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modesty

modesty

modesty Sentence Examples

  • He had seemed amused by her modesty in the past, and yet it had obviously troubled him.

  • Before she could escape into the modesty of the robe, he pulled her toward him.

  • "I can't take all the credit," Fred added with smug modesty.

  • "She didn't demonstrate any modesty when she came to your room," Fred pointed out, reopening a road Dean preferred to detour.

  • Even if modesty wasn't at the top of Franny's traits-list, it was January!

  • It must be modesty.

  • He was marked by the modesty of true genius, and his life was given to the single-minded pursuit of truth.

  • In the convent, his modesty was so great that he refused to accept the doctor's degree in theology, which is the highest prized honour in the order.

  • Though too weak and good-natured to cope with the problem which confronted him, Agis was characterized by a sincerity of purpose and a blend of youthful modesty with royal dignity, which render him perhaps the most attractive figure in the whole of Spartan history.

  • But with characteristic disinterestedness and modesty he declined all such honours.

  • In the delicate task of apportioning his own large share of merit, he certainly does not err on the side of modesty; but it would perhaps be as difficult to produce an instance of injustice, as of generosity in his estimate of others.

  • To the average man there is a distinction between clothing and ornament, the first being regarded as that covering which satisfies the claims of modesty, the second as those appendages which satisfy the aesthetic sense.

  • Modesty is not innate in man, and its conventional nature is easily seen from a consideration of the different ideas held by different races on this subject.

  • Modesty therefore is highly conventional, and to discover its origin the most primitive tribes must be observed.

  • One more point must be considered: there is the evidence of competent observers to show that members of a tribe accustomed to nudity, when made to assume clothing for the first time, exhibit as much confusion as would a European compelled to strip in public. This fact, considered together with what has been said above, compels the conclusion that modesty is a feeling merely of acute self-consciousness due to appearing unusual, and is the result of clothing rather than the cause.

  • This means very much, though his modesty led him to call in the aid of his friend Saul to cope with the new and expanding situation (25 f.).

  • In 1826 he moved to Paris, and during a ten months' stay he met the leading mathematicians of France; but he was little appreciated, for his work was scarcely known; and his modesty restrained him from proclaiming his researches.

  • 24), with a tribute of admiration to its "modesty, simplicity and fine serious spirit": Adulescens, tam etsi properas, to hoc saxum rogat Ut sese aspicias, deinde quod scriptum 'st legas.

  • Smith afterwards described Quesnay as a man "of the greatest modesty and simplicity," and declared his system of political economy to be, "with all its imperfections, the nearest approximation to truth that had yet been published on the principles of that science."

  • Guillaume de Nogaret, his minister, draws a far more flattering picture, enlarging on his charm, his amiability, his modesty, his charity to all men, and his piety; and the traits of this over-coloured portrait are more or less repeated by Yves, a monk of St Denis.

  • The discussion of this measure occupied most of the session of 1895; the bill was amended by the Centre so as to make it even more strongly a measure for the defence of religion; and clauses were introduced to defend public morality, by forbidding the public exhibition of pictures or statues, or the sale of writings, which, without being actually obscene, might rudely offend the feeling of modesty.

  • When Wallace found how much more fully Darwin was equipped for expounding the new views, he exhibited an unselfish modesty that fully repaid Darwin's generosity, henceforth described himself as a follower of Darwin, entitled his most important publication on the theory of evolution Darwinism, and did not issue it until 1889, long after the world had given full credit to Darwin.

  • It is considered essential to modesty to cover the head.

  • Her great eloquence and rare modesty and beauty, combined with her remarkable intellectual gifts, attracted to her class-room a large number of pupils.

  • This feeling arose from no false modesty.

  • With great modesty and secrecy Butler, then in his twenty-second year, wrote to the author propounding certain difficulties with regard to the proofs of the unity and omnipresence of the Divine Being.

  • In 1782 he obtained a silk gown, and was so far cured of his early modesty that he declined accepting the king's counselship if precedence over him were given to his junior, Thomas (afterwards Lord) Erskine, though the latter was the son of a peer and a most accomplished orator.

  • Doubtless, at the first founding of the school Zeno himself and Zeno's pupils were inspired with this hope; they emulated the Cynics Antisthenes and Diogenes, who never shrank out of modesty from the name and its responsibilities.

  • Personally he seemed cold and distant, partly because of his impressive appearance, and partly because of his own modesty, which made him backward in seeking friendships.

  • She is much praised by historians for her modesty and prudence, and is said to have brought about by her example a considerable improvement in the morals of her nation.

  • His protection and encouragement of Caxton were of inestimable value to English literature, and in the preface to the Dictes the printer gives an account of his own relations with the statesman which illustrates the dignity and modesty of Lord Rivers in a very agreeable way.

  • The tradition which assigns the first employment of the Greek word 4aAoa041a to Pythagoras has hardly any claim to be regarded as authentic; and the somewhat self-conscious modesty to which Diogenes Laertius attributes the choice of the designation is, in all probability, a piece of etymology crystallized into narrative.

  • The chair was not exactly offered to him, as has been sometimes asserted, but the electors, having met and talked over the subject, authorized one of their number, who was Hamilton's personal friend, to urge him to become a candidate, a step which his modesty had prevented him from taking.

  • The honour of knighthood was offered to Adams when Queen Victoria visited Cambridge in 1847; but then, as on a subsequent occasion, his modesty led him to decline it.

  • He was long remembered, not only for his great learning but for his modesty and kindly disposition.

  • Extreme modesty, almost amounting to diffidence, was combined with the utmost kindliness in Lord Kelvin's bearing to the most elementary student, and nothing seemed to give him so much pleasure as an opportunity to acknowledge the efforts of the humblest scientific worker.

  • He had seemed amused by her modesty in the past, and yet it had obviously troubled him.

  • It wasn't until she felt his warm hand on the bare skin under her shirt that she regained her sense of modesty.

  • Before she could escape into the modesty of the robe, he pulled her toward him.

  • "I can't take all the credit," Fred added with smug modesty.

  • "She didn't demonstrate any modesty when she came to your room," Fred pointed out, reopening a road Dean preferred to detour.

  • Even if modesty wasn't at the top of Franny's traits-list, it was January!

  • He once dreamed her naked torso was horribly disfigured by a giant birthmark but the truth was more likely childlike modesty kept in check by a general arrogance that forbade her to admit anything deemed to be a weakness.

  • It must be modesty.

  • He had an innate modesty and simplicity of character.

  • He writes about it sensitively, with due modesty and a sensible regard for the precise chronology, the details, the sensations.

  • In short, modesty and apparent diffidence, originating mainly in physical causes, were his leading characteristics.

  • In part, this can be explained by the socialization of women, which celebrates modesty as a distinctly feminine virtue.

  • But what success has your honor's modesty been crowned with now, that it grows so insolent upon us?

  • I'm sure it was only modesty which prevented the noble lord himself from mentioning it.

  • lucky with the weather - modesty forbids me from taking credit for that.

  • maidenly modesty - not challenging and indignant because she thought she was being trifled with.

  • Paul was attempting to preserve the modesty of the day.

  • You'd think the ladies would have a little more modesty.

  • As for those who simply consider themselves the « nucleus » of the revolutionary party, they show a little more modesty.

  • Bathing machines were invented to protect the modesty of female bathers at a time before'mixed bathing ' was acceptable.

  • Ian's assurance on matters to do with his distillery is balanced by a becoming modesty in most other things.

  • modesty required that every nun sleep alone, but the patriarchal authorities feared what might go on behind closed doors.

  • modesty as a distinctly feminine virtue.

  • His innate modesty and his sense of artistic privacy would certainly make him shun such a title but he fully deserved it nonetheless.

  • I've never been a believer in false modesty.

  • excessive modesty has no place in a teaching practice record.

  • It'll blow your wig off, " says Shadow with typical modesty.

  • Alastair, with characteristic modesty, conceded he had his fair share of luck during his innings.

  • Here is an abridged version of Judy's story, edited to avoid her extreme modesty where necessary.

  • modesty panel can be fitted in front or back positions.

  • modesty curtains and rocking chairs.

  • modesty's sake make more speed this way.

  • modesty in dress.

  • modesty of nature.

  • modesty of the man to whom he is referring?

  • With all modesty the story could win an Oscar!

  • overweening pride in our culture gives the lie to any claims we might make to theological modesty.

  • Motivational & After Dinner Speaker Debra's overwhelming positivity and ' go for it ' attitude are contagious, while her modesty is endearing.

  • This is not praiseworthy modesty on Peter's part.

  • And he always tries to make his case with modesty and thoughtfulness, the best way to convince a skeptic.

  • I have more personal vanity than modesty, and twice as much veracity as the two put together.

  • wert born to learn: submit with modesty to the laws of thy condition.

  • wrestlehile wrestling bouts and athletic training in ancient Greece would have been naked here we get false modesty.

  • He was marked by the modesty of true genius, and his life was given to the single-minded pursuit of truth.

  • In the convent, his modesty was so great that he refused to accept the doctor's degree in theology, which is the highest prized honour in the order.

  • Though too weak and good-natured to cope with the problem which confronted him, Agis was characterized by a sincerity of purpose and a blend of youthful modesty with royal dignity, which render him perhaps the most attractive figure in the whole of Spartan history.

  • But with characteristic disinterestedness and modesty he declined all such honours.

  • In the delicate task of apportioning his own large share of merit, he certainly does not err on the side of modesty; but it would perhaps be as difficult to produce an instance of injustice, as of generosity in his estimate of others.

  • To the average man there is a distinction between clothing and ornament, the first being regarded as that covering which satisfies the claims of modesty, the second as those appendages which satisfy the aesthetic sense.

  • Modesty is not innate in man, and its conventional nature is easily seen from a consideration of the different ideas held by different races on this subject.

  • Modesty therefore is highly conventional, and to discover its origin the most primitive tribes must be observed.

  • One more point must be considered: there is the evidence of competent observers to show that members of a tribe accustomed to nudity, when made to assume clothing for the first time, exhibit as much confusion as would a European compelled to strip in public. This fact, considered together with what has been said above, compels the conclusion that modesty is a feeling merely of acute self-consciousness due to appearing unusual, and is the result of clothing rather than the cause.

  • This means very much, though his modesty led him to call in the aid of his friend Saul to cope with the new and expanding situation (25 f.).

  • In 1826 he moved to Paris, and during a ten months' stay he met the leading mathematicians of France; but he was little appreciated, for his work was scarcely known; and his modesty restrained him from proclaiming his researches.

  • 24), with a tribute of admiration to its "modesty, simplicity and fine serious spirit": Adulescens, tam etsi properas, to hoc saxum rogat Ut sese aspicias, deinde quod scriptum 'st legas.

  • Smith afterwards described Quesnay as a man "of the greatest modesty and simplicity," and declared his system of political economy to be, "with all its imperfections, the nearest approximation to truth that had yet been published on the principles of that science."

  • Gregory XI., though equally distinguished for his erudition and pure morals, his piety, modesty and wisdom, was fated to Gregory Xl., pay dearly for the weakness of his predecessor in 1370-1378.

  • The philosophers and encyclopaedists who, by the mouth of Diderot, complimented Catherine on being superior to such female affectations as modesty and chastity, flattered her to some extent even here.

  • To his modesty Bossuet bears witness, when he told him to stand up sometimes, and not be always on his knees before a critic. Gibbon vouches for his learning, when (in the 47th chapter) he speaks of "this incomparable guide, whose bigotry is overbalanced by the merits of erudition, diligence, veracity and scrupulous minuteness."

  • Guillaume de Nogaret, his minister, draws a far more flattering picture, enlarging on his charm, his amiability, his modesty, his charity to all men, and his piety; and the traits of this over-coloured portrait are more or less repeated by Yves, a monk of St Denis.

  • The discussion of this measure occupied most of the session of 1895; the bill was amended by the Centre so as to make it even more strongly a measure for the defence of religion; and clauses were introduced to defend public morality, by forbidding the public exhibition of pictures or statues, or the sale of writings, which, without being actually obscene, might rudely offend the feeling of modesty.

  • When Wallace found how much more fully Darwin was equipped for expounding the new views, he exhibited an unselfish modesty that fully repaid Darwin's generosity, henceforth described himself as a follower of Darwin, entitled his most important publication on the theory of evolution Darwinism, and did not issue it until 1889, long after the world had given full credit to Darwin.

  • It is considered essential to modesty to cover the head.

  • Her great eloquence and rare modesty and beauty, combined with her remarkable intellectual gifts, attracted to her class-room a large number of pupils.

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