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ministration

ministration

ministration Sentence Examples

  • Under La Marmoras ad- be ~rznora ministration the September convention was ratified, de:

  • Ecclesiastical vestments, with which the present article is solely concerned, are the special articles of costume worn by the officers of the Christian Church "at all times of their ministration" - to quote the Ornaments Rubric of the English Book of Common Prayer, i.e.

  • It runs: "And here it is to be noted that such ornaments of the church and of the ministers thereof at all times of their ministration shall be retained and be in use, as was in the Church of England by the authority of parliament in the second year of the reign of King Edward VI."

  • the minister at the time of the Communion, and at all other times in his ministration, shall use, &c....

  • The result was the issue in 1566 by the archbishop of the statutory Advertisements, which fixed the vestments of the clergy as follows: (1) In the ministration of the Holy Communion in cathedral and collegiate churches, the principal minister to wear a cope, with gospeller and epistoler agreeably; 6 at all other prayers to be said at the Communion table, to use no copes but surplices; (2) the dean and prebendaries to wear surplice and hood; (3) every minister saying public prayers, or ministering the sacraments, to wear "a comely surplice with sleeves."

  • The parish church, effectively situated on an eminence by the side of the lake, was the scene of the ministration of the Rev. John Thomson (1778-1840), the landscape painter, who numbered Sir Walter Scott among his elders.

  • But readers and exorcists claim 3 " Fixed attention " on the deacon's ministration, the ministration itself being much more ancient.

  • - In the English Church the rochet is a vestment peculiar to bishops, and is worn by them, with the chimere both "at all times of their ministration" in church and also on ceremonial occasions outside, e.g.

  • Vestments are worn only at the ministration of the sacraments; incense is used invariably at the Eucharist and frequently at other services.

  • Appoint therefore unto yourselves bishops and deacons, worthy of the Lord, men meek and uncovetous, and true and approved; for they also minister unto you the ministration of the prophets and teachers.

  • - The surplice was prescribed by the second Prayer-Book of Edward VI., as, with the tippet or the academical hood, the sole vestment of the minister of the church at "all times of their ministration," the rochet being practically regarded as the episcopal surplice.

  • The ministration to sense, aided by observation and experiment.

  • The ministration to memory, aided by registering and arranging the data, of observation and experiment in tables of instances of agreement, difference and concomitant variations.

  • The ministration to intellect or reason, aided by the negative elimination by means of contradictory instances of whatever in the instances is not always present, absent and varying with the given subject investigated, and finally by the positive inference that whatever in the instances is always present, absent and varying with the subject is its essential cause.

  • s The senses and the memory, which collect and store up facts, must be assisted; there must be a ministration of the senses and another of the memory.

  • This process, which forms the essence of the new method, may in its entirety, as a ministration to the reason, be called a logic; but it differs widely from the ordinary or school logic in end, method and form.

  • The most prominent statesman in the new Conservative-Junimist ad- - ministration was P. Carp, who in the spring of 1889 succeeded in passing a bill which authorized the distribution of state lands among the peasantry.

  • Colbert (1773); Essai sur la legislation et le commerce des grains (1775); Compte rendu au roi (1781); De l'ad ' ministration des finances de la France (3 vols., 1784); Memoire en reponse au discours prononce par M.

  • Parish, in English ecclesiastical law, may be defined as the township or cluster of townships which was assigned to the ministration of a single priest, to whom its tithes and other ecclesiastical dues were paid; but the word has now acquired several distinct meanings.

  • ministration of death?

  • ministration of the spirit: he works powerfully by it.

  • A ministration of grace you understand, but you don't perhaps understand a ministration of condemnation.

  • Let us practice the fine art of making every work a priestly ministration.

  • Under La Marmoras ad- be ~rznora ministration the September convention was ratified, de:

  • They reject the ministration of priests altogether, since in the time of Antichrist (i.e.

  • Ecclesiastical vestments, with which the present article is solely concerned, are the special articles of costume worn by the officers of the Christian Church "at all times of their ministration" - to quote the Ornaments Rubric of the English Book of Common Prayer, i.e.

  • It runs: "And here it is to be noted that such ornaments of the church and of the ministers thereof at all times of their ministration shall be retained and be in use, as was in the Church of England by the authority of parliament in the second year of the reign of King Edward VI."

  • the minister at the time of the Communion, and at all other times in his ministration, shall use, &c....

  • The result was the issue in 1566 by the archbishop of the statutory Advertisements, which fixed the vestments of the clergy as follows: (1) In the ministration of the Holy Communion in cathedral and collegiate churches, the principal minister to wear a cope, with gospeller and epistoler agreeably; 6 at all other prayers to be said at the Communion table, to use no copes but surplices; (2) the dean and prebendaries to wear surplice and hood; (3) every minister saying public prayers, or ministering the sacraments, to wear "a comely surplice with sleeves."

  • 4 Resolutions of 1561, " Item that there be used only but one apparel; as the cope in the ministration of the Lord's Supper."

  • The parish church, effectively situated on an eminence by the side of the lake, was the scene of the ministration of the Rev. John Thomson (1778-1840), the landscape painter, who numbered Sir Walter Scott among his elders.

  • But readers and exorcists claim 3 " Fixed attention " on the deacon's ministration, the ministration itself being much more ancient.

  • - In the English Church the rochet is a vestment peculiar to bishops, and is worn by them, with the chimere both "at all times of their ministration" in church and also on ceremonial occasions outside, e.g.

  • Vestments are worn only at the ministration of the sacraments; incense is used invariably at the Eucharist and frequently at other services.

  • Appoint therefore unto yourselves bishops and deacons, worthy of the Lord, men meek and uncovetous, and true and approved; for they also minister unto you the ministration of the prophets and teachers.

  • - The surplice was prescribed by the second Prayer-Book of Edward VI., as, with the tippet or the academical hood, the sole vestment of the minister of the church at "all times of their ministration," the rochet being practically regarded as the episcopal surplice.

  • The ministration to sense, aided by observation and experiment.

  • The ministration to memory, aided by registering and arranging the data, of observation and experiment in tables of instances of agreement, difference and concomitant variations.

  • The ministration to intellect or reason, aided by the negative elimination by means of contradictory instances of whatever in the instances is not always present, absent and varying with the given subject investigated, and finally by the positive inference that whatever in the instances is always present, absent and varying with the subject is its essential cause.

  • s The senses and the memory, which collect and store up facts, must be assisted; there must be a ministration of the senses and another of the memory.

  • This process, which forms the essence of the new method, may in its entirety, as a ministration to the reason, be called a logic; but it differs widely from the ordinary or school logic in end, method and form.

  • The most prominent statesman in the new Conservative-Junimist ad- - ministration was P. Carp, who in the spring of 1889 succeeded in passing a bill which authorized the distribution of state lands among the peasantry.

  • Colbert (1773); Essai sur la legislation et le commerce des grains (1775); Compte rendu au roi (1781); De l'ad ' ministration des finances de la France (3 vols., 1784); Memoire en reponse au discours prononce par M.

  • Parish, in English ecclesiastical law, may be defined as the township or cluster of townships which was assigned to the ministration of a single priest, to whom its tithes and other ecclesiastical dues were paid; but the word has now acquired several distinct meanings.

  • It succumbed to heat stroke on Monday and awaits ministration, and probably a new fan, in a dark corner of a room.

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