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ministrations

ministrations Sentence Examples

  • One member of Mountain Rescue grabbed him under the arms while another unfastened his line, but he shook off their ministrations while he tried to focus on the activity going on around him.

  • The pain surprised her after Lankha's gentle ministrations.

  • Sometimes from curiosity he went to the ministrations of anabaptists, 2 to hear the preaching of peasants and artisans.

  • He wears all these vestments only at the celebration of the eucharist and on other very solemn occasions; at other ministrations he wears only the epitrachelion and phainolion over his cassock.

  • The United Free Church claims no buildings of much historic interest, but St George's Free was the scene of the ministrations of Dr Robert S.

  • St John's Episcopal church at the west end of Princes Street was the scene of the ministrations of Dean Ramsay, and St Paul's Episcopal church of the Rev. Archibald Alison, father of the historian.

  • and determined that no other should be bishop. The consecration took place at Lambeth on the 25th of January 1685; and one of Ken's first duties was to attend the death-bed of Charles, where his wise and faithful ministrations won the admiration of everybody except Bishop Burnet.

  • Among other laws Bonaparte enacted that French should at once be the official language, that 30 young men should every year be sent to France for their education; that all foreign monks be expelled, that no new priests be ordained before employment could be found for those existing; that ecclesiastical jurisdiction should cease; that neither the bishop nor the priests could charge fees for sacramental ministrations, &c. Stoppage of trade, absence of work (in a population of which more than half had been living on foreign revenues of the knights), and famine, followed the defeat of Bonaparte at the Nile, and the failure of his plans to make Malta a centre of French trade.

  • From this followed again the conclusion that obedience was not due to an unworthy priest, and that his ministrations were invalid.

  • The Waldenses withdrew altogether from the ministrations of the church, and chose ministers for themselves whose merits were recognized by the body of the faithful.

  • Already, in St Francis's lifetime, his friars had grown into an order dedicated to spiritual ministrations among the poor, the sick, the ignorant, the outcasts of the great cities; while by the very conception of their institute the Dominicans were dedicated to the special work of preaching, especially to heretics and heathens.

  • Men refused to attend their ministrations; in some cases they were subjected to what was afterwards called boycotting.

  • The state of the female side had already attracted the attention of that devoted woman, Mrs Fry, whose ministrations and wonderful success no doubt encouraged, if they did not bring about, the formation of the Prison Society.

  • Following Aristotle in this order - sense, memory, intellect - he resolved the whole process of induction into three ministrations: r.

  • Bacon, like Aristotle, was anticipated in this or that point; but, as Aristotle was the first to construct a system of deduction in the syllogism and its three figures, so Bacon was the first to construct a system of induction in three ministrations, in which the requisites of induction, hitherto recognized only in sporadic hints, were combined for the first time in one logic of induction.

  • He celebrates marriages in accordance with the provisions of the Foreign Marriage Act 1892, and, where the ministrations of a clergyman cannot be obtained, reads the burial service.

  • In law every subject of the state is also a member of the Established Church, and can lay claim to its ministrations so long as he or she obeys the ecclesiastical law, which is also the law of the state.

  • But as the friars soon came nearly all to be priests devoted to spiritual ministrations, and the communities grew larger, it became increasingly difficult for them to support themselves by personal work; and so the begging came to play a greater role than had been contemplated by St Francis.

  • But, as he refused to limit his ministrations to one sect, the Seceders and he parted company, and without their countenance he made a tour through the principal towns of Scotland, the authorities of which in most instances presented him with the freedom of the burgh, in token of their estimate of the benefits to the community resulting from his preaching.

  • When Louis tried to leave the Tuileries for St Cloud at Easter 1791, in order to enjoy the ministrations of a nonjuring priest, the National Guards of Paris would not let him budge.

  • Their churches are non -parochial, and they can perform such rites as baptisms, marriages, &c., only by permission of the parish priest, who is entitled to receive all fees due in respect of these ministrations.

  • One member of Mountain Rescue grabbed him under the arms while another unfastened his line, but he shook off their ministrations while he tried to focus on the activity going on around him.

  • The pain surprised her after Lankha's gentle ministrations.

  • I perform the duties of the house as if it is our home and I am awaiting the tread of my darling's foot upon the stair as he returns from his ministrations to the arms of his dutiful wife.

  • kind ministrations at this sad time.

  • ministrations of a local priest, Paganini died on 27 May 1840.

  • Those who suffer the ministrations of aliens apparently feel helpless at the aliens ' approach.

  • Who among us does not miss the gentle ministrations, the softening influences, the humble piety of Lucretia Borgia?

  • We would like to thank Canon Philip Dearden for his prayers and comforting ministrations during our father's illness and on his final journey.

  • Those who remained loyal to the papacy had to depend for spiritual ministrations upon priests who were educated abroad.

  • But even the gentle ministrations of the deep can become wearing after a time, and all I hear now is a death rattle.

  • Could it be that this item was already consigned to the tender ministrations of David Maclean in Mr Farrall's mind?

  • I wish I were out! His Sabbath ministrations, thus begun, very soon told upon the people.

  • But the lesson is prodigiously enhanced when we pass from the pulpit to his household ministrations.

  • Sometimes from curiosity he went to the ministrations of anabaptists, 2 to hear the preaching of peasants and artisans.

  • In 1862 the synod of the Popovshchina passed a circular letter making advances to the government with a view to a compromise, which was arranged on the basis of the Old Believers consenting to accept the ministrations of Orthodox priests on condition that they should use the unrevised books.

  • He wears all these vestments only at the celebration of the eucharist and on other very solemn occasions; at other ministrations he wears only the epitrachelion and phainolion over his cassock.

  • The United Free Church claims no buildings of much historic interest, but St George's Free was the scene of the ministrations of Dr Robert S.

  • St John's Episcopal church at the west end of Princes Street was the scene of the ministrations of Dean Ramsay, and St Paul's Episcopal church of the Rev. Archibald Alison, father of the historian.

  • and determined that no other should be bishop. The consecration took place at Lambeth on the 25th of January 1685; and one of Ken's first duties was to attend the death-bed of Charles, where his wise and faithful ministrations won the admiration of everybody except Bishop Burnet.

  • Among other laws Bonaparte enacted that French should at once be the official language, that 30 young men should every year be sent to France for their education; that all foreign monks be expelled, that no new priests be ordained before employment could be found for those existing; that ecclesiastical jurisdiction should cease; that neither the bishop nor the priests could charge fees for sacramental ministrations, &c. Stoppage of trade, absence of work (in a population of which more than half had been living on foreign revenues of the knights), and famine, followed the defeat of Bonaparte at the Nile, and the failure of his plans to make Malta a centre of French trade.

  • From this followed again the conclusion that obedience was not due to an unworthy priest, and that his ministrations were invalid.

  • The Waldenses withdrew altogether from the ministrations of the church, and chose ministers for themselves whose merits were recognized by the body of the faithful.

  • These letters were issued in compliance with the second recommendation (1906) of the Royal Commission on Ecclesiastical Discipline, viz.: that " Letters of business should be issued to the Convocations with instructions: (a) to consider the preparation of a new rubric regulating the ornaments (that is to say, the vesture) of the ministers of the church, at the times of their ministrations, with a view to its enactment by parliament; and (b) to frame, with a view to their enactment of parliament, such modifications in the existing law relating to the conduct of Divine Service, and to the ornaments and fittings of churches as may tend to secure the greater elasticity which a reasonable recognition of the comprehensiveness of the Church of England and of its present needs seems to demand."

  • Already, in St Francis's lifetime, his friars had grown into an order dedicated to spiritual ministrations among the poor, the sick, the ignorant, the outcasts of the great cities; while by the very conception of their institute the Dominicans were dedicated to the special work of preaching, especially to heretics and heathens.

  • Men refused to attend their ministrations; in some cases they were subjected to what was afterwards called boycotting.

  • The state of the female side had already attracted the attention of that devoted woman, Mrs Fry, whose ministrations and wonderful success no doubt encouraged, if they did not bring about, the formation of the Prison Society.

  • Following Aristotle in this order - sense, memory, intellect - he resolved the whole process of induction into three ministrations: r.

  • Bacon, like Aristotle, was anticipated in this or that point; but, as Aristotle was the first to construct a system of deduction in the syllogism and its three figures, so Bacon was the first to construct a system of induction in three ministrations, in which the requisites of induction, hitherto recognized only in sporadic hints, were combined for the first time in one logic of induction.

  • He celebrates marriages in accordance with the provisions of the Foreign Marriage Act 1892, and, where the ministrations of a clergyman cannot be obtained, reads the burial service.

  • In law every subject of the state is also a member of the Established Church, and can lay claim to its ministrations so long as he or she obeys the ecclesiastical law, which is also the law of the state.

  • But as the friars soon came nearly all to be priests devoted to spiritual ministrations, and the communities grew larger, it became increasingly difficult for them to support themselves by personal work; and so the begging came to play a greater role than had been contemplated by St Francis.

  • But, as he refused to limit his ministrations to one sect, the Seceders and he parted company, and without their countenance he made a tour through the principal towns of Scotland, the authorities of which in most instances presented him with the freedom of the burgh, in token of their estimate of the benefits to the community resulting from his preaching.

  • In the first place, owing to the general disuse of such ministrations, there were none among the English clergy who had experience in delicate questions of conscience; and there had been no treatment of casuistry since Sanderson and Jeremy Taylor (see Casuistry).

  • When Louis tried to leave the Tuileries for St Cloud at Easter 1791, in order to enjoy the ministrations of a nonjuring priest, the National Guards of Paris would not let him budge.

  • Their churches are non -parochial, and they can perform such rites as baptisms, marriages, &c., only by permission of the parish priest, who is entitled to receive all fees due in respect of these ministrations.

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