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millimetre

millimetre Sentence Examples

  • They range from a millimetre or so (smaller species of Aeolosoma) to 6 ft.

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  • In a well-made apparatus the pressure in the exhausted vessel is now reduced to I t o or 2 1, of a millimetre, or even less.

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  • In a well-made apparatus the pressure in the exhausted vessel is now reduced to I t o or 2 1, of a millimetre, or even less.

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  • It has been found that the " carbons " in drills can safely be subjected to a pressure of over 60 kilograms per square millimetre, and a speed of 25 metres per second.

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  • 37); the opposed faces of these plugs are perfectly smooth, and are placed within a millimetre of each other.

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  • As a rule flies are of small or moderate size, and many, such as certain blood-sucking midges of the genus Ceratopogon, are even minute; as extremes of size may be mentioned a common British midge, Ceratopogon varius, the female of which measures only 14 millimetre, and the gigantic Mydaidae of Central and South America as well as certain Australian robber-flies, which have a body 1-11n.

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  • Referring the reader to the article Elasticity for the theoretical and to the Strength Of Materials far the practical aspects of this subject, we give here a table of the "modulus of elasticity," E (column 2), for millimetre and kilogramme.

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  • The general nature of the phenomena is thus easily understood; but it is at a maximum at pressures comparable with a millimetre of mercury, at which the free path is still small, the greater number of molecules operating in intensifying the result.

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  • With a period of 18 seconds, and the record-receiving paper at a distance of about 15 ft., a deflection of I millimetre of the light spot may indicate a tilting of AD part of a second of arc, or I in.

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  • The metre and the kilometre, for instance, or the metre and the millimetre, are not directly comparable; but the metre can be conceived as containing too centimetres.

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  • For example, if the diameter be one millimetre, the disturbance is multiplied 1000 fold in about one-fortieth of a second.

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  • The value in terms of arc of the scale of the record can be obtained by measuring the distance between the magnet mirror and the recording drum, and in most observations it is such that a millimetre on the record represents one minute of arc. The time scale ordinarily employed is 15 mm.

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  • The earth would intercept an amount of it proportional to the solid angle it subtends at the sun; that is to say, it would receive a deposit of meteoric matter about one-tenth of a millimetre, of density say 2, over its whole surface in the course of the year.

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  • The earth would intercept an amount of it proportional to the solid angle it subtends at the sun; that is to say, it would receive a deposit of meteoric matter about one-tenth of a millimetre, of density say 2, over its whole surface in the course of the year.

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  • Fleuss consists of a vacuum pump capable of reducing the air pressure to a fraction of a millimetre, the suction pipe of which is connected first with a vessel containing sulphuric acid, and second with the vessel containing the water to be frozen.

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  • Fleuss consists of a vacuum pump capable of reducing the air pressure to a fraction of a millimetre, the suction pipe of which is connected first with a vessel containing sulphuric acid, and second with the vessel containing the water to be frozen.

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  • -- Decametre or 10 metres; double metre; metre or 1000 millimetres; decimetre or 0.1 metre; centimetre or 0.001 metre; millimetre.

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  • divisions of the micrometer scale in the eye-piece of the microscope, 54 divisions being equal to one millimetre.

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  • p. 402) made experiments to determine the greatest distance at which the effect of these forces is sensible, and he found for various substances distances about the twenty-thousandth part of a millimetre.

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  • The experiments of Quincke and others seem to show that the extreme range of the forces which produce capillary action lies between a thousandth and a twenty-thousandth part of a millimetre.

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  • Calculated as if the density were the same as in a normal state, the thickness of the film is found to be about two millionths of a millimetre.

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  • o of a millimetre.

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  • But for refined work this would imply the investigation of too many divisions of the scale; it is therefore more usual to divide the scale into single millimetres or half-millimetres and to provide a micrometer which subdivides the millimetre into 1000 or, by estimation, into Io,000 parts.

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  • 37); the opposed faces of these plugs are perfectly smooth, and are placed within a millimetre of each other.

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  • As a rule flies are of small or moderate size, and many, such as certain blood-sucking midges of the genus Ceratopogon, are even minute; as extremes of size may be mentioned a common British midge, Ceratopogon varius, the female of which measures only 14 millimetre, and the gigantic Mydaidae of Central and South America as well as certain Australian robber-flies, which have a body 1-11n.

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  • They range from a millimetre or so (smaller species of Aeolosoma) to 6 ft.

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  • Referring the reader to the article Elasticity for the theoretical and to the Strength Of Materials far the practical aspects of this subject, we give here a table of the "modulus of elasticity," E (column 2), for millimetre and kilogramme.

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    0
  • The general nature of the phenomena is thus easily understood; but it is at a maximum at pressures comparable with a millimetre of mercury, at which the free path is still small, the greater number of molecules operating in intensifying the result.

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    0
  • -- Decametre or 10 metres; double metre; metre or 1000 millimetres; decimetre or 0.1 metre; centimetre or 0.001 metre; millimetre.

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  • It has been found that the " carbons " in drills can safely be subjected to a pressure of over 60 kilograms per square millimetre, and a speed of 25 metres per second.

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    0
  • With a period of 18 seconds, and the record-receiving paper at a distance of about 15 ft., a deflection of I millimetre of the light spot may indicate a tilting of AD part of a second of arc, or I in.

    0
    0
  • The value in terms of arc of the scale of the record can be obtained by measuring the distance between the magnet mirror and the recording drum, and in most observations it is such that a millimetre on the record represents one minute of arc. The time scale ordinarily employed is 15 mm.

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    0
  • divisions of the micrometer scale in the eye-piece of the microscope, 54 divisions being equal to one millimetre.

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    0
  • p. 402) made experiments to determine the greatest distance at which the effect of these forces is sensible, and he found for various substances distances about the twenty-thousandth part of a millimetre.

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    0
  • The experiments of Quincke and others seem to show that the extreme range of the forces which produce capillary action lies between a thousandth and a twenty-thousandth part of a millimetre.

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    0
  • Calculated as if the density were the same as in a normal state, the thickness of the film is found to be about two millionths of a millimetre.

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  • For example, if the diameter be one millimetre, the disturbance is multiplied 1000 fold in about one-fortieth of a second.

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  • The metre and the kilometre, for instance, or the metre and the millimetre, are not directly comparable; but the metre can be conceived as containing too centimetres.

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  • o of a millimetre.

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