbe, between the fortified towns of Josephstadt and Kiiniggra,tz, with his right thrown back and covered by the lower courses of the Aupa and the Mettau.

    0
    0
  • As an eminent French critic (General Bonnal) says, this was but to repeat Frederick the Great's manoeuvre at Kolin, and, the Austrians being where they actually were and not where Moltke decided they ought to be, the result might have been equally disastrous.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile the duplicates had reached Moltke, and he, knowing well the temperament of the "Red Prince" and the impossibility of arresting the intended movement, obtained the royal sanction to a letter addressed to the crown prince, in which the latter was ordered to co-operate with his whole command.

    0
    0
  • The battle of Langensalza (June 27th) showed that the risks Moltke deliberately accepted when he transferred so many of the western troops to the Bohemian frontier were by no means imaginary, for v.

    0
    0
  • With his single aim in view he busied himself with the creation of a national militia, with the aid of Moltke and other German officers.

    0
    0
  • The next years were spent in military duties and in travels, in which he was accompanied by Moltke.

    0
    0
  • Moltke, still under the impression that the French right extended no farther than La Folie (2 m.

    0
    0
  • Corps was now rapidly approaching (about 6 p.m.), and the king, against Moltke's advice, now ordered von Steinmetz (to whom the II.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile the king, Moltke, and Bismarck, had ridden back behind Gravelotte where they passed two hours of intense anxiety.

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    0
  • It was the birthplace of Moltke, to whom a monument was erected in 1876.

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    0
  • But, as the event was to prove, the military policy of Japan had failed to produce the requisite number of men for the desired Sedan, and so, instead of boldly pushing out the 1st Army to such a distance that it could manoeuvre, as Moltke did in 1866 and 1870, he attached it to the general line of battle.

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    0
  • The retirement of the Russian Southern Force into its entrenchments emboldened the Japanese commanderin-chief to imitate Moltke's method to the full.

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  • The place was no longer tenable" (Moltke, Franco-German War).

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  • Without going back to the wellknown reply of Count Moltke to Professor Bluntschli respecting the Manual of the Laws of War drawn up by the Institute of International Law in 1880, 1 we need only quote that highly up-to-date philosopher, Nietsche: " It is mere illusion and pretty sentiment," he observes, " to expect much (even anything at all) from mankind if it forgets how to make war.

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  • Moltke in March 1848, and was employed on diplomatic missions to London and Berlin in connexion with the Schleswig-Holstein question.

    0
    0
  • It was in 1879 granted to Count von Moltke as a special distinction.

    0
    0
  • There are also monuments to Moltke (1881), to Count Johann von.

    0
    0
  • Moltke, and highly respected by Frederick V., he occupied for twenty-one years the highest positionin the government,andin the council of state his opinion was decisive.

    0
    0
  • These did not include any prominent parliamentary leaders, but many of the most important ministers and officials, including Moltke and some of the great nobles.

    0
    0
  • Changes were made in the higher posts of the army and civil service, and Moltke resigned the office of chief of the staff, which for thirty years he had held with such great distinction.

    0
    0
  • supreme command was obtained by the emperor for Count von Waldersee, who bad succeeded Moltke as chief of the staff.

    0
    0
  • In the promenades are monuments to Moltke, Bismarck and Karl Wilhelm, the composer of the Wacht am Rhein.

    0
    0
  • ADAM WILHELM MOLTKE, Count (1785-1864), Danish statesman, son of the minister Joachim Godske Moltke (1746-1818), and grandson of Adam Goctlob Moltke, was born at Einsiedelsborg in Funen, on the 25th of August 1785.

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    0
  • The services which Count Moltke rendered to Denmark cannot be too highly appreciated.

    0
    0
  • Moltke continued to take part in public life as a member of the Landsting, or Upper House, but henceforth kept in the background.

    0
    0
  • Helmuth Carl Bernhard, Count Von Moltke >>

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    0
  • The work of Moltke, who with other German officers who had been engaged in organizing the Turkish army, threatened to destroy his superiority in the field; the commercial treaty signed by the Ottoman government with Great Britain (Aug.

    0
    0
  • Entering the Prussian army in 1857, he won considerable distinction in the Danish war of 1864, and received instruction in strategy from General von Moltke.

    0
    0
  • Among the most important public squares are the Opern-platz, around or near which stand the opera house, the royal library, the university and the armoury; the Gendarmenmarkt, with the royal theatre in its centre, the Schloss-platz; the Lustgarten, between the north side of the royal palace, the cathedral and the old and new museums; the Pariser-platz with the French embassy, at the Brandenburg Gate; the KBnigs-platz, with the column of Victory, the Reichstagsgebaude and the Bismarck and Moltke monuments; the Wilhelms-platz; the circular Belle-Alliance-platz, with a column commemorating the battle of Waterloo; and, in the western district, the spacious Liitzow-platz.

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  • There are several high-grade schools, monuments to the emperor William I., Bismarck and Moltke, and, in the town-hall, a collection of antiquities.

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  • ADAM GOTTLOB MOLTKE, Count (1710-1792), Danish courtier, was born on the 10th of November 1710, at Riesenhof in Mecklenburg.

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    0
  • Though of German origin, many of the Moltkes were at this time in the Danish service, which was considered a more important and promising opening for the young north German noblemen than the service of any of the native principalities; and through one of his uncles, young Moltke became a page at the Danish court, in which capacity he formed a life-long friendship with the crown prince Frederick, afterwards Frederick V.

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  • As the inseparable companion of the king, Moltke's influence soon became so boundless that the foreign diplomatists declared he could make and unmake ministers at will.

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  • Especially interesting is Moltke's attitude towards the two distinguished statesmen who played the leading parts during the reign of Frederick V., Johan Sigismund Schulin and the elder Bernstorff.

    0
    0
  • But though a Prussian intrigue was set up for the supersession of Bernstorff by Moltke, the latter, convinced that Bernstorff was the right man in the right place, supported him with unswerving loyalty.

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    0
  • Moltke was far less liberal in his views than many of his contemporaries.

    0
    0
  • On the death of Queen Louisa the king would even have married one of Moltke's daughters had he not peremptorily declined the dangerous honour.

    0
    0
  • 14, 1766), Moltke's dominion was at an end.

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    0
  • Adam Wilhelm, Count Moltke >>

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  • army corps, his immediate superior being Major von Moltke.

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    0
  • In this square are monuments to the emperor William I., Bismarck and Moltke.

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    0
  • Hasse, Geschichte der Leipziger Messen (Leipzig, 1885); Tille, Die Anfdnge der hohen Landstrasse (Gotha, 1906); Biedermann, Geschichte der Leipziger Kramerinnung (Leipzig, 1881); and Moltke, Die Leipziger Kramerinnung im 15 and 16 Jahrhundert (Leipzig, 1901).

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  • Moltke drafts German ultimatum to Belgium, sent to Brussels Ambassador (29) to be delivered when instructed.

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