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militant

militant

militant Sentence Examples

  • Their bishops and priests, who wear the moustache in deference to popular prejudice, are typical specimens of the church militant.

  • The `EAXnvucwv OEpairEvruo lraen,uhTwv (De Curandis Graecorum Affectionibus) - written before 438 - is of an historical and apologetic character, very largely indebted to Clement of Alexandria and Eusebius; it aims at showing the advantages of Christianity as compared with " the moribund but still militant " Hellenism of the day, and deals with the assaults of pagan adversaries.

  • Ostentatious avoidance of a fish-diet became, indeed, one of the outward symbols of militant Protestantism among the Puritans.

  • The United States was, at this time, drawn into the vortex of European complications, and Adams, instead of taking advantage of the militant spirit which was aroused, patriotically devoted himself to securing peace with France, much against the wishes of Hamilton and of Hamilton's adherents in the cabinet.

  • The .Maccabaeans used compulsion in some cases, but Judaism in the Diaspora was a missionary religion in the less militant sense.

  • The last stage of Scholasticism preceding its dissolution is marked by the revival of Nominalism in a militant form.

  • Such an enthusiasm of militant piety, plainly based on actual successes of Israel and the house of Aaron, can only be referred to the first victories of the Maccabees, culminating in the purification of the Temple in 164 B.C. This restoration of the worship of the national sanctuary, under circumstances that inspired religious feelings very different from those of any other generation since the return from Babylon, might most naturally be followed by an extension of the Temple psalmody; it certainly was followed by some liturgical innovations, for the solemn service of dedication on the 25th day of Chisleu was made the pattern of a new annual feast (that mentioned in John x.

  • This doctrine of philosophic quietism was common to his successors, until in the time of the sixth guru, Har Govind, it was found necessary to support the separate existence of Sikhism by force of arms, and this led to the militant and political development of the tenth and most powerful of the gurus, Govind Singh.

  • Hitherto they had been merely an insignificant religious sect; now, stimulated by persecution, they became a militant and political power, inimical to the Mahommedan rulers of the country.

  • Macauliffe, The Sikh Religion: Its Gurus, Sacred Writings and Authors (6 vols., 1909), and two lectures before the United Service Institution of India on "The Sikh Religion and its Advantages to the State" and "How the Sikhs became a Militant Race."

  • The limits at each end, however, are very ill defined, the superior falling not later than 2000 B.C. and the inferior not earlier than boo B.C. This people was militant, aggressive and unsettled in the earlier part of that time; commercial, wealthy and enervated in the latter.

  • To the bishop's formula, "I separate thee from the church militant and the church triumphant," Savonarola replied in firm tones, "Not from the church triumphant; that is beyond thy power."

  • The great struggle between the Taira and Minamoto clans had ended, but the militant spirit was still strong, and brought work for the artists who made and ornamented arms and armour.

  • Tarentum alone, partly from Spartan origin, partly through stress of local conditions, shows traces of militant asceticism for a while.

  • The decree Sacrosancta (April 1415) proclaimed that a general council assembled in the Holy Spirit and representing the Catholic Church militant had its power immediately from Christ, and was supreme over every one in the Church, not excluding the pope, in all matters pertaining to the faith and reformation of the Church of God in head and members.

  • B ut more important and less speculative is the hero's aspect as a national type or an amalgamation of tribal types of physical force, of dauntless effort and endurance, of militant civilization, and of Hellenic enterprise, " stronger than everything except his own passions," and " at once above and below the noblest type of man " (Jebb).

  • Political differences soon interfered with his work; as an adherent of Prussia and a Protestant, especially as a militant champion against the Ultramontanes, he was from the first an object of suspicion to the Clerical party.

  • Though athletic, he was one of the least militant of the gods; a title rpoµaxos, the Defender, is found only in connexion with a victory of young men ("ephebes") in a battle at Tanagra.

  • For Poland, unlike Scotland, was fortunately, in those days of difficult inter-communication, not too far off, and it is indisputable that in the first instance it was the papal nuncios, men like Berard of Camerino and Giovanni Commendone, who reorganized the scattered and faint-hearted battalions of the Church militant in Poland and led them back to victory.

  • In Anglican churches non-communicants used to leave the church after the prayer for the Church Militant.

  • To the temperament of the Jat, the Arora and the Ramgarhia Sikh add the stimulus of a militant religion.

  • In France, so far from taking this direction, it has resulted, under democratic government and universal suffrage, in a widespread abhorrence of war, and, in fact, has converted the French people from being the most militant into being the most pacific nation in Europe.

  • As the saint purified in heaven is he who struggled with his sins on earth, so is the church triumphant one with the church militant.

  • His broad churchmanship placed him in opposition to the dominant tendency in the Church of England, and he was also a strong and militant Liberal in politics, being an ardent advocate of the disestablishment of the Church in Wales.

  • His incisive way of putting things earned for him the title of the "Militant Bishop," but, as he himself remarked in.

  • A short time afterwards the militant party among the Protestants suffered a heavy loss by the death of their leader, John Casimir, whose policy, however, was continued by his nephew and pupil, the elector Frederick IV.

  • But neither desertion nor death was able to crush entirely the militant Protestants, among whom Christian, prince of Anhalt (1568-1630), was rapidly becoming the most prominent figure.

  • In the last years of his short life he engaged actively in politics, and made speeches in Paris and in Moscow in the beginning of 1882 in favour of a militant Panslavism, predicting a desperate strife between Teuton and Sla y.

  • So, although the warlike character of Hera was not elsewhere prominent, she assumed a militant aspect in her two chief cities; a festival called the Shield (iuriris, in Pindar ay Wv X6XKEos) was part of the Argive cult, and there was an armed procession in her honour at Samos.

  • In Scotland the kirk, as ever, was militant, but it could no longer wage war on kings and their ministers, nor attempt to direct foreign and domestic policy.

  • Later political fervour has grouped him with the author of the Wallace, and treated the unequal pair as the singers of a militant patriotism.

  • In some instances, as in the great Creation Series of Babylon, the later scribes subjected the different versions to processes of editing, with the result that the earlier forms gave place to the redactions of a militant priesthood.

  • As virtuoso he held his own for the entire period during which he chose to appear in public; but the militant conductor and prophet of Wagner had a hard time of it, and the composer's place is still in dispute.

  • Terrified out of their lives at the way in which science and criticism were taking one theological citadel after another, the more militant section of the clergy declared war on thought itself.

  • This early Christian scripture is one of the books militant in the world's literature.

  • Vijayanagar gave the militant Mahommedanism of Northern India no, opportunity for a combined attack on the Portuguese settlements.

  • The Claridades de Sul of Gomes Leal, a militant anti-Christian, at times recall Baudelaire, and flashes of genius run through AntiChristo, which is alive with the instinct of revolt.

  • He was a fierce, violent man, a soldier and nothing else, whose piety was wholly militant.

  • From this he went on to socialism, which bases its militant philosophy upon this interpretation of history.

  • Carlyle was a militant Emerson, moving amid thunderclouds.

  • Into this movement he threw himself with militant ardour, his own goods being distrained upon, with those of numerous other Nonconformists, rather than that any contribution should be made by them in taxation for the purpose of an Education Act which in their opinion was calculated to support denominational religious teaching in the schools.

  • His grandfather, Thomas Swift, vicar of Goodrich near Ross, appears to have been a doughty member of the church militant, who lost his possessions by taking the losing side in the Civil War and died in 1658 before the restoration could bring him redress.

  • Lange then entered on a career of militant journalism in the cause of political and social reform.

  • The continental churchmen of the 11th century were brimming over with ascetic zeal and militant energy, while the majority of the English hierarchy were slack and easy-going.

  • Those Wh!gs end principles, to which that party adhered which about this time became known as the Tory party, had been formed under the influence of the terror caused by militant Puritanism.

  • Benn (History of English Rationalism in the zgth Cent.) goes beyond ordinary usage in defining rationalism as a militant theory opposed to all belief in God.

  • ~ militant ardour of monks and centuries of labor were needed to conquer the country districts, and in the meantime both dogma and internal organization were subjected to important modifications.

  • He protected the missionaries who paved the way for his militant invasions.

  • under foot, it now demanded much more radical reform, quitting the ranks of peaceable citizens to pass into the only militant class of the time and adopt its customs. Men like Coligny, dAndelot and Cond took the place of the timid Lefvre of Etapies and the harsh and bitter Calvin; and the reform party, in contradiction to its doctrines and its doctors, became a political and religious party of opposition, with all the compromises that presupposes.

  • Goaded by the vigorous revival of militant Catholicism which marked the opening of the 17th century, de Luynes tried to put a finishing touch to the triumph of Catholicism in France, which he had assisted, by abandoning in the treaty of Ulm the defence of the small German states against the ambition of the ruling house of Austria, and by sacrificing the Protestant Grisons to Spain.

  • Alarmed, the Trust tried to unload; militant womanhood, thoroughly aroused, scorned compromise.

  • assassinate militant activists.

  • Indeed, it seems like the supreme irony that militant atheism has managed to acquire the mentality of a religion.

  • The trouble with the vicar parody is that the most militant atheists in Britain don't believe vicars are evil.

  • The militant tendency once boasted the largest number of adherents of any far left group in Britain.

  • There were the militant imperialists, deeply impressed by German collectivism.

  • Alarmed, the Trust tried to unload; militant womanhood, thoroughly aroused, scorned compromise.

  • crucible of militant terrorism.

  • The specter of civil war still hangs over the nation, and Iraq has become a crucible of militant terrorism.

  • electricians ' union into one of the most militant unions in northern Sweden.

  • Many of these are depressingly familiar to militant workers around the world.

  • The fact is that, in a similar way to militant feminism, the battle has been won.

  • Militant reformers would suppress antiquities looting by international treaty, court order, state fiat, and the moral artillery of shame and guilt.

  • glimmer of hope, you see, which kept them militant.

  • intransigent, militant trade unions holding the country to ransom.

  • militant republicanism.

  • militant Islamists active in the Iraq crisis will also be affected whatever the outcome is.

  • militant suffragettes, the WSPU, was established.

  • militant secularism, which actively opposes any manifestations of religiosity.

  • militant atheism has managed to acquire the mentality of a religion.

  • Far from being moribund, Mohammedanism is a militant and proselytizing faith.

  • No longer the artisans of previous years, the modern loyalist mural painters were young men with more militant politics.

  • Neither in Militant nor in Socialist Appeal will one find polemics, not even between each other.

  • The peasant rebellion has spread in a more militant form.

  • Is he a militant republican or a liberal republican?

  • There is no need for working class leadership or militant republicanism.

  • romanticize the image of the non-compromising militant, ready to take anything on in the name of the cause.

  • We do not romanticize the image of the non-compromising militant, ready to take anything on in the name of the cause.

  • militant secularism of the old kind is not the answer.

  • We believe profoundly that a close study of the events of that time would immensely benefit the militant socialists of all countries.

  • Ms Pankhurst is a militant suffragette leading the revolution for women's suffrage for the vote.

  • She turned out to be one of the best known of the militant suffragists, Miss Emily Wilding Davison.

  • supreme irony that militant atheism has managed to acquire the mentality of a religion.

  • tyret they are now met by militant villagers who puncture the tires and even beat up the drivers and send them packing.

  • All components of what went on to establish the early CPGB were deeply rooted in the culture of militant trade unionism.

  • But the real way forward for the Brazilian left is to try to engage with militant trade unionists and the active social movements?

  • Alarmed, the Trust tried to unload; militant womanhood, thoroughly aroused, scorned compromise.

  • The body was for some years the only important suffrage society, and most of the pioneers of the movement belonged to it; but in 1906 the Women's Social and Political Union was formed, pledged to work by militant, as opposed to constitutional methods.

  • Mrs. Fawcett was strongly opposed to the tactics of the militant suffragists, and expressly dissociated the N.U.W.S.S.

  • Their bishops and priests, who wear the moustache in deference to popular prejudice, are typical specimens of the church militant.

  • The `EAXnvucwv OEpairEvruo lraen,uhTwv (De Curandis Graecorum Affectionibus) - written before 438 - is of an historical and apologetic character, very largely indebted to Clement of Alexandria and Eusebius; it aims at showing the advantages of Christianity as compared with " the moribund but still militant " Hellenism of the day, and deals with the assaults of pagan adversaries.

  • Unfortunately at the very outset of its career the composition of the new cabinet proved disappointing; for while such men as Count Guicciardini, the minister for foreign affairs, and Signor Luzzatti at the treasury commanded general approval, the choice of Signor Sacchi as minister of justice and of Signor Pantano as minister of agriculture and trade, both of them advanced and militant Radicals, savoured of an unholy compact between the premier and his erstwhile bitter enemies, which boded ill for tht~ success of the administration.

  • Ostentatious avoidance of a fish-diet became, indeed, one of the outward symbols of militant Protestantism among the Puritans.

  • The United States was, at this time, drawn into the vortex of European complications, and Adams, instead of taking advantage of the militant spirit which was aroused, patriotically devoted himself to securing peace with France, much against the wishes of Hamilton and of Hamilton's adherents in the cabinet.

  • The .Maccabaeans used compulsion in some cases, but Judaism in the Diaspora was a missionary religion in the less militant sense.

  • The last stage of Scholasticism preceding its dissolution is marked by the revival of Nominalism in a militant form.

  • Such an enthusiasm of militant piety, plainly based on actual successes of Israel and the house of Aaron, can only be referred to the first victories of the Maccabees, culminating in the purification of the Temple in 164 B.C. This restoration of the worship of the national sanctuary, under circumstances that inspired religious feelings very different from those of any other generation since the return from Babylon, might most naturally be followed by an extension of the Temple psalmody; it certainly was followed by some liturgical innovations, for the solemn service of dedication on the 25th day of Chisleu was made the pattern of a new annual feast (that mentioned in John x.

  • This doctrine of philosophic quietism was common to his successors, until in the time of the sixth guru, Har Govind, it was found necessary to support the separate existence of Sikhism by force of arms, and this led to the militant and political development of the tenth and most powerful of the gurus, Govind Singh.

  • Hitherto they had been merely an insignificant religious sect; now, stimulated by persecution, they became a militant and political power, inimical to the Mahommedan rulers of the country.

  • Macauliffe, The Sikh Religion: Its Gurus, Sacred Writings and Authors (6 vols., 1909), and two lectures before the United Service Institution of India on "The Sikh Religion and its Advantages to the State" and "How the Sikhs became a Militant Race."

  • The limits at each end, however, are very ill defined, the superior falling not later than 2000 B.C. and the inferior not earlier than boo B.C. This people was militant, aggressive and unsettled in the earlier part of that time; commercial, wealthy and enervated in the latter.

  • To the bishop's formula, "I separate thee from the church militant and the church triumphant," Savonarola replied in firm tones, "Not from the church triumphant; that is beyond thy power."

  • The great struggle between the Taira and Minamoto clans had ended, but the militant spirit was still strong, and brought work for the artists who made and ornamented arms and armour.

  • The Cretan cities, irrespective of origin, exhibit serfage, militant aristocracy, rigid martial discipline of all citizens, and other marked analogies with Sparta; but the Asiatic Dorians and the other Dorian colonies do not differ appreciably in their social and political history from their Ionian and Aeolic neighbours.

  • Tarentum alone, partly from Spartan origin, partly through stress of local conditions, shows traces of militant asceticism for a while.

  • The decree Sacrosancta (April 1415) proclaimed that a general council assembled in the Holy Spirit and representing the Catholic Church militant had its power immediately from Christ, and was supreme over every one in the Church, not excluding the pope, in all matters pertaining to the faith and reformation of the Church of God in head and members.

  • B ut more important and less speculative is the hero's aspect as a national type or an amalgamation of tribal types of physical force, of dauntless effort and endurance, of militant civilization, and of Hellenic enterprise, " stronger than everything except his own passions," and " at once above and below the noblest type of man " (Jebb).

  • Political differences soon interfered with his work; as an adherent of Prussia and a Protestant, especially as a militant champion against the Ultramontanes, he was from the first an object of suspicion to the Clerical party.

  • Though athletic, he was one of the least militant of the gods; a title rpoµaxos, the Defender, is found only in connexion with a victory of young men ("ephebes") in a battle at Tanagra.

  • For Poland, unlike Scotland, was fortunately, in those days of difficult inter-communication, not too far off, and it is indisputable that in the first instance it was the papal nuncios, men like Berard of Camerino and Giovanni Commendone, who reorganized the scattered and faint-hearted battalions of the Church militant in Poland and led them back to victory.

  • In Anglican churches non-communicants used to leave the church after the prayer for the Church Militant.

  • To the temperament of the Jat, the Arora and the Ramgarhia Sikh add the stimulus of a militant religion.

  • A third element was introduced by the rise of militant syndicalism in France (see Syndicalism).

  • In France, so far from taking this direction, it has resulted, under democratic government and universal suffrage, in a widespread abhorrence of war, and, in fact, has converted the French people from being the most militant into being the most pacific nation in Europe.

  • As the saint purified in heaven is he who struggled with his sins on earth, so is the church triumphant one with the church militant.

  • His broad churchmanship placed him in opposition to the dominant tendency in the Church of England, and he was also a strong and militant Liberal in politics, being an ardent advocate of the disestablishment of the Church in Wales.

  • His incisive way of putting things earned for him the title of the "Militant Bishop," but, as he himself remarked in.

  • A short time afterwards the militant party among the Protestants suffered a heavy loss by the death of their leader, John Casimir, whose policy, however, was continued by his nephew and pupil, the elector Frederick IV.

  • But neither desertion nor death was able to crush entirely the militant Protestants, among whom Christian, prince of Anhalt (1568-1630), was rapidly becoming the most prominent figure.

  • In the last years of his short life he engaged actively in politics, and made speeches in Paris and in Moscow in the beginning of 1882 in favour of a militant Panslavism, predicting a desperate strife between Teuton and Sla y.

  • So, although the warlike character of Hera was not elsewhere prominent, she assumed a militant aspect in her two chief cities; a festival called the Shield (iuriris, in Pindar ay Wv X6XKEos) was part of the Argive cult, and there was an armed procession in her honour at Samos.

  • In Scotland the kirk, as ever, was militant, but it could no longer wage war on kings and their ministers, nor attempt to direct foreign and domestic policy.

  • Later political fervour has grouped him with the author of the Wallace, and treated the unequal pair as the singers of a militant patriotism.

  • In some instances, as in the great Creation Series of Babylon, the later scribes subjected the different versions to processes of editing, with the result that the earlier forms gave place to the redactions of a militant priesthood.

  • As virtuoso he held his own for the entire period during which he chose to appear in public; but the militant conductor and prophet of Wagner had a hard time of it, and the composer's place is still in dispute.

  • Terrified out of their lives at the way in which science and criticism were taking one theological citadel after another, the more militant section of the clergy declared war on thought itself.

  • Far less plastic and form-loving than the Italian, the German intelligence was more penetrative, earnest, disputative, occupied with substantial problems. Starting with theological criticism, proceeding to the stage of solid studies in the three learned languages, German humanism occupied the attention of a widely scattered sect of erudite scholars; but it did not arouse the interest of the whole nation until it was forced into a violently militant attitude by Pfefferkorn's attack on Reuchlin.

  • This early Christian scripture is one of the books militant in the world's literature.

  • Vijayanagar gave the militant Mahommedanism of Northern India no, opportunity for a combined attack on the Portuguese settlements.

  • The Claridades de Sul of Gomes Leal, a militant anti-Christian, at times recall Baudelaire, and flashes of genius run through AntiChristo, which is alive with the instinct of revolt.

  • The volumes positively bulge with information and contain much acute criticism, but their value is diminished by frequent and needless digressions and by the fantastic theorizings of their author, a militant Positivist.

  • He was a fierce, violent man, a soldier and nothing else, whose piety was wholly militant.

  • From this he went on to socialism, which bases its militant philosophy upon this interpretation of history.

  • Carlyle was a militant Emerson, moving amid thunderclouds.

  • Into this movement he threw himself with militant ardour, his own goods being distrained upon, with those of numerous other Nonconformists, rather than that any contribution should be made by them in taxation for the purpose of an Education Act which in their opinion was calculated to support denominational religious teaching in the schools.

  • His grandfather, Thomas Swift, vicar of Goodrich near Ross, appears to have been a doughty member of the church militant, who lost his possessions by taking the losing side in the Civil War and died in 1658 before the restoration could bring him redress.

  • Lange then entered on a career of militant journalism in the cause of political and social reform.

  • The continental churchmen of the 11th century were brimming over with ascetic zeal and militant energy, while the majority of the English hierarchy were slack and easy-going.

  • Those Wh!gs end principles, to which that party adhered which about this time became known as the Tory party, had been formed under the influence of the terror caused by militant Puritanism.

  • Benn (History of English Rationalism in the zgth Cent.) goes beyond ordinary usage in defining rationalism as a militant theory opposed to all belief in God.

  • ~ militant ardour of monks and centuries of labor were needed to conquer the country districts, and in the meantime both dogma and internal organization were subjected to important modifications.

  • He protected the missionaries who paved the way for his militant invasions.

  • under foot, it now demanded much more radical reform, quitting the ranks of peaceable citizens to pass into the only militant class of the time and adopt its customs. Men like Coligny, dAndelot and Cond took the place of the timid Lefvre of Etapies and the harsh and bitter Calvin; and the reform party, in contradiction to its doctrines and its doctors, became a political and religious party of opposition, with all the compromises that presupposes.

  • Goaded by the vigorous revival of militant Catholicism which marked the opening of the 17th century, de Luynes tried to put a finishing touch to the triumph of Catholicism in France, which he had assisted, by abandoning in the treaty of Ulm the defence of the small German states against the ambition of the ruling house of Austria, and by sacrificing the Protestant Grisons to Spain.

  • The peasant rebellion has spread in a more militant form.

  • Is he a militant republican or a liberal republican?

  • Indeed the winning of reforms is very often the product of militant revolutionary struggle.

  • We do not romanticize the image of the non-compromising militant, ready to take anything on in the name of the cause.

  • Militant secularism of the old kind is not the answer.

  • We believe profoundly that a close study of the events of that time would immensely benefit the militant Socialists of all countries.

  • Herbert Asquith, the Prime Minister during the militant suffrage campaign, had always been totally against women having the vote.

  • Ms Pankhurst is a militant suffragette leading the revolution for women 's suffrage for the vote.

  • Her militant acts were in support of the suffragette movement which fought for women 's rights.

  • Even then, you have to remember that the press instigated a ban on the reporting of militant suffragette activities around 1911.

  • Founder of the Women 's Social and Political Union (WSPU) in 1903, she launched the militant suffragette campaign in 1905.

  • She turned out to be one of the best known of the militant suffragists, Miss Emily Wilding Davison.

  • A militant and aggressive temperance advocate, he led many campaigns against the trade.

  • It clearly showed the relationship between the Church militant upon the earth and the Church triumphant in heaven.

  • But they are now met by militant villagers who puncture the tires and even beat up the drivers and send them packing.

  • All components of what went on to establish the early CPGB were deeply rooted in the culture of militant trade unionism.

  • But the real way forward for the Brazilian left is to try to engage with militant trade unionists and the active social movements?

  • Well, perhaps unsurprisingly the issues of militant Islamists and free speech have vexed many people.

  • It was said the most militant and outspoken students were there.

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