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mississippi

mississippi

mississippi Sentence Examples

  • We settled on a bench with a view of the mighty Mississippi.

  • Her body was found on the Iowa bank of the Mississippi ten days later.

  • The only ones west of the Mississippi are Kansas and Oklahoma, and Arizona and New Mexico in the west.

  • I was born in Mississippi.

  • We've issued warning orders for the populace to avoid the cities, and we're stopping and quarantining everyone at the Mississippi.

  • And apparently, everyone else this side of the Mississippi as well.

  • The feds sealed off the Mississippi using the equipment left over from the war fifty years ago.

  • You'd think the plan was to help the survivors, but I'm in a constant battle with others who want to wipe out everything east of the Mississippi and just start over.

  • He'd surmised she was somewhere this side of the Mississippi, but he couldn't understand how she didn't know how bad it was.

  • Everything this side of the Mississippi is working on solar energy, but not all the facilities are equipped with energy storage, and because it's fall, our energy collection is limited.

  • What is this, the command center for everything this side of the Mississippi?

  • Lana typed a message to Mr. Tim, telling him she was leaving and heading to the Peace Command Center, which was the first center beyond the Mississippi River.

  • With Lana, you'll have access to all the emerops depots the feds have east of the Mississippi.

  • I can influence everything on this side of the Mississippi.

  • Tim released the locations to everything east of the Mississippi.

  • The emerops facility was across a field and a road then down a few blocks in the ghost town that was the city of Randolph on the eastern shores of the Mississippi.

  • All the cities along the Mississippi River had been marked as contaminated to some extent.

  • Randolph was the smallest of them, so she'd picked this town to cross the River rather than the larger ones south along the Mississippi.

  • However, she needed to get to the emerops facility in the town and then cross the bridge across the Mississippi.

  • The brunette waved in return and led her through the small town to a boardwalk lining the wide, slow-moving Mississippi River.

  • There were likely some nasty security features on the other side of the Mississippi left over from the East-West Civil War.

  • With a deep breath, she released the locks on all the emerops facilities east of the Mississippi.

  • And you're excluding the area on the other side of the Mississippi.

  • The Mississippi is locked down with everything the feds have.

  • There are three cities along the Mississippi.

  • Four-story buildings had been built to the ceiling, flanking a narrow pathway and canal of water, siphoned from the Mississippi.

  • Mike says along the Mississippi, all the towns are like this.

  • Mike gazed towards the Mississippi.

  • We're now in a city along the Mississippi.

  • She pulled out her micro as they traveled at the bottom of the Mississippi.

  • Except for his army hitch and a few late night military flights, Dean had never been west of the Mississippi and he'd never seen scenery as spec­tacular as Colorado in late spring.

  • 3 Central Mississippi 7 12 Upper 7 I.

  • Garner, Reconstruction in Mississippi (New York, 1901); W.

  • His refusal soon after his inauguration to honour the requisition of the governor of Virginia for three persons charged with assisting a slave to escape from Norfolk, provoked retaliatory measures by the Virginia legislature, in which Mississippi and South Carolina soon joined.

  • east of the Mississippi, especially in somewhat upland districts.

  • For practical studies see official reports on the Mississippi, Rhine, Seine, Elbe and other great rivers.

  • of Ottawa, on the Mississippi river, and at the junction of the main line and Brockville branch of the Canadian Pacific railway.

  • The wish to meet people of the different sections of the country and to explain his position upon the questions of the day led the President to begin (14th September 1909), a tour which included the Pacific coast, the South-west, the Mississippi Valley and the South Atlantic states, and during which he travelled 13,000 miles and made 266 speeches.

  • This change of attitude is thought to have been due chiefly to his suspicion of the North aroused by John Jay's proposal to surrender to Spain for twentyfive or thirty years the navigation of the Mississippi.

  • His historical writings, with the exception of a small volume on American Political Ideas (1885), an account of the system of Civil Government in the United States (1890), The Mississippi Valley in the Civil War (1900), a school history of the United States, and an elementary story of the revolutionary war, are devoted to studies, in a unified general manner, of separate yet related episodes in American history.

  • MISSISSIPPI, a South Central state of the United States, situated between 35° N.

  • Mississippi is bounded N.

  • by Louisiana, from which it is separated by the Pearl River and by the Mississippi, and by Arkansas, from which also it is separated by the Mississippi.

  • - Mississippi lies for the most part in the Mississippi embayment of the Gulf Coastal Plain.

  • Along the eastern border of this delta, and southward of it, along the Mississippi itself, extends a belt of hills or bluffs (sometimes called "cane-hills"), which is cut by deep ravines and, though very narrow in the north, has in the south an average width of about to m.

  • Pascagoula and Point aux Chenes bays; separated from it by the shallow and practically unnavigable Mississippi Sound is a chain of low, long and narrow sand islands, the largest of which are Petit Bois, Horn, Ship and Cat.

  • The principal rivers are: the Mississippi on the western border, and its tributaries, the Yazoo and the Big Black; the Pearl and Pascagoula, which drain much of the southern portion of the state and flow into the Gulf; and the Tombigbee, which drains most of the north-eastern portion.

  • The Pontotoc ridge separates the drainage system of the Mississippi from that of the Tombigbee; extending from the northeastern part of the state southward, this ridge divides in Choctaw county, the eastern branch separating the drainage basin in the Pascagoula from that of the Pearl, and the western branch separating the drainage basin of the Pearl from that of the Big Black and the Mississippi.

  • When this chain formed the Atlantic mountainborder of the continent excepting this north-eastern corner, Mississippi had not emerged from the waters of the ancient Gulf of Mexico.

  • Wherever stratification is observed in these formations in Mississippi, it shows a dip west and south of 20 or 30 ft.

  • There are four formations of Cretaceous strata in Mississippi, defined by lines having the same general direction as the one just described.

  • Deposits of the Tertiary period form the basis of more than half the state, extending from the border of the Cretaceous westward nearly to the Yazoo Delta and the Mississippi Bottom, and southward to within a few miles of the Gulf coast.

  • Seven formations (or groups) of the Tertiary strata have been distinguished in Mississippi.

  • The Vicksburg formation lies next in order south-west, in a narrow strip of fairly regular width which alone of the Tertiary formations runs as far west as the Mississippi River; it is probably nowhere more than 110 ft.

  • Buffalo-fish, paddle-fish, cat-fish, drum, crappie, black bass, rock bass, German carp, sturgeon, pike, perch, eels, suckers and shrimp inhabit the waters of the Mississippi and its tributaries, and oysters, shrimp, trout, Spanish mackerel, channel bass, black bass, sheepshead, mullet, croakers, pompano, pin-fish, blue-fish, flounders, crabs and terrapin are obtained from the Mississippi Sound and the rivers flowing into it.

  • Originally Mississippi was almost entirely covered with a growth of forest trees of large size, mostly deciduous; and in 1900 about seven-tenths of its area was still classed as timber-land.

  • The normal annual precipitation for Mississippi is about 51 in.; for the southern half, 54 in., and for the northern half, 49 in.

  • The most fertile soil is the alluvium of the' Delta, deposited during the overflows of the Mississippi.

  • Mississippi is devoted largely to the cultivation of cotton.

  • Mississippi ranks high among the southern states in the production of lumber.

  • Pine stumps and waste limbs are utilized, notably at Hattiesburg, for the manufacture of charcoal, tar, creosote, turpentine, &c. Fisheries Fishing is a minor industry, confined for the most part to the Mississippi Sound and neighbouring waters and to the Mississippi and Yazoo rivers.

  • Along the entire western border of the state the Mississippi River is navigable for river steamboats.

  • On the southern border, the Mississippi Sound affords safe navigation for small coasting vessels, and from Gulfport (13 m.

  • The first railway in Mississippi was completed from Vicksburg to Clinton in 1840, but the state had suffered severely from the panic of 1837, and in.1850 it had only 75 m.

  • The principal lines are the Illinois Central, the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley, the Southern, the Mobile & Ohio, the New Orleans & North-eastern, the Kansas City, Memphis & Birmingham, the Mobile, Jackson & Kansas City, the Alabama & Vicksburg, and the Gulf & Ship Island.

  • Mississippi has taken a leading part in the movement to bring about the removal of the common law disabilities of married women, the first statute for that purpose having been passed in 1839.

  • The state insane hospital, opened at Jackson in 1856 (act of 1848), in time became overcrowded and the East Mississippi insane hospital was opened, 2 m.

  • Charters were granted to schools in Claiborne, Wilkinson and Amite counties in 1809-1815, and to Port Gibson Academy and Mississippi College, at Clinton, in 1826.

  • In violation of this pledge, and in the hope that a new bank would be more tractable than the Bank of Mississippi, the Planters' Bank was established at Natchez, in 1830, with a capital of $3,000,000, two-thirds of which was subscribed by the state.

  • In 1853 the High Court of Appeals and Errors of the state in the case of Mississippi v.

  • Mississippi suffered less than most of the other Southern states during the Reconstruction period; but expenditures rose from $463,219.71 in 1869 to $1,729,046.34 in 1871.

  • At the beginning of the 16th century the territory included in the present state of Mississippi was inhabited by three powerful native tribes: the Natchez in the south-west, the Choctaws in the south-east and centre, and the Chickasaws in the north.

  • In addition, there were the Yazoos in the Yazoo valley, the Pascagoulas, the Biloxis, and a few weaker tribes on the borders of the Mississippi Sound.

  • The history of Mississippi may be divided into the period of exploration (154 1699), the period of French rule (1699-1763), the period of English rule (1763-1781), the period of Spanish rule (1781-1798), the territorial period (1798-1817), and the period of statehood (1817 seq.).

  • Hernando de Soto and a body of Spanish adventurers crossed the Tombigbee river, in December 1540, near the present city of Columbus, marched through the north part of the state, and reached the Mississippi river near Memphis in 1541.

  • In 1673 a French expedition organized in Canada under Jacques Marquette and Louis Joliet sailed down the Mississippi to the mouth of the Arkansas, and nine years later (1682) Rene Robert Cavelier, sieur de la Salle, reached the mouth of the river, took formal possession of the country which it drains, and named it Louisiana in honour of Louis XIV.

  • The first European settlement in Mississippi was founded in 1699 by Pierre Lemoyne, better known as Iberville, at Fort Maurepas (Old Biloxi) on the north side of Biloxi Bay, in what is now Harrison county.

  • At the close of the Seven Years' War (1763) France ceded to Great Britain all her territory east of the Mississippi except New Orleans, and Spain ceded Florida to Great Britain.

  • Mississippi Territory was then organized, with Winthrop Sargent as governor.

  • Mississippi thus became one of the first states in the Union to establish an elective judiciary.

  • The government added them to Mississippi in 1804.

  • 1835), a native of Maine, a graduate of the United States Military Academy (1861), a soldier in the Union army, and military governor of Mississippi in 1868-1870.

  • Owen, "A Biography of Mississippi," in the Annual Report of the American Historical Association, 1 899, i.

  • 633-828 (Washington, 1900); "Report of the Mississippi Historical Commission" in the Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society, v.

  • Claiborne's Mississippi as a Province, Territory and State (Jackson, 1880), gives the best account of the period before the Civil War.

  • McCardle, History of Mississippi (New York, 1893), is useful for local history.

  • Garner's Reconstruction Mississippi (New York, 1902) is judicial, scholarly and readable.

  • Most of Riley's work is in the Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society (Oxford, 1898 seq.), which he edited; see his Spanish Policy in Mississippi-after the Treaty of San Lorenzo, i.

  • 50-66; Location of the Boundaries of Mississippi, iii.

  • 167-184; and Transition from Spanish to American Rule in Mississippi, iii.

  • There is much material in the Encyclopaedia of Mississippi History (2 vols., Madison, Wisconsin, 1907), edited by Dunbar Rowland.

  • Mississippi River >>

  • of 5034 m., which is greater than that of any other state east of the Mississippi river.

  • Columbus, Mississippi >>

  • of the Mississippi.

  • Germann, National Legislation concerning Education, its Influence and Effect in the Public Lands east of the Mississippi River, admitted prior to 1820 (New York, 1899); J.

  • Foote established at Mound City a naval depot, which was the basis of his operations on the Mississippi.

  • Not only is the pest carried from place to place, but it also migrates, and in 1907 it crossed from Louisiana, where it first appeared in 1905, to Mississippi.

  • line was made 32° 28'), the Chattahoochee, and the Apalachicola rivers, the Gulf of Mexico, Mississippi Sound, Lakes Borgne, Pontchartrain and Maurepas, and the Mississippi river.

  • Two years later the American Congress annexed the portion of West Florida between the Pearl and the Mississippi rivers to Louisiana (hence the so-called Florida parishes of Louisiana), and that between the Pearl and the Perdido to the Mississippi Territory.

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