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mints

mints Sentence Examples

  • Five-sixths of these coins preserved at Stockholm were from the mints of the Samanian dynasty, which reigned in Khorasan and Transoxiana from about A.D.

  • There were then eight mints at work, a fact which exhibits evidence of great activity and the need of coin for the purposes of trade.

  • History of British Mints.

  • the existence of mints before the arrival of the Romans.

  • The Romans at first imported their coins, and no Roman mints were established until about the end of the 3rd century, when coins were being struck at London and Colchester.

  • 4 In Anglo-Saxon times Athelstan appears to have been the first monarch who enacted regulations for the mints.'

  • The necessity for so many mints lay in the imperfect means of communication.

  • 1 000, the dies were made in London and issued to the other mints.

  • There is a reference to it dated 1229 and a clear reference dated 1329.9 According to Ruding, there were over fifty mints in the reign of Edward the Confessor.

  • After the Norman Conquest the mints increased to about seventy, a greater number than now exists in the world, but they were gradually reduced and in the reign of Edward I.

  • Ruding enumerates 128 mints operated at various times in the United Kingdom, including some established by usurpation, as in the reign of Stephen by certain barons, and also mints established by grants to ecclesiastics to be worked for their own profit.

  • The provincial mints were all closed just before the reign of Mary, who coined in London only.

  • set up small mints in various towns, and for the great re-coinage in the reign of William III.

  • mints were established at York, Chester, Exeter, Bristol and Norwich, but were soon abandoned.

  • 1 Coinage in Dublin began in AngloSaxon times and came to an end in the reign of William III.2 The other Irish mints were of little importance.

  • Turning to mints in British Dominions beyond the Seas, Ruding enumerates twenty-six mints in France and Flanders used by British monarchs between 1186 and 1513, and Anglo-Hanoverian coins were struck at Clausthal, Zellerfeld and Hanover in the period 1714-1837.

  • The Calcutta mint was established by the East India Company in 1757, but other mints in Bengal continued to be used till about 1835, when the Calcutta mint was rebuilt.

  • The Calcutta and Bombay mints are still in operation.

  • In Australia there are three mints, Sydney, opened in 1855, Melbourne, opened in 1872, and Perth, opened in 1899.

  • Other mints are now in operation at New Orleans, San Francisco and Denver.

  • In most European countries a single mint situated at the capital is found to be sufficient, but there are six mints in the German Empire and two in Austria-Hungary.

  • In China 26 mints were at work in 1906.

  • There are also mints at Osaka, Bangkok and Teheran, and the Seoul mint was at work in 1904.

  • In Mexico 11 mints formerly existed, but one only, in the city of Mexico, remained open in 1907.

  • In South America there are mints at Lima, Santiago, Buenos Ayres and Tegucigalpa.

  • No mints are in operation in Africa.

  • In all there are nearly 70 mints in the world.

  • In European mints generally little difficulty is experienced in procuring refined gold and silver for coinage.

  • In Australia, the United States, Japan and some other countries, the Mints receive unrefined gold from the mines and refine it before it is coined.

  • (4) Adjusting the weight of the blanks (this is omitted in some mints).

  • (6) Annealing the blanks and (in some mints) cleaning them in acid.

  • In some other mints still larger crucibles are used, containing various amounts up to about moo kilograms or over 30,000 oz.

  • In foreign mints the molten metal is generally transferred from the crucible to the moulds by dipping crucibles or iron ladles covered with clay.

  • In many mints the flues pass into condensing chambers where volatilized gold and silver are recovered.

  • In some mints the fillets are annealed frequently, the fillets for one-mark pieces at the Berlin mint, for example, being annealed four times in the course of rolling.

  • In some mints the drag-bench or draw-bench is used after the rolls to equalize the thickness of the fillets.

  • A similar method was formerly used for gold coins in England and is still employed in some mints.

  • In 1851 these balances, improved by Richard Pitcher, were introduced at the Royal Mint, and modifications of them are now used at most foreign mints.

  • In most foreign mints the blanks are weighed by the automatic balances before being struck, and those which are too heavy are reduced by filing or planing.

  • This system was introduced into the Indian mints in 1873.

  • Coins from the London and Australian mints are examined.

  • Coins of foreign mints are generally submitted to examination by a committee of eminent chemists and metallurgists whose report is published in the official journals.

  • Byelyashevsky, The Mints of Kiev.

  • The quality of these coins (weighing about 81 grains troy) was low, and at last deteriorated so much that the Tibetans deserted the Nepal mints.

  • The coinage takes place in the six mints belonging to the various states thus Berlin (Prussia), Munich (Bavaria), Dresden (in the Muldenerhtte near Freibcrg, Saxony), Stuttgart (WUrttemberg), Karlsruhe (Baden) and Hamburg (for the state of Hamburg).

  • By it private war was declared unlawful, except in cases where justice could not be obtained; a chief justiciar was appointed for the Empire; all tolls and mints erected since the death of Henry VI.

  • In 1893 the Indian mints were closed to the free coinage of silver, and in 1899 the British sovereign was made legal tender at the rate of 1 s.

  • Accordingly in June 1893 an act was passed closing the Indian mints to the free coinage of silver.

  • These include fragments of custumals, records of the military service due, of markets, mints, and so forth.

  • An ounce of dust in 1848 frequently went for $4 instead of $17; for a number of years traders in dust were sure of a margin of several dollars, as for example in private coinage, mints for which were common by 1851.

  • The National Democratic Convention declared for the immediate opening of the mints to the free and unlimited coinage of silver at the ratio with gold of 16 to 1; and it nominated for the presidency William Jennings Bryan of Nebraska, who also received the nomination of the People's party and of the National Silver party.

  • Silver-mining ceased to be highly remunerative beginning with the closing of the India mints and repeal of the Sherman Law in 1893; since 1900 the yield has shown an extraordinary decrease - in 1905 it was $6,945,581, and in 1907 $7,411,652 - and it is said that as a result of the great fall in the market value of the metal the mines can now be operated only under the most favourable conditions and by exercise of extreme economy.

  • A later series of shekels, belonging to the Roman period, are tetradrachms, "which came from the mints of Caesarea and Antioch and were used as blanks on which to impress Jewish types."

  • A flourishing commerce, however, soon grew up in the Scandinavian towns; mints were established, and many foreign traders - Flemings, Italians and others - settled there.

  • Several mints had been established since Richard of York's time; the standards varied and imitation was easy.

  • All jurisdiction over their lands was vested in them, no new mints or toll-centres were to be erected on their domains, and the imperial authority was restricted to a small and dwindling area.

  • breath mints should be sucked only while out of view of customers.

  • Mints, bath confetti, seeds, tea, salts, and more!

  • Ah, where are the old dears who smelled of lavender and gave small altar boys stripy mints they couldn't crunch!

  • Enjoy your coffee without the mints and ask for semi-skimmed milk to replace the cream.

  • Are you spending almost as much in breath mints as you are in cigarettes?

  • As he poured out these failed glacier mints to set, Kendal mintcake was born.

  • If you sign up you'll receive a host's pack with complimentary Green & Black's chocolate mints.

  • Your package includes: Four course meal, with after dinner mints and coffee and a table for the duration of racing.

  • team mates and worked until after 8. We didn't even get any mints for our efforts.

  • I had a perfectly innocent relationship with a steady old workhorse called Nudge, who sucked his mints rather than crunching them.

  • Five-sixths of these coins preserved at Stockholm were from the mints of the Samanian dynasty, which reigned in Khorasan and Transoxiana from about A.D.

  • There were then eight mints at work, a fact which exhibits evidence of great activity and the need of coin for the purposes of trade.

  • History of British Mints.

  • the existence of mints before the arrival of the Romans.

  • The Romans at first imported their coins, and no Roman mints were established until about the end of the 3rd century, when coins were being struck at London and Colchester.

  • 4 In Anglo-Saxon times Athelstan appears to have been the first monarch who enacted regulations for the mints.'

  • The necessity for so many mints lay in the imperfect means of communication.

  • 1 000, the dies were made in London and issued to the other mints.

  • There is a reference to it dated 1229 and a clear reference dated 1329.9 According to Ruding, there were over fifty mints in the reign of Edward the Confessor.

  • After the Norman Conquest the mints increased to about seventy, a greater number than now exists in the world, but they were gradually reduced and in the reign of Edward I.

  • Ruding enumerates 128 mints operated at various times in the United Kingdom, including some established by usurpation, as in the reign of Stephen by certain barons, and also mints established by grants to ecclesiastics to be worked for their own profit.

  • The provincial mints were all closed just before the reign of Mary, who coined in London only.

  • set up small mints in various towns, and for the great re-coinage in the reign of William III.

  • mints were established at York, Chester, Exeter, Bristol and Norwich, but were soon abandoned.

  • 1 Coinage in Dublin began in AngloSaxon times and came to an end in the reign of William III.2 The other Irish mints were of little importance.

  • Turning to mints in British Dominions beyond the Seas, Ruding enumerates twenty-six mints in France and Flanders used by British monarchs between 1186 and 1513, and Anglo-Hanoverian coins were struck at Clausthal, Zellerfeld and Hanover in the period 1714-1837.

  • The Calcutta mint was established by the East India Company in 1757, but other mints in Bengal continued to be used till about 1835, when the Calcutta mint was rebuilt.

  • The Calcutta and Bombay mints are still in operation.

  • In Australia there are three mints, Sydney, opened in 1855, Melbourne, opened in 1872, and Perth, opened in 1899.

  • Other mints are now in operation at New Orleans, San Francisco and Denver.

  • In most European countries a single mint situated at the capital is found to be sufficient, but there are six mints in the German Empire and two in Austria-Hungary.

  • In China 26 mints were at work in 1906.

  • There are also mints at Osaka, Bangkok and Teheran, and the Seoul mint was at work in 1904.

  • In Mexico 11 mints formerly existed, but one only, in the city of Mexico, remained open in 1907.

  • In South America there are mints at Lima, Santiago, Buenos Ayres and Tegucigalpa.

  • No mints are in operation in Africa.

  • In all there are nearly 70 mints in the world.

  • In European mints generally little difficulty is experienced in procuring refined gold and silver for coinage.

  • In Australia, the United States, Japan and some other countries, the Mints receive unrefined gold from the mines and refine it before it is coined.

  • (4) Adjusting the weight of the blanks (this is omitted in some mints).

  • (6) Annealing the blanks and (in some mints) cleaning them in acid.

  • In some other mints still larger crucibles are used, containing various amounts up to about moo kilograms or over 30,000 oz.

  • In foreign mints the molten metal is generally transferred from the crucible to the moulds by dipping crucibles or iron ladles covered with clay.

  • In many mints the flues pass into condensing chambers where volatilized gold and silver are recovered.

  • In some mints the fillets are annealed frequently, the fillets for one-mark pieces at the Berlin mint, for example, being annealed four times in the course of rolling.

  • On the other hand, in the United States mints, the use of very carefully refined metal has made it possible to discontinue the annealing of partly rolled bars.

  • In some mints the drag-bench or draw-bench is used after the rolls to equalize the thickness of the fillets.

  • In marking machines in some foreign mints the groove is in the periphery of the revolving wheel, and the grooved block is curved (fig.

  • A similar method was formerly used for gold coins in England and is still employed in some mints.

  • In 1851 these balances, improved by Richard Pitcher, were introduced at the Royal Mint, and modifications of them are now used at most foreign mints.

  • In most foreign mints the blanks are weighed by the automatic balances before being struck, and those which are too heavy are reduced by filing or planing.

  • This system was introduced into the Indian mints in 1873.

  • Coins from the London and Australian mints are examined.

  • Coins of foreign mints are generally submitted to examination by a committee of eminent chemists and metallurgists whose report is published in the official journals.

  • Byelyashevsky, The Mints of Kiev.

  • The quality of these coins (weighing about 81 grains troy) was low, and at last deteriorated so much that the Tibetans deserted the Nepal mints.

  • The coinage takes place in the six mints belonging to the various states thus Berlin (Prussia), Munich (Bavaria), Dresden (in the Muldenerhtte near Freibcrg, Saxony), Stuttgart (WUrttemberg), Karlsruhe (Baden) and Hamburg (for the state of Hamburg).

  • By it private war was declared unlawful, except in cases where justice could not be obtained; a chief justiciar was appointed for the Empire; all tolls and mints erected since the death of Henry VI.

  • In 1893 the Indian mints were closed to the free coinage of silver, and in 1899 the British sovereign was made legal tender at the rate of 1 s.

  • Accordingly in June 1893 an act was passed closing the Indian mints to the free coinage of silver.

  • These include fragments of custumals, records of the military service due, of markets, mints, and so forth.

  • An ounce of dust in 1848 frequently went for $4 instead of $17; for a number of years traders in dust were sure of a margin of several dollars, as for example in private coinage, mints for which were common by 1851.

  • The National Democratic Convention declared for the immediate opening of the mints to the free and unlimited coinage of silver at the ratio with gold of 16 to 1; and it nominated for the presidency William Jennings Bryan of Nebraska, who also received the nomination of the People's party and of the National Silver party.

  • Silver-mining ceased to be highly remunerative beginning with the closing of the India mints and repeal of the Sherman Law in 1893; since 1900 the yield has shown an extraordinary decrease - in 1905 it was $6,945,581, and in 1907 $7,411,652 - and it is said that as a result of the great fall in the market value of the metal the mines can now be operated only under the most favourable conditions and by exercise of extreme economy.

  • A later series of shekels, belonging to the Roman period, are tetradrachms, "which came from the mints of Caesarea and Antioch and were used as blanks on which to impress Jewish types."

  • A flourishing commerce, however, soon grew up in the Scandinavian towns; mints were established, and many foreign traders - Flemings, Italians and others - settled there.

  • Several mints had been established since Richard of York's time; the standards varied and imitation was easy.

  • All jurisdiction over their lands was vested in them, no new mints or toll-centres were to be erected on their domains, and the imperial authority was restricted to a small and dwindling area.

  • Suitable herbs for use this way include; many of the mints and scented geraniums.

  • I joined with my team mates and worked until after 8. We did n't even get any mints for our efforts.

  • I had a perfectly innocent relationship with a steady old workhorse called Nudge, who sucked his mints rather than crunching them.

  • Brownies, cookies, chocolate-covered nuts, and mints are just some of the desserts that are typically served at baby showers.

  • While the traditional shower might offer cake, cookies, punch, tea, and mints, creative planners often steer away from the norm.

  • This line of cards - called the WOW! cards - include gift cards on the cover of a box of mints as well as a gift card attached to a nightlight.

  • Mints make excellent flavorings, and teas and tisanes brewed from mint calm upset stomachs, flatulence and any discomfort in the digestive system.

  • A handy tote is good for holding wedding day necessities like bottles of water, mints and sunblock.

  • Small boxes of mints are a sweet token from the couple that was "Mint to be" together.

  • With candy wedding favors, you have many options, from traditional butter mints to contemporary confectionary artistry.

  • You might want candy with personalized wrappers, such as full size or mini chocolate bars, packages of Lifesavers, chocolate Kisses, chocolate coins, Smarties, wrapped mints, and more.

  • Chocolate, conversation hearts, mints, lollipops, and even M&M's can be customized as a favor for your special day.

  • Something as inexpensive as a couple of Andes' mints wrapped in tulle with a pretty ribbon is perfectly acceptable and may cost less than a quarter per person.

  • Mints, wedding truffles, or chocolate covered strawberries make tasty additions to an edible centerpiece.

  • After the ceremony, serve wedding cake, punch, and mints to everyone.

  • Personalized ornaments, decorated cookies, mints, candy canes, and cocoas are popular winter wedding favors.

  • Instead of mints, place bowls of brightly colored pumpkin shaped candies on the tables for guests to snack on during the reception.

  • Tasty Favors: Give your guests a gift they'll really appreciate with candies, chocolates, or mints in a beautiful printed box, tied with ribbon.

  • Breath-Eze®: I like these mints and give them to my dogs all the time.

  • Excellent varieties to try are chamomile or any of the mints.

  • Patients should also avoid fatty foods, caffeine, mints and mint-flavoring, spicy foods, citrus fruits, and anything with tomatoes.

  • Favors to emphasize the sweetness of the couple's love, including candies, chocolate kisses or hearts, cookies, mints, or other treats.

  • Clutches, small, and mini bags are often best -- you can toss in your theater tickets, some breath mints, and lip gloss in an evening bag rather than lugging a clunky bag around while wearing a sophisticated evening dress.

  • Have your child glue the photo to the middle of the cardboard and then glue red and white candy mints around the edges to create a frame.

  • These typically feature specific slots for specific dates and even particular mints.

  • Sugar-free gum and mints are allowed, but no more than five pieces per day.

  • You can include balloons, makeup, mini-sized alcohol bottles, mints, popcorn, a camera, or anything else you feel fits your theme.

  • For instance, The Rosemary Company sells "hoppy" retirement frog tape measures and "Happy Retirement" mints.

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