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mole

mole

mole Sentence Examples

  • "Maybe you're the mole, brother," Kiki added.

  • Who better than your own daughter to plant as a mole?

  • The human flea is considerably exceeded in size by certain other species found upon much smaller hosts; thus the European Hystrichopsylla talpae, a parasite of the mole, shrew and other small mammals, attains a length of 5z millimetres; another large species infests the Indian porcupine.

  • A separate family, Notoryctidae, is represented by the marsupial mole (Notoryctes typhlops), of the deserts of south Central Australia, a silky, golden-haired, burrowing creature, with a curious leathery muzzle, and a short, naked stumpy tail.

  • Marsupial Mole >>

  • The two harbours are separated by a mole which runs obliquely into the sea.

  • Australia and Tasmania possess two animals of this order - the echidna, or spiny ant-eater (hairy in Tasmania), and the Platypus anatinus, the duckbilled water mole, otherwise named the Ornithorhynchus paradoxus.

  • This Barbour is formed by the projection of a mole, 2500 ft.

  • The modern town is a busy and flourishing port with a good harbour protected by Cranae, now connected by a mole with the mainland: it is the capital of the prefecture (voµos) of Aaru,vudi with a population in 1907 of 61,522.

  • Among the mammals are the opossum, raccoon, star-nosed mole (Condylura cristata), grey fox and fox squirrel.

  • The mole cricket (Gryllotalpa vulgaris) and various cockroaches (Blattidae) are also amongst the pests found in this order.

  • Contemporaneously with the restoration of the southern facade of St Mark's, the restoration of the colonnade of the ducal palace towards the Piazzetta and the Mole was undertaken at a cost of £23,000.

  • Louis Mathieu, Comte Mole >>

  • In 1383 Bishop Fordham gave the burgesses licence to receive tolls within the borough for the maintenance of the walls, while Bishop Neville granted a commission for the construction of a pier or mole.

  • MARSUPIAL MOLE (Notoryctes typhlops), the "Ur-quamata" of the natives, an aberrant polyprotodont from central South Australia, constituting a family (Notoryctidae).

  • The stem of the T was originally a mole leading to an island (Pharos) which formed the cross-piece.

  • In the course of centuries this mole has been silted up and is now an isthmus half a mile wide.

  • deep. The enclosed water is divided into an outer and inner harbour by a mole, 1000 yds.

  • Alexandria consisted originally of little more than the island of Pharos, which was joined to the mainland by a mole nearly a mile long and called the Heptastadium.

  • All that now lies between that point and the modern Ras et-Tin quarter is built on the silt which gradually widened and obliterated this mole.

  • On the east of the mole was the Great Harbour, now an open bay; on the west lay the port of Eunostos, with its inner basin Kibotos, now vastly enlarged to form the modern harbour.

  • (5, 6, 7) The Emporium (Exchange), Apostases (Magazines) and Navalia (Docks), lying west of (4), along the sea-front as far as the mole.

  • A temple of Hephaestus also stood on Pharos at the head of the mole.

  • It is pleasantly situated on rising ground above the river Mole, 3 m.

  • Parga has a rock-built citadel and a harbour formed by a mole which the Venetians constructed in 1572.

  • There is a mole about 90 ft.

  • The bear, badger, wolverine, polecat, ermine, common weasel, otter, wolf, fox, lynx, mole, hedgehog, common shrew, water-shrew and lesser shrew (Sorex vulgaris, S.

  • Flowing past Hampton Court, opposite to which it receives the Mole on the right, and past Kingston (202),(202), it reaches Teddington (184).

  • There are, moreover, HungarianFrench dictionaries by Kiss and Karady (Pest and Leipzig, 18 441848) and Babos and Mole (Pest, 1865), and English-Hungarian dictionaries by Dallos (Pest, 1860) and Bizonfy (Budapest, 1886).

  • those of Madame de Motteville, Mathieu Mole, De Brienne, and Bassompierre.

  • long, and shelters the anchorage from southerly storms. A mole extending from the N.E.

  • 1 the island was connected with the mainland by a mole (Freeman ii.

  • He then extended the city by including within the fortifications the low ground (or at any rate the western portion of the low ground) between Upper Achradina and the island, and making the Agora there 2; at the same time (probably) he was able to shift the position of the crossing to the island by making a new isthmus in the position of the present one, the old mole being broken through so as to afford an outlet from the Little Harbour on the east (Lupus, p. 91).

  • Lupus, Topographie von Syrahus, 91) make the construction of the mole and of the wall across it contemporary with the fortification of Achradina in the middle of the 7th century B.C. They also consider that the original west boundary of Achradina ran down to the Little Harbour, so that the southern boundary of Achradina was the sea itself.

  • (now demolished), does not occupy the site of the mole erected in the 6th or 7th century B.C., which may be recognized as having run due north from the north point of the island to the mainland near the ferry of S.

  • There are ten species of bat (komori) and seven of insect-eaters, and prominent in this class are the mole (mugura) and the hedgehog (hari-nezumi).

  • A breakwater and mole, constructed of blocks of concrete.

  • The harbour, formed by an ancient transverse mole nearly 1200 ft.

  • What is thus suggested is not a rash departure from the general point of view of idealism (by its achievements in every field to which it has been applied, " stat mole sua ") but a cautious inquiry into the possibility of reaching a conception of the world ' The most striking statement of this argument is to be found in Boutroux's treatise De la contingence des lois de la nature, first published in 1874 and reprinted without alteration in 1905.

  • The artificial mole was probably of earlier date than the reign of Augustus (possibly 2nd century B.C.); and by that time at any rate there were docks large enough to contain the vessels employed in bringing the obelisks from Egypt.

  • Remains of the piles of the mole still exist, and are popularly known as Caligula's Bridge, from the mistaken idea that they belong to the temporary structure which that emperor flung across the bay from the mole at Puteoli to the shore at Baiae.

  • Furthermore he warned Athens against the treason of the extreme oligarchs, and induced the troops to raze a mole erected to facilitate a Spartan descent on Peiraeus.

  • The principal villages, towns and places near or through which the way passed are as follow: Winchester, Alresvord, Ropley, Alton, Farnham (here the way follows the present main road), Seale, Puttenham, by the ruined chapel of St Catherine, outside Guildford, near where the road crosses the Wey above Shalford,' and by the chapel of St Martha, properly of " the martyr," now restored and used as a church, Albury, Shere, Gomshall, Dorking (near here the Mole is crossed), along the southern slope of Boxhill to Reigate, then through Gatton Park, Merstham, Otford, Wrotham, after which the Medway was crossed, Burham, past the megalithic monument Kit's Coty House, and the site of Boxley Abbey, the oldest after Waverley Abbey of Cistercian houses in England, and famous for its miraculous image of the infant saint Rumbold, and the still more famous winking rood or crucifix.

  • These buildings are a temple, dedicated to Caesar; a theatre; a hippodrome; two aqueducts; a boundary wall; and, chief of all, a gigantic mole, 200 ft.

  • SOUTH MOLTON, a market town and municipal borough in the South Molton parliamentary division of Devonshire, England, on the river Mole, 197 m.

  • The harbour, formed by a mole constructed to a length of 3 8 7 yds.

  • in the 14th century and afterwards extended to more than 650 yds., has been greatly improved since 1875 by dredging and a further addition to the mole of 136 yds.

  • The roads are protected from every wind except the south, which occasions a heavy surf; but against this a mole was constructed in 1863.

  • On the south side of the town there are three harbours - the large western or merchant harbour, the western flank of which is formed by a great mole joining the fortifications which traverse the breadth of the island on this side; the middle harbour, used chiefly for fitting out and repairing vessels; and the eastern or war harbour for vessels of the Russian navy.

  • It has few distinctive species, but within its borders the southern mole and cotton-tail rabbit of the South meet the northern star-nosed and Brewers moles and the varying hare of the North, and the southern bobwhite, Baltimore oriole, bluebird, catbird, chewink, thrasher and wood thrush are neighbors of the bobolink, solitary vireo and the hermit and Wilson s thrushes.

  • So by his counsel the queen, while nominally in league with De Retz and the parliamentary Fronde, laboured to form a purely royal party, wearied by civil dissensions, who should act for her and her son's interest alone, under the leadership of Mathieu Mole, the famous premier president of the parlement of Paris.

  • The new rectilinear mole, sanctioned in 1881, has been built out into the sea for a distance of 600 yds.

  • The Mole Antonelliana, built by Alessandro Antonelli, is the most important example of modern architecture in Turin.

  • Geomys bursaries, the "red pocket-gopher" of North America, with deeply grooved incisors, inhabits the plains of the Mississippi, living in burrows like the mole.

  • 5 - The following abound: wild swine, hyaena, jackal, cheetah, fox; gazelle (in herds), antelope species (in the steppe); jerboa, mole, porcupine, and especially the common European rat (in the desert); bat, long-haired desert hare.

  • Both the northern and the southern side of the hill are flanked by walls, which seem to have reached the sea, where there was a mole and a harbour; and the wall of the acropolis itself remains in one part to the height of eight courses.

  • Antwerp had reached the lowest point of its fortunes in 1800, and its population had sunk under 40,000, when Napoleon, realizing its strategical importance, assigned two millions for the construction of two docks and a mole.

  • With enormous toil the king drove out a mole from the mainland to the island and thus brought up his engines; ships from the other Phoenician towns and from Cyprus lent him their aid, and the town at length was forced in July 332; 8000 Tyrians were slain, 30,000 sold as slaves, and only a few notables, the king Azemilkos, and the festal envoys from Carthage who had taken refuge in the sanctuary of Melkarth, were spared (Diod.

  • granted the magistracy a licence to build a mole; and in 1474 the Moll de Santa Creu was officially begun.

  • An extension of the former mole, and the construction of another from the foot of Montjuich, have embraced a portion of the sea outside of the bank, and a convenient shelter is thus afforded for the heaviest battleships.

  • The actual harbour of Zeebrugge is small and is formed by a long curved mole on the western side, whose assault was an important part of the operation.

  • This mole was r2 m.

  • The" Vindictive,"supported by two auxiliary vessels" Iris II."and" Daffodil,"was to assault the mole on its outer and western side and by creating an impression that this was the main operation, divert the enemy's fire from the blocking ships.

  • The attack on the mole was to be made by the" Vindictive "(Capt.

  • The viaduct of the mole was to be blown up by two submarines, CI (Lt.

  • The object of the attack on the mole at Zeebrugge was first to seize the battery at the seaward end and prevent it firing at the block ships, and then to demolish the structures on it as far as possible.

  • The "Vindictive" was to reach the mole at midnight.

  • The "Thetis" was to pass the end of the mole 25 minutes later.

  • At 11:56 the "Vindictive" emerged out of the smoke into the full glare of their beams. The mole could be seen 300 yd.

  • At one minute past midnight, the ship came alongside the mole.

  • battery, but the starboard anchor was hung up with a strong tide sluicing down the mole, and the ship was carried some 700 yd.

  • The rush of the 3-knot tide between the ship and mole created a heavy swell which threw the ship off the mole; only two of the 18 brows could reach the parapet, and the ship could not be kept into the mole.

  • Swaying upward with the roll of the ship the two foremost brows came down scraping and grinding along the mole.

  • As the seamen got to the wall they leapt down and tried to make the mole grapnels fast (for hauling the ship into the mole), but only one was got in place and a heavy roll broke it up.

  • This was a critical time, and it was four minutes past midnight when the little "Daffodil" came up and pushed the ship bodily into the mole.

  • She had gone alongside the mole about 150 yd.

  • Claude Hawkings ("Erin"), who led the way, made a grapnel fast and was shot down on the mole.

  • Bradford ("Orion") got to the top of a derrick with a grapnel, leapt on to the mole, secured it and fell back shot into the water.

  • To return to the landing on the mole.

  • along the mole.

  • The "fortified zone," instead of being between the "Vindictive" and the shore, was now between the "Vindictive" and the battery on the mole, increasing the difficulty of an assault.

  • D Company was still in the "Iris II.," but the marines were forming up on the mole to make an assault.

  • Another party of marines dropping straight to the mole had established a strong point by No.

  • The viaduct had gone up, and the mole was secure from landward side.

  • None of the mole anchors had grappled.

  • The ship was being held into the mole by the "Daffodil," and if she were disabled it was practically certain that the men in the mole would not get back.

  • He was last seen fighting on the mole.

  • the "Daffodil" began to pull her bows off the mole.

  • came under a heavy fire as she left the mole.

  • The "Intrepid" astern had come under heavy shrapnel fire from the guns as she approached the mole, but after rounding it escaped their attention.

  • She came under shrapnel fire off the mole, and as she rounded it a star shell showed up the "Intrepid" heading for the canal and the "Thetis" aground.

  • The "Warwick," "Phoebe" and "North Star" had been cruising off the mole to screen the force from torpedo attack.

  • The town, which has a population of about 40,000, presents a picturesque appearance from the sea, rising gradually in the form of an amphitheatre, with the citadel, the remainder of the English mole and York Castle to the right: in the central valley is the commercial quarter, while to the left along the beach runs the track to Tetuan.

  • Since 1907 a basin with an outer and inner mole has been built.

  • 7,687 9, 6,132 9,738 1784 Sale Mole ve (highest point) 4,528 9,987 Mont Favre.

  • of wharfage, and of a mole 1639 ft.

  • Its seaward fortifications rise directly from the water's edge, one fort, on the north mole, standing boldly on a tall rock almost isolated by a little inlet of the Adriatic. On the landward side a massive round tower dominates the city from a still higher eminence.

  • Then, to raise funds for the cause, he returned to America; his fervid appeals enabled him to collect about $60,000, which he spent on provisions and clothing, and he established a relief depot near Aegina, where he started works for the refugees, the existing quay, or American Mole, being built in this way.

  • From the landing-place, where a mole is cut out of the rock, there is a steep ascent to the upper town, characteristically Spanish in appearance.

  • A mole, probably Talpa Europaea; Sorex Indicus; Erinaceus collaris (Indian), and Er.

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