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miracle

miracle

miracle Sentence Examples

  • In retrospect, it was a miracle none of us fainted.

  • Then I lost a grandson and thanks to a miracle, he was returned to me, unharmed.

  • We were content to allow him this small title of uniqueness knowing it was killing him to be so close to a scientific miracle with hands tied and mouth gagged against announcing his findings to the world.

  • "It will be a miracle if we even get there but if we do, you can turn away from the actual abduction," I said as I readied the equipment and turned on the recorder.

  • How many days, months, years had she prayed for a miracle like the one in her hand?

  • She'd always hoped Wynn found some miracle cure, even while checking things off her bucket list.

  • She didn't miss Hannah's stunned look, as if it were a miracle her homely sister could catch the eye of anyone!

  • Miracle of miracles, Cynthia picked up the phone on the first ring.

  • Miracle of miracles, Gladys is awake and it ain't even noon yet.

  • Never mind he spent three years constantly riding the bench, hoping against hope for a miracle, as he practiced, cheered and hustled with unbridled enthusiasm.

  • Magic is a child's interpretation of a miracle, or anything they can't understand.

  • We should be enjoying this miracle, not fighting and accusing.

  • When Dusty found Bianca, she swore she'd seen a miracle, for the master assassin was the last person in either world she'd ever have thought would fall to something like love.

  • More vexing than the inexplicable medical miracle was the creature that did it.

  • At one of the altars in this crypt occurred the miracle of Bolsena in 1263.

  • The miracle forms the subject of a celebrated fresco by Raphael in the Vatican.

  • Urban's bull was once more promulgated, at the council of Vienne in 1311, by 1 The pope's decision, so the story goes, was hastened by a miracle.

  • This triumph was universally considered at the time, and for long afterwards, to have been a miracle, and bore the title of "The Miracle of the Thundering Legion."

  • Commodus, who was with his father when he died, erected to his memory the Antonine column (now in the Piazza Colonna at Rome), round the shaft of which are sculptures in relief commemorating the miracle of the Thundering Legion and the various victories of Aurelius over the Quadi and the Marcomanni.

  • To the Israelites, however, it was a miracle, an unexpected intervention on the part of Yahweh, and the first of many marvels which he performed on behalf of the people of his choice.

  • Miracle could not be to a 3rd century writer what it was to W.

  • But, if Jesus really cured leprosy or really restored the dead to life, we have miracle plainly enough in the region of healing.

  • was residing at Orvieto; and it was to commemorate this miracle that the existing cathedral was built.

  • 8vo), a work fully intended to take the place of Temminck's; but of which Bonaparte, in a caustic but by no means ill-deserved Revue critique (12 mo, 1850), said that the author had performed a miracle since he had worked without a collection of specimens and without a library.

  • was carried on beams and could be raised in the middle, as we see it in Carpaccio's picture of "The Miracle of the Cross."

  • " In miracle no new powers, instituted or stimulated by God's creative action, are at work, but merely the general order of nature "; but " the manifold physical and spiritual powers in actual existence so blend together as to produce a startling result " (Dorner's System of Christian Doctrine, ii.

  • An attempt is made to get rid of the distinctive nature of miracle when the exceptionalness of the events so regarded is reduced to a new subjective mode of regarding natural phenomena.

  • So for Schleiermacher "miracle is neither explicable from nature alone, nor entirely alien to it."

  • Mill's definition of miracles: " to constitute a miracle, a phenomenon must take place without having been preceded by any antecedent phenomenal conditions sufficient again to reproduce it.

  • The test of a miracle is, were there present in the case such external conditions, such second causes we may call them, that wherever these conditions or causes reappear the event will be reproduced.

  • If there were, it is not a miracle; if there were not, it is " (Essays, p. 224).

  • When the existence of God is denied (atheism), or His nature is declared unknowable (agnosticism), or He is identified with nature itself (pantheism), or He is so distinguished from the world that His free action is excluded from the course of nature (deism), miracle is necessarily denied.

  • Lotze has shown how the possibility of miracle can be conceived.

  • And this being the case, the complete conditioning causes of the miracle will be found in God and nature together, and in that eternal action and reaction between them which perhaps, although not ordered simply according to general laws, is not void of regulative principles.

  • This vital, as opposed to a mechanical, constitution of nature, together with the conceptions of nature as not complete in itself - as if it were dissevered from the divine energy - shows how a miracle may take place without any disturbance elsewhere of the constancy of nature, all whose forces are affected sympathetically, with the consequence that its orderly movement goes on unhindered " (Mikrokosmos, iii.

  • This congruity of the miracle with divine truth and grace is the answer to Matthew Arnold's taunt about turning a pen into a pen-wiper or Huxley's about a centaur trotting down Regent Street.

  • Hume maintains that no evidence, such as is available, can make a miracle credible.

  • If it means all experience it assumes the point to be proved; if it means only common experience then it simply asserts that the miracle is unusual - a truism.

  • Of the supreme miracle of His resurrection there is earlier evidence' than of any of the others (1 Cor.

  • There were medieval Baedekers in abundance for the use of the annual flow of tourists, who were carried every Easter by the vessels of the Italian towns or of the Orders to visit the Holy Land and to bathe in Jordan, to gather palms, and to see the miracle of fire at the Sepulchre.

  • The most frequent are the miracle at Cana, the multiplication of the loaves and fishes, the paralytic carrying his bed, the healing of the woman with the issue of blood, the raising of Lazarus, FIG.

  • (5) The miracle of the loaves.

  • He went to Bologna, and studied under the friendly tutelage of Guido; thence he proceeded to Rome, where he painted, in the Cistercian monastery, the "Miracle of the Loaves."

  • This miracle was achieved by tact and management.

  • In such circumstances nothing less than a miracle could enable human ingenuity to fathom the secret.

  • 4) gives the following account of the miracle: As all the Apostles were watching round the dying Mary, Jesus appeared with His angels and committed the soul of His Mother to the Archangel Michael.

  • It would have been a miracle if the first generation of Mexican and South American history had not been anarchical.

  • We cannot well claim more than these three kinds of reality for the first and the last signs, the miracle at Cana and the resurrection of Lazarus.

  • in the symbolic story, the moment for working the miracle; in the symbolized reality, the hour of His death, condition for the spirit's advent; and " what is there between Me and thee ?

  • His collected works, prefaced by a fulsome panegyric, in the course of which it is said that " he was a miracle of nature, and rather seemed to be the immediate production of God Almighty than born of a woman," were produced by his son-in-law, Thomas Wilson, in 1619.

  • But no remains exist of the priories of Augustinian canons at Canterbury (St Gregory's; 1084), Leeds, near Maidstone (1119), Tunbridge (middle of 12th century), Combwell, near Cranbrook (time of Henry II.); the nunnery of St Sepulchre at Canterbury (about 110o) and Langdon abbey, near Walmer (1192), both belonging to the Benedictines; the Trinitarian priory of Mottenden near Headcorn, the first house of Crutched Friars in England (1224), where miracle plays were presented in the church by the friars on Trinity Sunday; the Carmelite priories at Sandwich (1272) and Losenham near Tenterden (1241); and the preceptory of Knights of St John of Jerusalem at West Peckham, near Tunbridge (1408).

  • The Holy Spirit was supposed to be manifest in various striking ways, in prophecy, speaking with tongues and miracle working.

  • Owing to a miracle which he is alleged to have worked on a child suffering from a throat affection, who was brought to him on his way to execution, St Blaise's aid has always been held potent in throat and lung diseases.

  • As Dr Milligan has said very well, " It is not only in things to which we commonly confine the word miracle that the Divine appears.

  • The "miracle of St Januarius" did not occur before the middle of the 15th century.

  • Different writers style her "the tenth Muse," "the flower of the Graces," "a miracle," "the beautiful," the last epithet referring to her writings, not her person, which is said to have been small and dark.

  • At the Jordan, Elijah, wrapping his prophet's mantle together, smote the water with it, and so by a last miracle passed over on dry ground.

  • Faith in the divinity of Christ does not rest upon a miracle in nature, but upon a miracle in the moral world.

  • Shortly after the appearance of the Provinciales, on the 24th of May 1656, occurred the miracle of the Holy Thorn, a fragment of the crown of Christ preserved at Port Royal, which cured the little Marguerite Perier of a fistula lacrymalis.

  • The Jesuits were much mortified by this Jansenist miracle, which, as it was officially recognized, they could not openly deny.

  • The truth is, it would have been a miracle indeed if the style of the Koran had been perfect.

  • Such were: his first miracle, when, returning across the Jordan, he made a dry path for himself in.

  • Another miracle of the same class, the feeding of a hundred men with twenty loaves so that something was left over (iv.

  • 20-27), though a miracle of judgment, scarcely belongs to the same class as the other; and it will be observed that Gehazi's subsequent relations with the court (viii.

  • Darwin and his generation were deeply imbued with the Butlerian tradition, and regarded the organic world as almost a miracle of adaptation, of the minute dovetailing of structure, function and environment.

  • To his continuators, on the other hand, it is an established fact that Helena brought all three crosses to light, and ascertained the genuine Cross by the instrumentality of a miracle, in addition to discovering the nails of the Crucifixion (Rufin.

  • St Augustine observes that, though Africa was full of martyrs' tombs, no miracle had been wrought at them so far as his knowledge extended.

  • On occasion, a chain or ring was fastened about his body, that his condition might be obvious to all; and soon all manner of fables gained currency: how, here or there, the iron had sprung apart by a miracle, in token that the sinner was thereby absolved by God.

  • One of them relates, probably following the legend of St Eustace, the miracle of the conversion of St Hubert.

  • Once more we come across a mysterious limitation of His powers: " He could not do there any miracle," save the cure of a few sick folk; and He marvelled because of their want of faith.

  • The excitement produced by this miracle led to yet another attack, destined this time to be successful, on the life of Jesus.

  • He acquired a reputation as a worker of miracles, and on this ground was sent to Rome as an envoy, where (legend tells) he exorcised from the emperor's daughter a demon who had obligingly entered the lady to enable Simon to effect his miracle.

  • 36-40 (with "God") is strange after the description of the miracle in vv.

  • She worked a miracle there in an incredibly short space of time.

  • The scientific method, then, is to consider each " miracle " on its own merits, according as we find reason to suppose that it has reached our author more or less directly.

  • While heretical on so many points, he was a firm believer in supernatural Christianity, and frequently took the field in defence of prophecy and miracle, including anointing the sick and touching for the king's evil.

  • Several Russian friends and companions, from Kiev and Old Novgorod, are recorded by Daniel as present with him at the Easter Eve "miracle," in the church of the Holy Sepulchre.

  • Besides furnishing the early playwrights with material for miracle plays, it has supplied episodes and apologues to many a writer, including Boccaccio, John Gower and Shakespeare.

  • Up to this point he has mentioned no miracle.

  • Whether He intervenes directly by miracle, or merely sets His laws in operation, He is master of men's fate.

  • Inasmuch as several well-marked races of mankind, such as the Egyptian, Phoenician, Ethiopian, &c., were much the same three or four thousand years ago as now, their variation from a single stock in the course of any like period could hardly be accounted for without a miracle.

  • It is so called from one of several wells or springs in this district, near which miracle plays were performed by the parish clerks of London.

  • Soon after his death the story of the miracle of "Garnet's Straw" was circulated all over Europe, according to which a blood-stained straw from the scene of execution which came into the hands of one John Wilkinson, a young and fervent Roman Catholic, who was present, developed Garnet's likeness.

  • What he would have been as a poet, if, instead of visiting Europe in early life and drinking in the spirit of the middle ages under the shadows of cathedral towers, he had, like Whittier, grown old amid American scenery and life, we can only guess from his earlier poems, which are as naturalistic, fresh and unmystical as could be desired; but certain it is that, from his long familiarity with the medieval view of nature, and its semi-pagan offspring, the romantic view, he was brought, for the greater part of his life, to look upon the world of men and things either as the middle scene of a miracle play, with a heaven of rewarding happiness above and a purgatory of purifying pain below, or else as a garment concealing, while it revealed, spiritual forms of unfathomed mystery.

  • The sun rose and sank, but the expected miracle did not come to pass.

  • Pollard's English Miracle Plays..

  • La Esmeralda, the libretto of an opera founded on his great tragic romance of Notre-Dame de Paris, is a miracle of lyric melody and of skilful adaptation.

  • If so, parliament was told that temporal possessions ruin the church and drive out the Christian graces of faith, hope and charity; that the priesthood of the church in communion with Rome was not the priesthood Christ gave to his apostles; that the monk's vow of celibacy had for its consequence unnatural lust, and should not be imposed; that transubstantiation was a feigned miracle, and led people to idolatry; that prayers made over wine, bread, water, oil, salt, wax, incense, altars of stone, church walls, vestments, mitres, crosses, staves, were magical and should not be allowed; that kings should possess the jus episcopale, and bring good government into the church; that no special prayers should be made for the dead; that auricular confession made to the clergy, and declared to be necessary for salvation, was the root of clerical arrogance and the cause of indulgences and other abuses in pardoning sin; that all wars were against the principles of the New Testament, and were but murdering and plundering the poor to win glory for kings; that the vows of chastity laid upon nuns led to child murder; that many of the trades practised in the commonwealth, such as those of goldsmiths and armourers, were unnecessary and led to luxury and waste.

  • But we must know what we mean by miracle.

  • In the devastation of the north of England which followed the Conquest, Beverley is said to have escaped by a miracle attributed to St John; the Norman leader, while about to enter and pillage the church, fell from his horse dead, and the king, thinking this a sign that the town was under the protection of heaven, exempted it from pillage.

  • He was present at a conversion of this sort, though the miracle beheld by the people was invisible to the missionary.

  • This gave rise to the famous epigram: De par le roi, defense a Dieu De faire miracle en ce lieu.

  • She would be helping them achieve a miracle and they would be helping her with a financial problem.

  • Whether it was an unforgivable sin or a miracle, the twins were living babies now.

  • In retrospect, it was a miracle none of us fainted.

  • Then I lost a grandson and thanks to a miracle, he was returned to me, unharmed.

  • We were content to allow him this small title of uniqueness knowing it was killing him to be so close to a scientific miracle with hands tied and mouth gagged against announcing his findings to the world.

  • "It will be a miracle if we even get there but if we do, you can turn away from the actual abduction," I said as I readied the equipment and turned on the recorder.

  • How many days, months, years had she prayed for a miracle like the one in her hand?

  • She'd always hoped Wynn found some miracle cure, even while checking things off her bucket list.

  • She didn't miss Hannah's stunned look, as if it were a miracle her homely sister could catch the eye of anyone!

  • She opened her eyes, expecting a miracle to occur and the battle to be won.

  • Miracle of miracles, Cynthia picked up the phone on the first ring.

  • Miracle of miracles, Gladys is awake and it ain't even noon yet.

  • Not necessary, my tailor is a miracle worker.

  • Never mind he spent three years constantly riding the bench, hoping against hope for a miracle, as he practiced, cheered and hustled with unbridled enthusiasm.

  • Maternity clothes would only serve to remind him that she was pregnant, rather than underline the fact that they were sharing a miracle.

  • Magic is a child's interpretation of a miracle, or anything they can't understand.

  • We should be enjoying this miracle, not fighting and accusing.

  • When Dusty found Bianca, she swore she'd seen a miracle, for the master assassin was the last person in either world she'd ever have thought would fall to something like love.

  • More vexing than the inexplicable medical miracle was the creature that did it.

  • "By some fucking miracle, you didn't kill the bastard," Darian said.

  • How helpless can people feel, in the face of such adversity; it would take a miracle to save us now.

  • The "Asian miracle" and the discourse on Asian values questioned the dominance of the western development paradigm.

  • adrift with twenty games to go - you boys have pulled off a minor miracle.

  • aforesaid abbot says this miracle was not wrought in his presence, but that he had it from those who were present.

  • One poem compared the custard apple and the mango: " The dangling miracle of cognition " .

  • They are still bamboozled by the oval game but, in Rome, they always recognize a miracle.

  • benign tumor, Miracle #2.

  • A miracle happened â the red bracts that are associated with Christmas appeared on the weed.

  • Those must have been some miracle bristles on your old broom.

  • Unfortunately, there are no miracle cures or easy answers.

  • He thinks of Windex as a miracle cure-all and that kimonos were invented by the Greeks, along with philosophy and astronomy.

  • Chlorophos (PBI) containing diazinon & chlorophos Soil Pest Killer (Miracle) containing pirimiphos-methyl Both are dusts used at sowing or transplanting.

  • After ten weeks I felt quite disheartened as my hoped for miracle had not transpired.

  • dustproof case this rugged, durable, compact and easily transportable handheld is a miracle of modern technology.

  • No one can suppose that going tabloid is some miracle elixir.

  • The earlier spiritualism was founded upon facts in nature, which did not need the desperate expedient of a miracle to explain.

  • Legend states that he restored the broken eggs to whole a miracle for which he became famed.

  • The steak was like mousse, the onions were a miracle of candy floss texture.

  • great powerhem are called kingdom theologians and they believe that somehow the church is going to gain great miracle power.

  • Whether a miracle or sheer guts I don't know.

  • legato line is a miracle of smoothness and transparency.

  • miracle of the loaves and fishes.

  • miracle of the resurrection that our salvation is sealed.

  • Jesus expected the miracle to end a forty year cosmic battle, assuming him to be an Essene.

  • A Chou En Lai verdict on Gordon Brown Samuel Brittan The Financial Times 22/07/05 Is Gordon Brown's supposed economic miracle based on sand?

  • He needed a bloody miracle, that's what he needed.

  • He experienced at first hand the application of new holistic management practices that produced the Japanese post-war economic miracle.

  • miracle cure for burns, even severe ones.

  • miracle stories in the OT being recycled into the New Testament.

  • That's an Old testament miracle, of course.

  • naturalistic explanations prove the miracle did not happen.

  • neuromuscular stimulators can be compared to facial fitness programs - it is not a quick fix or an overnight miracle.

  • nippy result was a miracle of ' package efficiency ' which carried four adults in a smaller, nippier car.

  • Miracle Theater presents an exposé of the darker side of small-town bureaucracy and petty officialdom.

  • pearlescent colors, the sweet aromas or the miracle results they promise?

  • perseverance paid off, however, for a miracle did happen.

  • How does God work in acts of special providence or miracle in a world governed by the laws of physics?

  • It's a miracle anyone survives past puberty, what with all these global crises.

  • In one of his works Plutarch tells about a miracle of the Greek general Pyrrhus.

  • We cannot at once keep sacred the miracle of existence and hold sacrosanct the capacity to destroy it.

  • The earlier spiritualism was founded upon facts in nature, which did not need the desperate expedient of a miracle to explain.

  • But even a miracle of western statecraft would only lead to Afghanistan's impoverished neighbors seizing a greater share of this lucrative trade.

  • When, conscious of his helplessness, he combined his pleading with earnest supplication did the miracle of a spiritual resurrection happen.

  • No one can suppose that going tabloid is some miracle elixir.

  • organ transplant is not a miracle cure by any means.

  • Only a miracle would have stopped the club falling through the relegation trapdoor.

  • The mass was a rare type of benign tumor, Miracle #2.

  • unflinching courage is a miracle of grace in itself.

  • unfolding miracle of.

  • Hawaii honeymoon vacations could take you to a miracle trip to the most enchanting beaches of Hawaii.

  • This miracle was naturally regarded by the Pope as a complete vindication, and the saint was sent home to England in honor.

  • wrought the miracle which was trailered in the opening paragraph of this account.

  • It is interesting as the residence of Lazarus and his sisters, and a favourite retreat of Jesus (see especially John xi., which describes the miracle of the resurrection of Lazarus at this place).

  • I indulged in no vain illusion; I believed in no miracle; I was quite sensible of the sort of hallucination into which I had fallen; I neither sought to intensify it nor to escape from it.

  • This work, described by one of his friends as " a miracle of boldness," is full of originality and suggestiveness, but its publication awakened against him a storm of theological prejudice, which followed him more or less through life.

  • At one of the altars in this crypt occurred the miracle of Bolsena in 1263.

  • The miracle forms the subject of a celebrated fresco by Raphael in the Vatican.

  • Whereas Descartes made the union between them a violent collocation, Geulincx practically called it a miracle.

  • Urban's bull was once more promulgated, at the council of Vienne in 1311, by 1 The pope's decision, so the story goes, was hastened by a miracle.

  • This triumph was universally considered at the time, and for long afterwards, to have been a miracle, and bore the title of "The Miracle of the Thundering Legion."

  • Dacier, however, and others who adhere to the Christian view of the miracle, admit that the appellation of "Thundering" or "Lightning" (KEpavv000Xos, or KepavvoOpos) was given to the legion because there was a figure of lightning on their shields.

  • Commodus, who was with his father when he died, erected to his memory the Antonine column (now in the Piazza Colonna at Rome), round the shaft of which are sculptures in relief commemorating the miracle of the Thundering Legion and the various victories of Aurelius over the Quadi and the Marcomanni.

  • To the Israelites, however, it was a miracle, an unexpected intervention on the part of Yahweh, and the first of many marvels which he performed on behalf of the people of his choice.

  • Miracle could not be to a 3rd century writer what it was to W.

  • Benedict Spinoza, the eminent Jewish pantheist (1632-1677), to whom miracle is impossible, revelation a phrase, and who renews pioneer work in Old Testament criticism, finds at least a fair measure of liberty and comfort in Holland (his birth-land).

  • But, if Jesus really cured leprosy or really restored the dead to life, we have miracle plainly enough in the region of healing.

  • was residing at Orvieto; and it was to commemorate this miracle that the existing cathedral was built.

  • 8vo), a work fully intended to take the place of Temminck's; but of which Bonaparte, in a caustic but by no means ill-deserved Revue critique (12 mo, 1850), said that the author had performed a miracle since he had worked without a collection of specimens and without a library.

  • was carried on beams and could be raised in the middle, as we see it in Carpaccio's picture of "The Miracle of the Cross."

  • MIRACLE (Lat.

  • Other terms used in the New Testament are buvaµts " with reference to the power residing in the miracle worker " (cf.

  • " In miracle no new powers, instituted or stimulated by God's creative action, are at work, but merely the general order of nature "; but " the manifold physical and spiritual powers in actual existence so blend together as to produce a startling result " (Dorner's System of Christian Doctrine, ii.

  • An attempt is made to get rid of the distinctive nature of miracle when the exceptionalness of the events so regarded is reduced to a new subjective mode of regarding natural phenomena.

  • So for Schleiermacher "miracle is neither explicable from nature alone, nor entirely alien to it."

  • Mill's definition of miracles: " to constitute a miracle, a phenomenon must take place without having been preceded by any antecedent phenomenal conditions sufficient again to reproduce it.

  • The test of a miracle is, were there present in the case such external conditions, such second causes we may call them, that wherever these conditions or causes reappear the event will be reproduced.

  • If there were, it is not a miracle; if there were not, it is " (Essays, p. 224).

  • When the existence of God is denied (atheism), or His nature is declared unknowable (agnosticism), or He is identified with nature itself (pantheism), or He is so distinguished from the world that His free action is excluded from the course of nature (deism), miracle is necessarily denied.

  • Lotze has shown how the possibility of miracle can be conceived.

  • And this being the case, the complete conditioning causes of the miracle will be found in God and nature together, and in that eternal action and reaction between them which perhaps, although not ordered simply according to general laws, is not void of regulative principles.

  • This vital, as opposed to a mechanical, constitution of nature, together with the conceptions of nature as not complete in itself - as if it were dissevered from the divine energy - shows how a miracle may take place without any disturbance elsewhere of the constancy of nature, all whose forces are affected sympathetically, with the consequence that its orderly movement goes on unhindered " (Mikrokosmos, iii.

  • The doctrine of Evolution, instead of increasing the difficulty of conceiving the possibility of miracle, decreases it; for it presents to us the universe as an uncompleted process, and one in which there is no absolute continuity on the phenomenal side; for life and mind are inexplicable by their physical antecedents, and there is not only room for, but need of, the divine initiative, a creative as well as conservative co-operation of God with nature.

  • The proof of the possibility of miracle leads us inevitably to the inquiry regarding the necessity of miracle.

  • The miracle and the doctrine mutually illuminate one another.

  • If it be asked why the character may not be displayed in ordinary acts instead of miracles, the answer may be given, "Miracle is the certificate of identity between the Lord of Nature and the Lord of Conscience - the proof that He is really a moral being who subordinates physical to moral interests " (Liddens' Elements of Religion, p. 73).

  • This congruity of the miracle with divine truth and grace is the answer to Matthew Arnold's taunt about turning a pen into a pen-wiper or Huxley's about a centaur trotting down Regent Street.

  • Hume maintains that no evidence, such as is available, can make a miracle credible.

  • If it means all experience it assumes the point to be proved; if it means only common experience then it simply asserts that the miracle is unusual - a truism.

  • Of the supreme miracle of His resurrection there is earlier evidence' than of any of the others (1 Cor.

  • There were medieval Baedekers in abundance for the use of the annual flow of tourists, who were carried every Easter by the vessels of the Italian towns or of the Orders to visit the Holy Land and to bathe in Jordan, to gather palms, and to see the miracle of fire at the Sepulchre.

  • The most frequent are the miracle at Cana, the multiplication of the loaves and fishes, the paralytic carrying his bed, the healing of the woman with the issue of blood, the raising of Lazarus, FIG.

  • (5) The miracle of the loaves.

  • He went to Bologna, and studied under the friendly tutelage of Guido; thence he proceeded to Rome, where he painted, in the Cistercian monastery, the "Miracle of the Loaves."

  • As the sacrifice of the mass is the central mystery of the Catholic faith, so the seven orders of the hierarchy culminate in that of priest, who alone is empowered to work the daily miracle of the altar (see Holy Order).

  • Also the Acts of Peter and Andrew, which among other incidents recount the miracle of a camel passing through the eye of a needle.

  • This miracle was achieved by tact and management.

  • "A miracle," cried the weeping Piagnoni; but then the fire leapt up and ferocious yells of triumph rang from the mob.

  • 3 He censured the German rationalists " for having preferred, by convulsive efforts of interpretation, to compress the memoirs of Christ and His apostles into the dimensions of ordinary life, rather than admit the operation of miracle on the one hand, or proclaim their abandonment of Christianity on the other."

  • In such circumstances nothing less than a miracle could enable human ingenuity to fathom the secret.

  • Sir William Hamilton thinks that the logically necessary advance from the old theory of representative perception to idealism was stayed by anxiety to save this miracle of the church; and he gives Collier credit for being the first to make the discovery.

  • 4) gives the following account of the miracle: As all the Apostles were watching round the dying Mary, Jesus appeared with His angels and committed the soul of His Mother to the Archangel Michael.

  • It would have been a miracle if the first generation of Mexican and South American history had not been anarchical.

  • Moreover, in a procession which forms part of the festivities at Grasmere, certain Biblical stories are symbolized, and in this a connexion with the ancient miracle plays may be found (see H.

  • We cannot well claim more than these three kinds of reality for the first and the last signs, the miracle at Cana and the resurrection of Lazarus.

  • in the symbolic story, the moment for working the miracle; in the symbolized reality, the hour of His death, condition for the spirit's advent; and " what is there between Me and thee ?

  • His collected works, prefaced by a fulsome panegyric, in the course of which it is said that " he was a miracle of nature, and rather seemed to be the immediate production of God Almighty than born of a woman," were produced by his son-in-law, Thomas Wilson, in 1619.

  • But no remains exist of the priories of Augustinian canons at Canterbury (St Gregory's; 1084), Leeds, near Maidstone (1119), Tunbridge (middle of 12th century), Combwell, near Cranbrook (time of Henry II.); the nunnery of St Sepulchre at Canterbury (about 110o) and Langdon abbey, near Walmer (1192), both belonging to the Benedictines; the Trinitarian priory of Mottenden near Headcorn, the first house of Crutched Friars in England (1224), where miracle plays were presented in the church by the friars on Trinity Sunday; the Carmelite priories at Sandwich (1272) and Losenham near Tenterden (1241); and the preceptory of Knights of St John of Jerusalem at West Peckham, near Tunbridge (1408).

  • The Holy Spirit was supposed to be manifest in various striking ways, in prophecy, speaking with tongues and miracle working.

  • Owing to a miracle which he is alleged to have worked on a child suffering from a throat affection, who was brought to him on his way to execution, St Blaise's aid has always been held potent in throat and lung diseases.

  • As Dr Milligan has said very well, " It is not only in things to which we commonly confine the word miracle that the Divine appears.

  • Timotheus, again pronouncing sentence of death, was struck with blindness, but immediately healed by the powerful intercession of the saint, a miracle which converted nearly five thousand men on the spot.

  • The "miracle of St Januarius" did not occur before the middle of the 15th century.

  • 955); there was an Alexandrian tradition that he was one of the servants at the miracle of Cana of Galilee, that he was the "man bearing a pitcher of water" in whose house the last supper was prepared, and that he was also the owner of the house in which the disciples met on the evening of the resurrection (Renaudot, loc. cit.); and even in modern times there has been the conjecture that he was the "certain young man" who "fled naked" from Gethsemane, Mark xiv.

  • Different writers style her "the tenth Muse," "the flower of the Graces," "a miracle," "the beautiful," the last epithet referring to her writings, not her person, which is said to have been small and dark.

  • At the Jordan, Elijah, wrapping his prophet's mantle together, smote the water with it, and so by a last miracle passed over on dry ground.

  • Faith in the divinity of Christ does not rest upon a miracle in nature, but upon a miracle in the moral world.

  • Shortly after the appearance of the Provinciales, on the 24th of May 1656, occurred the miracle of the Holy Thorn, a fragment of the crown of Christ preserved at Port Royal, which cured the little Marguerite Perier of a fistula lacrymalis.

  • The Jesuits were much mortified by this Jansenist miracle, which, as it was officially recognized, they could not openly deny.

  • The truth is, it would have been a miracle indeed if the style of the Koran had been perfect.

  • Such were: his first miracle, when, returning across the Jordan, he made a dry path for himself in.

  • Another miracle of the same class, the feeding of a hundred men with twenty loaves so that something was left over (iv.

  • 20-27), though a miracle of judgment, scarcely belongs to the same class as the other; and it will be observed that Gehazi's subsequent relations with the court (viii.

  • Darwin and his generation were deeply imbued with the Butlerian tradition, and regarded the organic world as almost a miracle of adaptation, of the minute dovetailing of structure, function and environment.

  • To his continuators, on the other hand, it is an established fact that Helena brought all three crosses to light, and ascertained the genuine Cross by the instrumentality of a miracle, in addition to discovering the nails of the Crucifixion (Rufin.

  • St Augustine observes that, though Africa was full of martyrs' tombs, no miracle had been wrought at them so far as his knowledge extended.

  • On occasion, a chain or ring was fastened about his body, that his condition might be obvious to all; and soon all manner of fables gained currency: how, here or there, the iron had sprung apart by a miracle, in token that the sinner was thereby absolved by God.

  • One of them relates, probably following the legend of St Eustace, the miracle of the conversion of St Hubert.

  • Once more we come across a mysterious limitation of His powers: " He could not do there any miracle," save the cure of a few sick folk; and He marvelled because of their want of faith.

  • The excitement produced by this miracle led to yet another attack, destined this time to be successful, on the life of Jesus.

  • He acquired a reputation as a worker of miracles, and on this ground was sent to Rome as an envoy, where (legend tells) he exorcised from the emperor's daughter a demon who had obligingly entered the lady to enable Simon to effect his miracle.

  • 36-40 (with "God") is strange after the description of the miracle in vv.

  • She worked a miracle there in an incredibly short space of time.

  • The scientific method, then, is to consider each " miracle " on its own merits, according as we find reason to suppose that it has reached our author more or less directly.

  • But the record of miracle as such cannot prejudice the question of authorship. Even the form in which the gift of Tongues at Pentecost is conceived does not tell against a companion of Paul, since it may have stood in his source, and the first outpouring of the Messianic Spirit may soon have come to be thought of as unique in some respects, parallel in fact to the Rabbinic tradition as to the inauguration of the Old Covenant at Sinai (cf.

  • While heretical on so many points, he was a firm believer in supernatural Christianity, and frequently took the field in defence of prophecy and miracle, including anointing the sick and touching for the king's evil.

  • Several Russian friends and companions, from Kiev and Old Novgorod, are recorded by Daniel as present with him at the Easter Eve "miracle," in the church of the Holy Sepulchre.

  • Besides furnishing the early playwrights with material for miracle plays, it has supplied episodes and apologues to many a writer, including Boccaccio, John Gower and Shakespeare.

  • Up to this point he has mentioned no miracle.

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