Modern-english sentence example

modern-english
  • The geographical features of the countries formerly known collectively as the Netherlands or Low Countries are dealt with under the modern English names of Holland and Belgium.
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  • The Cockers are smaller spaniels, brown, or brown-and-white in the Welsh variety, black in the more common modern English form.
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  • The modern English foxhound has been bred from the old northern and southern hounds, and is more lightly built, having been bred for speed and endurance.
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  • The fine arts department contains twenty-seven oil paintings by modern English and continental artists bequeathed by William Menelaus of Dowlais in 1883, the Pyke-Thompson collection of about roo water-colour paintings presented in 5899, and some 3000 prints and drawings relating to Wales.
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  • The word "kennel," a gutter, a drain in a street or road, is a corruption of the Middle English canel, cannel, in modern English "channel," from Latin canalis, canal.
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  • The writings which he produced at this period created a new epoch in the history of modern English theological scholarship. In 1855 he published the first edition of his History of the New Testament Canon, which, frequently revised and expanded, became the standard English work upon the subject.
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  • The buildings of the old town are chiefly of brick, from four to five storeys in height, with flat roofs, and other oriental peculiarities; while in the new town hewn stone is very largely employed, and the architecture is often of a modern English style.
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  • The first translation into modern English was by Miss Anna Gurney, privately printed in 1819.
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  • See Sir Clements Markham, Major James Rennell and the Rise of Modern English Geography (London, 1895).
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  • The period of our history between 1536 and 1642 shows how difficult it is to separate these two factors in the re-birth of Europe, both of which contributed so powerfully to the formation of modern English nationality.
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  • A volume of lectures given in America, The Sea in English Poetry, was published in 1913, and in 1914 he was elected to a professorship of modern English literature at Princeton University.
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  • In not a few instances modern English nomenclature has supplanted the old Welsh placenames in popular usage, although the town's original appellation is retained in Welsh literature and conversation, e.g.
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  • The most active and by no means the least efficient branch of the modern English police is that especially devoted to criminal investigation or the detection of crime.
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  • Pitt, the first real Imperialist in modern English history, was the directing mind in the expansion of his country, and with him the beginning of empire is rightly associated.
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  • It was produced with great success in 1883, and was the first of a too short series of modern English operas; Mackenzie's second opera, The Troubadour, was produced by the same company in 1886; and his third dramatic work was His Majesty, an excellent comic opera (Savoy Theatre, 1897).
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  • It has been done into verse; it has been done into modern English.
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  • Hegelianism appears as a distinct element in modern English ethical thought; but the direct influence of Hegel's system is perhaps less important than that indirectly exercised through the powerful stimulus which it has given to the study of the historical development of human thought and human society.
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  • The language started to have adjective comparison in late middle, early modern and modern English.
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  • The call of the male bittern is known in Modern English as a boom.
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  • A close phonetic transliteration of Jesus ' Hebrew name into modern English would be Yeshua ' .
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  • Its modern English name is a corrupt form of the Spanish Vizcaya.
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  • It is possible to conceive of any number of notes struck and sustained by the fingers as consisting of so many quasi-vocal parts; but when a series of single sounds is played and each sound continues to vibrate by means of a pedal which prevents the dampers from falling on the strings, then we are conscious that the sounds have been produced as from one part, and that they nevertheless combine to form a chord; and this is as remote from the spirit of polyphonic part-writing as modern English is from classical Greek.
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