Mirror sentence examples

mirror
  • A mirror lined the inside of one door.

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  • She pushed open the door with the mirror and stared.

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  • Passing a mirror she glanced into it.

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  • Natasha was looking at the mirror, but did not see herself.

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  • Katie looked up at her in the mirror as she finished zipping the dress.

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  • I figured these abductions mirror some old case, and then there's a time break of a few years, like he was away.

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  • The spell was broken like a dropped mirror on a marble floor.

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  • In the morning, I stood in front of the mirror getting ready for school.

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  • He stood at the mirror and gazed upon himself for the first time since being abducted.

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  • She looked first in the mirror and froze.

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  • He turned from the mirror and gazed down at her solemnly.

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  • She immediately looked in the mirror at her neck.

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  • Her face looked thin in the mirror, and her eyes looked large.

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  • After she dressed, she stood before the mirror with the flower in her hand.

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  • Deidre went back to the mirror and gazed at herself.

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  • Crossing the threshold into the bathroom, she paused to look at herself in the mirror with a grimace.

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  • It was too short for her to see clearly, and she crossed to the mirror on the other side of the room.

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  • Have you gazed in the mirror since we arrived here?

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  • He crossed to a mirror and pulled her in front of him.

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  • He checked the mirror one last time and headed for the stairs.

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  • I can see her in my rear view mirror, just sitting there, plotting a way they can escape.

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  • The flash of her reflection in the mirror caught her attention.

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  • In every mirror, dust obliterated her past.

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  • In spite of the happy group that greeted him, Fred's somber mood didn't mirror theirs.

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  • She could almost see him standing before his mirror practicing the line before going to the bars to pick up chicks.

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  • He glanced at her in the mirror and continued shaving.

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  • She wanted to deck her mirror image.

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  • Lana programmed her micro quickly to mirror the messages and set it to work decrypting the encoding.

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  • When she retreated to the bathroom, she flipped on the light, cringed, but forced herself to stare at her reflection in the mirror over the sink.

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  • Glancing in the mirror, he did a double take when he saw her.

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  • He crossed to a mirror.

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  • He glanced at her in the mirror and stopped shaving long enough to answer.

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  • "Look in the mirror," he said, nodding his head towards the wardrobe.

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  • Dean looked back at Fred in the rear view mirror but there was no hint of clarification.

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  • As she watched him in the mirror, he stopped behind her and surveyed her soberly.

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  • She placed the medallion around her neck and admired it in the mirror, vowing not to think of the man whose presence plagued her.

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  • A moment later, a thin figure entered the room.  The last of the shapeshifters created, this one was a mirror image of the mad scientist, Ully.

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  • Standing before the mirror, as I had seen others do, I anointed mine head with oil and covered my face thickly with powder.

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  • She looked in the mirror, distraught, then scrubbed her face and turned off the shower.

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  • In such a day, in September or October, Walden is a perfect forest mirror, set round with stones as precious to my eye as if fewer or rarer.

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  • He was watching her in the mirror, his expression a blend of surprise and disgust.

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  • Shoddy apartments and an image in the mirror of a dirty toddler in a diaper.

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  • She caught sight of her gaze in the mirror again and stared.

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  • Seeing her mirror image was a reminder that Deidre was created by a goddess with the sole intention of using and discarding the human she made.

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  • She hadn't looked in a mirror, but she guessed she had the healthy coloring of a mortal.

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  • She caught her reflection in the mirror and admired her hair.

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  • She stared at herself in the mirror, wondering when she'd started looking like a pound dog.

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  • There was no mirror in the bedroom, so she put the earrings back in the box.

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  • Glancing at Katie in the mirror as she helped with the wedding dress, Carmen spoke jokingly.

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  • She dressed and grabbed a comb from her locker, crossing to the mirror above the sinks.

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  • If she asked, a mirror would appear on the opposite wall.

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  • One diaphragm gives the mirror a movement in a vertical direction while the other gives it a horizontal motion.

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  • Deidre looked over her shoulder at the reflection in the mirror displaying the two markings on her back.

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  • Glancing at her reflection in the mirror, Carmen straightened her dress.

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  • If she hadn't humiliated him that day as they stood before the mirror, maybe this conversation would never have been necessary.

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  • He was standing in front of the mirror in his jeans and an athletic undershirt, shaving with a disposable razor.

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  • You remember when I looked in the mirror for you... at Otradnoe at Christmas?

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  • They sat her in front of a mirror while Felipa worked.

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  • Her move toward the fire was reflected in a small mirror behind the desk in front of which he stood.

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  • And gradually from week to week the character of each tree came out, and it admired itself reflected in the smooth mirror of the lake.

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  • The mother smoothed the folds of her dyed silk dress before a large Venetian mirror in the wall, and in her trodden-down shoes briskly ascended the carpeted stairs.

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  • Glancing in the mirror, he straightened his jacket and tucked the tie back down into his vest.

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  • "The soul is trained as it were to behold itself in a mirror, it shows the divine spirit, if it should be found worthy of such fellowship, as in a mirror, and thus discovers the traces of a secret path to participation in the divine nature."

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  • She met his gaze briefly in the mirror.

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  • In her room she ran a comb threw her curls and stared back at the violet eyes haunting her from the mirror.

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  • The image was first thrown upon an inclined mirror and then reflected upwards to a paper screen on the top of the box.

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  • An hour circle attached to E P and a declination circle attached to the box containing the mirror N, both of which can be read or set from E, complete the essentials of the instrument.

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  • In this way a spot of light is obtained from each mirror.

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  • I was quite amazed to find some of your observations an almost perfect mirror to my comments.

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  • She started to put the pillow down and caught the movement in the mirror from the corner of her eye.

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  • Dean left the cell confident that the old man was coping, but he was beginning to mirror Fred's concern with his past.

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  • When she modeled them in front of the mirror, they did things to her figure she never would have guessed.

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  • For a moment he searched her face in the mirror, and then he turned away, striding from the room.

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  • The flame appears to lengthen, but if the reflection is viewed in a vertical mirror revolving about a vertical axis or in Koenig's cube of mirrors, it is seen that the flame is really intermittent, jumping up and down once with each vibration, sometimes apparently going within the jet tube at its lowest point.

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  • Her shot nerves calmed until she rubbed a towel against the misty mirror and saw the tattoo again.

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  • She caught her reflection in the mirror, and the sight of the tattoo around her neck infuriated her.

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  • Reminding herself that the mirror promised she wasn't as exposed as much breast as it looked from above, she left the ruffle on her arms and began filling their plates.

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  • It is a mirror which no stone can crack, whose quicksilver will never wear off, whose gilding Nature continually repairs; no storms, no dust, can dim its surface ever fresh;--a mirror in which all impurity presented to it sinks, swept and dusted by the sun's hazy brush--this the light dust-cloth--which retains no breath that is breathed on it, but sends its own to float as clouds high above its surface, and be reflected in its bosom still.

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  • Boris paused in the middle of the room, looked round, brushed a little dust from the sleeve of his uniform, and going up to a mirror examined his handsome face.

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  • Having looked in a mirror, and standing before Dolokhov in the same pose he had assumed before it, he lifted a glass of wine.

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  • The diaphragms of these are mechanically connected to a small mirror and control its movement in accordance with the strength and direction of the received currents.

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  • The two acting together can thus give the mirror any desired movement within limits.

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  • A ray of light is directed upon the mirror, and the motion of the latter, due to the varying strengths and direction of the received currents, is made to write the transmitted signals upon a strip of bromide photographic paper about three inches wide.

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  • Two receiving instruments, a siphon recorder and a mirror galvanometer, are shown; one only is absolutely necessary, but it is convenient Cable to have the galvanometer ready, so that in case of accident to the recorder it may be at once switched into circuit by the switch s.

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  • The simplest form of receiving instrument (formerly much used) is known as the " mirror."

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  • In this instrument a small and very light mirror, about a in.

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  • galvanometer coil so that the influence of the latter causes the mirror (through the action of the magnetic needle) to be turned through a small angle in one direction or the other according to the direction of the current through the coil.

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  • A ray of light from a lamp is thrown on the mirror, whence it is reflected upon a white surface or scale set at a distance of about 3 ft., forming a bright spot on the surface; the slightest angular deflexion of the mirror, owing to its distance from the scale, moves the spot of light a very appreciable distance to the right or left according to the direction of the angular movement.

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  • Its deflexion was observed by an attached mirror in the usual way.

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  • The process of reflection in the case of a wave motion involves the condition that the wave-length shall be small compared with the dimensions of the mirror, and hence the attempt to reflect and converge electric waves loon ft.

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  • Mirror of Perfection, 1899).

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  • Mirror >>

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  • Citric acid is also distinguished from tartaric acid by the fact that an ammonia solution of silver tartrate produces a brilliant silver mirror when boiled, whereas silver citrate is reduced only after prolonged ebullition.

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  • He is the type of knightly virtue, the mirror of patriotic duty, the flower of all Christian grace.

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  • This may consist simply in attaching one end of the wire to an index lever and the other to a fixed support, or the elongation of the wire may cause a rotation in a mirror from which a ray of light is reflected, and the movement of this ray over a scale will then provide the necessary means of indication.

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  • in length, rests a very light metallic bridge to which a mirror is attached, the mirror reflecting a ray of light from a lamp upon a screen.

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  • If a small alternating current is passed through one wire, it sags down, the mirror is tilted, and the spot of light on the screen is displaced.

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  • Changes of atmospheric temperature affect both wires equally and do not tilt the mirror.

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  • Secondly, lie simulated thunder and lightning, the latter by flashing in Zeno's eyes an intolerable light from a slightly hollowed mirror.

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  • A sublimate may be formed of: sulphur - reddish-brown drops, cooling to a yellow to brown solid, from sulphides or mixtures; iodine - violet vapour, black sublimate, from iodides, iodic acid, or mixtures; mercury and its compounds - metallic mercury forms minute globules, mercuric sulphide is black and becomes red on rubbing, mercuric chloride fuses before subliming, mercurous chloride does not fuse, mercuric iodide gives a yellow sublimate; arsenic and its compounds - metallic arsenic gives a grey mirror, arsenious oxide forms white shining crystals, arsenic sulphides give reddish-yellow sublimates which turn yellow on cooling; antimony oxide fuses and gives a yellow acicular sublimate; lead chloride forms a white sublimate after long and intense heating.

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  • Lucas Janszon Waghenaer (Aurigarius) of Enkhuizen published the first edition of his Spiegel der Zeevaart (Mariners' Mirror) at Leiden in 1585.

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  • Cosimo employed almost the last hours of his life in listening to Ficino's reading of a treatise on the highest good; while Lorenzo, in a poem on true happiness, described him as the mirror of the world, the nursling of sacred muses, the harmonizer of wisdom and beauty in complete accord.

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  • In the " Kongespeil " (King's mirror) of the 13th century it is stated that the old Norsemen tried in vain to raise barley.

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  • The magnetic needle may be cemented horizontally across the back of a little plane or concave mirror, about or $ in.

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  • Deflections of the suspended needle are indicated by the movement of a narrow beam of light which the mirror reflects from a lamp and focusses upon a graduated cardboard scale placed at a distance of a few feet; the angular deflection of the beam of light is, of course, twice that of the needle.

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  • If the cardboard scale upon which the beam of light is reflected by the magnetometer mirror is a flat one, the deflections as indicated by the movement of the spot of light are related to the actual deflections of the needle in the ratio of tan 20 to 0.

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  • If the distance of the mirror from the scale is equal to n scale divisions, and if a deflection 0 of the needle causes, the reflected spot of light to move over s scale divisions, we shall have s/n = tan 20 exactly, s/2n = tan 0 approximately.

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  • The cardboard scale SS is placed above a wooden screen, having in it a narrow vertical slit which permits a beam of light from the lamp L to reach the mirror of the magnetometer M, whence it is reflected upon the scale.

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  • From the former we deduce Ho, and from the latter the corresponding value of I, using the formulae Ho = 47rin/l and I - X s, (d (-- 11)2n7rr 2 i where s is the deflection in scale-divisions, n the distance in scaledivisions between the scale and the mirror, and r the radius of the wire.

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  • The finest, known from its polished surfaces as the "Mirror Tomb," is about 2 m.

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  • (It is easy to see that the radius of the bright spot is of the same order of magnitude.) The experiment succeeds in a dark room of the length above mentioned, with a threepenny bit (supported by three threads) as obstacle, the origin of light being a small needle hole in a plate of tin, through which the sun's rays shine horizontally after reflection from an external mirror.

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  • When parallel rays fall directly upon a spherical mirror the longitudinal aberration is only about one-eighth as great as for the most favourably shaped single lens of equal focal length and aperture.

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  • Hence a spherical mirror of 3 ft.

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  • A rotation by which one edge of the mirror advances 4X (while the other edge retreats to a like amount) introduces a phase-discrepancy of a whole period where before the rotation there was complete agreement.

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  • A rotation of this amount should therefore be easily visible, but the limits of resolving power are being approached; and the conclusion is independent of the focal length of the mirror, and of the employment of a telescope, provided of course that the reflected image is seen in focus, and that the full width of the mirror is utilized.

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  • Then, if Q be any radiant point and Q' its image (primary focus) in the spherical mirror AP, we have 1 1 2cos4) v l + u 'a ' ' where v 1 = AQ', u =AQ, a =OA, =angle of incidence QAO, equal to the angle of reflection Q'AO.

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  • To make a really good mirror of glass two things are required - a plate free from bubbles and striae, and a method of applying a film of metal with a uniform bright surface free from defects.

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  • The royal glass manufactory of La Granja de San Ildefonso was founded about 1725; in the first instance for the manufacture of mirror plates, but subsequently for the production of vases and table-ware in the French style.

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  • In the 17th century the manufacture of mirror glass became an important branch of the industry.

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  • Mirror plates previous to the invention had been made from blown " sheet " glass, and were consequently very limited in size.

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  • SHEPHERD OF HERMAS, one of the works representing the Apostolic Fathers, a hortatory writing which " holds the mirror up " to the Church in Rome during the 3rd Christian generation.

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  • CAMERA OBSCURA, an optical apparatus consisting of a darkened chamber (for which its name is the Latin rendering) at the top of which is placed a box or lantern containing a convex lens and sloping mirror, or a prism combining the lens and mirror.

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  • If now we place a plane mirror (e.g.

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  • a lady's hand glass) behind the lens and inclined at an angle of 45° to the horizon so as to reflect Mirror the rays of light vertically downwards, we can produce >» on a horizontal sheet of Image with Mirror paper an unperverted image FIG.

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  • the image has the same appearance as the object and is not perverted as when the reflection of a printed page is viewed in a mirror.

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  • 2nd Image Object Mirror Image without Lens camera obscura, which was extensively used in sketching from nature before the introduction of photography, although it is now scarcely to be seen except as an interesting side-show at places of popular resort.

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  • Generally the mirror and lens are combined into a single piece of worked glass represented in section in fig.

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  • i, and the plane surface performs the function of the mirror.

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  • The account is not very clear, but seems to imply the use of a concave mirror rather than a lens, which might be suggested by the word orbem.

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  • Instead of a mirror, the objective of a microscope is attached to one prong of the first fork and the eyepiece of the microscope is fixed behind the fork.

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  • Instead of a mirror the second fork carries a bright point on one prong, and the microscope is focused on this.

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  • To show its intermittent character its reflection is viewed in a revolving mirror.

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  • The orifice which is usually placed to the ear was enlarged and closed by a corrugated plate like that of an aneroid barometer, and the motion of this plate was indicated by means of a mirror which had one edge fixed, while the other was attached to a style fixed to the centre of the plate.

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  • When the plate vibrated the mirror was vibrated about the fixed edge, and the image of a reflected slit was broadened out into a band, the broadening giving the amplitude of vibration of the plate.

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  • When the flames are viewed in a revolving mirror and the pipes are blown, each image of one flame lies between two images of the other.

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  • If one prong of each fork be furnished with a small plain mirror, and a beam of light from a luminous point be reflected successively by the two mirrors, so as to form an image on a distinct screen, when one fork alone is put in vibration, the image will move on the screen and be seen as a line of a certain length.

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  • A Serpent was the Egyptian equivalent of Scorpio; the Arrow only of Sagittarius was retained; Capricornus became " Life," or a Mirror as an image of life; Aquarius survived as Water; Taurus, Virgo and Pisces remained unchanged.'

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  • He was a Protestant, and among other religious works translated the Psalms. His best work was Zwierciadio albo zywot poczciwego czlowieka (The Mirror or Life of an Honourable Man) - a somewhat tedious didactic piece.

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  • C. who wrote for the Mirror for Magistrates (ed.

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  • His writings, with the exception of his contributions to the Mirror for Magistrates, are chiefly autobiographical in character or deal with the wars in which he had a share.

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  • Such restorations are possible because of the intimate fitness of animals and plants to their environment, and because such fitness has distinguished certain forms of life from the Cambrian to the present time; the species have altogether changed, but the laws governing the life of certain kinds of organisms have remained exactly the same for the whole period of time assigned to the duration of life; in fact, we read the conditions of the past in a mirror of adaptation, often sadly tarnished and incomplete owing to breaks in the palaeontological record, but constantly becoming more polished by discoveries which increase the understanding of life and its all-pervading relations to the non-life.

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  • This appointment was inaugurated by two events, - a course of eight lectures on sound, which proved no success and was not repeated, and the determination by means of a revolving mirror of the speed of electric discharge in conductors, a piece of work leading to enormously important results.

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  • Dee's Speculum or mirror, a piece of solid pink-tinted glass about the size of an orange, is preserved in the British Museum.

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  • Belopolsky and Prince Galitzin, who substituted for the source an image formed of a stationary object in a rapidly moving mirror.

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  • C. C. Schenck 2 subsequently conducted similar experiments, using a rotating mirror, and though he put a different interpretation on the effects, the main conclusions of Schuster and Hemsalech were not affected.

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  • The Mirror of Vertue in Worldly Greatness; or, the Life of Syr Thomas More was written by his son-in-law William Roper about the end of Mary's reign.

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  • The geometrical axis of the magnet is sometimes defined by means of a mirror rigidly attached to the magnet and having the normal to the mirror as nearly as may be parallel to the magnetic axis.

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  • This arrangement is not very convenient, as it is difficult to protect the mirror from accidental displacement, so that the angle between the geometrical and magnetic axes may vary.

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  • For this reason the end of the magnet is sometimes polished and acts as the mirror, in which case no displacement of the reflecting surface with reference to the magnet is possible.

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  • To obtain the geographical meridian the box A is removed, and an image of the sun or a star is reflected into the telescope B by means of a small transit mirror N.

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  • This mirror can rotate about a horizontal axis which is at right angles to the line of collimation of the telescope, and is parallel to the surface of the mirror.

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  • Hence in more recent patterns of magnetometer it is usual to do away with the transit mirror method of observing and either to use a separate theodolite to observe the azimuth of some distant object, which will then act as a fixed mark when making the declination observations, or to attach to the magnetometer an altitude telescope and circle for use when determining the geographical meridian.

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  • The auxiliary magnet has a plane mirror attached, the plane of which is at right angles to the axis of the magnet.

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  • An image of the ivory scale B is observed after reflection in the magnet mirror by the telescope A.

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  • The axis of the magnet is horizontal and at the same level as the mirror magnet, while when the central division of the scale B appears to coincide with the vertical cross-wire of the telescope the axes of the two magnets are at right angles.

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  • During the experiment the mirror magnet is protected from draughts by two wooden doors which slide in grooves.

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  • What is known as the method of sines is used, for since the axes of the two magnets are always at right angles when the mirror magnet is in its zero position, the ratio M/H is proportional to the sine of the angle between the magnetic axis of the mirror magnet and the magnetic - = meridian.

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  • from the mirror magnet and to the east of the latter, and the whole instrument is turned till the centre division of the scale B coincides with the cross-wire of the telescope, when the readings of the verniers on the azimuth circle are noted.

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  • The difference between the two sets of readings gives twice the angle which the magnetic axis of the mirror magnet makes with the magnetic meridian.

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  • In order to eliminate any error due to the zero of the scale D not being exactly below the mirror magnet, the support L is then removed to the west side of the instrument, and the settings are repeated.

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  • from the mirror magnet.

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  • It is also provided with an azimuth circle or mirror and a shadow pin or style placed in the centre of the glass cover, by either of which the variable angle between the compass north and true north, called the "total error," or variation and deviation combined, can be observed.

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  • In his efforts to make the papal institution entirely worthy of its mission St Bernard himself did not shrink from presenting to the papacy " the mirror in which it could recognize its deformities."

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  • Though of a fickle and treacherous nature, he had all the personal fascination of his family, and is extolled by his contemporaries as a mirror of chivalry.

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  • The use of reflecting mirrors for the purpose of observing from cover is no novelty, and during the trench warfare of the Crimean War 1854-5 a device was patented which scarcely differs from the simple mirror periscope of the World War.

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  • The simplest form of periscope, and that most generally used by troops, consisted of a tube, rectangular in section, provided with two mirrors, the upper of which, inclined at an angle of 45° to the axis of the tube, reflected the image of the foreground vertically downwards to a second mirror, also inclined to the axis at 45° into which the observer looked.

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  • 5) are reflected by a mirror B down the centre of the conical casing which contains the upper optical system and is attached to the top of the mast.

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  • The mirror can be elevated and depressed by means of a flexible shaft which passes up the centre of the mast and actuates gear attached to the mirror frame.

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  • The Order of the Mirror or Happy Sacred Treasure (Zaihosho) was founded in 1888, with eight classes.

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  • The cross of white and gold clustered rays bears in a blue centre a silver star-shaped mirror.

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  • The rays, rendered parallel by the collimator objective, meet a plane mirror (f) of silvered glass, which reflects them to the prisms (g, g').

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  • In order to bring a spectral line upon the camera slit, the slit is widely opened and the plane mirror (f) rotated until the line is seen.

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  • among them the Vinland sagas, also a Norwegian work of the 13th century, called Speculum regale (The King's Mirror), and some papal letters, give interesting glimpses of the life of this colony.

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  • A simple form, which is sometimes referred to as a conical pen dulum, may be con structed with a large sewing needle carrying a galvanometer mirror, suspended by means of a silk or quartz fibre as shown in fig.

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  • The movements of the apparatus, which when complete should consist of two similar pendulums in planes at right angles to each other, are recorded by means of a beam of light, which, after reflection from the mirror or mirrors, passes through a cylindrical lens and is focussed upon a moving surface of photographic paper.

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  • The more distant this is from the pendulum the greater is the magnification of the angular movements of the mirror.

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  • The record is obtained by the light from a small lamp reflected downwards by a mirror so as to pass through a slit in a small plate attached to the outer end of the boom.

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  • The short streak of light thus obtained moves with Mirror, .l 4,Stindd Boom Balance Weight, j/?/?j?jj/ Masonry Column Lamp Br.mide Paper_ On- Need,Le o 0 the movement of the boom over a second slit perpendicular to the first and made in the lid of a box containing clockwork driving a band of bromide paper.

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  • This consists of a mirror about half an inch in diameter, which, when it is suspended as shown in fig.

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  • It is found that the motion of the galvanometer mirror faithfully records, except in a few special cases, the motion of the pendulum; the actual record is made on sensitized paper.

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  • Thus the new art became a mirror of almost all the life and thoughts of the age.

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  • Thus the reflection of a person in a mirror is known as his "image"; in popular usage one person is similarly described as "the very image" of another; so in entomology the term is applied in its Latin form imago to an insect which, having passed through its larval stages, has achieved its full typical development.

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  • The optical apparatus generally consists of a mirror mounted on an axis parallel to the axis of the earth, and rotated with the same angular velocity as the sun.

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  • One of the simplest consists of a plane mirror rigidly connected with a revolving axis so that the angle be tween the normal to the mirror and the axis of the instrument equals half the sun's polar distance, the mirror being adjusted so that the normal has the same right ascension as the sun.

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  • It is easily seen that if the mirror be rotated at the same angular velocity as the sun the right ascensions will remain equal throughout the day, and therefore this device reflects the rays in the direction of the earth's axis; a second fixed mirror reflects them in any other fixed direction.

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  • X is the mirror rotating about the point E, and placed so that (if EB is the horizontal direction in which the rays are to be reflected) (I) the normal CE to the mirror is jointed to BC at C and is equal in length to BE, (2) the rod DBC passes through a slot in a rod ED fixed to, and in the plane of, the mirror.

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  • Since CE equals BE these directions are equally inclined to, and coplanar with, the normal to the mirror.

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  • The rods BC and DB carry two small rods EF, GF jointed at F; at this joint there is a pin which slides in a slot on the rod BH, which is normal to the mirror X.

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  • It is easy to show that rays falling on the mirror in the direction BC will be reflected along BD.

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  • The mirror mm is attached to the framework pafe, the members of which are parallel to the incident and reflected rays SO, OR, and the diagonal pf is perpendicular to the mirror.

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  • By the use of a revolving mirror similar to that used by Sir Charles Wheatstone for measuring the rapidity of electric currents, he was enabled in 1850 to demonstrate the greater velocity of light in air than in water, and to establish that the velocity of light in different media is inversely as the refractive indices of the media.

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  • With Wheatstone's revolving mirror he in 1862 determined the absolute velocity of light to be 298,000 kilometres (about 185,000 m.) a second, or 10,000 kilom.

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  • showed that, if the large mirror were a segment of a paraboloid of revolution whose focus is F, and the small mirror an ellipsoid of revolution whose foci are F and P respectively, the resulting image will be plane and undistorted.

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  • The focal adjustment is accomplished by the screw S, which acts on a slide carrying an arm to which the mirror B is attached.

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  • The magnifying power of the telescope is = Ff /ex, where F and f are respectively the focal lengths of the large and the small mirror, e the focal length of the eye-piece, and x the distance between the principal foci of the two mirrors (=Ff in the diagram) when the instrument is in adjustment for viewing distant objects.

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  • The Cassegrain telescope differs from the Gregorian only in the substitution of a convex hyperboloidal mirror for a concave ellipsoidal mirror as the small speculum.

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  • A A is a concave mirror whose axis is a a.

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  • Parallel rays falling on A A converge on the plane mirror B B, and are thence reflected at Ne w right angles to the axis, forming an image in the focus of i the eye-piece E.

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  • The surface of the large mirror should be a paraboloid of revolution, that of the small mirror a true optical plane.

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  • A glass prism of total reflection is sometimes substituted for the plane mirror.

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  • A A is a concave parabolic mirror, whose axis a c is inclined to the axis of the tube a b so that the image of an object in the focus of the mirror may be viewed by an eye-piece at E, the angle b a c being tier equal to the angle c a E.

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  • This form was adopted by the - elder Herschel to avoid the loss of light from reflection in the small mirror of the Newtonian telescope.

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  • The best speculum metal and the greatest care are no guarantee of freedom from tarnish, and, if such a mirror is much exposed, as it must be in the hands of an active observer, frequent repolishing will probably be necessary.

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  • Partly for these reasons the reflecting telescope with metallic mirror has never been a favourite with the professional astronomer, and has found little employment out of England.'

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  • speculummetal mirror employed by Sir William Huggins at Tulse Hill, with which a large part of his remarkable and important series of astrospectroscopic results have been obtained.

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  • So far as we know, this mirror has never been repolished since its first installation in 1870, and still retains its admirable surface.

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  • The silver-on-glass mirror has the enormous advantage that it can be resilvered with little trouble, at small expense, and without danger of changing the figure.

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  • But Sir David Gill found from experience and careful comparison that a silvered mirror of 12-in.

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  • aperture, mounted as a Newtonian telescope (with a silvered plane for the small mirror), when the surfaces are in fair average condition, is equal in light grasp to a first-rate refractor of 10-in.

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  • (F) The telescope is fixed and the rays are reflected along its axis from an external mirror or mirrors.

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  • The combined overhanging weight of the cast-iron fork, the mirror and tube is so great, that without a very perfect relief-friction system the instrument could not be moved in right ascension with any approach to practical ease.

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  • silver-on-glass mirror (weighing about one ton) rests at the lower end of the tube on a support-system consisting of a large number of weighted levers which press against the back of the glass and distribute the load.

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  • Similar weighted levers around the circumference of the mirror provide the edge support.

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  • mirror is of 25-ft.

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  • mirror being reflected to the side of the tube where FIG.

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  • 21 (b), in which case the upper section of the tube bearing the plane mirror is removed and a shorter section substituted for it.

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  • This latter carries a hyperboloidal mirror, which returns the rays towards the centre of the large mirror and causes them to converge less rapidly.

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  • They then meet a small plane mirror supported at the point of intersection of the polar and declination axes, whence they are reflected down through the hollow polar axis as shown in fig.

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  • 21 (d); in this case a convex mirror of different curvature is employed, the equivalent focus of the combination being 80 ft.

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  • There is a plane mirror at M, which reflects rays converging from the object-glass to the eye-piece at E.

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  • instrument of the same type subsequently mounted at Paris, and in like instruments of intermediate size mounted at other French observatories, the object-glass is placed outside the mirror N, so that both the silvered mirrors are protected from exposure to the outer air.

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  • If then the objective tube is directed to any star, the convergent beam from the object-glass is received by the plane mirror from which it is reflected upwards along the polar axis and viewed through the hollow upper pivot.

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  • - In all the previously described types of telescope mounting the axis of the instrument is either pointed directly at the object or to the pole; in the latter case the rays from the star under observation are reflected along the polar axis by a mirror or mirrors attached to or revolving with it.

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  • In those of type E the eye-piece has a fixed position and the observer may even occupy a room maintained at uniform temperature, but he must submit to a certain loss of light from one or more reflecting surfaces, and from possible loss of definition from optical imperfection or flexure of the mirror or mirrors.

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  • But if it be possible to mount a fixed telescope by which a solar or stellar image can be formed within a laboratory we give the following advantages: - (1) There is no mechanical limit to the length of the telescope; (2) the clockwork and other appliances to move the mirror, which reflects the starlight along the axis, are much lighter and smaller than those required to move a large telescope; (3) the observer remains in a fixed position, and spectroscopes of any weight can be used on piers within the laboratory; and (4) the angular value of any linear distance on a photographic plate can be determined by direct measurement of the distance of the photographic plate from the optical centre of the object-glass.

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  • The difficulty is that the automatic motion of a single mirror capable of reflecting the rays of any star continuously along the axis of a fixed horizontal telescope, requires a rather complex mechanism owing to the variation of the angle of reflexion with the diurnal motion.

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  • It is, however, certain that the Foucault siderostat is not capable, in practice, of maintaining the reflected image in a constant direction with perfect uniformity on account of the sliding action on the arm that regulates the motion of the mirror; such an action must, more or less, take place by jerks.

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  • Its lower extremity terminates in a fork on which is mounted a mirror C D, capable of turning about A on an axis at right angles to A B, the plane of the mirror being parallel to this latter axis.

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  • The mirror C D is set at such an angle as to reflect rays from the star S in the direction of the polar axis to the mirror R and thence to the horizontal telescope T.

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  • The mirrors of Lindemann's equatorial coude reflecting light downwards upon the mirror R would furnish an ideal siderostat for stellar spectroscopy in conjunction with a fixed horizontal telescope.

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  • If a mirror is mounted on a truly adjusted polar axis, the plane of the mirror being parallel to that axis, the normal to that mirror will always be directed to some point on the celestial equator through whatever angle the axis is turned.

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  • Also, if the axis is made to revolve at half the apparent diurnal motion of the stars, the image of the celestial sphere, viewed by reflection from such a moving mirror, will appear at rest at every point - hence the name coelostat applied to the apparatus.

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  • Thus, any fixed telescope directed towards the mirror of a properly adjusted coelostat in motion will show all the stars in the field of view at rest; or, by rotating the polar axis independently of the clockwork, the observer can pass in review all the stars visible above the horizon whose declinations come within the limits of his original field of view.

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  • Therefore, to observe stars of a different declination it will be necessary either to shift the direction of the fixed telescope, keeping its axis still pointed to the coelostat mirror, or to employ a second mirror to reflect the rays from the coelostat mirror along the axis of a fixed telescope.

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  • In the latter case it will be necessary to provide means to mount the coelostat on a carriage by which it can be moved east and west without changing the altitude or azimuth of its polar axis, and also to shift the second mirror so that it may receive all the light from the reflected beam.

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  • As soon divorce the investigation of the shape and material of a mirror from the laws of the incidence of the rays that form images in it, and call it a science of reflection!

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  • Thus, when an image is formed by a plane mirror, the distance of any point in it from the mirror is simply the negative of that of the corresponding point of the object.

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  • The changes in declination are obtained by means of a magnet which is suspended by a long fibre and carries a mirror, immediately below which a fixed mirror is attached to the base of the instrument.

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  • Light passing through a vertical slit falls upon the mirrors, from which it is reflected, and two images of the slit are produced, one by the movable mirror attached to the magnet and the other by the fixed mirror.

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  • The light reflected from the fixed mirror traces a straight line on the paper, serving as a base line from which the variations in declination are measured.

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  • As the declination changes the spot of light reflected from the magnet mirror moves parallel to the axis of the recording drum, and hence the distance between the line traced by this spot and the base line gives, for any instant, on an arbitrary scale the difference between the declination and a constant angle, namely, the declination corresponding to the base line.

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  • The value in terms of arc of the scale of the record can be obtained by measuring the distance between the magnet mirror and the recording drum, and in most observations it is such that a millimetre on the record represents one minute of arc. The time scale ordinarily employed is 15 mm.

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  • The magnet is so weighted that its axis is approximately horizontal, and any change in the inclination of the axis is observed by means of an attached mirror, a second mirror fixed to the stand serving to give a base line for the records, which are obtained in the same way as in the case of the declination.

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  • Mag., 1904 [6 ], 7, 393) designed a form of vertical force balance in which the magnet with its mirror is attached to the mid point of a horizontal stretched quartz fibre.

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  • To overcome this difficulty Eschenhagen in his earlier type of instruments attached to each magnet two mirrors, their planes being inclined at a small angle so that when the spot reflected from one mirror goes off the paper, that corresponding to the other comes on.

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  • In the later pattern a third mirror is added of which the plane is inclined at about 30° to the horizontal.

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  • The light from the slit is reflected on to this mirror by an inclined fixed mirror, and after reflection at the movable mirror is again reflected at the fixed mirror and so reaches the recording drum.

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  • By this arrangement the angular rotation of the reflected beam is less than that of the magnet, and hence the spot of light reflected from this mirror yields a trace on a much smaller scale than that given by the ordinary mirror and serves to give a complete record of even the most energetic disturbance.

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  • Besides the implements and weapons of iron there are fibulae and brooches of bronze, weaving combs and spindle-whorls, a bronze mirror and tweezers, wheel-made pottery as well as hand-made, ornamented with Late Celtic patterns, a bowl of thin bronze decorated with bosses, the nave of a wooden wheel with holes for twelve spokes, and a dug-out canoe.

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  • His incommensurable and indescribable masterpiece of mingled humour, wisdom, satire, erudition, indecency, profundity, levity, imagination, realism, reflects the whole age in its mirror of hyperAristophanic farce.

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  • One of his earliest and most useful contributions (in 1858) was the invention of the mirror galvanometer.

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  • Abandoning the long and somewhat heavy magnetic needles that had been used up to that date in galvanometers, he attached to the back of a very small mirror made of microscopic glass a fragment of magnetized watch-spring, and suspended the mirror and needle by means of a cocoon fibre in the centre of a coil of insulated wire.

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  • Lord Kelvin's mirror galvanometer was first used in receiving signals through the short-lived 1858 cable.

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  • The needle in its normal position is symmetrically placed with regard to the quadrants, and carries a mirror by means of which its displacement can be observed in the usual manner by reflecting the ray of light from it.

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  • Magnus employed a rotating mirror, and also a rotating disk from which a fine slit was cut out.

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  • It holds up an almost perfectly level and spotless mirror to the temper of the earlier Renaissance.

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  • This, like the scandal concerning Margaret and Suffolk, is baseless; the tradition, however, continued and found expression in the Mirror for Magistrates and in Drayton's Heroical Epistles, as well as in Shakespeare's Henry VI.

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  • He solved the problem of finding the point in a convex mirror at which a ray coming from one given point shall be reflected to another given point.

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  • In both cases the curves are epicycloids; in the first case the radii of the rolling and the fixed circles are a(2n - I) /4n and a/2n, and in the second, an/(2n+ I) and a/(2n4-I), where a is the radius of the mirror and n the number of reflections.

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  • The first MS. which he undertook in London was one sent to him by "the noble and puissant lord, Lord Antone, Erle of Ryvyers," consisting of a translation "into right good and fayr Englyssh" of Jean de Teonville's French version of a Latin work, "a glorious fair mirror to all good Christian people."

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  • (For, although the term "ontology" has been as good as disused, it still remains true that the aim of philosophy must be to furnish us with an ontology or a coherent and adequate theory of the nature of reality.) But if, on the other hand, knowledge and reality be ab initio opposed to one another - if consciousness be set on one side as over against reality, and merely holding up a mirror to it - then it follows with equal naturalness that the truly real must be something which lurks unrevealed behind the subject's representation of it.

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  • they are non-superposable, one being the mirror reflection of the other: they are left-handed and right-handed crystals respectively.

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  • de virtu; the Invdtdturi crectine.Ft i, " Christian teachings " of Filoteos (ibid., 1700); the short moral guide, Ceirare pre scurt, by Ioan of Vinci (Belgrad, 1685), translated from some Hungarian original; the Mdntuirea paciitosilor, or " Salvation of sinners," translated from the Greek by a certain Cozma in 1682, which is a storehouse of medieval exempla; and above all the Mirror of Kings, ascribed to Prince Neagoe Bassaraba, written originally in Slavonic (or Greek, if the prince be really the author), and translated (c. 1650) into Rumanian.

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  • Mention may be made of a few more moral treatises such as the Ufa poceiintei, " Gate of Penitence " (Kronstadt, 1812); Oglinda omului din eiuntru, " The Mirror of the Inner Man "; or Pilde filosofesti, " Philosophical Saws and Maxims " (Tirgovishtea, 1715).

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  • This inferiority of the Gregorian he explained as being probably due to the mutual interference of the rays as they crossed at the principal focus before reflection at the second mirror.

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  • Unfortunately for England his ambition was to be tile mirror of chivalry rather than a model administrator He took up and abandoned great enterprises with equal levity; he was reckless in the spending of money; and in times of trouble he was careless of constitutional precedent, and apt to push his prerogative to extremes.

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  • word, derived from avlc, back, and pop4, form: the second o in the Greek is long, but in English the pronunciation varies), a deformation or distortion of appearance; in drawing, the representation of an object as seen, for instance, altered by reflexion in a mirror; in botany, e.g.

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  • The arc being struck in the usual way between two carbons, a concave mirror, placed close behind it, caused a large part of the radiation to be directed through an aperture in the camera and concentrated to a focus outside.

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  • The material world is an emanation from, and a "mirror" of, the Divine Intelligence.

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  • mirror, used on the " frontview " plan, Mimas and Enceladus, the innermost Saturnian moons, were brought to view on the 28th of August and the 17th of September 1789.

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  • was measured by the deflection of a mirror galvanometer, and the temperature by means of a mercury thermometer or an auxiliary thermocouple.

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  • In the greater part of the Ebro basin the heat of summer is even more intense, The treeless mostly steppe-like valley with a brightcoloured soil acts like a concave mirror in reflecting the suns rays and, moreover, the mountains and highlands by which the valley is enclosed prevent to a large extent the access of winds.

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  • Descartes (Dioptrique, 1637) describes microscopes wherein a concave mirror, with its concavity towards the object, is used, in conjunction with a lens, for illuminating the object, which is mounted on a point fixing it at the focus of the mirror.

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  • Since, however, only relatively low powers are now employed, the ordinary rack and pinion movement for focusing suffices, and for the illuminating the object only a mirror below the stage is required when the object is transparent, and a condensing lens above the stage when opaque.

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  • Illumination of transparent objects is effected by the universal-jointed mirror.

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  • For slight magnifications a revolving plane mirror fixed below the object for altering the direction of the rays suffices.

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  • The possibilities of illuminating with a concave mirror seem a little more favourable.

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  • As a rule a concave mirror of similar aperture is fitted on the other side of the plane mirror.

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  • With the concave mirror an image of the source of light can be thrown upon the object.

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  • The distance of the concave mirror from the stage plate is about equal to its focal length.

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  • - Mirror Illuminadistance between the stage plate and tion.

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  • the mirror should then be increased, ti M l = plane-, M2 = curvedso that an image of the source of light mirror.

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  • By a correct choice of the focal length of the illuminating lens in relation to the focal length of the mirror, it is possible to choose the size of the image of the source of light so that the whole object-field is uniformly lighted.

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  • As a rule an iris diaphragm, which can be moved sideways, is now fitted below this condenser; below is the mirror which can be moved in all directions.

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  • The Abbe apparatus consists of a condenser, movable iris diaphragm, and mirror (fig.

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  • The correct direction can be given to the illuminating cone by the mirror m.

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  • ,; To examine small opaque objects with a high magnification the Lieberkiihn mirror, so named after its inventor, was formerly much used.

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  • This was a concave mirror, pierced in the middle, fixed to the objective, and directed towards the object and with such a FIG.

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  • In this case the object lay upon a stage plate, whose centre had so far been made opaque, so that the rays coming from the illuminating plane mirror could not reach the objective direct, but only the rays passing the stage plate to the side of this blackened portion reached the Lieberkiihn mirror, and were used in lighting.

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  • It consists in half of a short focused parabolic mirror, which concentrates all the light coming from the one side on to the object.

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  • This depends on the good combination of the entering cones of rays, which should be as oblique as possible; this is most easily done by mirror condensers.

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  • It is a double mirror system, whose reflecting surfaces are a sphere a and a cardioid b.

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  • The object can be held firmly on the stage plate B by cramps C. On the lower side of the stage plate are the condenser and the diaphragms, and the illuminating mirror J is held by a rod D fixed to the stage plate.

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  • The illuminating mirror is turned aside and a graduated scale is laid on the foot of the microscope.

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  • If the object can be seen by using the mirror, the plane mirror must be used; then the actual size of the object and of the image produced by the objective is measured (of the image by a micrometer ocular).

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  • This distance is composed of the distance of the object from the centre of the plane mirror, and of the distance of the focus of the objective on the stage plate from the centre of the plane mirror.

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  • The mirror galvanometer and the siphon recorder, which was patented in 1867, were the outcome of these researches; but the scientific value of the mirror galvanometer is independent of its use in telegraphy, and the siphon recorder is the direct precursor of one form of galvanometer (d'Arsonval's) now commonly used in electrical laboratories.

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  • Oil of cloves is used in the silvering of mirror glasses.

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  • By means of an attached mirror and reflected ray of light the motion of the movable system can be indicated on a screen.

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  • This ray is also given a periodic motion of the same frequency by reflection from a separate oscillating mirror so as to make the two motions at right angles to one another, and thus we have depicted on the screen a bright line having the same form as the periodic current being tested.

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  • To this is attached a mirror; hence, if a current goes up one side of a loop and down another, the wires are oppositely displaced in the field.

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  • The loop and mirror move in a cavity full of oil to render the system dead-beat.

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  • A ray of light is reflected from this mirror and from another mirror which is rocked by a small motor driven off the same circuit, so that the ray has two vibratory motions imparted to it at right angles, one a simple harmonic motion and the other a motion imitating the variation of the current or electromotive force under test.

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  • In the Duddell oscillograph it is usual to place a pair of loops in the magnetic field, each with its own mirror, so that a pair of curves can be delineated at the same time, and if there is any difference in phase between them, it will be detected.

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  • In one form of Blondel's oscillograph, the vibrating system is a small magnetic needle carrying a mirror, but the principle on which it operates is the same as that of the instrument above described.

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  • In this case the large vibrating mirror must be oscillated by a current from an alternator, on the shaft of which is a disk of nonconducting material with brass slips let into it and so arranged with contact brushes that in each period of the alternator a contact is made, charging say a condenser and discharging it through the oscillograph.

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  • mirror which reflects a ray of light on to a screen or photographic plate as in the Duddell oscillograph.

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  • If this patch is also given a displacement in the direction of right angles by examining it in a steadily vibrating mirror, we see a wavy or oscillatory line of light which is an optical representation of the wave form of a current in the coils embracing the Braun tube.

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  • He also carried on extensive researches in the theory of magnetism; and it is interesting that in connexion with his observations in terrestrial magnetism he not only employed an early form of mirror galvanometer, but also, about 1833, devised a system of electromagnetic telegraphy, by which a distance of some 9000 ft.

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  • Slipping into a pale yellow sun dress, she surveyed herself in the mirror.

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  • Instead of a closet, a large wardrobe stood at one end of the room, dwarfing a vanity desk with a large oval mirror.

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  • The brooding blond bodyguard-Guardian driving the Yukon looked at him in the rearview mirror, torn.

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  • The Guardian Jenn watched the interrogation from the privacy of the two-way mirror.

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  • "What is wrong with me?" she screamed, slamming her fists against the mirror.

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  • Sofia started the car with shaking hands and tore away from the curb, heart pounding as she watched Ving's furious form grow smaller in the rearview mirror.

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  • She dressed then went through the motions of brushing her teeth and dressing without the aid of a mirror, irritated that the only mirror in the bedroom was in the inside door of the wardrobe.

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  • At the same time, the petite woman in the mirror was beyond gorgeous, the combination of shimmering seductiveness and cool beauty stunning.

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  • She pushed herself away from the door and glanced at her reflection in the mirror.

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  • Past-Death took Deidre's arm and spun her back to the mirror.

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  • in the large bathroom.s mirror, and her gaze was drawn to the lumpy scar marring one arm.

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  • Dean left the parking lot on Elm Street, turned left on Church, and after dutifully pausing for a calico cat to stalk a pigeon, he continued out Yoder Avenue, watching the city slowly dissolve in his rearview mirror.

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  • Darian caught his reflection in the mirror as he walked down the long hallway of the White God's Texas headquarters.

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  • Surveying herself in the mirror, she decided that the hanging pearl earrings would set off a little brooch Alex had given her.

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  • I didn't want to see her beady eyes looking back at me so I avoided the mirror.

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  • ABC notation will tend to mirror the grouping which would be used in standard notation.

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  • The three models are summarized in Table 3.1 Table 3.1: A brief summary of the three models used for the NOT mirror aberrations.

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  • Van Helsing holds mirror to Dracula DRACULA: (slaps mirror to the floor) Dr. Seward, my humble apology.

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  • The electric windows and door mirror control are sensibly place in the driver's armrest.

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  • You will not " frame " or " mirror " any part of the Service, without Our prior written authorization.

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  • There are also BP tape backups made of the mirror data.

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  • Internal mechanisms such as the shutter unit and mirror balancer have also been designed for the maximum durability required of professional cameras.

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  • Architecturally, it has a basilica, which is believed to closely mirror the now destroyed abbey at Cluny.

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  • basin with heated mirror over.

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  • bend radius is set at 24 turns for the cylindrical mirror.

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  • boos from the audience, the Daily Mirror reports.

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  • According to the Sunday Mirror, Charlotte Church has had a blazing row with her rugby star boyfriend Gavin Henson over his late-night partying.

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  • The nearest we all get to seeing multiple images is with soap bubbles reflected in our bathroom mirror.

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  • With this step, the CD at least proved capable of taking a look at itself in the mirror.

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  • Frank Morgan landed 2 10lb common carp, Ron Broom landed a 10lb mirror carp all on Friday night.

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  • Markets Coarse fish are stocked for angling: mirror carp, green tench, bream.

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  • The classical Cassegrain In the classical Cassegrain telescope, the primary mirror is paraboloid shaped.

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  • Features include a original marble fireplace with insert, overmantle mirror and stunning chandelier.

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  • Moving the WFS collimator lens barrel back further from the science collimator lens barrel back further from the science collimator mirror would provide room for the mechanism.

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  • By January 1950, the rumors had reached the ears of Walter Winchell, the syndicated columnist on the New York Daily Mirror.

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  • concave mirror produces a very narrow cone of light.

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  • Some are very conceited: Percival can¹t pass a mirror without admiring himself.

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  • The process of lapping makes the heatsink base smooth to a near mirror finish, which improves heat conductivity.

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  • The artist has painted himself in a convex mirror on a specially prepared convex mirror on a specially prepared convex panel.

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  • We cut marble countertops for your bar, side tables, mirror stands - whatever you want to surface.

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  • An insider told the Mirror " Something very crafty is being planned.

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  • crouched position at the south end, with a mirror propped against her legs.

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  • In 1842, Parsons, now the third Earl, cast a 72 inch mirror, weighing over four tons, using three crucibles.

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  • Cuttlefish pots are baited with a female cuttlefish pots are baited with a female cuttlefish, a mirror or a shiny CD to attract the males!

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  • A gilded mirror filled up the space between two windows, curtained amply with blue damask.

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  • Curious, nearing the mirror, I see that my pupils are fully dilated.

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  • The findings suggest that email strives to mirror spoken discourse in many ways.

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  • distract the driver, or block their view in the mirror.

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  • Rudloe Manor both for rail and UFO enthusiasts has become a dreamers mirror, you see there what you want to see.

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  • dwindlethis beam dwindling slowly in my rear view mirror at the weekend, I drove off to find the World Cup.

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  • The shaping of the horizontally focusing mirror is more extreme as its bend is required to have greater ellipticity for a uniform focus.

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  • Unfortunately, with tragic results, the other mirror image enantiomer causes genetic damage in the fetus resulting in physical deformities of the limbs.

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  • Here the dance takes off with everyday people entangled in vanity reflected in an unseen mirror.

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  • The CCD and flip mirror is too long to clear the mount, which makes me wish for a german equatorial mount!

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  • faked photographs published by the Mirror.

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  • The mirror frame is hung between two scratch stock, tapered supports with adjustable, brass thumb side screws and brass bell finials.

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  • They may suffer horrific flashbacks of the accident or assault which caused the facial injury every time they look in the mirror.

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  • flip mirror is out of alignment.

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  • You might be amused by a photo, Alien; I think it's the first fractal to feature on the Mirror Project.

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  • Will's hair was redder and he had far more freckles, but otherwise he and Geoffrey were mirror images of each other.

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  • She hides my pile ointment behind the mirror on the window sill, and she sprays air freshener and perfume about the place.

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  • front of the mirror but just wondered.

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  • full-length mirror?

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  • The German physicist and chemist studied electricity and magnetism, and designed a mirror galvanometer.

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  • Whit to congressional mirror was placed inert gases in.

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  • gazellup reasoned that chimpanzees who touched the red spot while gazing into a mirror recognized the mirror image as themselves.

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  • groovy girls is also launching a Groovy Style Sittin' Pretty salon with hair dryer, sink with water sprayer and large mirror and chair.

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  • glance in the mirror trusting that " happy on the inside " would translate.

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  • And the mirror opens dripping a little black goo and giving access to the halls Ramon was trapped in before.

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  • growgrew particularly fond of the automatic mirror lights, which I swear made me look as if I had a healthy tan.

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  • Sight through the rear sight and the window in the mirror and align the hairline at the reflection of the face of the compass.

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  • halogen down lighters, heated towel rail, fitted mirror.

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  • headrest on the rear seats taking up most of the rear-view mirror.

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  • Although, banning the hearsay and conjecture of the S*n, Mirror, Skysports News etc may be impossible.

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  • Daily Mirror JOHN HOLLINS is convinced Swansea's promotion drive has been fuelled by memories of last season's play-off heartache.

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  • So did the holly and lights on the mirror.

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  • Despite consistent claims to the contrary, never before or since has Hollywood held the mirror up to itself with such unflinching honesty.

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  • Finally, and by no means least we are proud to introduce the CMH chilled mirror hygrometers.

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  • illuminate any one mirror.

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  • illumined heart shall become a pure mirror reflecting the images of all the worlds.

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  • The next stage is to get the Copy Center to do a mirror image of the photocopied banners.

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  • incised with the double disk and Z-rod, beast and mirror symbols.

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  • The mirror acts to amplify the energy of the pyramid thus intensifying the power of your healing requests.

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  • CMS corrects for large angle scattering intrinsic in the HEAO-2 mirror.

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  • Atomic Force Microscopy is employed to study the kinetics of the etching mechanism used to produce the mirror surface.

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  • limpid lines of Therapy mirror its theme to some ironic degree; the frustration of a weak erection.

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  • It does have mirror lockup - good for the Moon - and a brilliant focusing system.

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  • look in the mirror these days. At least not at 4.30 am.

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  • magnetopause boundary crossing and the onset of mirror activity.

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  • mahogany sideboard with an oval mirror.

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