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mines

mines Sentence Examples

  • How often had she heard how dangerous abandoned mines were?

  • That's when I knew what everyone says about old mines being dangerous is true.

  • If they didn't own the ore mines, they'd be using rocks to fight.

  • My forefathers rigged the mines on the planet to explode.

  • The mines were rigged, and he'd never wanted to think he'd need to destroy his home in order to rid it of the blight affecting it.

  • "And the mines give us nothing we can use to barter for more food and water," his uncle added.

  • Long ago, his ancestors had rigged the planet to blow the mines and turn the atmosphere into a toxic mix no one would survive.

  • The mines will chain-detonate.

  • He destroyed the mines.

  • Romas rescued me from the cave before you blew up the mines.

  • I can't say if I knew the deceased but the Wanaka and all the mines send us so many of their workers I may have.

  • Parkside's economy was less than spectacular, but at least it didn't require dependency on the fickle business of mines, steel or man­ufacturing for its fiscal survival.

  • Extensive coal mines are in the vicinity, and there are manufactures of iron and steel, mill machinery, door and sash factories, etc., as well as several shipbuilding yards.

  • There is a manufacture of tape in the town, and lead-mining and stone-quarrying are carried on in the neighbourhood; relics of the Roman working of the lead mines have been discovered.

  • There are mines of silver, copper, lignite and salt, and many hot springs, including some of great repute medicinally.

  • He died on the 26th of February 1608, leaving a large fortune from lead mines discovered in the Mendip Hills.

  • It was a royal preserve, and remains for the most part an uncultivated waste, but it is also a rich coalfield, and there are mines in every direction.

  • Mines and Quarries.

  • Most of the mines are operated under " non-union " rules.

  • No female or male under twelve may be employed in mines, and no child under twelve may be employed in a factory, and when school is in session none under fourteen.

  • The first permanent settlements in Matto Grosso seem to have been made in 1718 and 1719, in the first year at Forquilha and in the second at or near the site of Cuyaba, where rich placer mines had been found.

  • Near the city are valuable coal mines, and there is one within the city limits.

  • The mines were known to the Carthaginians, as discoveries of lamps, coins, &c. (now in the museum at Cagliari), testify.

  • When the island passed to Savoy, in 1720, the mines passed to the state.

  • The government let the mines to contractors for forty years and then took them over; but in the period from 1720 to 1840 only 14,620 tons of galena were extracted and 2772 of lead.

  • In 1904-1905, 14,188 workmen were employed in the mines of the province of Cagliari.

  • There are besides in the island 10 gymnasia, 3 lycees, 6 technical and nautical schools and institutes (including a school of mines at Iglesias), and 9 other institutes for various branches of special education.

  • Between this and the "elliptical" kraal are the "Valley Ruins," consisting of smaller buildings which may have been the dwellings of those traders who bartered the gold brought in from distant mines.

  • Near the source of the Tigris, at Arghana-Ma'den, are copper mines.

  • The industries of the town include manufactures of cotton, silk, earthenware, machinery and tobacco, with brass and iron founding; while slate and stone are quarried, and there are coal, iron and lead mines in the neighbourhood.

  • Gold mines were worked in antiquity in the Drin valley, and silver mines in the Mirdite region were known to the Venetians in the middle ages.

  • The output is to-day relatively small in comparison with that of many other fields, but there are one or two permanent gold mines of great value working low-grade ore.

  • 26, Economic Resources of the Northern Black Hills, 1904), and of the South Dakota School of Mines (Bulletin No.

  • In 1582 Sir Archibald was appointed master of the mint in Scotland, with the sole charge of superintending the mines and minerals within the realm, and this office he held till his death in 1608.

  • The city throve on the freighting trade of the mines.

  • To meet the needs of technical and industrial education there are a school of mines at San Juan, a school of viticulture at Mendoza, an agronomic and veterinary school at La Plata, several agricultural and pastoral schools, and commercial schools in Buenos Aires, Rosario, Bahia Blanca and Concordia.

  • Coal.The principal mines of France are coal and iron mines.

  • the tax on property in mortmain, dues for the verification of weights and measures, the tax on royalties from mines, on horses, mules and carriages, on cycles, &c.

  • There are also directors of stores, of naval construction, of the medical service, and of the submarine defences (which are concerned with torpedoes, mines and torpedo-boats), as well as of naval ordnance and works, The prefect directs the operations of the arsenal, and is responsible for its efficiency and for that of the ships which are there in reserve.

  • Other schools are the school of naval medicine at Bordeaux with annexes at Toulon, Brest and Rochefort; schools of torpedoes and mines and of gunnery at Toulon, &c., &c. The coles dhydro graphic established at various ports are for theoretical training for the higher grades of the merchant service.

  • At Paris the cole Suprieure des Mines and the cole des Fonts et Chausses are controlled by the minister of public, works, the cole des Beaux-Arts, the cole des Arts Dcoratifs and the Conservatoire National de Musique et de Dclamation by the unr,ler-secretary for fine arts.

  • Here are the oldest and most celebrated copper mines in Europe.

  • The mines belong to the Kopparberg Mining Company (Stora Kopparbergs Bergslags Aktiebolag, formerly Kopparbergslagen).

  • The company also owns iron mines, limestone and quartz quarries, large iron-works at Domnarfvet and elsewhere, a great extent of forests and saw-mills, and besides the output of the copper mines it produces manufactured iron and steel, timber, wood-pulp, bricks and charcoal.

  • It was found in some abundance at the end of the 18th century in the copper mines of the St Day district in Cornwall, and has since been found at a few other localities, for example, at Konigsberg near Schemnitz in Hungary, and in the Tintic district in Utah.

  • The greatest development of quartz reefing is found in Victoria, some of the mines being of great depth.

  • There are eight mines in the Bendigo district over 3000 ft.

  • The leading silver mines are in New South Wales, the returns from the other states being comparatively insignificant.

  • At Broken Hill mines about 11,000 miners are employed.

  • The low quotations which ruled for a number Copper of years had a depressing effect upon the industry, and many mines once profitably worked were temporarily closed, but in 1906 there was a general revival.

  • The Wallaroo and Moonta mines, discovered in 1860 and 1861, proved to be even more valuable than the Burra Burra, the Moonta mines employing at one time upwards of 1600 hands.

  • The dividends paid by these mines amounted to about £1,750,000 sterling.

  • The more important mines are those of Cobar, where the Great Cobar mine produces annually nearly 4000 tons of refined copper.

  • The returns from the copper fields in the state are at present a little over half a million sterling per annum, and would be still greater if it were not for the lack of suitable fuel for smelting purposes, which renders the economical treatment of the ore difficult; the development of the mines is also retarded by the want of easy and cheaper communication with the coast.

  • The chief mines belong to the Mount Lyell Mining & Railway Co., and are situated on the west side of the island with an outlet by rail to Strahan on the west coast.

  • At many of the mines at Kalgoorlie, Western Australia, large quantities of ores of telluride of gold have been found in the lode formations.

  • The association of this metal with silver in the Broken Hill mines of New South Wales adds very greatly to the value of the product.

  • The mines, however, are situated too far from the coast to permit of serious competition with Newcastle in an export trade, and the output is practically restricted to supplying local requirements.

  • The first of these comprises chiefly the mines of the Hunter river districts; the second includes the Illawarra district, and, generally, the coastal regions to the south of Sydney, together with Berrima, on the tableland; and the third consists of the mountainous regions on the Great Western railway and extends as far as Dubbo.

  • The coal mines of New South Wales give employment to 14,000 persons, and the annual production is over 6,600,000 tons.

  • The finest opal known is obtained in the Upper Cretaceous formation at White Cliffs, near Wilcannia, New South Wales, and at these mines about 700 men find constant employment.

  • Victoria produced already more wool than New South Wales,the aggregate produce of Australia in 1852 being 45,000,000 lb; and South Australia, between 1842 and this date, had opened most valuable mines of copper.

  • The copper mines of South Australia were for the time deserted, while Tasmania and New Zealand lost many inhabitants, who emigrated to the more promising country.

  • The Chinese difficulty, so far as the mining population was concerned, was solved by the exhaustion of the extensive alluvial deposits; the miners' prejudice against the race, however, still exists, though they are no longer serious competitors, and the laws of some of the states forbid any Chinese to engage in mining without the express authority in writing of the minister of mines.

  • On the 6th of September the silver mines closed down, and a week later a conference of employers issued a manifesto which was met next day by a counter-manifesto of the Intercolonial Labour Conference, and almost immediately afterwards by the calling out of 40,000 men.

  • It has large coal mines, which form the south-western portion of the extensive Upper Silesian coal fields, the largest Austrian deposit.

  • It is noticed that labourers employed in deep mines worked by shafts suffer less from fever than do those who are engaged in stripping the alluvial deposits.

  • - The only ancient remains found in the peninsula are the stone implements, of which mention has already been made, and some remarkable ancient mines, which are situated in the Jelai valley in Pahang.

  • Belleville is in a rich agricultural region, and in the vicinity there are valuable coal mines, the first of which was sunk in 1852; from this dates the industrial development of the city.

  • The results of his work at Babylon appeared first in the Vienna serial Mines de l'orient, and in 1815 in England, under the title Narrative of a Journey to the Site of Babylon in 1811.

  • The modern town in the immediate neighbourhood, still known as Fokia, was founded by the Genoese in 1421 on account of the rich alum mines in the neighbourhood.

  • In cases where the direction of the air motion is always the same, as in the ventilating shafts of mines and buildings for instance, these anemometers, known, however, as air meters, are employed, and give most satisfactory results.

  • Elba was famous for its mines in early times, and the smelting furnaces gave it its Greek name of A' OaNia ("soot island").

  • The mines near the city are very productive, and thousands of men and beasts are employed in transporting lead, iron, copper, zinc and sulphur to the coast.

  • Its silver and gold mines were the source of great wealth both to the Carthaginians and to the Romans.

  • The number of mines increased from 589 in 1881 to 1580 in 1902.

  • The bulk of the sulphur mines are in Sicily, while the majority of the lead and zinc mines are in Sardinia; much of the lead smelting is done at Pertusola, near Genoa, the company formed for this purpose having acquired many of the Sardinian mines.

  • Italy has only unimportant lignite and anthracite mines, but water power is abundant and has been largely applied to industry, especially in generating electricity.

  • Lincoln is situated in a productive grain region, and has valuable coal mines.

  • Near Tokat copper pyrites, with iron and manganese, kaolin and coal are found; but most of the copper worked here comes from the mines of Keban Maden and Arghana Maden, on the upper Euphrates and Tigris.

  • The mines were visited some years ago by Dr Fritz Noetling, and the mineral has been described by Dr Otto Helm.

  • Later writers, Posidonius, Diodorus, Strabo and others, call them smallish islands off (Strabo says, some way off) the north-west coast of Spain, which contained tin mines, or, as Strabo says, tin and lead mines - though a passage in Diodorus derives the name rather from their nearness to the tin districts of north-west Spain.

  • The Eastern railway has works at Romilly, and there are iron works at Clairvaux and wire-drawing works at Plaines; but owing to the absence of coal and iron mines, metal working is of small importance.

  • The gold and platinum mines of Choco were on some of its affluents, and the river sands are auriferous.

  • The chief mineral product is the asphalt of the mines of Seyssel on the eastern frontier, besides which potter's clay, building stone, hydraulic lime and cement are produced in the department.

  • These mines are the richest in Austria, and among the most remarkable in the world.

  • The length of the mines from E.

  • There are also two large chapels, containing altars, ornaments, &c., in rock-salt, a room called the dancing saloon (Tanzsaal), where the objects of interest found in the mines are kept; the Kronleuchtersaal, and the chamber Michatovice are also worth mention.

  • In the interior of the mines are sixteen ponds, of which the large lake of Przykos is 195 ft.

  • deep. The mines employ over loon workers, and yield about 60,000 tons annually.

  • The date of the discovery of the mines is unknown, but they were already worked in the 11th century.

  • The mines suffered greatly from inundations in 1868 and 1879, and the soil on which the town is built shows signs of subsidence.

  • "Mines and Quarries").

  • It is the distributing point for the gold mines of the district, and during the summer months steamboat communication is maintained on the lake.

  • Below the junction of the two arms the Euphrates flows south-west past the lead mines of Keban Maden, where it is 120 yds.

  • Bethune lies in the midst of the richest coal mines in France.

  • The principal manufactures are firearms, ironmongery, earthenware, woollen cloth, beer, stoneware, zinc goods, colours and salt; in the neighbourhood are iron and coal mines.

  • Gold-mining has been carried on in a primitive manner for more than two centuries, but the output has never been large and no very rich mines have been discovered.

  • Pop. (1906) 9749 It possesses iron mines and is the centre of the coal-fields of the Aveyron, which supply the ironworks established by the Duc Decazes, minister of Louis Xviii.

  • It is thus a common mineral in all copper mines, and sometimes occurs in large masses, as in Arizona and in South Australia, where it has been worked as an ore of copper, of which element it contains 55%.

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