Misconduct sentence example

misconduct
  • The misfortune and misconduct of his parents were not the only troubles of Kepler's childhood.
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  • Disaster after disaster occurred, not without misconduct.
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  • John, the new kings only surviving brother, had been declared Lord of Ireland by his father in 1185, but Henry had been forced to remove him for persistent misconduct, and had left him nothing more than a titular sovereignty in the newly conquered island.
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  • The pope immediately summoned Henry to appear at Rome in order to justify his private misconduct, and Henry replied by causing the partisan synod of Worms (1076) to pronounce Gregory's deposition.
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  • The sacked worker had been found guilty of gross misconduct for playing a leading role in the walk out.
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  • Most cases of alleged misconduct will be settled informally.
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  • In cases where a parent feels a teacher is guilty of serious misconduct a parent may complain to the General Teaching Council.
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  • During the 2nd of June the fleets engaged again, and on this day the self-will of Van Tromp, who commanded the rear in the battle, and the misconduct of some of the ships in the van, prevented De Ruyter from making full use of his numbers.
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  • One was the strict limitation of corporal punishment to offences of mutiny and gross personal violence to officers, where previously it might be inflicted for many forms of misconduct, and it can only now be adjudged under great restrictions.
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  • We will apologize publicly for our misconduct.
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  • The MPS would seek clarification on the admissibility of previous unproven allegations of misconduct.
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  • There are few prosecutions, suggesting that action is taken only when misconduct is particularly gross.
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  • You were fired from your job for gross misconduct instead of being laid off for other reasons beyond your control.
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  • Employees who had their hours reduced, quit their jobs or were fired due to gross misconduct are not eligible for the subsidy.
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  • In regard to " clerks," there was (1) all the criminal jurisdiction which existed over laymen, and (2) criminal jurisdiction in regard to professional misconduct.
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  • She afterwards reconciled the king and the prince, thus saving for John the succession which he had forfeited by his misconduct.
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  • The next following council of Orleans, 533, broke in upon this principle, by declaring that a bishop could not reclaim from his clergy any grants made to them by his predecessor, excepting in cases of misconduct.
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  • There are a number of reasons why research misconduct may be on the increase.
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  • The term "hostile work environment" is used to describe serious workplace misconduct.
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  • If you have a friend at work who has witnessed the misconduct, ask him or her to contribute a statement to your file as well.
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  • Although many people are adamantly opposed to quitting their job because of a colleague's misconduct, you may want to ask yourself if the added stress is worth sticking around in a place that is making you unhappy.
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  • Workers who left a paid position without just cause or terminated for misconduct do not qualify for unemployment compensation.
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  • Being fired for misconduct, lying on your application or refusing to work can also disqualify you from receiving benefits.
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  • Are you worried your relationship might be consider sexual misconduct.
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  • On May 24, 2010, the GMC's Fitness to Practice Panel found him guilty of serious professional misconduct during the study, and revoked his medical license and removed him from the official medical register.
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  • It protects small business owners in case of sexual harassment, misconduct and wrongful termination lawsuits.
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  • If you were fired for reasons related to misconduct, you may not qualify.
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  • Except for gross misconduct, the circumstances of the loss of employment are not considered when determining if someone qualifies for coverage under COBRA.
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  • The exception to this rule is a situation where the person has been fired for gross misconduct.
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  • In a case of gross misconduct, the burden of proof is on the employer to prove that the misconduct existed, such as in the case of the employee being caught stealing from the employer or starting an altercation on the job.
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  • Remember that the employer must prove that the gross misconduct existed.
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  • Any of these individuals qualify when an employee is either voluntarily or involuntarily terminated from their job (unless it's for "gross misconduct") or if the employee has reduced hours that limited health benefits.
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  • If an organization is grossly negligent or intentionally took part in misconduct that caused the injury they can still be sued for the personal injury.
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  • Also, in most cases the misconduct or gross negligence of an employee is viewed as negligence of the company they work for.
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  • In the event that you were fired, the reason you were terminated cannot have been for "gross misconduct" or anything that may fall under the "gross misconduct" heading.
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  • You might consider getting clarification from your employer as to what constitutes "gross misconduct" in the workplace.
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  • In 2000, he was investigated for financial misconduct for reportedly buying shares of a computer company before it was published that it was a good buy.
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  • The continued misconduct of the Sana Kachins from beyond the administrative border rendered punitive measures necessary.
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  • But the misconduct of the Mahratta leader induced him to abandon the confederacy, just in time to escape the murderous defeat at Panipat.
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  • It was at this time that Bambaata, a chief in the Greytown district who had been deposed for misconduct, kidnapped the regent appointed in his stead.
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  • The statutory definition of the grounds of reduction was intended, however, merely to put an end to the practice which had previously obtained of reviewing awards on their merits, and it does not prevent the courts from setting aside an award where the arbitrator has exceeded his jurisdiction, or disregarded any one of the expressed conditions of the submission, or been guilty of misconduct.
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  • In many states officials may be removed, not only by impeachment, but also sometimes by vote of the legislature, sometimes by the governor on the address of both houses, or by the governor either alone or with the concurrence of the senate; but such removals must be made for specific misconduct.
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  • Many mistakes were made in the administration, and cases of misconduct by individual officials formed the text for attacks on the whole system.
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  • Sir George Grey sought to deal with the difficulty as a whole, and to provide for all classes of criminals, the most heinous deserving severe correction and the minor offenders in the earliest stages of misconduct.
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  • It must be borne in mind that the marks thus earned may be forfeited at any time by misconduct, but affect remission to this extent only.
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  • The closing years of Akbar's reign were rendered very unhappy by the misconduct of his sons.
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  • He is also empowered to detain a foreign ship the master or seamen of which appear to him through their misconduct or want of skill to have caused injury to a British vessel, until the necessary application for satisfaction or security be made to the local authorities.
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  • The abbess is solemnly admitted to her office by episcopal benediction, together with the conferring of a staff and pectoral cross, and holds for life, though liable to be deprived for misconduct.
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  • The office of the clerk is regulated by an act of 1844, enabling a curate to undertake its duties, and providing facilities for vacating the office in case of misconduct.
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  • "We're debating an alleged act of misconduct by one of our Guardians," Damian explained then faced the small man with purple eyes.
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  • Serious cases, which constitute gross misconduct, are likely to lead to dismissal.
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  • All four pleaded guilty to charges of conspiracy to commit misconduct in a public office.
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  • The same is said with regard to abstaining from stealing, sexual misconduct, lying and the taking of intoxicants.
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  • Some examples I am acting for a public sector body investigating the alleged misconduct of officers.
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  • Pursuing misconduct Editors are often the first recipients of reports of studies that may involve misconduct.
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  • Traditionally, English Courts have taken a restrictive view on what amounts to wilful misconduct.
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  • In 1751 he was accused of sexual misconduct with several young women from the Bristol Circuit.
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  • Researchers are encouraged to report cases of suspected misconduct and to do so in a responsible and appropriate manner.
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  • She recently co-wrote the Legal Action Group's book on police misconduct.
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  • Eighty-three per cent of the annual convictions, summarily and on indictment, followed by committal to gaol, are for misconduct that is distinctly non-criminal, such as breaches of municipal by-laws and police regulations, drunkenness, gaming and offences under the vagrancy acts.
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  • Similarly, Israel has been exiled for gross misconduct - idolatry, immorality, persistent refusal to hear YHWH calling her back to obedience.
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  • Kerry was also accused of misconduct, allegedly violating debate rules by removing a pen from his jacket.
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  • The re-elected and newly-elected politicians would be well-advised to pay close attention to the lessons arising from their misconduct in 2003.
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  • For a pandemic, however, Republican leaders would allow suits only if there was willful misconduct.
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  • Geragos believes that the only way this could have ever happened is due to "…outrageous government misconduct" and is looking to get the entire case against his fallen-superstar client dismissed.
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  • He received the rudiments of his education at the monastery of Caltagirone in Sicily, but was expelled from it for misconduct and disowned by his relations.
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  • Other property was similarly allotted to his widow and remaining children, though some difficulty seems to have arisen from the misconduct of his son, to whom, for some purpose, the property was assigned during his father's lifetime, and who refused to pay what was due.
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  • The subject matter of the jurisdiction of Hellenic courts Christian seems to be confined to strictly spiritual discipline, mainly in regard to the professional misconduct of the clergy.
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  • The French prince was actually inaugurated duke of Brabant at Antwerp (February 1582) and count of Flanders at Bruges (July), but his misconduct speedily led to his withdrawal from the Netherlands, and even before the assassination of Orange (July 1584) the authority of Philip had been practically restored throughout the two provinces.
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  • Owing, however, to the mutual jealousies and misconduct of Goring and Grenville, and the prince's own disregard and contempt of the council, his presence was in no way advantageous, and could not prevent the final overthrow of the king's forces in 1646.
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  • The strong measures he took against disorderly elements in Aragon in 1591 were provoked by extreme misconduct on the part of a faction.
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  • An award may, however, be set aside where the arbitrator has misconducted himself (an arbitrator may also be removed by the court on the ground of misconduct), or where it is ultra vires, or lacks any of the other requisites - above mentioned - of a valid award, or where the arbitrator has been wilfully deceived by one of the parties, or some such state of things exists.
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  • Her dower is not lost by a divorce resulting from the fault or misconduct of the husband.
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  • At the opening of his reign Richard had one all-engrossing desire; he was set on going forth to the Crusade for the recovery of Jerusalem which had been proclaimed in 1187, Crusade, partly from chivalrous instincts, partly as a penance for his misconduct to his father.
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  • Besides the qualifications required of a presentee by canon law, such as being of the canonical age, and in priest's orders before admission, sufficient learning and proper orthodoxy or morals, the Benefices Act requires that a year shall have elapsed since a transfer of the right of patronage, unless it can be shown that such transfer was not made in view of a probable vacancy; that the presentee has been a deacon for three years; and that he is not unfit for the discharge of his duties by reason of physical or mental infirmity or incapacity, grave pecuniary embarrassment, grave misconduct or neglect of duty in an ecclesiastical office, evil life, or conduct causing grave scandal concerning his moral character since his ordination, or being party to an illegal agreement with regard to the presentation; that notice of the presentation has been given to the parish of the benefice.
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  • The duty of the local supervising authority is to Midw exercise general supervision over all midwives practising within their area in accordance with rules laid down in the act; to investigate charges of malpractices, negligence or misconduct on the part of a midwife, and if a prima facie case be established, to report it to the Central Midwives Board; to suspend a midwife from practice if necessary to prevent the spread of infection; to report to the central board the name of any midwife convicted of an offence; once a year (in January) to supply the central board with the names and addresses of all midwives practising within their area and to keep a roll of the names, accessible at all reasonable times for public inspection; to report at once the death of any midwife or change in name and address.
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