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milwaukee

milwaukee

milwaukee Sentence Examples

  • of Milwaukee and 50 m.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western railway, by interurban electric lines connecting with Chicago and Milwaukee, and by freight and passenger steamship lines on Lake Michigan.

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  • Shortly after the plans were announced for building the Western Pacific, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul also decided to extend west.

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  • It is served by the Chicago Great Western and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways.

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  • of Milwaukee, and about 70 m.

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  • of Milwaukee.

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  • The northern portion of the lake only is covered with ice in winter, and ice never reaches as far south as Milwaukee.

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  • Milwaukee River remains closed on an average for one hundred days - from the beginning of December to the middle of March.

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  • Milwaukee, situated on the shore of Milwaukee Bay, on the western side of the lake, is, next to Chicago, the largest city on the lake, and has a large commerce and a harbour of refuge.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Chicago, Milwaukee & Gary ("Rockford Route") and the Illinois Central railways, and is connected by interurban electric railway with Chicago and Freeport, Illinois, and Janesville, Wisconsin.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & Saint Paul, the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific (which has repair shops here), and the Illinois Central railways, and by interurban electric lines.

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  • It is the natural terminal of three great northern transcontinental railway lines - the Northern Pacific, the Great Northern, and the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound (the extension of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul system); and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy and the connecting lines of the Canadian Pacific form lines of communication with the middle Northwest and the Pacific provinces of Canada.

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  • WellmanChalmers Co., Milwaukee, Seaver-Morgan Co., Cleveland, Wisconsin, makers.

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  • He graduated at Western Reserve College in 1864 and at Andover Theological Seminary in 1869; preached in Edinburg, Ohio, in 1869-1871, and in the Spring Street Congregational Church of Milwaukee in 5875-5879; and was professor of philosophy at Bowdoin College in 58 791881, and Clark professor of metaphysics and moral philosophy at Yale from 1881 till 5905, when he took charge of the graduate department of philosophy and psychology; he became professor emeritus in 1905.

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  • It is served by the Chicago Great-Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific railways.

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  • Kremers, Milwaukee Press, 1900).

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  • It is served by two branches of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, by the main line and one branch of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, by the Illinois Central, by the Iowa Central, and by the Minneapolis & St Louis railways.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railways.

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  • The Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railroad was completed to Prairie du Chien in 1857.

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  • Des Moines is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago Great Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Wabash, the Minneapolis & St Louis, and the Des Moines, Iowa Falls & Northern railways; also by several interurban electric lines.

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  • The several roads are under the management of twenty-seven companies, but about 75% of the business is done by the Chicago Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago Milwaukee & St Paul and the Chicago Rock Island & Pacific. Electric interurban railways are increasing in importance for freight and passenger service.

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  • In 1848 he came to London, but passed on in 1849 to America, where he ministered as rabbi in Cleveland,Cincinnati, Milwaukee, Detroit and Newark, New Jersey.

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  • Davenport is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Iowa & Illinois (interurban), and the Davenport, Rock Island & North Western railways; opposite the city is the western terminus of the Illinois and Mississippi, or Hennepin, Canal (which connects the Mississippi and Illinois rivers).

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  • of Milwaukee, at the S.

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  • The city is a railway centre of some importance, and is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Minneapolis, St Paul & Sault St Marie, and the Chicago & NorthWestern railways, by interurban electric lines, and by steamboat lines connecting through the Fox river with vessels on the Great Lakes.

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  • - Puget Sound has formed a natural terminus for several transcontinental railways, the cities of Seattle and Tacoma on its shores affording outlets to the commerce of the Pacific for the Northern Pacific, the Great Northern and the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound transcontinental lines, which enter these cities with their own tracks.

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  • The Great Northern, running west from Spokane, crosses the state in nearly a straight line, and between this road and the Northern Pacific, and parallelingthe Great Northern, runs the recently constructed Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound, the westward extension of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul.

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  • Montana is served by three transcontinental railways: the Great Northern traversing the north, the Northern Pacific traversing the south-east, south and south-west portions, and, north of the Northern Pacific, the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound, an extension of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul to Seattle and Tacoma, practically completed in 1909; branch lines of the Great Northern, from the north, connect with the Northern Pacific and the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound at Butte, and with the Northern Pacific at Laurel.

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  • The Oregon Short Line from the south connects with the Northern Pacific, the Great Northern, and the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound at Butte, and the Burlington system, also from the south, connects with the Northern Pacific at Billings, Yellowstone county.

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  • It is served by the Pere Marquette, the Michigan Central, and the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, by electric railways to St Joseph and Niles, Mich., and South Bend, Indiana, and for a part of the year by steamboat lines to Chicago and Milwaukee.

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  • The "Drincipal systems are the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Great Northern and the North-western.

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  • A railway (part of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul system) was built from Sioux City to Yankton in 1872-1873, and in 1874 General Custer led an exploring expedition into the Black Hills, which resulted in the discovery of gold and the rapid settlement of a considerable portion of the west of the territory.

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  • MILWAUKEE, a city and the county-seat of Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, U.S.A., the largest city of the state, at the mouth of the Milwaukee river on the W.

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  • The Milwaukee river entering the city from the north is joined about 2 m.

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  • Milwaukee Bay, into which their combined waters empty, is an inlet of Lake Michigan, about 6 m.

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  • Other parks are Lake Park, also on the lake shore, at North Point, where stands the waterworks pumping station with its tall tower; Riverside and Kilbourn Parks, east and west respectively of the upper Milwaukee river, in the northern part of the city, Washington Park on the west side, containing a menagerie and a herd of deer; Sherman Park on the west side, and Kosciusko, Humboldt and Mitchell Parks on the south side.

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  • In addition to the statues in Juneau Park there is a statue of Kosciusko in the park of that name; one of Washington and a soldiers' monument on Grand Avenue; a statue of Henry Bergh in front of the city hall; one of Robert Burns in the First Ward Park, and, in Washington Park, a replica of Ernst Rietschel's Schiller-Goethe monument in Jena, given to the city in 1908 by the Germans of Milwaukee.

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  • long, constructed in 1888, water is pumped by means of one of the largest single pumps in the world from the lake into the upper Milwaukee river, which is thus completely flushed by fresh water every twenty-four hours.

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  • Milwaukee is one of the most healthful of the larger cities of the United States.

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  • As a result, the population has overflowed into several populous suburbs industrially a part of a "greater" Milwaukee.

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  • It has a Carnegie library, and is the seat of an Evangelical Lutheran theological seminary (1865), of Lutheran homes for the aged and orphan, of the Milwaukee county hospital for the insane, of the Milwaukee sanatorium for nervous diseases, and of the north-western branch of the national soldiers' home, which has grounds covering 385 acres and with main building and barracks affording quarters for over 2000 disabled veterans, and has a hospital, a theatre, and a library of 15,000 volumes.

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  • Other suburbs are West Allis (pop., 1905, 2306; local est., 1908, 7500), an incorporated rapidly growing manufacturing city on the west; Cudahy (pop., 1905, 2556), a manufacturing village south of Milwaukee, largely devoted to meat packing; South Milwaukee (pop., 1905, 6284), an incorporated city with several large manufactories, and North Milwaukee (pop., 1905, 1236), a village immediately adjoining the city on the north.

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  • In Milwaukee are St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral and All Saints Protestant Episcopal Cathedral - the city is the see of a Roman Catholic archbishopric (established in 1892) and of a Protestant Episcopal bishopric. Among other church structures are Plymouth Congregational, Westminster Presbyterian, Church of Gesu (Roman Catholic) and Trinity Lutheran.

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  • The social clubs include the Milwaukee, Deutscher-Concordia, University and Marquette clubs.

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  • Milwaukee-Downer College (for girls), in the north-east part of the city was established in 1895 by a consolidation of Milwaukee College for girls, and Downer College, formerly at Fox Lake.

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  • Other institutions are Concordia College (1881, Lutheran), a state normal school (1880), the Wisconsin College of physicians and surgeons (1893), the national German-American teachers' seminary (normal), Milwaukee academy (1864), Milwaukee University school, Milwaukee school of engineering (1904), Milwaukee Turnverein school of physical culture, one of the largest schools of the sort in the United States, St John's Catholic institute, Our Lady of Mercy academy (Roman Catholic), Wisconsin academy of music, the Wisconsin school of art (art students' league), a Catholic normal school, St Rose's manual training school, the industrial chemical institute (the only technical school for brewers in the United States) and several business and commercial schools.

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  • The Milwaukee public school system comprises four high schools, a high school of trades, and in addition to the ordinary grades, a kindergarten department and day schools for the blind and deaf.

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  • Milwaukee is favourably situated commercially, with excellent facilities for shipping both by lake and rail afforded by four trunk lines and a dozen lines of lake steamboats.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Minneapolis, St Paul & Sault Ste Marie, the Grand Trunk, and the Pere Marquette railways.

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  • The last-named connects with the main line at Ludington, Michigan, by means of a railway ferry across Lake Michigan; the Grand Trunk has a railway ferry from Milwaukee to Grand Haven.

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  • - Commercially Milwaukee is one of the most important of the inland cities of the United States, although its trade it largely domestic. It is a distributing point for a considerable part of Wisconsin, and several states farther west, its wholesale business aggregating about $350,000,000 annually.

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  • The country produce sold in Milwaukee averages about $75,000,000 a year in value.

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  • Milwaukee is an important grain slipping port - in 1908 it shipped 28,618,519 bushels of grain and 3,752,033 barrels of flour, and its 25 elevators have a capacity of over 12,500,000 bushels.

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  • In 1905 the total value of Milwaukee's factory products was $ 1 3 8, 881, 545, 2 5.3% more than in 1900.

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  • In the manufacture of malt liquors and malt Milwaukee stands first among the cities of the United States and of the world.

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  • In 1905 Milwaukee manufactured 77.1% of the malt liquors manufactured in the state and 7.4% of the entire product of the United States.

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  • Other products exceeding $1,000,000 in value were: leather ($14, 0 74,397), Milwaukee being second in the manufacture of leather among the cities of the United States; foundry and machine shop products ($10,232,723); iron and steel ($7,010,793); flour and grist-mill products ($6,320,428) slaughtering and meat-packing products ($5,95 8, 5 1 5); men's clothing ($4,759,54 8); boots and shoes ($2,929,405); electrical machinery, apparatus and supplies ($2,257,229); chewing and smoking tobacco ($1,966,930) and cigars and cigarettes ($1,540,019); furniture ($1,767,290); trunks and valises ($1,623,310); hosiery and knit goods ($ 1, 535, 1 7 6); confectionery ($1,379,668); stoves and furnaces ($1,288,931); leather gloves and mittens 41,207,633); structural iron work ($1,037,217); wooden packing boxes ($1,024,750); and paints ($ 1, 01 5,774).

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  • Among Milwaukee's largest industrial establishments are: the Pabst and the Schlitz breweries, on the west side of the city.

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  • The flour mills of Milwaukee have a capacity of about 12,000 barrels a day.

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  • In the Menominee river valley the peculiar cream-coloured Milwaukee bricks are made.

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  • North of the city on the Milwaukee river are extensive cement works.

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  • The first newspaper in Milwaukee, the Advertiser, began publication in 1836.

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  • The population of Milwaukee in 1840 was only 1712.

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  • The fact that out of a population of 285,315 in 1900, 88,991 were foreign-born, and 235,889 were of foreign parentage, that 53,854 were born in Germany, that 124,211 had both parents born in Germany, and that 26,834 additional had one or the other parent born in Germany, stamps the character of Milwaukee's population.

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  • Milwaukee is governed under a city charter of 1874, providing the form of city government most common in America, a mayor (elected biennially) and a single board of aldermen.

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  • According to a special report of the census the cost of the city government of Milwaukee in 1906 was smaller per capita than that of any other city in the country with a population of over 300,000.

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  • The first Europeans known to have visited the site of Milwaukee were Father Jacques Marquette, the Jesuit missionary, and his companion, Louis Joliet, who on their return in the autumn of 1673 to the mission of St Francis Xavier at De Pere from their trip down the Mississippi, skirted the west shore of Lake Michigan in their canoes from Chicago northward.

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  • Milwaukee Bay is distinctly marked in the map attributed to Marquette, the original of which is now in the Jesuit College at Montreal, Canada; it was discovered in a convent in Montreal by Felix Martin (1804-1886), of the Society of Jesus, and was copied by Parkman.

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  • In 1679 La Salle and his party probably stopped here on their way south, and in the Jesuit Relations of that year the name Milwaukee first appears, as "Millioke."

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  • Milwaukee was on the direct route of travel between Fort Dearborn (Chicago) and the flourishing settlement at Green Bay, and at once after the treaties between the United States and the Menominee in 1831 and 1833 for the extinguishing of the Indian titles, settlers began to come to the neighbourhood.

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  • The rival settlements, officially known as Milwaukee East Side and Milwaukee West Side, bore the popular designations of "Juneautown" and "Kilbourntown."

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  • Milwaukee county was set off from Brown county in 1834, and in 1836 the establishment of townships was authorized.

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  • Walker's Point, the south side, was annexed as a third ward in 1845, and in 1846 the three wards were incorporated as the city of Milwaukee, of which Solomon Juneau was elected first mayor.

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  • Through it the Chicago Milwaukee & St Paul and other western railways were financed.

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  • Beer was first brewed in Milwaukee in 1840.

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  • Milwaukee was connected with Chicago by telegraph in 1849, and by railway in 1856.

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  • Previous to this, however, in 1851, the first train ran over the Chicago Milwaukee & St Paul railway to Waukesha, and in 1857 through trains were run over the same road to the Mississippi at Prairie du Chien.

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  • Buck, Pioneer History of Milwaukee (4 vols., Milwaukee, 1876-1886); A.

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  • C. Wheeler, Chronicles of Milwaukee (Milwaukee, 1861); E.

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  • Mack, "The Founding of Milwaukee" in Proceedings of the State Historical Society for 1906 (Madison, 1907); and L.

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  • Larson, Administrative History of Milwaukee (Madison, Wisconsin, 1908).

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  • Water - town is served by the Chicago & North-Western and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways, and by an interurban electric line, connecting with Milwaukee.

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  • Distillers and revenue officers in St Louis, Milwaukee, Cincinnati and other cities were implicated, and the illicit gains - which in St Louis alone probably amounted to more than $2,500,000 in the six years 1870-1876 - were divided between the distillers and the revenue officers, who levied assessments on distillers ostensibly for a Republican campaign fund to be used in furthering Grant's re-election.

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  • The Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railway, running E.

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  • Cooper, Chronological and Alphabetical Record of the Great Civil War (Milwaukee, 1904) may be mentioned as a work of reference.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & Saint Paul, the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago, Saint Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Illinois Central, and the Great Northern railways.

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  • Sioux City is the see of a Roman Catholic bishop. The Chicago, Milwaukee & Saint Paul, the Great Northern, and the Chicago, Saint Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha have shops here; meat packing is an important industry, and the city has large stock yards.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western and Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways, by interurban electric lines and by lake and river steamboat lines, it being the head of lake navigation on the Fox river.

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  • Tacoma is served by the Northern Pacific, the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound, and the Tacoma Eastern railways; the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railway operates through trains to and from Missouri river points and Tacoma, over the Northern Pacific tracks, which are also used by the Great Northern and Oregon & Washington railways.

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  • Other important manufactures were furniture, ships and boats, railway cars (the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound and the Northern Pacific systems having shops here), engines, machinery, shoes, water pipes, preserves and beer.

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  • of Milwaukee, on Beaver Lake, which is 9 m.

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  • Beaver Dam is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railway.

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  • Almost all the great steamship transportation lines of the Great Lakes have an eastern terminus at Buffalo, which thus has direct passenger and freight connexion with Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukee and the "Head of the Lakes" (Duluth-Superior).

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  • Ripon is served by the Chicago & North-Western, and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways.

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  • P. Mapes, History of Ripon (Milwaukee, Wis., 1873); Consul W.

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  • It is served by the Chicago Milwaukee & Saint Paul, the Chicago Rock Island & Pacific, and the Muscatine North & South railways.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western (which has construction and repair shops here), the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Newton & North-Western railways, and by the Fort Dodge, Des Moines & Southern (inter-urban) railway, of which it is the headquarters.

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  • Toledo is served by the Ann Arbor, the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Detroit, Toledo & Milwaukee, the Detroit & Toledo Shore Line, the Hocking Valley, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Michigan Central, the Pennsylvania, the Pere Marquette, the Toledo, St Louis & Western, the Wabash, and the Wheeling & Lake Erie railways, by a "belt line" (30 m.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western, and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways, and by steamboats on the Fox river, by means of which it meets lake transportation at De Pere and Green Bay.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western, and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways, and by an inter-urban electric railway to Janesville, Wisconsin and Rockford, Illinois.

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  • of Milwaukee, and 14 m.

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  • Menasha is served by the Minneapolis, St Paul & Sault Ste Marie, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Chicago & North-Western railways, and by an inter-urban electric railway system.

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  • Pop. (1900) 4743, of whom 1277 were foreign-born; (1904 state census) 5239 It is served by the Grand Trunk and the Pere Marquette railways, and by steamboat lines to Chicago, Milwaukee and other lake ports, and is connected with Grand Rapids and Muskegon by an electric line.

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  • It is pre-eminently a railway centre, being served by the Union Pacific, of which it is the principal eastern terminus, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Milwaukee & Saint Paul, the Chicago & Northwestern, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Chicago Great-Western, the Illinois Central, and the Wabash, which together have given it considerable commercialimportance.

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  • Douglas he took part as a speaker; and later in 1858 he was admitted to the Wisconsin bar and began to practise law in Milwaukee.

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  • of Milwaukee on the Little Fox river.

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  • Waukesha is served by the Minneapolis, St Paul && Sault Ste, Marie, the Chicago & North-Western and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways, and by interurban electric railways connecting it with Milwaukee, Oconomowoc and Madison.

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  • In 1851 the first railway in the state was com - pleted between Milwaukee and Waukesha, but the village re - mained only a farming community until the exploitation of the mineral springs was begun about 1868.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Ailwaukee & St Paul railway and by an electric railway connecting with Milwaukee.

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  • Superior is served by the Northern Pacific, the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic, the Wisconsin Central, the Great Northern, the Minneapolis, St Paul & Sault Ste Marie, and the Chicago & North-Western railways, and (for freight only) by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul.

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  • He graduated from the university of Copenhagen in 1865, began the study of law, removed to the United States in 1867, taught German in Milwaukee, was admitted to the bar in 1869, and practised in Chicago.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Milwaukee & Saint Paul, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, and the Wabash railways.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Wabash, and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railways.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific railways.

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  • There are, according to Hoffmann's Directory (Milwaukee, 1907), 4364 parochial schools, in which 1,096,842 children of both sexes receive instruction.

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  • of Milwaukee and about 131 m.

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  • Madison is served by the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Illinois Central railways (being the northern terminus of the last), and by interurban electric lines, connecting with Janesville, Beloit and Chicago.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Chicago, St Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha railways.

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  • Marie, and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul.

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  • Milwaukee >>

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  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Milwaukee, St Paul & Sault Ste Marie railways, by two interurban electric railways, and by steamboat lines on the lake and on the Fox river, which flows out of Lake Winnebago at this point.

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  • It is served by the Grand Trunk, the Pere Marquette, the Grand Rapids & Indiana, and the Grand Rapids, Grand Haven & Muskegon (electric) railways, and by steamboat lines to Chicago, Milwaukee and other lake ports.

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  • Clinton is served by the Chicago & North-Western (which has machineshops here), the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific railways, and is connected with Davenport by an electric line.

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  • Elgin is served by the Chicago & NorthWestern and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways, and by interurban electric railways to Chicago, Aurora and Belvidere.

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  • Among these are the Menominee and Oconto, which flow into Green Bay; an arm of Lake Michigan, and the Sheboygan and Milwaukee rivers emptying directly into the lake.

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  • Within a period of thirty-eight years, from 1870 to 1908, extremes at Milwaukee ranged from 100° to - 25°, while at La Crosse, on the western border and less than 60 m.

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  • More than one-third of the value of factory products was that of the manufactures of Milwaukee ($138,881,545).

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  • There are large deposits of stratified clay along the shores of Lake Michigan, from which is made a cream-coloured brick, so largely used in Milwaukee that that city has been called the "cream city"; the total value of clay products in 1907 was $1,127,819 and in 1908 $95 8, 395.

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  • The first limestone quarries were opened at Genesee, Waukesha county, in 1848; at Wauwatosa, near Milwaukee, in 1855; and near Bridgeport in 1856.

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  • Railway building in Wisconsin began in 1851, when a track was laid from Milwaukee to Waukesha (20 m.), which was extended westward in 1854 to Madison and in 1857 to the Mississippi at Prairie du Chien.

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  • This line was the forerunner of the great Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul system, which now crosses the southern half of the state with two trunk lines and with one line parallels the shore of Lake Michigan.

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  • Milwaukee is one of the leading lake ports, and is the only port of entry in the state; its imports were valued at $796,285 in 1899 and at $4,493,635 i:1 1909, and its exports at $2726 in 1899 and at $244,890 in 1909.

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  • Germans and Irish are now scattered throughout the state; but the German element predominates markedly in Milwaukee.

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  • Poles are chiefly in Milwaukee, Manitowoc and Portage counties, Belgians and Dutch in Brown and Door counties, German Swiss in Green, Fond du Lac, Winnebago, Buffalo and Pierce counties, and Bohemians in Kewaunee county, where they form almost 50% of the population.

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  • The judicial power of the state is vested: in a supreme court' of seven members (salary $6000 a year; elected for a term of ten years; the senior justice is chief justice) with appellate jurisdiction throughout the state, general superintendence over all inferior courts, power to issue, hear and determine writs of habeas corpus, mandamus, injunction, quo warranto, certiorari and other original and remedial writs; nineteen (only five under the constitution of 1848) circuit courts, of one judge each except in the second circuit (including Milwaukee) in which there are four judges, elected (at a spring election, and not at the general state election) by the voters of the circuit district; probate judges, one elected (for two years) in each county, except where the legislature confers probate powers on inferior courts; and in towns, cities and villages, justices of the peace, elected for two years.

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  • Justices of the peace hold office for two years, other town officers for one year only, except that in a county having a population of 100,000 or more (Milwaukee county), town meetings are biennial and all officers are elected for two years.

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  • The state tax on railways and other public service corporations is 1 The first class comprises cities having a population of 150,000 or more (Milwaukee); the second class those having a population between 40,000 and 150,000; the third class those having a population between Io,000 and 40,000; the fourth class those having a population less than 10,000.

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  • There are special kindergarten training departments in the Milwaukee and Superior schools, departments for manual training at Oshkosh and Platteville, and a training department in domestic science at the Stevens Point school.

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  • Educational institutions of collegiate rank are Beloit College (1846; originally Congregational, now undenominational) at Beloit; Carroll College (1846, Presbyterian), at Waukesha; Lawrence College (1847; Methodist Episcopal), at Appleton; Concordia College (1881; Lutheran), Marquette University (1864, Roman Catholic), and Milwaukee-Downer College (1895; non-sectarian, for women; an outgrowth of Downer College, Congregational and Presbyterian, founded at Fox Lake in 1853), all at Milwaukee; Milton College (1867; Seventh Day Adventist), at Milton; North-western University 0865; Lutheran) at Watertown; Ripon College (1851; originally under Presbyterian and Congregational control, now non-sectarian), at Ripon; Wayland University (1855; co-educational; Baptist), at Beaver Dam; and the following Roman Catholic schools: St Clara Academy (1847; Dominican) at Sinsiniwa, St Francis Seminary (1853) at St Francis, and St Lawrence College (1861, Capuchin) at Mt Calvary.

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  • In addition the board has partial control over the Wisconsin Workshop for the Blind (1903) at Milwaukee, where there is a willow ware factory, and the Wisconsin Industrial School for Girls (1875) also at Milwaukee.

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  • Among these were Alexander Henry (1739-1824), who as early as 1760 had visited the site of Milwaukee, and who now obtained a monopoly of the Lake Superior trade, and Jonathan Carver, who in 1766 reached Green Bay on his way to the Mississippi.

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  • The first Territorial Council met in 1836 at Old Belmont, now Leslie, Lafayette county, but in December of that year Madison was selected as the capital, after a contest in which Fond du Lac, Milwaukee, Racine, Green Bay, Portage and other places were considered, and in which James Duane Doty, later governor, owner of the Madison town plat, was charged with bribing legislators with town lots in Madison.

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  • In the same year a fugitive slave named Glover was seized at Racine and was afterward rescued by an anti-slavery mob from Milwaukee; the State Supreme Court rendered a decision which declared the Fugitive Slave Law to be null and void in Wisconsin.

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  • 1840) was a printer and then a journalist, founded in 1874 at La Crosse the Sun, which in 1878 he removed to Milwaukee, and was the author of many humorous sketches, notably a series of volumes of which the hero is ” Peck's Bad Boy.” 3 Lieut.-Governor; succeeded Barstow, who resigned during a contest with Bashford.

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  • C. Case's Wisconsin, its Geology and Physical Geography (Milwaukee, 1907).

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  • iii., new series, of the Bulletin (Milwaukee) of the Wisconsin Natural History Society, are valuable.

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  • Legler's Leading Events in Wisconsin History (Milwaukee, 1898), a good brief summary, are other single-volume works covering the entire period of the state's history.

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  • The Parkman Society Papers (Milwaukee, 1895-1899) provide a collection of good articles on special topics of Wisconsin history, and the Original Narratives and Reprints published by the Wisconsin History Commission (created by an act of 1905) deal with Wisconsin in the Civil War.

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  • Mankato is served by the Chicago, St Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha, the Chicago & North-Western (both "North -Western Lines"), the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Chicago Great-Western railways.

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  • Minneapolis is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Great Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Chicago & Northwestern, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Great.

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  • There are a Union passenger station, and separate stations for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Chicago, Great Western and the Minneapolis & St Louis railways.

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  • Kremers under the title Volatile Oils (Milwaukee, Wisconsin); F.

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  • conn Milwaukee and in the world.

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  • laudatory article about Schmitt written by Milwaukee writer Gillian Sender.

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  • An agreement with really a call milwaukee The New India Assurance Company Limited concours motors ' .

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  • Rates here several few offering certain milwaukee concours motors ' .

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  • Indianapolis, Milwaukee) to dirt ovals (e.g.

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  • The Milwaukee Hole Shooter is a good drill. warren weber replied to Jay on 28 Feb 2003 I have both keyed and keyless.

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  • of Milwaukee and 50 m.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western railway, by interurban electric lines connecting with Chicago and Milwaukee, and by freight and passenger steamship lines on Lake Michigan.

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  • Shortly after the plans were announced for building the Western Pacific, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul also decided to extend west.

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  • It is served by the Chicago Great Western and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways.

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  • Cloquet is served by the Northern Pacific, the Great Northern, the Duluth & North-Eastern, and (for freight only) the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways.

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  • of Milwaukee, and about 70 m.

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  • of Milwaukee.

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  • The northern portion of the lake only is covered with ice in winter, and ice never reaches as far south as Milwaukee.

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  • Milwaukee River remains closed on an average for one hundred days - from the beginning of December to the middle of March.

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  • Milwaukee, situated on the shore of Milwaukee Bay, on the western side of the lake, is, next to Chicago, the largest city on the lake, and has a large commerce and a harbour of refuge.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Chicago, Milwaukee & Gary ("Rockford Route") and the Illinois Central railways, and is connected by interurban electric railway with Chicago and Freeport, Illinois, and Janesville, Wisconsin.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & Saint Paul, the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific (which has repair shops here), and the Illinois Central railways, and by interurban electric lines.

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  • It is the natural terminal of three great northern transcontinental railway lines - the Northern Pacific, the Great Northern, and the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound (the extension of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul system); and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy and the connecting lines of the Canadian Pacific form lines of communication with the middle Northwest and the Pacific provinces of Canada.

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  • WellmanChalmers Co., Milwaukee, Seaver-Morgan Co., Cleveland, Wisconsin, makers.

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  • He graduated at Western Reserve College in 1864 and at Andover Theological Seminary in 1869; preached in Edinburg, Ohio, in 1869-1871, and in the Spring Street Congregational Church of Milwaukee in 5875-5879; and was professor of philosophy at Bowdoin College in 58 791881, and Clark professor of metaphysics and moral philosophy at Yale from 1881 till 5905, when he took charge of the graduate department of philosophy and psychology; he became professor emeritus in 1905.

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  • It is served by the Chicago Great-Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific railways.

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  • Kremers, Milwaukee Press, 1900).

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  • It is served by two branches of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, by the main line and one branch of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, by the Illinois Central, by the Iowa Central, and by the Minneapolis & St Louis railways.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railways.

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  • The Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railroad was completed to Prairie du Chien in 1857.

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  • Des Moines is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago Great Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Wabash, the Minneapolis & St Louis, and the Des Moines, Iowa Falls & Northern railways; also by several interurban electric lines.

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  • The several roads are under the management of twenty-seven companies, but about 75% of the business is done by the Chicago Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago Milwaukee & St Paul and the Chicago Rock Island & Pacific. Electric interurban railways are increasing in importance for freight and passenger service.

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  • In 1848 he came to London, but passed on in 1849 to America, where he ministered as rabbi in Cleveland,Cincinnati, Milwaukee, Detroit and Newark, New Jersey.

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  • Davenport is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Iowa & Illinois (interurban), and the Davenport, Rock Island & North Western railways; opposite the city is the western terminus of the Illinois and Mississippi, or Hennepin, Canal (which connects the Mississippi and Illinois rivers).

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  • of Milwaukee, at the S.

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  • The city is a railway centre of some importance, and is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Minneapolis, St Paul & Sault St Marie, and the Chicago & NorthWestern railways, by interurban electric lines, and by steamboat lines connecting through the Fox river with vessels on the Great Lakes.

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  • - Puget Sound has formed a natural terminus for several transcontinental railways, the cities of Seattle and Tacoma on its shores affording outlets to the commerce of the Pacific for the Northern Pacific, the Great Northern and the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound transcontinental lines, which enter these cities with their own tracks.

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  • The Great Northern, running west from Spokane, crosses the state in nearly a straight line, and between this road and the Northern Pacific, and parallelingthe Great Northern, runs the recently constructed Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound, the westward extension of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul.

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  • Montana is served by three transcontinental railways: the Great Northern traversing the north, the Northern Pacific traversing the south-east, south and south-west portions, and, north of the Northern Pacific, the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound, an extension of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul to Seattle and Tacoma, practically completed in 1909; branch lines of the Great Northern, from the north, connect with the Northern Pacific and the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound at Butte, and with the Northern Pacific at Laurel.

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  • The Oregon Short Line from the south connects with the Northern Pacific, the Great Northern, and the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound at Butte, and the Burlington system, also from the south, connects with the Northern Pacific at Billings, Yellowstone county.

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  • It is served by the Pere Marquette, the Michigan Central, and the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, by electric railways to St Joseph and Niles, Mich., and South Bend, Indiana, and for a part of the year by steamboat lines to Chicago and Milwaukee.

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  • The "Drincipal systems are the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Great Northern and the North-western.

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  • A railway (part of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul system) was built from Sioux City to Yankton in 1872-1873, and in 1874 General Custer led an exploring expedition into the Black Hills, which resulted in the discovery of gold and the rapid settlement of a considerable portion of the west of the territory.

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  • MILWAUKEE, a city and the county-seat of Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, U.S.A., the largest city of the state, at the mouth of the Milwaukee river on the W.

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  • The Milwaukee river entering the city from the north is joined about 2 m.

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  • Milwaukee Bay, into which their combined waters empty, is an inlet of Lake Michigan, about 6 m.

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  • Other parks are Lake Park, also on the lake shore, at North Point, where stands the waterworks pumping station with its tall tower; Riverside and Kilbourn Parks, east and west respectively of the upper Milwaukee river, in the northern part of the city, Washington Park on the west side, containing a menagerie and a herd of deer; Sherman Park on the west side, and Kosciusko, Humboldt and Mitchell Parks on the south side.

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  • In addition to the statues in Juneau Park there is a statue of Kosciusko in the park of that name; one of Washington and a soldiers' monument on Grand Avenue; a statue of Henry Bergh in front of the city hall; one of Robert Burns in the First Ward Park, and, in Washington Park, a replica of Ernst Rietschel's Schiller-Goethe monument in Jena, given to the city in 1908 by the Germans of Milwaukee.

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  • long, constructed in 1888, water is pumped by means of one of the largest single pumps in the world from the lake into the upper Milwaukee river, which is thus completely flushed by fresh water every twenty-four hours.

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  • Milwaukee is one of the most healthful of the larger cities of the United States.

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  • Milwaukee proper occupies 222 sq.

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  • As a result, the population has overflowed into several populous suburbs industrially a part of a "greater" Milwaukee.

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  • It has a Carnegie library, and is the seat of an Evangelical Lutheran theological seminary (1865), of Lutheran homes for the aged and orphan, of the Milwaukee county hospital for the insane, of the Milwaukee sanatorium for nervous diseases, and of the north-western branch of the national soldiers' home, which has grounds covering 385 acres and with main building and barracks affording quarters for over 2000 disabled veterans, and has a hospital, a theatre, and a library of 15,000 volumes.

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  • Other suburbs are West Allis (pop., 1905, 2306; local est., 1908, 7500), an incorporated rapidly growing manufacturing city on the west; Cudahy (pop., 1905, 2556), a manufacturing village south of Milwaukee, largely devoted to meat packing; South Milwaukee (pop., 1905, 6284), an incorporated city with several large manufactories, and North Milwaukee (pop., 1905, 1236), a village immediately adjoining the city on the north.

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  • In Milwaukee are St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral and All Saints Protestant Episcopal Cathedral - the city is the see of a Roman Catholic archbishopric (established in 1892) and of a Protestant Episcopal bishopric. Among other church structures are Plymouth Congregational, Westminster Presbyterian, Church of Gesu (Roman Catholic) and Trinity Lutheran.

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  • The social clubs include the Milwaukee, Deutscher-Concordia, University and Marquette clubs.

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  • Milwaukee-Downer College (for girls), in the north-east part of the city was established in 1895 by a consolidation of Milwaukee College for girls, and Downer College, formerly at Fox Lake.

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  • Other institutions are Concordia College (1881, Lutheran), a state normal school (1880), the Wisconsin College of physicians and surgeons (1893), the national German-American teachers' seminary (normal), Milwaukee academy (1864), Milwaukee University school, Milwaukee school of engineering (1904), Milwaukee Turnverein school of physical culture, one of the largest schools of the sort in the United States, St John's Catholic institute, Our Lady of Mercy academy (Roman Catholic), Wisconsin academy of music, the Wisconsin school of art (art students' league), a Catholic normal school, St Rose's manual training school, the industrial chemical institute (the only technical school for brewers in the United States) and several business and commercial schools.

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  • The Milwaukee public school system comprises four high schools, a high school of trades, and in addition to the ordinary grades, a kindergarten department and day schools for the blind and deaf.

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  • Milwaukee is favourably situated commercially, with excellent facilities for shipping both by lake and rail afforded by four trunk lines and a dozen lines of lake steamboats.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Minneapolis, St Paul & Sault Ste Marie, the Grand Trunk, and the Pere Marquette railways.

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  • The last-named connects with the main line at Ludington, Michigan, by means of a railway ferry across Lake Michigan; the Grand Trunk has a railway ferry from Milwaukee to Grand Haven.

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  • - Commercially Milwaukee is one of the most important of the inland cities of the United States, although its trade it largely domestic. It is a distributing point for a considerable part of Wisconsin, and several states farther west, its wholesale business aggregating about $350,000,000 annually.

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  • The country produce sold in Milwaukee averages about $75,000,000 a year in value.

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  • Milwaukee is an important grain slipping port - in 1908 it shipped 28,618,519 bushels of grain and 3,752,033 barrels of flour, and its 25 elevators have a capacity of over 12,500,000 bushels.

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  • In 1905 the total value of Milwaukee's factory products was $ 1 3 8, 881, 545, 2 5.3% more than in 1900.

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  • In the manufacture of malt liquors and malt Milwaukee stands first among the cities of the United States and of the world.

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  • In 1905 Milwaukee manufactured 77.1% of the malt liquors manufactured in the state and 7.4% of the entire product of the United States.

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  • Other products exceeding $1,000,000 in value were: leather ($14, 0 74,397), Milwaukee being second in the manufacture of leather among the cities of the United States; foundry and machine shop products ($10,232,723); iron and steel ($7,010,793); flour and grist-mill products ($6,320,428) slaughtering and meat-packing products ($5,95 8, 5 1 5); men's clothing ($4,759,54 8); boots and shoes ($2,929,405); electrical machinery, apparatus and supplies ($2,257,229); chewing and smoking tobacco ($1,966,930) and cigars and cigarettes ($1,540,019); furniture ($1,767,290); trunks and valises ($1,623,310); hosiery and knit goods ($ 1, 535, 1 7 6); confectionery ($1,379,668); stoves and furnaces ($1,288,931); leather gloves and mittens 41,207,633); structural iron work ($1,037,217); wooden packing boxes ($1,024,750); and paints ($ 1, 01 5,774).

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  • Among Milwaukee's largest industrial establishments are: the Pabst and the Schlitz breweries, on the west side of the city.

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  • The flour mills of Milwaukee have a capacity of about 12,000 barrels a day.

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  • In the Menominee river valley the peculiar cream-coloured Milwaukee bricks are made.

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  • North of the city on the Milwaukee river are extensive cement works.

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  • The first newspaper in Milwaukee, the Advertiser, began publication in 1836.

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  • The population of Milwaukee in 1840 was only 1712.

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  • The fact that out of a population of 285,315 in 1900, 88,991 were foreign-born, and 235,889 were of foreign parentage, that 53,854 were born in Germany, that 124,211 had both parents born in Germany, and that 26,834 additional had one or the other parent born in Germany, stamps the character of Milwaukee's population.

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  • Milwaukee is governed under a city charter of 1874, providing the form of city government most common in America, a mayor (elected biennially) and a single board of aldermen.

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  • According to a special report of the census the cost of the city government of Milwaukee in 1906 was smaller per capita than that of any other city in the country with a population of over 300,000.

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  • The first Europeans known to have visited the site of Milwaukee were Father Jacques Marquette, the Jesuit missionary, and his companion, Louis Joliet, who on their return in the autumn of 1673 to the mission of St Francis Xavier at De Pere from their trip down the Mississippi, skirted the west shore of Lake Michigan in their canoes from Chicago northward.

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  • Milwaukee Bay is distinctly marked in the map attributed to Marquette, the original of which is now in the Jesuit College at Montreal, Canada; it was discovered in a convent in Montreal by Felix Martin (1804-1886), of the Society of Jesus, and was copied by Parkman.

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  • In 1679 La Salle and his party probably stopped here on their way south, and in the Jesuit Relations of that year the name Milwaukee first appears, as "Millioke."

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  • Milwaukee was on the direct route of travel between Fort Dearborn (Chicago) and the flourishing settlement at Green Bay, and at once after the treaties between the United States and the Menominee in 1831 and 1833 for the extinguishing of the Indian titles, settlers began to come to the neighbourhood.

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  • The rival settlements, officially known as Milwaukee East Side and Milwaukee West Side, bore the popular designations of "Juneautown" and "Kilbourntown."

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  • Milwaukee county was set off from Brown county in 1834, and in 1836 the establishment of townships was authorized.

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  • Walker's Point, the south side, was annexed as a third ward in 1845, and in 1846 the three wards were incorporated as the city of Milwaukee, of which Solomon Juneau was elected first mayor.

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  • Through it the Chicago Milwaukee & St Paul and other western railways were financed.

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  • Beer was first brewed in Milwaukee in 1840.

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  • Milwaukee was connected with Chicago by telegraph in 1849, and by railway in 1856.

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  • Previous to this, however, in 1851, the first train ran over the Chicago Milwaukee & St Paul railway to Waukesha, and in 1857 through trains were run over the same road to the Mississippi at Prairie du Chien.

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  • Buck, Pioneer History of Milwaukee (4 vols., Milwaukee, 1876-1886); A.

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  • C. Wheeler, Chronicles of Milwaukee (Milwaukee, 1861); E.

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  • Mack, "The Founding of Milwaukee" in Proceedings of the State Historical Society for 1906 (Madison, 1907); and L.

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  • Larson, Administrative History of Milwaukee (Madison, Wisconsin, 1908).

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  • Water - town is served by the Chicago & North-Western and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways, and by an interurban electric line, connecting with Milwaukee.

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  • Distillers and revenue officers in St Louis, Milwaukee, Cincinnati and other cities were implicated, and the illicit gains - which in St Louis alone probably amounted to more than $2,500,000 in the six years 1870-1876 - were divided between the distillers and the revenue officers, who levied assessments on distillers ostensibly for a Republican campaign fund to be used in furthering Grant's re-election.

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  • The Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railway, running E.

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  • Cooper, Chronological and Alphabetical Record of the Great Civil War (Milwaukee, 1904) may be mentioned as a work of reference.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & Saint Paul, the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago, Saint Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Illinois Central, and the Great Northern railways.

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  • Sioux City is the see of a Roman Catholic bishop. The Chicago, Milwaukee & Saint Paul, the Great Northern, and the Chicago, Saint Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha have shops here; meat packing is an important industry, and the city has large stock yards.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western and Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways, by interurban electric lines and by lake and river steamboat lines, it being the head of lake navigation on the Fox river.

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  • Tacoma is served by the Northern Pacific, the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound, and the Tacoma Eastern railways; the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railway operates through trains to and from Missouri river points and Tacoma, over the Northern Pacific tracks, which are also used by the Great Northern and Oregon & Washington railways.

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  • Other important manufactures were furniture, ships and boats, railway cars (the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound and the Northern Pacific systems having shops here), engines, machinery, shoes, water pipes, preserves and beer.

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  • of Milwaukee, on Beaver Lake, which is 9 m.

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  • Beaver Dam is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railway.

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  • Almost all the great steamship transportation lines of the Great Lakes have an eastern terminus at Buffalo, which thus has direct passenger and freight connexion with Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukee and the "Head of the Lakes" (Duluth-Superior).

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  • Ripon is served by the Chicago & North-Western, and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways.

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  • P. Mapes, History of Ripon (Milwaukee, Wis., 1873); Consul W.

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  • It is served by the Chicago Milwaukee & Saint Paul, the Chicago Rock Island & Pacific, and the Muscatine North & South railways.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western (which has construction and repair shops here), the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Newton & North-Western railways, and by the Fort Dodge, Des Moines & Southern (inter-urban) railway, of which it is the headquarters.

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  • Toledo is served by the Ann Arbor, the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Detroit, Toledo & Milwaukee, the Detroit & Toledo Shore Line, the Hocking Valley, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Michigan Central, the Pennsylvania, the Pere Marquette, the Toledo, St Louis & Western, the Wabash, and the Wheeling & Lake Erie railways, by a "belt line" (30 m.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western, and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways, and by steamboats on the Fox river, by means of which it meets lake transportation at De Pere and Green Bay.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western, and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways, and by an inter-urban electric railway to Janesville, Wisconsin and Rockford, Illinois.

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  • of Milwaukee, and 14 m.

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  • Menasha is served by the Minneapolis, St Paul & Sault Ste Marie, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Chicago & North-Western railways, and by an inter-urban electric railway system.

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  • Pop. (1900) 4743, of whom 1277 were foreign-born; (1904 state census) 5239 It is served by the Grand Trunk and the Pere Marquette railways, and by steamboat lines to Chicago, Milwaukee and other lake ports, and is connected with Grand Rapids and Muskegon by an electric line.

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  • It is served by the Union Pacific, the Missouri Pacific, the 'Frisco System, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Chicago Great Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Chicago & Alton, the Wabash, the Kansas City Southern, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, the Leavenworth, Kansas & Western, the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient, the St Louis, Kansas City & Colorado, the Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City, and the St Joseph & Grand Island railways, and by steamboat lines to numerous river ports.

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  • It is pre-eminently a railway centre, being served by the Union Pacific, of which it is the principal eastern terminus, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Milwaukee & Saint Paul, the Chicago & Northwestern, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Chicago Great-Western, the Illinois Central, and the Wabash, which together have given it considerable commercialimportance.

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  • Douglas he took part as a speaker; and later in 1858 he was admitted to the Wisconsin bar and began to practise law in Milwaukee.

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  • of Milwaukee on the Little Fox river.

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  • Waukesha is served by the Minneapolis, St Paul && Sault Ste, Marie, the Chicago & North-Western and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways, and by interurban electric railways connecting it with Milwaukee, Oconomowoc and Madison.

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  • In 1851 the first railway in the state was com - pleted between Milwaukee and Waukesha, but the village re - mained only a farming community until the exploitation of the mineral springs was begun about 1868.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Ailwaukee & St Paul railway and by an electric railway connecting with Milwaukee.

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  • Superior is served by the Northern Pacific, the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic, the Wisconsin Central, the Great Northern, the Minneapolis, St Paul & Sault Ste Marie, and the Chicago & North-Western railways, and (for freight only) by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul.

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  • He graduated from the university of Copenhagen in 1865, began the study of law, removed to the United States in 1867, taught German in Milwaukee, was admitted to the bar in 1869, and practised in Chicago.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Milwaukee & Saint Paul, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, and the Wabash railways.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Wabash, and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railways.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific railways.

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  • There are, according to Hoffmann's Directory (Milwaukee, 1907), 4364 parochial schools, in which 1,096,842 children of both sexes receive instruction.

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  • of Milwaukee and about 131 m.

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  • Madison is served by the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Illinois Central railways (being the northern terminus of the last), and by interurban electric lines, connecting with Janesville, Beloit and Chicago.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Chicago, St Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha railways.

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  • Marie, and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Milwaukee, St Paul & Sault Ste Marie railways, by two interurban electric railways, and by steamboat lines on the lake and on the Fox river, which flows out of Lake Winnebago at this point.

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  • It is served by the Grand Trunk, the Pere Marquette, the Grand Rapids & Indiana, and the Grand Rapids, Grand Haven & Muskegon (electric) railways, and by steamboat lines to Chicago, Milwaukee and other lake ports.

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  • Clinton is served by the Chicago & North-Western (which has machineshops here), the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific railways, and is connected with Davenport by an electric line.

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  • Elgin is served by the Chicago & NorthWestern and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways, and by interurban electric railways to Chicago, Aurora and Belvidere.

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  • Among these are the Menominee and Oconto, which flow into Green Bay; an arm of Lake Michigan, and the Sheboygan and Milwaukee rivers emptying directly into the lake.

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  • Within a period of thirty-eight years, from 1870 to 1908, extremes at Milwaukee ranged from 100° to - 25°, while at La Crosse, on the western border and less than 60 m.

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  • More than one-third of the value of factory products was that of the manufactures of Milwaukee ($138,881,545).

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  • There are large deposits of stratified clay along the shores of Lake Michigan, from which is made a cream-coloured brick, so largely used in Milwaukee that that city has been called the "cream city"; the total value of clay products in 1907 was $1,127,819 and in 1908 $95 8, 395.

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  • The first limestone quarries were opened at Genesee, Waukesha county, in 1848; at Wauwatosa, near Milwaukee, in 1855; and near Bridgeport in 1856.

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  • Railway building in Wisconsin began in 1851, when a track was laid from Milwaukee to Waukesha (20 m.), which was extended westward in 1854 to Madison and in 1857 to the Mississippi at Prairie du Chien.

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  • This line was the forerunner of the great Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul system, which now crosses the southern half of the state with two trunk lines and with one line parallels the shore of Lake Michigan.

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  • Milwaukee is one of the leading lake ports, and is the only port of entry in the state; its imports were valued at $796,285 in 1899 and at $4,493,635 i:1 1909, and its exports at $2726 in 1899 and at $244,890 in 1909.

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  • Germans and Irish are now scattered throughout the state; but the German element predominates markedly in Milwaukee.

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  • Poles are chiefly in Milwaukee, Manitowoc and Portage counties, Belgians and Dutch in Brown and Door counties, German Swiss in Green, Fond du Lac, Winnebago, Buffalo and Pierce counties, and Bohemians in Kewaunee county, where they form almost 50% of the population.

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  • The judicial power of the state is vested: in a supreme court' of seven members (salary $6000 a year; elected for a term of ten years; the senior justice is chief justice) with appellate jurisdiction throughout the state, general superintendence over all inferior courts, power to issue, hear and determine writs of habeas corpus, mandamus, injunction, quo warranto, certiorari and other original and remedial writs; nineteen (only five under the constitution of 1848) circuit courts, of one judge each except in the second circuit (including Milwaukee) in which there are four judges, elected (at a spring election, and not at the general state election) by the voters of the circuit district; probate judges, one elected (for two years) in each county, except where the legislature confers probate powers on inferior courts; and in towns, cities and villages, justices of the peace, elected for two years.

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  • Justices of the peace hold office for two years, other town officers for one year only, except that in a county having a population of 100,000 or more (Milwaukee county), town meetings are biennial and all officers are elected for two years.

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  • The state tax on railways and other public service corporations is 1 The first class comprises cities having a population of 150,000 or more (Milwaukee); the second class those having a population between 40,000 and 150,000; the third class those having a population between Io,000 and 40,000; the fourth class those having a population less than 10,000.

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  • There are special kindergarten training departments in the Milwaukee and Superior schools, departments for manual training at Oshkosh and Platteville, and a training department in domestic science at the Stevens Point school.

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  • Educational institutions of collegiate rank are Beloit College (1846; originally Congregational, now undenominational) at Beloit; Carroll College (1846, Presbyterian), at Waukesha; Lawrence College (1847; Methodist Episcopal), at Appleton; Concordia College (1881; Lutheran), Marquette University (1864, Roman Catholic), and Milwaukee-Downer College (1895; non-sectarian, for women; an outgrowth of Downer College, Congregational and Presbyterian, founded at Fox Lake in 1853), all at Milwaukee; Milton College (1867; Seventh Day Adventist), at Milton; North-western University 0865; Lutheran) at Watertown; Ripon College (1851; originally under Presbyterian and Congregational control, now non-sectarian), at Ripon; Wayland University (1855; co-educational; Baptist), at Beaver Dam; and the following Roman Catholic schools: St Clara Academy (1847; Dominican) at Sinsiniwa, St Francis Seminary (1853) at St Francis, and St Lawrence College (1861, Capuchin) at Mt Calvary.

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  • In addition the board has partial control over the Wisconsin Workshop for the Blind (1903) at Milwaukee, where there is a willow ware factory, and the Wisconsin Industrial School for Girls (1875) also at Milwaukee.

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  • Among these were Alexander Henry (1739-1824), who as early as 1760 had visited the site of Milwaukee, and who now obtained a monopoly of the Lake Superior trade, and Jonathan Carver, who in 1766 reached Green Bay on his way to the Mississippi.

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  • The first Territorial Council met in 1836 at Old Belmont, now Leslie, Lafayette county, but in December of that year Madison was selected as the capital, after a contest in which Fond du Lac, Milwaukee, Racine, Green Bay, Portage and other places were considered, and in which James Duane Doty, later governor, owner of the Madison town plat, was charged with bribing legislators with town lots in Madison.

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  • In the same year a fugitive slave named Glover was seized at Racine and was afterward rescued by an anti-slavery mob from Milwaukee; the State Supreme Court rendered a decision which declared the Fugitive Slave Law to be null and void in Wisconsin.

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  • 1840) was a printer and then a journalist, founded in 1874 at La Crosse the Sun, which in 1878 he removed to Milwaukee, and was the author of many humorous sketches, notably a series of volumes of which the hero is ” Peck's Bad Boy.” 3 Lieut.-Governor; succeeded Barstow, who resigned during a contest with Bashford.

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  • C. Case's Wisconsin, its Geology and Physical Geography (Milwaukee, 1907).

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  • iii., new series, of the Bulletin (Milwaukee) of the Wisconsin Natural History Society, are valuable.

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  • Legler's Leading Events in Wisconsin History (Milwaukee, 1898), a good brief summary, are other single-volume works covering the entire period of the state's history.

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  • The Parkman Society Papers (Milwaukee, 1895-1899) provide a collection of good articles on special topics of Wisconsin history, and the Original Narratives and Reprints published by the Wisconsin History Commission (created by an act of 1905) deal with Wisconsin in the Civil War.

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  • Mankato is served by the Chicago, St Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha, the Chicago & North-Western (both "North -Western Lines"), the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, and the Chicago Great-Western railways.

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  • Minneapolis is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Great Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Chicago & Northwestern, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Great.

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  • There are a Union passenger station, and separate stations for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Chicago, Great Western and the Minneapolis & St Louis railways.

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  • Kremers under the title Volatile Oils (Milwaukee, Wisconsin); F.

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  • The Milwaukee Hole Shooter is a good drill. warren weber replied to Jay on 28 Feb 2003 I have both keyed and keyless.

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  • If you are traveling by car or tour bus, take exit 267 off I-94 between Madison and Milwaukee.

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  • If your energy level is still high, but you want a mental break from shopping, you can visit the Aztalan Museum, watch the Milwaukee Brewers play baseball, or visit the Vetro Winery.

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  • From Milwaukee, exit the same road (exit 147, Highway 165), turn left, then cross over the highway.

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  • From Milwaukee, exit the same road (exit 147, Highway 165), turn left, then cross over the highway.

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  • Things changed drastically when Winfrey was six years old and moved to Milwaukee to live with her mother.

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  • Gene Wilder was born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

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  • Campuses are located in metropolitan areas such as Madison and Milwaukee, as well as more remote locations and smaller cities, such as Superior and Rock County.

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  • Eva's Bridal in Oak Creek is a well-considered bridal shop that has served the Milwaukee area since 1946.

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  • Amelishan, a newer shop in the Germantown area of Milwaukee, has elegant dresses with a modern edge.

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  • This theme park destination is just a stone's throw from both Chicago and Milwaukee, and provides rides, shows, food and water park fun to keep all ages entertained.

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  • Badgerland RV - This RV rental provider is located in southern Wisconsin, in close proximity to Madison and Milwaukee.

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  • Saunders RV - Based in Milwaukee, Saunders RV specializes on Class C motor home rentals, offering customers the choice of 29 foot or 31 foot models.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine. 611 East Wells St., Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine. 555 East Wells Street, Suite 1100, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3823.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine. 611 East Wells St., Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology. 555 East Wells St., Suite 1100, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3823.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine (AAEM). 555 East Wells Street, Suite 1100, Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine. 611 East Wells Street, Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. 611 East Wells St., Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine. 611 East Wells Street, Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine. 611 East Wells Street, Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine. 611 East Wells Street, Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine (AAEM). 555 East Wells Street, Suite 1100, Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • The Milwaukee brace consists of metal uprights attached to pads at the hips, rib cage, and neck.

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  • American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, Immunology. 555 East Wells Street, Suite 1100, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3823.

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  • American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI). 611 East Wells Street, Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology. 555 East Wells Street, Suite 1100, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3823.

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  • P.O. Box 170864, Milwaukee, WI 53217-8076. (888) 964-2001.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine. 611 East Wells Street, Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 611 East Wells Street, Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine. 611 East Wells Street, Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • P.O. Box 170864, Milwaukee, WI 53217-8076. (888) 964-2001.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine (AAEM). 555 East Wells Street, Suite 1100, Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine. 611 East Wells Street, Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. 555 East Wells Street, Suite 1100, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3823.

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  • Milwaukee, Wisconsin, reported 4,000 unexcused absences on an average school day.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine. 611 East Wells St., Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine. 611 East Wells Street, Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • Wells St., Milwaukee, WI 53202. (800) 822-ASTHMA or (414) 272-6071.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine. 555 East Wells Street, Suite 1100, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3823.

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  • Movement Disorders Society. 555 East Wells St., Suite 1100, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3823. (414) 276-2145.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine. 611 East Wells St., Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. 611 East Wells St, Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI). 611 East Wells Street, Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine (AAEM). 555 East Wells Street, Suite 1100, Milwaukee, WI 53202.

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  • It was based on stereotypes and created to sell Old Milwaukee Beer.

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  • Enter the Swedish girls in bikinis carrying plenty of Old Milwaukee beer on a boat and looking for a party.

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  • It is easily accessible form Green Bay, Milwaukee and Plymouth.

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  • The company serves moviegoers in major markets including Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota, Fargo, North Dakota, Columbus, Ohio, and the Greater Chicago-land area.

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  • Working Person.com carries brands like Harley Davidson, Milwaukee, Red Wing and Double H.

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  • Its close proximity to both Milwaukee and Chicago make it popular with commuters and with Young and the Restless fans.

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  • Wisconsin got another chance to shine on the national spotlight when Young and the Restless producers cast four popular Milwaukee Brewer players on the show.

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  • Also, from South Bend you can really serve Detroit, Toledo, Cleveland, Indianapolis, Milwaukee, and Chicago.

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  • In addition to their website, Marcus Uniforms offers a hard copy catalog and a retail store located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

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  • Milwaukee may be a large urban center, but it still offers ample opportunities for outdoor recreation.

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  • Milwaukee's many parks have trails for hiking and biking, and wintertime brings snowshoeing and cross-country skiing.

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  • Cloquet is served by the Northern Pacific, the Great Northern, the Duluth & North-Eastern, and (for freight only) the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways.

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