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minstrel

minstrel

minstrel Sentence Examples

  • 2 Elster (Beitrage) says that the poem is the work of two poets: the first part by a Thuringian wandering minstrel, the second - which differs in style and dialect - by a Bavarian official.

  • The celebrated expression certaminis gaudia assuredly came at first neither from the suave minister Cassiodorus nor from the small-souled notary Jordanes, but is the translation of some thought which first found utterance through the lips of a Gothic minstrel.

  • 1552) distinguished himself at the battle of Pinkie (1547), and furnished material for his later namesake's famous poem, The Lay of the Last Minstrel; and his great-grandson Sir Walter (1565-1611) was created Lord Scott of Buccleuch in 1606.

  • HARRY THE MINSTREL, or Blind Harry (fl.

  • On the other hand, there are elements in the poem which show that it is not entirely the work of a poor crowder; and these (notably references to historical and literary authorities, and occasional reminiscences of the literary tricks of the Scots Chaucerian school) have inclined some to the view that the text, as we have it, is an edited version of the minstrel's rough song story.

  • He is said to have been the king's minstrel, and to have spoilt the earlier part of his life in frivolity.

  • It is certainly not impossible that a Christian Saxon, sufficiently educated to read Latin easily, may have chosen to follow the calling of a stop or minstrel instead of entering the priesthood or the cloister; and if such a person existed, it would be natural that he should be selected by the emperor to execute his design.

  • The next step in the development of epic narrative was the single lay of an episodic character, sung by a single individual, who was frequently a member of a distinguished family, not merely a professional minstrel.

  • The character of Constantine in many respects resembles that of Alexius Comnenus; the slaying of a tame lion by one of the gigantic followers of Rother is founded on an incident which actually took place at the court of Alexius during the crusade of i ioi under duke Well of Bavaria, when King Rother was composed about 1160 by a Rhenish minstrel.

  • This is the foundation for the tale of his discovery by the faithful minstrel Blondel, which first occurs in a French romantic chronicle of the next century.

  • A detailed narrative of Richard's crusade is given in L'Estoire de la guerre sainte, a rhyming French chronicle by the minstrel Ambroise (ed.

  • He loved music himself, and justified this profane pleasure by the example of Bishop Grosseteste, who lodged his harper in the chamber next his own; but he holds up as a warning to gleemen the fate of the minstrel who sang loud while the bishop said grace, and was miserably killed by a falling stone in consequence.

  • He figures in the works of Barbour and Harry the Minstrel as the sympathizing contemporary of their heroes, and Walter Bower, who continued the Scotichronicon of Fordun, tells how he prophesied the death of Alexander III.

  • There he gives himself out for a minstrel, Tantris, and as such is tended and healed by Queen Iseult and her daughter of the same name.

  • Suspecting that the seneschal is not really the slayer of the dragon, mother and daughter go secretly to the scene of the combat, find Tristan, whom they recognize as the minstrel, Tantris, and bring him back to the palace.

  • The "Gerbert" continuation of the Perceval contains the working over of one of two short Tristan poems, called by him the Luite Tristran; the latter part, probably a distinct poem, shows Tristan, in the disguise of a minstrel, visiting the court of Mark.

  • That authority cannot be implicitly relied on, though we need not conclude that the minstrel invented the stories he relates.

  • As Blair's account has perished, we cannot tell how far the minstrel has faithfully followed his authority, but some comparatively recent discoveries have confirmed the truth of portions of the narrative which had previously been doubted.

  • It is immortalized in the Nibelungenlied in the person of "Volker von Alzeie," the warrior who in the last part of the epic plays a part second only to that of Hagen, and who "was called the minstrel (spilman) because he could fiddle."

  • Sir Walter Scott has immortalized the east window, in The Lay of the Last Minstrel, but the south window with its flowing tracery is even finer.

  • Independent of this group of alliterative romances is the not less important body of historical verse associated with the names of John Barbour, Andrew of Wyntoun, and, in the middle period, Harry the Minstrel.

  • The non-Chaucerian verse of this period is represented by (a) alliterative romance-poems and (b) verse of a rustic, domestic and " popular " character Of the historical romance-poem there is little or nothing beyond Henry the Minstrel's Wallace (supra).

  • The sailors, desirous of hearing so famous a musician, consented, and the poet, standing on the deck of the ship, in full minstrel's attire, sang a dirge accompanied by his lyre.

  • The minstrel of early Germanic times was required to be learned not only in the traditions of his own people, but also in those of the other peoples with whom they felt their kinship. He had a double task to perform.

  • We cannot determine the date at which some book-learned man, interested in poetry, took down from the lips of a minstrel one of the stories that he had been accustomed to sing.

  • The blind minstrel was the counterpart of the noble savage.

  • One mile beyond it, occupying a commanding site on the left bank of the Teviot, stands Branxholm Castle, the Branksome Hall of The Lay of the Last Minstrel, once owned by the Lovels, but since the middle of the 15th century the property of the Scotts of Buccleuch, and up to 1756 the chief seat of the duke.

  • The Haverhill homestead, memorized in Snow-Bound, is also held by trustees " to preserve the natural features of the landscape," and to keep the buildings and furniture somewhat as they were in their minstrel's boyhood.

  • The body or barrel should be moderately deep, long and straight, the length being really in the shoulders and in the quarters; the back should be strong Waxy* (1790) Penelope (1798) the shoulders and and muscular, with Wanderer (r790) loins running well Thalestris (1809) in at each end; Chanticleer (1787) Ierne (1790) the loins themEscape (1802) Young Heroine selves should have Waxy* (,790) great breadth and Penelope (1798) Octavian (1807) substance, this Caprice (1797) Whitelock (1803) being a vital neces Coriander mare (1799) sity for weightOrville: (1709) Minstrel (1803) carrying and pro Buzzard (1787) pelling power Alexander mare (1790) Williamson's Ditto (1800) uphill.

  • He is the type of the medieval knightly minstrel of the age of the Minnesang.

  • The poem was first written down by a wandering minstrel about 971 to 991, was remodelled about 1140 by Konrad,' who introduced interpolations in the spirit of chivalry and was perhaps responsible for the metre; during the wars and miseries of the next fifty years manners and taste became barbarized and the fine traditions of the old popular poetry were obscured, and it was under this influence that, about 1190, a jongleur (Spielmann) revised the poem, this recension being represented by group B.

  • On Boxing day and New Year's Day, an old tradition is to don blackface and parade through the town singing minstrel songs.

  • blackface minstrel entertainment, containing dialog and sketches.

  • It features a richly carved oak rood screen and a minstrel's gallery above.

  • Singing Sam was a wandering minstrel who lived about 250 years ago.

  • In a nutshell - " a traveling minstrel with a down to earth message " .

  • It was not long until the dogs uncovered the minstrel on the banks of the Tyne and tore him to pieces.

  • minstrel on the banks of the Tyne and tore him to pieces.

  • Performs wherever people will listen to him: " Like a wandering medieval minstrel, he's bringing his art to the people.

  • The Lay of the last minstrel First Edition, First Impression: The Lay of the Last Minstrel: A Poem.

  • Role Types: white, Mediterranean, Goth, black and white minstrel.

  • The U.M. next meets up with the spirit of the blind minstrel, Ayreon.

  • He is a modern minstrel with gentle wit, sensitive vocals, and wicked guitar skills.

  • minstrel galleries.

  • minstrel show is thought to have taken place in Boston, in 1843.

  • minstrel songs.

  • minstrel boy " followed.

  • minstrel's gallery.

  • 2 Elster (Beitrage) says that the poem is the work of two poets: the first part by a Thuringian wandering minstrel, the second - which differs in style and dialect - by a Bavarian official.

  • The celebrated expression certaminis gaudia assuredly came at first neither from the suave minister Cassiodorus nor from the small-souled notary Jordanes, but is the translation of some thought which first found utterance through the lips of a Gothic minstrel.

  • 1552) distinguished himself at the battle of Pinkie (1547), and furnished material for his later namesake's famous poem, The Lay of the Last Minstrel; and his great-grandson Sir Walter (1565-1611) was created Lord Scott of Buccleuch in 1606.

  • HARRY THE MINSTREL, or Blind Harry (fl.

  • On the other hand, there are elements in the poem which show that it is not entirely the work of a poor crowder; and these (notably references to historical and literary authorities, and occasional reminiscences of the literary tricks of the Scots Chaucerian school) have inclined some to the view that the text, as we have it, is an edited version of the minstrel's rough song story.

  • He is said to have been the king's minstrel, and to have spoilt the earlier part of his life in frivolity.

  • It is certainly not impossible that a Christian Saxon, sufficiently educated to read Latin easily, may have chosen to follow the calling of a stop or minstrel instead of entering the priesthood or the cloister; and if such a person existed, it would be natural that he should be selected by the emperor to execute his design.

  • The next step in the development of epic narrative was the single lay of an episodic character, sung by a single individual, who was frequently a member of a distinguished family, not merely a professional minstrel.

  • The character of Constantine in many respects resembles that of Alexius Comnenus; the slaying of a tame lion by one of the gigantic followers of Rother is founded on an incident which actually took place at the court of Alexius during the crusade of i ioi under duke Well of Bavaria, when King Rother was composed about 1160 by a Rhenish minstrel.

  • This is the foundation for the tale of his discovery by the faithful minstrel Blondel, which first occurs in a French romantic chronicle of the next century.

  • A detailed narrative of Richard's crusade is given in L'Estoire de la guerre sainte, a rhyming French chronicle by the minstrel Ambroise (ed.

  • He loved music himself, and justified this profane pleasure by the example of Bishop Grosseteste, who lodged his harper in the chamber next his own; but he holds up as a warning to gleemen the fate of the minstrel who sang loud while the bishop said grace, and was miserably killed by a falling stone in consequence.

  • He figures in the works of Barbour and Harry the Minstrel as the sympathizing contemporary of their heroes, and Walter Bower, who continued the Scotichronicon of Fordun, tells how he prophesied the death of Alexander III.

  • There he gives himself out for a minstrel, Tantris, and as such is tended and healed by Queen Iseult and her daughter of the same name.

  • Suspecting that the seneschal is not really the slayer of the dragon, mother and daughter go secretly to the scene of the combat, find Tristan, whom they recognize as the minstrel, Tantris, and bring him back to the palace.

  • The "Gerbert" continuation of the Perceval contains the working over of one of two short Tristan poems, called by him the Luite Tristran; the latter part, probably a distinct poem, shows Tristan, in the disguise of a minstrel, visiting the court of Mark.

  • The following is a partial list of his writings: The Diverting History of John Bull and Brother Jonathan (1812); The Lay of the Scottish Fiddle (1813), a good-natured parody on The Lay of the Last Minstrel; Letters from the South (1817); The Backwoodsman: a Poem (1818); Salmagundi (2nd series, 1819-1820); A Sketch of Old England, by a New England Man (1822); Koningsmarke, the Long Finne (1823), a quiz on the romantic school of Walter Scott; John Bull in America; or the New Munchausen (1824), a broad caricature of the early type of British traveller in America; The Merry Tales of the Three Wise Men of Gotham (1826); Chronicles of the City of Gotham, from the Papers of a Retired Common Councilman (183 0); The Dutchman's Fireside (1831); Westward Ho!

  • That authority cannot be implicitly relied on, though we need not conclude that the minstrel invented the stories he relates.

  • As Blair's account has perished, we cannot tell how far the minstrel has faithfully followed his authority, but some comparatively recent discoveries have confirmed the truth of portions of the narrative which had previously been doubted.

  • It is immortalized in the Nibelungenlied in the person of "Volker von Alzeie," the warrior who in the last part of the epic plays a part second only to that of Hagen, and who "was called the minstrel (spilman) because he could fiddle."

  • Sir Walter Scott has immortalized the east window, in The Lay of the Last Minstrel, but the south window with its flowing tracery is even finer.

  • Independent of this group of alliterative romances is the not less important body of historical verse associated with the names of John Barbour, Andrew of Wyntoun, and, in the middle period, Harry the Minstrel.

  • The non-Chaucerian verse of this period is represented by (a) alliterative romance-poems and (b) verse of a rustic, domestic and " popular " character Of the historical romance-poem there is little or nothing beyond Henry the Minstrel's Wallace (supra).

  • The sailors, desirous of hearing so famous a musician, consented, and the poet, standing on the deck of the ship, in full minstrel's attire, sang a dirge accompanied by his lyre.

  • The minstrel of early Germanic times was required to be learned not only in the traditions of his own people, but also in those of the other peoples with whom they felt their kinship. He had a double task to perform.

  • We cannot determine the date at which some book-learned man, interested in poetry, took down from the lips of a minstrel one of the stories that he had been accustomed to sing.

  • The blind minstrel was the counterpart of the noble savage.

  • It is mentioned Sir Walter Scott in " The Lay of the Last Minstrel " " For he was speechless, ghastly, wan Like him of whom the story ran Who spoke the spectre hound in Man."

  • One mile beyond it, occupying a commanding site on the left bank of the Teviot, stands Branxholm Castle, the Branksome Hall of The Lay of the Last Minstrel, once owned by the Lovels, but since the middle of the 15th century the property of the Scotts of Buccleuch, and up to 1756 the chief seat of the duke.

  • The Haverhill homestead, memorized in Snow-Bound, is also held by trustees " to preserve the natural features of the landscape," and to keep the buildings and furniture somewhat as they were in their minstrel's boyhood.

  • The body or barrel should be moderately deep, long and straight, the length being really in the shoulders and in the quarters; the back should be strong Waxy* (1790) Penelope (1798) the shoulders and and muscular, with Wanderer (r790) loins running well Thalestris (1809) in at each end; Chanticleer (1787) Ierne (1790) the loins themEscape (1802) Young Heroine selves should have Waxy* (,790) great breadth and Penelope (1798) Octavian (1807) substance, this Caprice (1797) Whitelock (1803) being a vital neces Coriander mare (1799) sity for weightOrville: (1709) Minstrel (1803) carrying and pro Buzzard (1787) pelling power Alexander mare (1790) Williamson's Ditto (1800) uphill.

  • He is the type of the medieval knightly minstrel of the age of the Minnesang.

  • The poem was first written down by a wandering minstrel about 971 to 991, was remodelled about 1140 by Konrad,' who introduced interpolations in the spirit of chivalry and was perhaps responsible for the metre; during the wars and miseries of the next fifty years manners and taste became barbarized and the fine traditions of the old popular poetry were obscured, and it was under this influence that, about 1190, a jongleur (Spielmann) revised the poem, this recension being represented by group B.

  • In the film, Glover plays one of the performers in a satiric blackface minstrel show and even enjoys an on-screen relationship with Jada Pinkett Smith.

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