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modern

modern

modern Sentence Examples

  • The appliances were modern but the cabinets were old and solid.

  • The laundry room was also clean and an old wringer tub still sat in one corner, as though unwilling to completely surrender to modern appliances.

  • Why doesn't he get the proper equipment and run it like a modern ranch?

  • The small kitchen showed signs of its past life, before the addition of a modern sink and electric stove.

  • Dusty stripped off the clunky modern weaponry, keeping his sword and knives.

  • He was an excellent speaker and unabashedly told the gathering how he'd found the local sheriff's office in disarray and how it lacked up-to-date tools to deal with modern problems.

  • Maybe it was a relationship that was difficult for the modern wife to understand.

  • Gabriel didn't need to understand modern science.

  • She grimaced, expecting an outhouse, and was pleasantly surprised at the cozy but modern bathroom.

  • The road leading to the castle was modern blacktop.

  • It had all the modern conveniences – dishwasher, garbage disposal, and even a built-in oven.

  • It was her responsibility now and having a job would give her the opportunity for a more modern approach to being a wife and mother.

  • Before Katie started teaching her how to be a modern wife and mother, what were her expectations?

  • A tiny bathroom off the kitchen sported a bathtub with feet, a modern commode and a sink with porcelain handles.

  • In all its main features it is essentially a modern town, and few of its principal buildings are older than the 19th century.

  • Of the numerous churches in the city the most interesting are the Stiftskirche, with two towers, a fine specimen of 15th-century Gothic; the Leonhardskirche, also a Gothic building of the 15th century; the Hospitalkirche, restored in 1841, the cloisters of which contain the tomb of Johann Reuchlin; the fine modern Gothic church of St John; the new Roman Catholic church of St Nicholas; the Friedenskirche; and the English church.

  • Its importance, however, is of comparatively modern growth and in the early history of Wurttemberg it was overshadowed by Cannstatt, the central situation of which on the Neckar seemed to mark it out as the natural capital of the country.

  • While such judgments are naturally exaggerated, there is no doubt that he takes a very high place among modern Latin poets.

  • But among archaeologists the word is usually restricted in its technical modern application to a sepulchral mound of greater or less magnitude.

  • But it seems pretty clear that if there is any change in weight consequent on chemical change, it is too minute to be of im- portance to the chemist, though the methods of modern physics may settle the question.

  • Mobius must be regarded as one of the leaders in the introduction of the powerful methods of modern projective geometry.

  • Among modern buildings may be mentioned the Bakewell and High Peak Institute, and the town hall and museum.

  • The houses of the city are built of stone, their walls commonly showing the massive masonry of the Incas at the bottom, crowned with a light modern superstructure roofed with red tiles.

  • The cruciform church of St Mary, with a central tower and short spire, is in great part Early English, with Perpendicular additions; but considerable traces of a Norman building were revealed during a modern restoration.

  • The best modern authorities are K.

  • The castle was restored in modern times.

  • The first modern translation of the works is the French edition published by F.

  • There is a complete edition in modern notation by T.

  • The hotel de ville, also by Abadie, is a handsome modern structure, but preserves two towers of the château of the counts of Angouleme, on the site of which it is built.

  • Although of early origin, its appearance, like that of other great manufacturing towns of the vicinity, is wholly modern.

  • This latter sense has been adapted and extended by modern historians concerned with the frontiers of the Roman Empire.

  • The frontier which they form is inconveniently long, enclosing an acute-angled wedge of foreign territory - the modern Baden and Wurttemberg.

  • The German populations of these lands seem in Roman times to have been scanty, and Roman subjects from the modern Alsace and Lorraine had drifted across the river eastwards.

  • The church of St Luke is Perpendicular, enlarged in modern times.

  • Banbridge is a entirely modern town.

  • The church of St John the Baptist, though largely altered by modern restoration, retains Early English to Perpendicular portions, and some early monuments and brasses.

  • Modern equity, it need hardly be said, does not profess to soften the rigour of the law, or to correct the errors into which it falls by reason of its generality.

  • Aguilar "of the Frontier" was so named in the middle ages from its position on the border of the Moorish territories, which were defended by the castle of Anzur, now a ruin; but the spacious squares and modern houses of the existing town retain few vestiges of Moorish dominion.

  • After a few years the father quarrelled with the Russian government, and went to England, where he obtained a professorship of natural history and the modern languages at the famous nonconformist academy at Warrington.

  • uses and not modelled on that of modern Rome, these albs are frequently apparelled.

  • the modern Italian camice for alb) - it seems to have been thus used as early as the 5th century.

  • Robinson with the modern Beit Jibrin.

  • over the sill at average water-level, the tidal range at Malta being but slight; and opening into French creek a dry dock of more modern construction, known as No.

  • This medieval fortress, strong by art as well as position before the invention of modern artillery, has since undergone numerous sieges.

  • The town is one of the oldest in Norway, founded in the 8th or 9th century, but the present town is modern, though narrow, winding streets and wooden houses give it an antique appearance.

  • The last of the direct descendants of Simon Grynaeus was his namesake Simon (1725-1799), translator into German of French and English anti-deistical works, and author of a version of the Bible in modern German (1776).

  • from the coast, while the modern houses of Bridlington Quay, the watering-place, fringe the shore of Bridlington Bay.

  • The northern portion of it consists of a lofty ridge with two summits, the westernmost of which is occupied by the modern town (985 ft.), while the easternmost, which is slightly higher, bears the name of Rock of Athena, owing to its identification in modern days with the acropolis of Acragas as described by Polybius, who places upon it the temple of Zeus Atabyrius (the erection of which was attributed to the half mythical Phalaris) and that of Athena.'

  • In the modern town, on the other hand, the remains of one temple are to be seen in the church of S.

  • 433, accepts the name "Rock of Athena" and yet puts the acropolis on the site of the modern town, arguing further that the cathedral hill was an acropolis within an acropolis (II.

  • Close to this temple on the west is the site of the gate known in later times as the Porta Aurea, through which the modern road passes, so that no traces now remain.

  • A village of the Byzantine period has been explored at Balatizzo, immediately to the south of the modern town (Notizie degli Scavi, 1900, 511-520).

  • Delambre gives 3 the following comparison between the results of Gascoigne's measurements of the sun's semi-diameter and the computed results from modern determinations: Gascoigne.

  • Beyond the introduction of the spider line it is unnecessary to mention the various steps by which the Gascoigne micrometer assumed the modern forms now in use, or to describe in detail the suggestions of Hooke, 4 Wren, Smeaton, Cassini, Bradley, Maskelyne, Herschel, Arago, Pearson, Bessel, Struve, Dawes, &c., or the successive productions of the great artists Ramsden, Troughton, Fraunhofer, Ertel, Simms, Cooke, Grubb, Clarke and Repsold.

  • The Modern Filar Micrometer.

  • In all modern reading micrometers the cross webs of fig.

  • An important modern application of the micrometer, which is not dealt with in the article Transit Circle, is that which is now called " the travelling wire micrometer."

  • In the case of the original Repsold plan without clockwork the description is not quite exact, because both the process of following the object and correcting the aim are simultaneously performed; whilst, if the clockwork runs uniformly and the friction-disk is set to the proper distance from the apex of the cone, the star will appear almost perfectly at rest, and the observer has only to apply delicate corrections by differential gear - a condition which is exactly analogous to that of training a modern gun-sight upon a fixed object.

  • Nach., 3377, for an illustrated account of the original Repsolds instrument and to the History and Description of the Cape Observatory for a complete description of the most modern form of its application to the Cape transit circle, with and without clockwork.

  • 15); modern German translation of Lohengrin, by H.

  • A modern edition was issued in 1901 from the Grolier Club, New York.

  • the Syllabus of 1864, and therefore to a war d outrance against modern civilization.

  • In some of the towns, however, and especially at Iglesias, they are good modern buildings.

  • It is thus clear that in the Bronze Age Sardinia was fairly thickly populated over by far the greater part of its extent; this may explain the lack of Greek colonies, except for Olbia, the modern Terranova, and Neapolis on the cians.

  • Its line is followed closely by the modern highroad and railway.

  • A portion of its course, however, between Forum Traiani and the modern Abbasanta, is not so followed, and is still well preserved.

  • A branch from this road ran to Olbia (followed closely by the modern highroad and railway also), and was perhaps the main line of communication, though the itineraries state that the road from Carales to Olbia ran through the centre of the island by Biora, Valentia, Sorabile (near Fonni) and Caput Thyrsi.

  • - the exact distance in English miles by the modern railway!

  • s There is no authentic history for the intervening period; the famous " pergamene d'Arborea," published by P. Martini in 1863 at Cagliari, have been shown to be modern forgeries.

  • But, like other modern German theologians, he showed a greater disposition to compromise.

  • He published works on Leibnitz, empiricism and scepticism in Hume's philosophy, modern pessimism, Kantic criticism, English philosophy, Heraclitus of Ephesus and many other subjects.

  • Shaftesbury was the first great party leader in the modern sense, and the founder of modern parliamentary oratory.

  • The building has been restored in modern times to serve as a court of justice and a prison.

  • GEORGE OF PODEBRAD (1420-1471), king of Bohemia, was the son of Victoria of Kunstat and Podebrad, a Bohemian nobleman, who was one of the leaders of the "Orphans" or modern Taborites during the Hussite wars.

  • The modern and principal residential part of the town is called Scala.

  • The surrounding hills (Vinik, Goritsa, Kamenitsa) were, after 1886, fortified by modern earthworks.

  • The history of modern Mannheim begins, however, with the opening of the 17th century, when the elector palatine Frederick IV.

  • He at once undertook the defence of his wife's dominions from an attack by Louis XI., king of France, and defeated the French forces at Guinegatte, the modern Enguinegatt; on the 7th of August 1479.

  • In 1831, from a study of the specific heats of compounds, he formulated "Neumann's law," which expressed in modern language runs: "The molecular heat of a compound is equal to the sum of the atomic heats of its constituents."

  • A modern stainedglass window commemorates Wolfe.

  • He may, in fact, be called the father of modern pathology, for his view, that every animal is constituted by a sum of vital units, each of which manifests the characteristics of life, has almost uniformly dominated the theory of disease.since the middle of the 59th century, when it was enunciated.

  • i on Plate II.) Note - Of the two types of colouration found in modern domestic cats, the striped type obviously corresponds to the original wild cat as seen in various parts of North Europe to-day.

  • The course of the road after the first six miles from Rome is not identical with that of any modern road, but can be clearly traced by remains of pavement and buildings along its course.

  • The modern town of Megara is situated on two low hills which formed part of the ancient site; it is the chief town of the eparchy of Megaris; pop. about 6400.

  • But as yet he had only glimpses of a logical method which should invigorate the syllogism by the co-operation of ancient geometry and modern algebra.

  • Such is the basis of the algebraical or modern analytical geometry.

  • Thus Descartes gave to modern geometry that abstract and general character in which consists its superiority to the geometry of the ancients.

  • Descartes laid down the lines on which modern philosophy and science were to build.

  • It should be added that the modern theory of vortex-atoms (Lord Kelvin's) to explain the constitution of matter has but slight analogy with Cartesian doctrine, and finds a parellel, if anywhere, in a modification of that doctrine by Malebranche.

  • The Port Royalists, Pierre Nicole (1625-1695) and Antoine Arnauld (1612-1694), had applied it to grammar and logic; Jean Domat or Daumat (1625-1696) and Henri Francois Daugesseau (1668-1751) to jurisprudence; Fontenelle, Charles Perrault (1628-1703) and Jean Terrasson (1670-1750) to literary criticism, and a worthier estimate of modern literature.

  • Adamson, The Development of Modern Philosophy (Edinburgh, 1903); J.

  • from Rome by the Via Ostiensis, a road of very ancient origin still followed by a modern road which preserves some traces of the old pavement and remains of several ancient bridges.

  • Under the shelter of the castle lies the modern village.

  • The modern village is a part of the commune of Rome.

  • The first book, after a short introduction upon the nature of theology as understood by Aquinas, proceeds in 119 questions to discuss the nature, attributes and relations of God; and this is not done as in a modern work on theology, but the questions raised in the physics of Aristotle find a place alongside of the statements of Scripture, while all subjects in any way related to the central theme are brought into the discourse.

  • The best modern edition of the works of Aquinas is that prepared at the expense of Leo XIII.

  • Near Palo is the modern sea-bathing resort Ladispoli, founded by Prince Odescalchi.

  • It is a modern town, although many of the houses have the flat roofs, view-turrets (miradores) and horseshoe arches characteristic of Moorish architecture.

  • MODERN WORKS.

  • Vancouver has well-paved streets and is well supplied with water, electric lighting, electric cars and all the improvements of a modern city.

  • The church of St James dates from 1763, and the other numerous places of worship and public buildings are all modern.

  • The jactus lapidum of which he speaks was probably more akin to the modern "putting the weight," once even called "putting the stone."

  • ijXcos, the sun), a gaseous chemical element, the modern discovery of which followed closely on that of argon.

  • The proxenus is generally compared to the modern consul or minister resident.

  • And this constitutes the modern (so-called) "Tatar city" of Peking, the south front of which is identical with the south front of the city of Kublai.

  • Destroyed by barbarian invaders in the 7th century the town recovered its importance only in comparatively modern times.

  • A large sugar-beet industry has also sprung up here in modern times.

  • And it would avoid awkward places where it's unclear if the category is for a modern or a historical entity.

  • For modern views of Alexander see Thirlwall, History of Greece; Niebuhr, Lectures on Ancient History (Eng.

  • The best modern work on the subject is by the comtesse Catherine de Flavigny, entitled Sainte Brigitte de Suede, sa vie, ses revelations et son oeuvre (Paris, 1892), which contains an exhaustive bibliogr,aphy.

  • Stubbs, Lectures on Medieval and Modern History (3rd ed., Oxford, 1900).

  • Any note may be a pitch note; for orchestras custom has settled upon a' in the treble clef, for organs and pianos in Great Britain c 2, and for modern brass instruments b flat'.

  • Among other buildings are the modern "Phoenix" club-house of the students; the hospital, containing some anatomical pictures, including one by the two Mierevelts.

  • It has, however, been revived in modern times under the name of "New Delft."

  • Avicenna seems to have declined the offers of Mahmud the Ghaznevid, and proceeded westwards to Urjensh in the modern Khiva, where the vizier, regarded as a friend of scholars, gave him a small monthly stipend.

  • In modern times it has been more criticized than read.

  • The manufacture of highly ornate firearms, yataghans and other weapons at Scutari, Jakova and Prizren has declined, owing to the importation of modern rifles and revolvers.

  • at Spalato and on the island of Lesina) has been shown by modern archaeologists to belong to the Roman period.

  • The first of these is the modern Beit Jibrin (see Eleutheropolis), the second is Tuffuh, near Hebron.

  • The chief subjects of discussion were: the relations of faith and modern thought, the supply and training of the clergy, education, foreign missions, revision and "enrichment" of the Prayer-Book, the relation of the Church to "ministries of healing" (Christian Science, &c.), the questions of marriage and divorce, organization of the Anglican Church, reunion with other Churches.

  • The building of the Canadian Pacific railway through almost continuous rocks for 800 miles was one of the greatest engineering feats of modern times.

  • A notable feature of modern boiler construction is the mode of building the apparatus of cast iron in either horizontal or vertical sections.

  • His own children, who sign deeds along with him, use every mode except Napier, the form now adopted by the family, and which is comparatively modern.

  • He took immense pains with his work, and to some degree anticipated the modern scientific method of writing history.

  • In the 'seventies all the facilities of a modern city - gas, street-cars, water-works, telephones - were introduced.

  • This is now admitted by modern expositors.

  • A third theory, advanced by Professor Witherow and others, is that the modern elder is intended to be, and should be, recognized as a copy of the scriptural presbyter.

  • Presbyterianism in Ireland, in modern times at least, dates from the plantation of Ulster in the reign of James I.

  • In his philosophy he was mainly concerned to defend Christianity against modern Positivism.

  • Modern reform in Judaism is parting to some extent from this conception, but it still holds good even among the liberals.

  • The churches of Notre-Dame des Champs and St Saturnin are modern buildings in the Gothic style.

  • The equipment of the standing army is thoroughly modern, the infantry being provided with Mauser rifles and the artillery with Krupp batteries.

  • 1848), by Dufrnoy and Elie de Beaumont; a more modern account, with full references, is given by A.

  • Eberian influence in the south-west, Ligurian on the shores of the Mediterranean, Germanic immigrations from east of the Rhine and Scandinavian immigrations in the north-west have tended to produce ethnographical diversities which ease of intercommunication and other modern conditions have failed to obliterate.

  • It was stated that, according to proposed arrangements, the~ principal fighting elements of the fleet would be, in 1919, 34 battleships, 36 armoured cruisers, 6 smaller cruisers of modern type, 109 destroyers, 170 torpedo boats and 171 submersibles and submarines.

  • During the second period the pupil has a choice of four courses: (1) Latin and Greek; (2) Latin and sciences; (3) Latin and modern languages; (4) sciences and modern languages.

  • (I) it is a corruption of the ancient name, Egeopelago; (2) it is from the modern Greek, `Ayco iraayo, the Holy Sea; (3) it arose at the time of the Latin empire, and means the Sea of the Kingdom (Arche); (4) it is a translation of the Turkish name, Ak Denghiz, Argon Pelagos, the White Sea; (5) it is simply Archipelagus, Italian, arcipelago, the chief sea.

  • Macaulay terms, him, justly enough, "the father of modern Toryism, of Toryism modified to suit an order of things in which the House of Commons is the most powerful body in the state."

  • A similar influence was exerted by him in other branches of the common law; and although, after his retirement, a reaction took place, and he was regarded for a while as one who had corrupted the ancient principles of English law, these prejudices passed rapidly away, and the value of his work in bringing the older law into harmony with the needs of modern society has long been fully recognized.

  • Its chief buildings are the modern hospital and theatre, and the 17th-century church.

  • The island forms part of the modern nomos of Attica and Boeotia, of which it forms an eparchy.

  • The story of Nicodromus, while it proves the existence of a democratic party, suggests, at the same time, that it could count upon little support.; (2) Modern.

  • There are numerous modern churches and chapels, many of them very handsome; and the former parish church of St Nicholas remains, a Decorated structure containing a Norman font and a memorial to the great duke of Wellington.

  • The city is generously provided with all the modern public services, including two street car lines, local and long distance telephone lines, electric power and light, and waterworks.

  • Owing to the antiquity of both placentals and marsupials, the arboreal character of the feet of the modern forms of the latter is of little importance.

  • It will be observed from the figures of the lower jaws, which are in most cases the only parts known, that in many instances the number of cheek-teeth exceeds that found in modern marsupials except Myrmecobius.

  • All that can be done is to form a continuous account in accord with the ancient histories, and with the original formation of the ground, so far as this has been identified by modern exploration.

  • Prior to 1858, when the modern building period commenced, Jerusalem lay wholly within its 16th-century walls, and even as late as 1875 there were few private residences beyond their limits.

  • The modern Persians call this place Nakshi Rustam (" the picture of Rustam ") from the Sassanian reliefs beneath the opening, which they take to be a representation of the mythical hero Rustam.

  • The present fabric is largely modern; while the portico was designed by Inigo Jones.

  • Modern criticism of the history of Sabbath observance among the Hebrews has done nothing more than follow out these arguments in detail, and show that the result is in agreement with what is known as to the dates of the several component parts of the Pentateuch.

  • The modern er-Riha is a poor squalid village of, it is estimated, about 300 inhabitants.

  • The mound of Tell es-Sultan, near "Elisha's Fountain," north of the modern village, no doubt covers the Canaanite town.

  • It was probably the crusaders who established the modern site.

  • It lies in a healthy, hilly district, and has grown in modern times from a village into a large residential town.

  • The modern city of Rhodes is in general the work of the Knights of St John, and has altogether a medieval aspect.

  • passim; C. Torr, Rhodes in Ancient Times (Cambridge, 1885), Rhodes in Modern Times (Cambridge, 1887); C. Schumacher, De republica Rhodiorum commentatio (Heidelberg, 1886); H.

  • Modern naturalists consider that many of the problems of Australia's remarkable fauna and flora can be best explained by the following hypothesis: - The region now covered by the antarctic ice-cap was in early Tertiary times favoured by a mild climate; here lay an antarctic continent or archipelago.

  • After voyaging westward for nearly three weeks, Cook, on the 19th of April 1770, sighted the eastern coast of Australia at a point which he named after his lieutenant, who discovered it, Point Hicks, and which modern geographers identify with Cape Everard.

  • The two most striking political events in the modern history of Australia, as a whole, apart from the readiness it has shown to remain a part of the British empire, and to in Australia.

  • One of the most notable events in the modern history of Australia occurred shortly after the great strike of 1890.

  • From its pleasant situation in a hilly, wooded district near the headwaters of the Cray stream, Orpington has become in modern times a favourite residential locality for those whose business lies in London.

  • The three subjects to which Smith's writings relate are theory of numbers, elliptic functions and modern geometry; but in all that he wrote an "arithmetical" made of thought is apparent, his methods and processes being arithmetical as distinguished from algebraic. He had the most intense admiration of Gauss.

  • The place of meeting, Elvira, was not far from the modern Granada, if not, as Dale thinks, actually identical with it.

  • in 209, has been called Artabanus by some modern authors without any reason.

  • The battle of Lund was, relatively to the number engaged, one of the bloodiest engagements of modern times.

  • PALENQUE, the modern name of a deserted city in Mexico, in the narrow valley of the Otolum, in the north part of the state of Chiapas, 80 m.

  • Modern mathematicians may find on reading this brilliant summary a good many dicta which they will call in question, but, whatever its defects may be, Peacock's report remains a work of permanent value.

  • The geographical features of the countries formerly known collectively as the Netherlands or Low Countries are dealt with under the modern English names of Holland and Belgium.

  • Whether the division of the lobus dexter into two divisions - (i) lobus dexter proper and (2) lobus quadratus, as in modern anatomical nomenclature - was also assumed in Babylonian hepatoscopy, is not certain, but the groove separating the right lobe into two sections - the fossa venae umbilicalis - was recognized and distinguished by the designation of "river of the liver."

  • The two appendixes attached to the upper lobe or lobus pyramidalis, and known in modern nomenclature as processus pyramidalis and processus papillaris, were described respectively as the "finger" of the liver and as the "offshoot."

  • In modern times hepatoscopy still survives among primitive peoples in Borneo, Burma, Uganda, &c.

  • For the modern order of the Golden Fleece, see Knighthood And Chivalry, section Orders of Knighthood.

  • St Mary's in Builth, took its name from the ancient territorial division of Buallt in which it is situated, which was, according to Nennius, an independent principality in the beginning of the 9th century, and later a cantrev, corresponding to the modern hundred of Builth.

  • Nantwich retains not a few old timbered houses of the 16th and 17th centuries, but the town as a whole is modern in appearance.

  • The drug is not used in modern therapeutics.

  • Origen reprobated medical art on the ground that the prescription here cited is enough; modern faith-healers and Peculiar People have followed in his wake.

  • The city consists of two parts; the modern French town, built on the level ground by the seashore, and the ancient city of the deys, which climbs the steep hill behind the modern town and is crowned by the kasbah or citadel, 400 ft.

  • A large part of the modern town lies south of the square de la Republique; in this quarter are the law courts, hotel de ville, post office and other public buildings.

  • The streets in the modern town are regularly laid out; several are arcaded on both sides.

  • In 337 B.C. the town was abandoned, under the pressure of the Sidicini, in favour of the site of the modern Sessa.

  • The bark of young oak branches has been employed in medicine from the days of Dioscorides, but is not used in modern practice.

  • The vigour and success with which he organized the national resources and upheld the national honour, asserted the British sovereignty of the seas, defended the oppressed, and caused his name to be feared and respected in foreign courts where that of Stuart was despised and neglected, command praise and admiration equally from contemporaries and from modern critics, from his friends and from his opponents.

  • Cromwell shares with Frederick the Great the credit of founding the modern cavalry spirit.

  • The professional soldiers of the Continent could rarely be brought to force a decision; but the English, contending for a cause, were imbued with the spirit of the modern "nation in arms"; and having taken up arms wished to decide the quarrel by arms. This feeling was not less conspicuous in the far-ranging rides, or raids, of the Cromwellian cavalry.

  • The variety of his pursuits at this time carried him over the whole field of ancient and modern literature.

  • Levy Bruhl, History of Modern Philos.

  • It was well known during the middle ages, and was largely used by William, archbishop of Tyre, for the first six books of his Belli sacri historic. In modern times its historical value has been seriously impugned, but the verdict of the best scholarship seems to be that in general it forms a true record of the events of the first crusade, although containing some legendary matter.

  • The other modern editions of the text are those of Fleckeisen (containing ten plays, excellent for his time), 1859; Ussing (with a commentary), 1875-1887, 2nd ed.

  • Among modern editions of separate plays with commentaries the following are probably the most useful: Amphitruo by Palmer, 1890,1890, and Havet, 1895; Asinaria by Gray, 1894; Aulularia by Wagner, 1866 and 1876; Captivi by Brix, 6th ed., revised by Niemeyer, 1910; an English edition of this work by Sonnenschein (with introduction on prosody), 1880; same play by Lindsay (with metrical introduction), 1900; Epidicus by Gray, 1893; Menaechmi by Brix, 4th ed., revised by Niemeyer, 1891; Miles gloriosus by Lorenz, 2nd ed., 1886; by Brix, 3rd ed., revised by Niemeyer, 1901; by Tyrrell, 3rd ed., 1894; Mostellaria by Lorenz, 2nd ed., 1883; by Sonnenschein, 2nd ed., 1907; Pseudolus by Lorenz, 1876; Rudens by Sonnenschein, 1891, editio minor (with a metrical appendix), 1901; Trinummus (with a metrical introduction) by Brix, 5th ed., revised by Niemeyer, 1907; by Gray, 1897; Truculentus by Spengel and Studemund, 1898.

  • - A comprehensive view of the influence of Plautus on modern literatures is given by Reinhardstoettner, Spatere Bearbeitungen plautinischer Lustspiele (1886).

  • in Shakespeare's Parolles and Ben Jonson's Captain Bobadil) but also in most of the literatures of modern Europe.

  • Their territory formed part of the modern Croatia.

  • 1903), and thus they have some connexion with the grand jury of modern times.

  • The modern town in the immediate neighbourhood, still known as Fokia, was founded by the Genoese in 1421 on account of the rich alum mines in the neighbourhood.

  • In modern times the manor was held by Wynne Ellis (1790-1875), who left a valuable collection of paintings to the nation.

  • His conduct, judged not by a modern standard, but by the ideas of his age, will be found compatible with the highest Christian charity, as that of the duke with sound political prudence.

  • Among the very numerous modern studies may be named an essay by Leigh Hunt entitled "The Gentleman Saint" (The Seer, pt.

  • He died before it was completed, but it was finished by Sargon, who reduced the city, deported its inhabitants, and established within it a mixed multitude of settlers (who were the ancestors of the modern Samaritans).

  • It was renamed by him Sebaste, in honour of Augustus: this name still survives in the modern name Sebusteh.'

  • The walls can be traced almost all round the town: at the end of the mound opposite the modern village are the dilapidated ruins of a large gate.

  • These last have a white or reddish ground, with ornamentation in blue, red, brown or black, and are of much better manufacture than the modern pottery of the country.

  • Rowland and others, necessitated by modern requirements, have shown that it is in error, but by less than 1%.

  • Instrumentation is in all standard text-books treated as a technical subject, from the point of view of practical students desirous of writing for the modern orchestra.

  • In the 16th century instrumentation was, in its normal modern sense, non-existent; but in a special sense it was at an unsurpassable stage of perfection, namely, in the treatment of pure vocal harmony.

  • It is in the attempt to supply the place of this continuo (or _ figured bass) by definite orchestral parts that modern per formances, until the most recent times, have shown so radical an incapacity to grasp the nature of 18th-century instrumentation.

  • There seems no good reason why in modern performances the pianoforte should not be used for the purpose; if only accompanists can be trained to acquire the necessary delicacy of touch, and can be made to understand that, if they cannot extemporize the necessary polyphony, and so have to play something definitely written for them, it is not a mass of interesting detail which they are to bring to the public ear.

  • The greater richness of tone of the modern pianoforte is a better compensation for any bareness that may be imputed to pure two-part or three-part writing than a filling out which deprives the listener of the power to follow the essential lines of the music. The same holds good, though in a lesser degree, of the resources of the harpsichord in respect of octavestrings.

  • The genius of the modern pianoforte is to produce richness by depth and variety of tone; and players who cannot find scope for such genius in the real part-writing of the 18th century will not get any nearer to the 18th-century spirit by sacrificing the essentials of its art to an attempt to imitate its mechanical resources by a modern tour de force.

  • But experiment shows that in this condition much of the violin part sounds incomplete; and the truth appears to be that Haydn is thinking, like any modern composer, of the opposition of two solid bodies of tone - the pianoforte and the stringed instruments.

  • His music is highly polyphonic, and modern in its instrumental treatment throughout.

  • There is hardly one of Wagner's orchestral innovations which is not inseparably connected with his adaptation of music to the re q uirements of drama; and modern conductors, in treating Wagner's orchestration, as the normal standard by which all previous and contemporary music must be judged, are doing their best to found a tradition which in another fifty years will be exploded as thoroughly as the tradition of symphonic additional accompaniments is now exploded in the performances of Bach and Handel.

  • The modern Wagnerian conductor is apt to complain that Beethoven, in his four-bar phrase, drowns a melody which lies in the weakest register of the clarinet by a crowd of superfluous notes in oboes, horns and flutes.

  • Experience shows that in the modern orchestra there is safety in.

  • "He led them forth like sheep," in Israel in Egypt, and the music of the Witch of Endor, and the appearance of Samuel's spirit in Saul) are as modern as Gluck's.

  • Chamber-music. - Bach's and his contemporaries' combinations with the harpsichord show the natural fondness, in his day, for instruments of a tone too gentle for prominent use in large rooms, or indeed for survival in modern times.

  • Classical and modern chamber-music in the sonata style consists mainly of string-quartets for 2 violins, viola and violoncello; string-trios (rare, because very difficult to write sonorously); pianoforte-trios (pianoforte, violin and violoncello); pianoforte-quartets (pianoforte with string-trio); pianoforte-quintets (pianoforte with string-quartet); string-quintets (with 2 violas, very rarely with 2 violoncellos), and (in two important cases by Brahms) stringsextets.

  • For many years the best workshop travellers were those driven by quick running ropes; these performed admirable service, but they have given place to the more modern electric traveller.

  • 18 shows a modern design of crane intended to command the maximum of yard space, and having some of the characteristics both of the Goliath and of the revolving jib crane, and fig.

  • The term came in time to mean " a beggar " and with that meaning has passed through Aramaic and Hebrew into many modern languages; but though the Code does not regard him as necessarily poor, he may have been landless.

  • The application of this to telegraphic purposes was suggested by Laplace and taken up by Ampere, and afterwards by Triboaillet and by Schilling, whose work forms the foundation of much of modern telegraphy.

  • A noticeable feature in the modern A B C indicator, as well as in all modern forms of telegraph instruments, is the adoption of " induced " magnets in the moving portion of the apparatus.

  • The needle (in the modern pattern) is of soft iron, and is kept magnetized in ductively by the action of two permanent steel magnets.

  • 15 shows the modern pattern of " sounder " as used by the - == IIB I FIG.

  • - Modern " Sounder."

  • 20, which is the most modern pattern of relay used by the British Post Office, known as the " Post Office Standard Relay."

  • The wide streets are traversed by a system of tramways, which pass through modern suburbs to the mining district about two leagues inland, and on the west a canal enables small vessels to enter the town without using the port.

  • of Perusia and connected with it by a by-road, which joined the Via Flaminia near the temple of Jupiter Appenninus, at the modern Scheggia.

  • Two pictures byMorales, unfortunately retouched in modern times, are preserved in the cathedral.

  • In the time of Ptolemy their territory is limited to the district between the Ciabrus (Tzibritza) and Utus (Vid), in the modern Bulgaria, their chief town being Oescus (OtvKos Tpc aXX6 v).

  • In city districts the modern practice is to restrict the number to four stations per line, and to equip the exchanges and stations for selective ringing.

  • The large modern trunk exchanges are equipped with relays and lamps for signalling purposes.

  • ITALY (Italia), the name1 applied both in ancient and in modern times to the great peninsula that projects from the mass of central Europe far to the south into the Mediterranean Sea, where the island of Sicily may be considered as a continuation of he continental promontory.

  • But Augustus, who was the first to give to Italy a definite political organization, carried the frontier to the river Varus or Var, a few miles west of Nice, and this river continued in modern times to be generally recognized as the boundary between France and Italy.

  • This great valley—one of the most considerable on the southern side of the Alps—has attracted special attention, in ancient as well as modern times, from its leading to two of the most frequented passes across the great mountain chain—the Great and the Little St Bernard—the former diverging at Aosta, and crossing the main ridges to the north into the valley of the Rhone, the other following a more westerly direction into Savoy.

  • The whole of this portion of Central Italy is a hilly country, much broken and cut up by the torrents from the mountains, but fertile, especially in fruit-trees, olives and vines; and it has been, both in ancient and modern times, a populous district, containing many small towns though no great cities.

  • The eucalyptus is of quite modern introduction; it has been extensively planted in malarious districts.

  • The cultivation of oranges, lemons and their congeners (collectively designated in Italian by the term agrumi) is of comparatively modern date, the introduction of the Citrus Bigarcidia being probably due to the Arabs.

  • Modern methods have been introduced.

  • Carriage-roads have been greatly extended in modern times, although their ratio to area varies in different localities.

  • Modern battleships - 4 4 3

  • Modern torpedo boats 34 - 15

  • The four modern shipsthe Vittorio Emanuele class, laid down in 1897have a tonnage of 12,625, two 12-in, and twelve 8-in.

  • The difficulty of Italian history lies in the fact, that until modern times the Italians have had no political unity, no independence, no organized existence as a nation.

  • The ethnography of ancient Italy is a very complicated and difficult subject, and notwithstanding the researches of modern scholars is still involved in some obscurity.

  • was able before his death in 1455 to secure the modern status of the pontiff as a splendid patron and a wealthy temporal potentate.

  • That they had created modern civilization for Europe availed them nothing.

  • Calderai, who may be compared to the Black Hundreds of modern Russia, the revolutionary spirit continued to grow, but it was not at first anti-dynastic. The granting of the Spanish constitution of 1820 proved the signal for the beginning of the Italian.

  • from an agglomeration of, scattered medieval princi- I Ic bleins palities into a unified modern nation.

  • See also the Cambridge Modern History, vols.

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