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mmr

mmr

mmr Sentence Examples

  • autism diagnosed did not rise after the introduction of the MMR vaccine.

  • baulky can't wonder why I do n't balk at asking whether Leo has had an MMR jab.

  • This paper reviews the epidemiological evidence about MMR and autistic enterocolitis.

  • I have 5 kids, two eldest had single jabs, number 3 got full MMR, youngest two started on single vaccinations.

  • It organized trials of poliovirus and measle vaccines and more recently the very successful combined measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine.

  • measles vaccine in addition to MMR.

  • mercury in vaccine may lower the immune system with the MMR being a possible trigger.

  • The only effective way to prevent mumps is to have two MMR vaccinations.

  • mumps vaccine or will they have to have MMR?

  • Student Health: War on mumps Daily Mirror P 33 A mumps outbreak among 90 Oxford students has sparked a mass MMR vaccination program.

  • MMR protects your child and your family against measles mumps and rubella.

  • pending the outcome of the judicial review Hodge Jones & Allen have decided not to take on any new MMR cases.

  • It is not present in live vaccines such as MMR and oral polio.

  • In the UK, these include rubella, mumps, measles (usually given together as MMR ), BCG and yellow fever.

  • rubella vaccination before, are less likely to develop side effects from the MMR vaccine.

  • I can't help thinking somebody somewhere is making a lot of money out of the MMR jab.

  • Whilst she is reinforcing the MMR scare, hundreds of children are going unprotected from the measles.

  • In the UK, these include rubella, mumps, measles (usually given together as MMR), BCG and yellow fever.

  • That is why persons who have had measles and rubella vaccination before, are less likely to develop side effects from the MMR vaccine.

  • I ca n't help thinking somebody somewhere is making a lot of money out of the MMR jab.

  • Whilst she is reinforcing the MMR scare, hundreds of children are going unprotected from the measles.

  • The combined vaccine for measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) was claimed to cause autism or bowel disorders in some children.

  • Parents in Britain began demanding the measles vaccine as a separate dose, and scientists were exploring that option as an alternative to the combined MMR vaccine.

  • Child mortality due to measles is considered largely preventable, and making the MMR vaccine widely available in developing countries is part of WHO strategy to reduce child mortality by two-thirds by the year 2015.

  • Rubella vaccine is usually given in conjunction with measles and mumps vaccines in a shot referred to as MMR (mumps, measles, and rubella).

  • Children receive one dose of MMR vaccine at 12 to 15 months and another dose at four to six years.

  • The vaccine preparation (MMR) is usually given as part of a combination injection that helps protect against measles, mumps, and rubella.

  • MMR is a live vaccine administered in one dose between the ages of 12 and 15 months, between four and six years of age, or 11 and 12 years of age.

  • The CDC recommends that all children infected with human immunodeficiency disease (HIV) who are asymptomatic should receive an the MMR vaccine at 15 months of age.

  • The negative publicity given to the vaccine in the mass media led some parents to refuse to immunize their children with the MMR vaccine.

  • In the fall of 2002, the New England Journal of Medicine published a major Danish study disproving the hypothesis of a connection between the MMR vaccine and autism.

  • Several vaccines are delivered in one injection, such as the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) and diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) combinations.

  • Children who are allergic to the antibiotics neomycin or polymyxin B should not take rubella vaccine, measles vaccine, mumps vaccine, or the combined measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine.

  • Women should avoid becoming pregnant for three months after taking rubella vaccine, measles vaccine, mumps vaccine, or the combined measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) as these vaccines may cause problems in the unborn baby.

  • Some vaccines are mixed in one solution, such as measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) and diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) combination.

  • It is recommended that babies receive a single-dose injection of Varivax between the ages of 12 and 18 months, usually at the same time that they receive their first measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine.

  • Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR vaccine)-These are given by injection in two doses.

  • MMR vaccine is a combined vaccine to protect children against measles, mumps, and rubella, which are dangerous and potentially deadly diseases.

  • The MMR vaccine is a mix of three vaccines: attenuvax (measles), mumpsvax (mumps), and meruvax II (rubella).

  • The three-in-one MMR vaccine protects against measles, mumps, and rubella.

  • The second dose of the MMR vaccine should be given at four to six years of age.

  • Before infants and children of 12 months of age or older leave the United States, they should receive two doses of MMR vaccine separated by at least 28 days, with the first dose given on their birthday.

  • If monovalent vaccine is not available, no specific contraindication exists to giving MMR to infants six to eleven months of age.

  • Infants who receive the monovalent measles vaccine or MMR before their first birthday are vulnerable to all three diseases and should be revaccinated with two doses of MMR.

  • As of 2004 there is no published evidence showing a benefit to separating the combination MMR vaccine into three individual shots.

  • The CDC continues to recommend two doses of the combined MMR vaccine for all children.

  • Because signs of autism may appear around the time children receive the MMR vaccine, some parents worry that the vaccine causes autism.

  • Research has not found a relationship between MMR vaccine and autism.

  • MMR vaccinations are appropriate for children with chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular condition as advised by the pediatrician.

  • Symptoms of low-grade fever, irritability, and soreness at the injection site following the MMR immunization can be relieved with an analgesic such as acetaminophen as recommended by the pediatrician.

  • A Jab in the Dark: Anxiety and Rationality in the MMR Controversy.

  • A stabilized oxygen formula of 28 percent sodium chlorite in distilled water, MMR produces chlorine dioxide when mixed with lemon juice or citric acid.

  • Another theory on the possible connection between autism and childhood vaccinations involves the MMR vaccine.

  • Regressive autism is the form of this disorder that many suspect as being linked to the MMR vaccine, as its onset often occurs after the vaccine has been given.

  • From this review, the committee concluded that the evidence of these studies overwhelmingly favors the position that there is no connection between either thimerosal containing vaccines or the MMR injection.

  • The stated goal of authors of this study was to determine whether autism and GI inflammation could be connected with the administration of the MMR vaccine.

  • The results state that no differences were found between the case group and the control, providing strong evidence against a cause and effect relationship between MMR exposure and autism or GI tract disturbances.

  • According to the CDC, any correlation between the administration of the MMR vaccine and regressive autism is coincidental, rather than a cause and effect relationship.

  • Among the latest of these is one funded by the CDC and the National Institute of Health, published on September 4, 2008, stating that the results provide strong evidence against any association between MMR exposure and autism.

  • On February 12, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims Office of Special Masters found that the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine did not cause autism in Michelle Cedillo, Colton Snyder and William Yates Hazelhurst.

  • A week later on February 24, the media reported that the same court ruled that the MMR vaccine caused a brain inflammation in Bailey Banks, who later developed pervasive development disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) in July 2007.

  • The families sought compensation from the NVICP because they believed that the MMR vaccine caused their children's autism.

  • On February 12, 2009, the Vaccine Court found that the MMR vaccine did not cause autism in the three children.

  • However, it should be noted that this decision only addressed the possible link between autism and the MMR vaccine in combination with thimerosal-containing vaccines, not all childhood vaccinations.

  • The Special Masters found the three test cases did not provide sufficient evidence of a connection between the MMR vaccine and autism.

  • While the court decision provides strong support for the recent MMR studies and the theory that the MMR vaccine is safe, it is not a conclusive answer to the possible connection between the vaccine and autism.

  • Bailey Banks contracted a brain inflammation, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) after receiving the MMR vaccine as a toddler.

  • The Special Master found that the MMR vaccine caused the complication of ADEM, which ultimately led to the development of PDD-NOS.

  • The Bailey Banks ruling provides a possible link between the MMR vaccine and autism through the development of ADEM.

  • Many autism experts and families who disagree with the February 2009 ruling point to this case as evidence that the MMR vaccine may cause autism in certain individuals.

  • Some doctors disagree with the ruling and believe that the MMR vaccine has harmed certain autistic patients such as Banks and Poling.

  • The February 2009 and July 2007 autism vaccination rulings may provoke more questions than answers about the possible connection between autism and the MMR vaccine.

  • The question about a connection between the MMR vaccine and autism continues to be a major controversy within the autism community.

  • How did the MMR vaccine debate begin and does the vaccine have a possible connection to autism?

  • MMR vaccine protects against measles, mumps and rubella.

  • Since 1971, the MMR vaccine has been a part of the standard childhood vaccinations in the USA.

  • After the introduction of the MMR vaccine, the incidence of measles declined by 99 percent in the USA.

  • Pre-existing Health Issues: A number of children had gastrointestinal problems before receiving the MMR vaccine.

  • Despite the many questions about the study that originally suggested the MMR vaccine as a possible cause of autism, families all over the world reacted by vaccinating their children less.

  • A number of key studies examined the MMR vaccine.

  • The CDC and the Danish Medical Council studied more than 500,000 children over a seven year period and found no evidence that the MMR vaccine affects the development of autism.

  • The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and the CDC studied 351 children with autism and 31 children without autism who all received the MMR vaccine.

  • A 2008 study that was published in the Public Library of Science investigated the results of an earlier study that linked the MMR vaccine with autism.

  • After significant studies supporting the safety of the MMR vaccine, the CDC, American Academy of Pediatrics and the Institute of Medicine have concluded that there is no link between the MMR vaccine and autism.

  • The U.S. Court of Federal Claims Office of the Special Masters found that the MMR vaccine did not cause autism in three test cases that affected more than 5,000 families.

  • The current research will reassure many parents about the MMR vaccine's safety.

  • The heated debate of the possible link between vaccinations and autism continues, with many parents noting a drastic change in their children's behavior after receiving the MMR vaccines.

  • This statement was issued soon after the US Court of Federal Claims Office of Special Masters ruled that the MMR vaccine did not cause autism in three test cases that represented more than 5,000 families.

  • At one time, proponents of a link between autism and vaccines believed that the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination was the most likely autism trigger for many autistic children.

  • Current research, a discredited research study and a high profile federal court case have made the idea of a possible connection between the MMR vaccine and autism less likely.

  • Yet, many families of autistic children remain convinced that the MMR vaccine plays some role in the development of autism.

  • Yet, when Dr. Andrew Wakefield published a 1998 study in the British medical journal The Lancet that suggested a link between MMR vaccines and autism, parents around the world began to question the safety of the MMR vaccine.

  • Wakefield's team of researchers studied autistic children with gastrointestinal problems whose autism symptoms suggested a possible link between autism and their MMR vaccination.

  • Detractors of the study pointed out that the study involved only 12 children, all of whom had preexisting gastrointestinal problems before receiving the MMR vaccine.

  • The discredit of the 1998 Wakefield Lancet study has now become a popular example in the argument against a connection between autism and vaccines, especially the MMR vaccine.

  • On February 12, 2009, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims Office of the Special Masters (aka Vaccine Court) found that the MMR vaccine did not cause autism in three test cases that represented more than 5,000 families.

  • The Vaccine Court found that the three test cases did not provide adequate evidence of a connection between the MMR vaccine and autism.

  • The autism vaccination ruling led to many official statements by the mainstream medical community, such as the American Medical Association (AMA), against a connection between the MMR vaccine and autism.

  • The CDC site also published a page about the safety of the MMR vaccine with a list of studies that support the safety of the vaccine.

  • The traditional medical view of a connection between the MMR vaccine, or any childhood vaccine, and autism agrees with the statements made by U.S. Department of Health and Humans Services, the CDC and the AMA.

  • The mainstream medical community argues that childhood vaccines, especially the MMR vaccine, is safe and protects children from potentially fatal diseases.

  • The general consensus of the traditional medical community is that MMR vaccine is safe and has no connection to autism.

  • Despite the mainstream medical opinion, the discredited study and the Vaccine Court ruling, a number of families believe that the MMR vaccine triggered their children's autism.

  • These families argue that many autistic children became ill after receiving the MMR vaccine and soon developed autism symptoms.

  • Unfortunately, there is no definitive answer to the question, "Does MMR vaccine cause autism?"

  • There is not enough scientific evidence to prove the MMR vaccine causes autism.

  • Current studies suggest that there is no link between the MMR vaccine and autism.

  • More research is necessary to determine a more conclusive answer to whether the MMR vaccine has any connection to autism.

  • However, autism vaccine debate continues, and Wakefield's MMR study still provokes a concern over vaccine safety among many members of the autism community.

  • Yet, Dr. Andrew Wakefield's 1998 MMR vaccine study provoked an unprecedented worldwide response.

  • Wakefield's study linked autism and the MMR vaccine, which prompted thousands of parents across the world to delay or refuse childhood vaccinations.

  • The study's results suggested that the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine played a role in the development of the gastrointestinal disorder and autism.

  • Some children may experience a negative reaction to the combination of the three live viruses in the MMR vaccine.

  • The response to the study was so large because of media coverage discussing links between autism and the MMR vaccine as well as Wakefield's vocal campaign to warn parents of the possible dangers of the MMR vaccine.

  • The measles outbreak rate has grown significantly in the UK since many parents have refused the MMR vaccine.

  • The Wakefield autism vaccine study retracted helps calm many parent's fears about MMR vaccine safety.

  • Perhaps the most well-known environmental suspect is the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine.

  • Many people believe there is a link between the MMR vaccine and autism, while many others assert they are not related.

  • The MMR vaccine is a single inoculation that protects children from measles, mumps and rubella.

  • Many speculate whether or not MMR vaccinations are a possible cause for autism.

  • The question about a possible link between the MMR vaccine and autism is a source of heated debate within the autism community.

  • NIH also notes that there is no confirmed connection between autism and the MMR vaccine, and it indicates that occurrences of deafness, long term seizures and brain damage are so rare that these side effects are questionable.

  • While there is no evidence that MMR vaccines cause autism, many people believe that they are linked.

  • Many families report their children began showing signs of autism a few days after having the MMR vaccine.

  • While studies are unable to conclusively connect autism with MMR vaccines, some evidence holds up in court.

  • The controversy started in the 1990s when a UK doctor published a study indicating that there might be a link between the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine and autism.

  • The MMR vaccine once contained thimerosal and was the subject of great controversy.

  • Andrew Wakefield, the author of the study, contends that there is a link between the MMR vaccine and autism.

  • The latter is the case, according to the British Medical Journal when it comes to Wakefield's study that links the MMR vaccine to the development of autistic disorders.

  • Brian Deer's article, How the Case Against the MMR Vaccine was Fixed finds that the data collected in the Wakefield study was manufactured.

  • Parents who are apprehensive about the possibility of their children developing autism after having an MMR vaccine may avoid getting their children vaccinated.

  • With the considerable ramifications for failing to vaccinate children against potentially deadly diseases, why do many continue to insist that there is a link between autism and the MMR vaccine?

  • Many continue to support the researcher, and many families note that they have seen changes in their children following the MMR vaccine.

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