Miles sentence example

miles
  • He was working on the ranch, fifteen miles away.

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  • He says it's only a few miles away and we'll be right back.

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  • Now he's three thousand miles away.

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  • It came from Boston, a few hundred miles away; sort of like the tip you just made.

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  • We can't run sixty miles in an hour, so we make cars.

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  • How many miles had they traveled today?

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  • Not that she was likely to see him again - especially out here in the desert, hundreds of miles from their little Texas ranch.

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  • I've travelled many miles since my last and I'm becoming impatient for company.

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  • That must be three hundred and fifty miles from here!

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  • It's just two miles an hour.

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  • I spent the autumn months with my family at our summer cottage, on a mountain about fourteen miles from Tuscumbia.

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  • Though in the new reign he was free to return to the capitals, he still continued to live in the country, remarking that anyone who wanted to see him could come the hundred miles from Moscow to Bald Hills, while he himself needed no one and nothing.

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  • There were lots of businesses and folks came out of the hollows from miles around to shop.

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  • We're two hundred miles away.

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  • If he can get us better and timelier information and direct us to the best place to call in our tips, we're miles ahead.

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  • Howie, now able to usually remain with a vehicle, stayed with the car to a suburban ranch style house only six miles from the kidnapping.

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  • After all, you're miles away in Keene, New Hampshire.

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  • He could be 500 miles away.

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  • The people for miles around were roused as though a fire were raging.

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  • The schoolhouse was two or three miles from home, but he did not mind the long walk through the woods and over the hills.

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  • This morning I rode over twelve miles on my tandem!

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  • I have thus surveyed the country on every side within a dozen miles of where I live.

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  • Childhood excursions had taught her that the country was rough, but was she up to ten miles of walking?

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  • They were several miles down the road before either of them spoke.

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  • It seemed unlikely that he would travel so many miles to get her, and then give up.

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  • She plodded on, willing herself to take each step, not thinking of the miles to go, but merely getting through one more painful step.

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  • Peabody was two hundred and thirty miles and we arrived at our destination a little after eleven on Friday night, after nearly six hours of steady traffic.

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  • We did so although the driving was downright dangerous for the first fifty miles.

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  • We splurged for a motel room in Peabody, a few miles from the LeBlanc's home.

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  • His house was situated seven miles from the office and about the same distance from Betsy and me.

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  • Days without refreshing little company to pass the dreary miles.

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  • That's eighty or ninety miles.

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  • I pass farm country, for miles and miles as I travel in my home on wheels.

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  • For two hundred years the mountain has attracted visitors from miles away.

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  • Betsy exclaimed as we caught our breath, standing atop the highest point for thirty miles around.

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  • There is a lovely beach that stretches miles along the blue Atlantic.

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  • I drove the few miles to Howie's home feeling as guilty as a cheating husband for leaving Betsy alone and uninformed.

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  • If our boy made his getaway at more than five or ten miles an hour, you can bet your ass he was on one of these babies.

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  • She had not been reported missing because her mother lay dead in their small rural farm house over a hundred miles away.

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  • Howie was three thousand miles away; who would come to call at this hour of the night?

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  • I thanked him and drove the last few miles to my house, more sedately than earlier.

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  • Going three thousand miles away sounds like a good idea for you folks, even if it's only for a couple of days.

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  • We'd go twenty, thirty miles away to do our business, moving to different towns.

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  • Wherever he is, it's more than a thousand miles from here.

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  • Our motel was at least five or six miles up the coast highway through town.

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  • It's only two or three miles.

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  • We just received word of a horrific accident about ten miles up the road.

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  • He must have been flying a hundred miles an hour to make that mess.

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  • The authorities secured the van's mileage from the previous owner and carefully attempted to construct miles driven to pin-point Grasso's hideout.

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  • Soup was out of the question; it might as well have been a million miles away in the kitchen.

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  • Everyone within a hundred miles felt what you did.

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  • This area is ten square miles, though.

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  • Miles away, Sofia couldn't shake the feeling that something was very wrong with Damian.

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  • Now, thanks to an overzealous social worker, Martha was scheduled to become reacquainted with mommy dearest—in Denver, over three hundred miles away from Bird Song's nest.

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  • Dean suggested before returning that they drive ten miles to the Ridgway fairgrounds, where a Sunday morning farmer's market offered fresh fruits and vegetables.

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  • Ridgway, a few more miles away from the backdrop of mountains, provided a spectacular view.

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  • Dreams are fine as long as they're responsible, but acting stupid and doing the smart thing are miles apart!

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  • It's ten miles from nowhere, in every direction.

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  • How many miles do you suppose it is?

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  • His bike awaited, but when he divided the hundred promised miles a week by seven, the number was daunting.

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  • Thirty five miles later he found the address, a private home on the side street of a quiet neighborhood.

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  • Lydia lived in a newly constructed condo on Oak Street as it drifted out of the main body of town and became the back road to neighboring Ridgway, ten miles away.

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  • What are the odds of her meeting this guy and being the daughter of his mine manager from twenty years earlier and a thousand miles away?

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  • While Pumpkin Green was not at this week's mass, or probably any other service within miles of Ouray, Billy Langstrom's partner in love Melissa attended.

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  • The Dexter Creek Road departed from the highway a few miles north of town and climbed sharply up the eastern escarpment of the valley.

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  • Thousands of miles away, Gabriel was with one of his death dealers surveying the gruesome discovery.

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  • After explaining the situation and giving her address, she turned down the road toward the nearest public area – a service station 2 miles away.

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  • It was cold, sandy – and completely void of any other signs of life for miles.

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  • The lush Scottish Highlands around him were covered in a blanket of snow that stretched for miles, the white world interrupted only by a few narrow roads snaking in different directions.

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  • She'd not yet figured out how to convert their measures of distance to miles.

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  • He's not going to get her committed without a few miles of red tape but just the threat of a lockup could drag her back to old Virginia.

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  • The famous million dollar highway, which climbed three mountain passes before ending seventy-odd miles later in Durango, was spectacular by anyone's definition, more so after a fresh winter snow.

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  • Eight miles from Ouray, but still four miles from the summit of Red Mountain Pass, the road leveled out.

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  • There aren't any open side roads and hardly a plowed turnoff on this highway for twenty miles.

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  • The distance between Ouray and Telluride was less than twenty miles, on a map, or as the eagle soars, when he feels like a thrill.

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  • By highway, the journey was fifty miles—ten miles north to Ridgway, then westerly to Placerville and then back toward the southeast, all necessary to circumnavigate fourteen-thousand foot Mount Sneffles and its towering neighbors.

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  • There were markedly different conditions just a few miles away.

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  • A typical year saw four hundred inches of snow fall atop Red Mountain, a hundred and seventy-five inches in Ouray, and perhaps a foot in Montrose, all within fifty miles.

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  • Much to their dismay, the incoming plane for Cynthia's scheduled flight had been diverted to Grand Junction, sixty miles further away.

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  • It snowed for the entire trip, but all but a few other drivers had the sense to remain home for the last fifty miles.

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  • I just drove two hundred very nasty miles and I'm going to bed.

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  • I didn't sleep worth a damn last night, I got rapped in the head pretty good this morning, and I just drove a couple of hundred miles in a blizzard.

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  • Three or four miles from town, the roadway opened and he slowed, allowing the warmth of the day to soak into his stiff body.

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  • He was concentrating on the roadway, miles from Ouray, when Franny Mulligan passed him, slammed on her brakes, and waved him back to where she parked.

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  • Dean was several miles north of Ridgway, fifteen miles from Ouray.

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  • She finally turned to him and whispered, "I was nearly two hundred and fifty miles away."

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  • Much as she liked Katie, they were miles apart in their opinions and dreams.

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  • No need to rout Josh out and make him drive 60 miles for nothing.

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  • There were too many miles between them to make her secret desires anything more than a dream.

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  • Of all the... do you actually think I traveled six hundred miles just for a tumble in the hay with you?

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  • Sure, you say that now, but come Monday morning you'll be six hundred miles away.

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  • She walked two miles to Josh's place.

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  • He was in need of a veterinarian if he was going to live, and the closest one was nearly twenty miles away.

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  • Alex is a veterinarian, and Katie lives less than five miles away.

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  • Home was in Arkansas now, over five hundred miles away, and he planned to sleep there tonight.

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  • Nothing for miles in working condition, except the fed buildings down the road.

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  • The only thing running for a hundred miles.

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  • By the time the man had finished, his night vision was better and he could make out the tiny necklace of lights in the distance, the Chesapeake Bridge-Tunnel that ran 17 miles to the Eastern shore.

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  • Parkside was a small city of 40,000 located 50 miles northwest of Philadelphia.

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  • Given more time, he'd have preferred to put the bike on the car's rack and chew up some countryside miles, tour­ing the hills and farm lands that surrounded Parkside.

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  • Looks like he recorded it when he got here, then put another 23 miles on it, running to the office and around town.

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  • They reached a compromise and Baratto began to half-tell his story until Dean found an all-night truck stop, miles north of Parkside.

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  • That's out 309, maybe 20 miles from town.

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  • There's not a chance in a mil­lion your boy was 50 miles from the drop so don't give Baratto any excuse to clam up on me.

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  • After a quick supper of pastrami and fruit at Uncle Sally's Galley, Dean pedaled 27 hard miles, working up a good sweat and a painful case of shin splints.

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  • Dean had no way of checking Byrne's mileage and if by chance he had detoured east on Interstate 84, probably 30 miles further, instead of taking the more direct south-easterly route between Scranton and Parkside.

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  • Fred wanted to drive the extra 30 miles or more and visit the rest stop drop location but Dean put his foot down, pointing out that it was two months earlier when the money disappeared.

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  • Dean was within ten miles of Parkside before he noticed a blue Ford that had stayed behind him for an unusual length of time.

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  • Dean sped up to 80 miles an hour and turned across three lanes to an exit while the Ford tried vainly, but unsuccessfully, to follow.

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  • We're hundreds of miles from Parkside.

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  • Earlier he'd signed up to take his July vacation in Iowa, biking the 400 miles across that state on a seven-day bike tour known as "RAG­BRAI," named for the sponsoring Des Moines Register newspaper.

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  • Dean calculated he was 12 to 14 miles from his car, with noth­ing but corn and cows around him.

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  • It was three miles before he came to a closed gas station, but there was a phone booth outside.

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  • It's up in the mountains, a zillion miles from any shopping.

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  • According to Norm Hunter, the fisherwoman was so frightened she'd fainted dead away, while her 12-year-old son thought towing Willie two miles to port was super cool.

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  • Jeffrey Byrne's wife was in far better physical shape than she had let on, and the pair managed 20 miles before finally calling it quits, not because she was tired, but because, as she said, her what-sis was so sore.

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  • He stayed one night, about three miles from Rollins, Kansas.

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  • Some of the days, you only bike 40 or 50 miles but on others you do 80 or 90.

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  • While Dean held out no illusions of leading the pack through the mountains, after turning out 73 miles of rolling hills on a humid Saturday, he felt more confident of his chance of least not embarrassing himself.

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  • It was as if this separation was by miles only, and not the great chasm created by the disap­pearance of Jeffrey Byrne.

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  • The last 200 miles of the bus ride traversed the first three days of the bike tour route after which the tour would turn north and enter the really tough mountain portions of the trek.

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  • Sunday morning broke with a surge of nervous excitement as 2,000 cyclists oozed out of Cortez, Colorado, bound for their first day's destination 46 miles distant.

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  • The afternoon was a blur as Dean's mind alternated between the task at hand and the sobering fact that he might be within miles, or perhaps yards, of Cynthia Byrne's missing husband.

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  • With a full water bottle and a full stomach and legs warmed to the rhythm of the ride, he became molded into a near trance as he churned up the Colorado miles.

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  • He slid in behind another biker and followed the crouched figure evenly, absentmindedly match­ing the rider stride for stride for several miles as he pondered his course of action.

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  • The Denver and Rio Grande Western made daily warm-weather trips up the mountain to the mining town of Silverton, 40 miles away.

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  • They were far too busy stretching mus­cles and preparing for the more torturous miles that lay ahead.

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  • After a misty sunrise, a plateful of pan­cakes and the first ten miles, his legs hit a nice smooth cadence.

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  • Physically, while the day had started well, his body thought 40 to 50 miles was plenty.

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  • By the time Dean ped­aled the last of the 60 miles into the small town of Pagosa Springs, he knew he'd had a full day's workout.

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  • After the obligatory shower, fresh clothes and a hearty supper, the tired body was beginning to revive, as long as the mind kept mum about tomorrow's 90 miles and the 10,850­foot climb up Wolfe Creek Pass.

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  • A part of him kept asking why he was doing this—not the bik­ing but chasing after a ghost wearing number 888 who was proba­bly hundreds of miles away.

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  • He had covered only 23 miles but each mile had given him a sense of accomplishment that astonished him.

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  • His digital speedometer read 54 miles an hour, faster than he had ever ridden in his life, and his eyes watered from the rush of cold air.

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  • If you had dumped back up the road a couple of miles, you'd still be falling.

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  • They rolled past South Fork, and 20 miles later, Del Norte, where the lead cadre of bikers hummed their way toward Monte Vista, 14 miles further, and then the final 17 miles to Alamosa.

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  • Maybe it was because he wasn't a few miles away, happy at work.

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  • He was hundreds of miles away, maybe sick from a rough flight.

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  • Fifteen minutes to travel six miles to the clinic — most of it rough gravel roads.

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  • He hopped into the car, directing her to the small Cafe a few miles down the road.

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  • It stretched for miles, littered with stars brighter than any he'd ever seen.

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  • The destruction continued for miles without end, as far as she could see.

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  • These could probably run around 45 miles per hour in a sprint.

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  • Multicolored fields of grain and soy beans lay like a patchwork quilt for miles.

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  • I live about five miles from you.

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  • I'm from Arizona, but I've spent the last three summers within 5 miles of this place.

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  • He wasn't likely to travel hundreds of miles to address the issue, though.

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  • A green sign indicated Huntsville was only 17 miles away.

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  • When she caught up with a motor home going forty miles an hour, she found no place to pass.

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  • What was so strange about a man dropping in to welcome a new neighbor - one visitor to another - a man welcoming a person who lived several miles away?

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  • It's about eight miles after you reach the highway.

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  • His boss was over two-thousand miles away and, while he wouldn't be too happy about Keaton spending the night with her, he would certainly approve of any hours spent watching over her.

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  • If this cabin had only been in the California hills, instead of so many miles away, it would make an excellent investment.

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  • They traveled through miles of wild country where the hills were covered with a dense undergrowth of brush.

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  • Figures they're somewhere where our nearest station is ten miles out.

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  • Nine miles from Tebessa are the extensive phosphate quarries of Jebel Dyr, where is also an interesting megalithic village.

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  • To the north-east of the new palace lies the beautiful palace park, embellished with statuary and artificial sheets of water, and extending nearly all the way to Cannstatt, a distance of over two miles.

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  • North of the Senegal the Sahara reaches the coast, and for over moo miles no river enters the ocean.

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  • Two miles from the town, amidst beautiful gardens and meadows, is Haddon Hall.

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  • It next passes Innsbruck and from Hall, a few miles lower down, begins to be navigable for barges.

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  • The steepest slope observed occurs off the island of Sapienza, near Navarino, where 1720 fathoms has been obtained only 10 miles from land.

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  • Deurne, a few miles east of Helmond, the site of a prehistoric burial-ground, was an early fen colony.

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  • Although Mount Everest appears fairly bright at 100 miles' distance, as seen from the neighbourhood of Darjeeling, we cannot suppose that the atmosphere is as transparent as is implied in the above numbers; and, of course, this is not to be expected, since there is certainly suspended matter to be reckoned with.

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  • Ben Rinnes (2755 ft.) and several other hills of lesser altitude all lie within a few miles of Dufftown.

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  • Five miles from Norfolk and with Norfolk as its headquarters was held from the 26th of April to the 30th of November 1907 the Jamestown Ter-Centennial Exposition, celebrating the first permanent English settlement in America at Jamestown, Virginia.

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  • The city extends for several miles along both sides of the river, and is in a good farming district, with which it is connected by stone roads.

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  • The difference between English and Roman miles would be compensated for by the more devious course taken by the railway.

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  • When Roland heard of his wife's condemnation, he wandered some miles from his refuge in Rouen; maddened by despair and grief, he wrote a few words expressive of his horror at those massacres which could only be inspired by the enemies of France, protesting that "from the moment when I learned that they had murdered my wife I would no longer remain in a world stained with enemies."

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  • Two miles north-west of Callander is the Pass of Leny, "the gate of the Highlands," and farther in the same direction is Loch Lubnaig, on the shores of which stand the ruins of St Bride's chapel.

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  • The course of the road after the first six miles from Rome is not identical with that of any modern road, but can be clearly traced by remains of pavement and buildings along its course.

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  • For the 150 miles between Ras Malan and Pasni Alexander was compelled by the natural barriers to march inland, and it was here that his troops sank under the horrors of heat and thirst and sand.

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  • It is divided between some twenty firms. The premises of Bass's brewery extend over Soo acres, while Allsopp's stand next; upwards of 5000 hands are employed in all, and many miles of railways owned by the firms cross the streets in all directions on the level, and connect with the lines of the railway companies.

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  • Two miles south is the scene of the battle of Bosworth, in 1485, where Richard III.

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  • The building of the Canadian Pacific railway through almost continuous rocks for 800 miles was one of the greatest engineering feats of modern times.

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  • After traversing North Italy, in a direction first southerly and then easterly, it falls into the Adriatic at Porto Fossone, a few miles north of the mouth of the Po.

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  • None of the tributaries of the La Plata system thus far mentioned is navigable except the lower Pilcomayo and Bermejo for a few miles.

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  • Other river ports, of less importance, are Concordia on the Uruguay river, San Nicolas and Campana on the Parana river, Santa Fe on the Salado, a few miles from the Parana, the city of Parana on the Parana river, and Gualeguay on the Gualeguay river.

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  • Two miles north-east is the famous Silla de Caracas, whose twin summits, like a gigantic old-fashioned saddle (silla), rise to an elevation of 8622 ft.; and the Naiguete, still farther eastward, overlooks the valley from a height of 9186 ft.

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  • A few miles above this point the river is spanned by the magnificent bridges of Cubzac-lesPonts, which carry a road and railway.

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  • As the tableland runs northward it decreases both in height and width, until it narrows to a few miles only, with an elevation of scarcely 1500 ft.; under the name of the Blue Mountains the plateau widens again and increases in altitude, the chief peaks being Mount Clarence(4000 ft.), Mount Victoria (3525 ft.), and Mount Hay (3270 ft.).

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  • Having left the tree-line far behind him, nothing is visible to the traveller for miles around but barren peaks and torn crags in indescribable confusion.

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  • This is especially the case with the tributaries of the Darling on its left bank, where in seasons of great rains these rivers overspread their banks and flood the flat country for miles around and thus reach the main stream.

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  • Each tribe occupied a recognized territory, averaging perhaps a dozen square miles, and used a common dialect.

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  • A line drawn diagonally down the centre from the isthmus of Kra to Cape Romania (Ramunya) gives the extreme length at about 750 miles.

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  • The west coast throughout its whole length is covered to a depth of some miles with mangrove swamps, with only a few isolated stretches of sandy beach, the dim foliage of the mangroves and the hideous mud flats presenting a depressing spectacle.

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  • On the east coast the force of the north-east monsoon, which beats upon the shores of the China Sea annually from November to February, has kept the land for the most part free from mangroves, and the sands, broken here and there by rocky headlands thickly wooded, and fringed by casuarina trees, stretch for miles without interruption.

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  • In the interior brakes of bamboos are found, many of which spread for miles along the river banks.

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  • Algiers maintains communication with Marseilles by a quick service of steamers, which run the 497 miles across the Mediterranean in twenty-eight to thirty hours.

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  • The journey between Algiers and Paris, from which it is distant 1031 miles, is accomplished in about forty-five hours.

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  • An attempt at the assassination of Cromwell by Miles Sindercombe added to the general feeling of anxiety and unrest.

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  • South of the port is the shallow entrance to the Lagoa do Norte, or Lagoa Mundahu, a salt-water lake extending inland for some miles.

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  • Again, the central ridge of the South Atlantic extends a thousand miles farther south than was supposed, joining the east and west ridge, just described, between the Bouvet Islands and the Sandwich group.

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  • Two or three miles below Jalalabad it is joined by the Kunar, the river of Chitral.

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  • The main body of his works belongs, so far as can be ascertained from the scanty evidence which we have, to the latter half of his life; 206 B.C. is the approximate date of the Miles gloriosus; cf.

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  • Radermacher assigns the Asinaria to a date as early as 212 B.C. Of the extant plays the Cistellaria and the Stichus must be associated with the Miles as comparatively early works; for the former was clearly produced before (though not long before) the conclusion of the Second Punic War, see 1.201 seq.; and the Stichus is proved by its didascalia to have been produced in 200 B.C. The Pseudolus and the Truculentus fall within the last seven years of his life.

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  • From the first, however, it had a military significance, and its usual Latin translation was miles, although minister was often used.

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  • Three miles to the south of Herat the Kandahar road crosses the river by a masonry bridge of 26 arches now in ruins.

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  • A few miles below Herat the river begins to turn north-west, and after passing through a rich country to Kuhsan, it turns due north and breaks through the Paropamisan hills.

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  • In the British Postal Telegraph Department all the most important wires are tested every morning between 7.30 and 7.45 A.M., in sections of about 200 miles.

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  • The ordinates of the curve give the strain in cwts., and the abscissae the distance in miles measured from the Canso end; as the strain is proportional to the depth, 18 cwts.

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  • Owing to the experience gained with many thousands of miles of cable in all depths and under varying conditions of weather and climate, the risk, and consequently the cost, of laying has been greatly reduced.

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  • As to cost, one transatlantic cable repair cost 75,000; the repair of the Aden-Bombay cable, broken in a depth of 1900 fathoms, was effected with the expenditure of 176 miles of new cable, and after a lapse of 251 days, 103 being spent in actual work, which for the remainder of the time was interrupted by the monsoon; a repair of the Lisbon-Porthcurnow cable, broken in the Bay of Biscay in 2700 fathoms, eleven years after the cable was laid, took 215 days, with an expenditure of 300 miles of cable.

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  • It was not, however, a sufficiently perfect representation of a laid cable to serve for duplexing cables of more than a few hundred miles in length.

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  • It was found impossible to make the Morse ink writer so sensitive that it could record signals sent over land lines of several hundred miles in length, if the speed of transmission was very much faster than that which could be effected by hand, and this led to the adoption of automatic methods of transmission.

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  • One of the longest circuits upon which it has been successfully worked is that between St Petersburg and Omsk, a distance of approximately 2400 miles of iron wire, with three repeating stations.

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  • Under the then existing telegraphic tariff the charge in Great Britain was a shilling for a twenty-word message over a distance not exceeding ioo miles; is.

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  • The submarine cables of the world now have a length exceeding 200,000 nautical miles, and most of them have been manuf actured on the Thames.

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  • Starting from an observation of Marconi's, a number of interesting facts have been accumulated on the absorbing effect of sunlight on the propagation of long Hertzian waves through space, and on the disturbing effects of atmospheric electricity as well as upon the influence of earth curvature and obstacles of various kinds interposed in the line between the sending and transmitting stations.4 Electric wave telegraphy has revolutionized our means of communication from place to place on the surface of the earth, making it possible to communicate instantly and certainly between places separated by several thousand miles, whilst The Electrician, 1904, 5 2, p. 407, or German Pat.

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  • It has a few miles of Atlantic coast-line on the N., and the Rio Parnahyba forms the boundary line with Maranhao throughout its entire length.

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  • But Augustus, who was the first to give to Italy a definite political organization, carried the frontier to the river Varus or Var, a few miles west of Nice, and this river continued in modern times to be generally recognized as the boundary between France and Italy.

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  • A few miles below Valenza it is joined by the Tanaro, a large stream, which brings with it the united waters of the Stura, the Bormida and several minor rivers.

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  • Or the west side of the lake the Toccia or Tosa descends from the pass of the Gries nearly due south to Domodossola, where it receives the waters of the Doveria from the Simplon, and a few miles lower down those of the Val d'Anzasca from the foot of Monte Rosa, and 12 m.

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  • Issuing thence at its southwest extremity, the Oglio has a long and winding course through the plain before it finally reaches the Po a few miles above Borgoforte.

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  • The best known and the most extensive of these lagoons is that in which Venice is situated, which extends from Torcello in the north to Chioggia and Brondolo in the south, a distance of above 40 m.; but they were formerly much more extensive, and afforded a continuous means of internal navigation, by what were called "the Seven Seas" (Septem Maria), from Ravenna to Altinum, a few miles north of Torcello.

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  • It was adopted by Augustus as the boundary of Gallia Cispadana; the far-famed Rubicon was a trifling stream a few miles farther north, now called Fiumicino.

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  • It is occupied by the branches and offshoots of the mountain ranges which separate it from the great plain to the north, and send down their lateral ridges close to the water's edge, leaving only in places a few square miles of level plains at the mouths of the rivers and openings of the valleys.

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  • The Elsa and the Era, which join it on its left bank, descending from the hills near Siena and Volterra, are inconsiderable streams; and the Serchio, which flows from the territory of Lucca and the Alpi Apuani, and formerly joined the Arno a few miles from its mouth, now enters the sea by a separate channel.

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  • The Nera, which rises in the lofty group of the Monte della Sibilla, is a considerable stream, and brings with it the waters of the Velino (with its tributaries the Turano and the Salto), which joins it a few miles below its celebrated waterfall at Terni.

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  • The Teverone or Anio, which enters the Tiber a few miles above Rome, is an inferior stream to the Nera, but brings down a considerable body of water from the mountains above Subiaco.

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  • The Silarus or Sele enters the Gulf of Salerno a few miles below the ruins of Paestum.

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  • The axis of this band, almost a meridian line, is 156 statute miles long.

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  • The length of the Tetuaroa reef ring is about six miles; it bears twelve palm-covered islets, of which several are inhabited, and has one narrow boat-passage leading into the lagoon.

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  • Here we find open plant associations of Haifa or Esparto Grass (Stipa lenacissima) alternating with steppes of Chih (Artemisia herba-alba); and each plant association extends for several scores of miles.

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  • Hemsley remarks that the northerr genus Erica, which covers thousands of square miles in Europe with very few species, is represented by hundreds of species in I comparatively small area in South Africa.

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  • On the 7th of October he was dangerously wounded, and the queen showed her anxiety for his safety by riding 40 miles to visit him, incurring a severe illness.

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  • The Murray is navigable for small steamers from this town to its mouth, a distance of 1800 miles.

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  • The imam died in March 819 in the village Sanabad near Tus, some miles north-west of Meshed.

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  • The northern face of the mountain, overlooking Table Bay, extends like a great wall some two miles in length, and rises precipitously to a height of over 3500 ft.

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  • After running south-east through the grandest scenery, and closely approaching the source of the western Tigris, it turns south-west and leaves the mountains a few miles above Samsat (Samosata; altitude, 1500 ft.).

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  • In this part of its course the Euphrates runs through an open, treeless and sparsely peopled country, in a valley a few miles wide, which it has eroded in the rocky surface.

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  • Twentysix miles farther down lies the town of Deir, where the river divides into two channels and the river valley opens out into quite extensive plains.

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  • Twenty-five miles below Basra the river Karun from Shushter and Dizful throws off an arm, which seems to be artificial, into the Euphrates.

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  • A mean degree of the meridian being assumed to be 69-09 statute miles of 5280 ft., the nautical mile (A l b - degree) is taken as 6080 ft., which is a sufficiently close approximation for practical purposes, and the distances between the knots are made to bear the same relation to 6080 ft.

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  • Two miles inland is Ancon, in the Canal Zone, in which are the hospitals of the Isthmian Canal Commission and the largest hotel on the isthmus.

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  • In the 16th century the city was the strongest Spanish fortress in the New World, excepting Cartagena, and gold and silver were brought hither by ship from Peru and were carried across the Isthmus to Chagres, but as Spain's fleets even in the Pacific were more and more often attacked in the 17th century, Panama became less important, though it was still the chief Spanish port on the Pacific. In 1671 the city was destroyed by Henry Morgan, the buccaneer; it was rebuilt in 1673 by Alfonzo Mercado de Villacorta about five miles west of the old site and nearer the roadstead.

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  • Taking their rise on the plateau formation, or in its outskirts, they flow first along lofty longitudinal valleys formerly filled with great lakes, next they cleave their way through the rocky barriers, and finally they enter the lowlands, where they become navigable, and, describing wide curves to avoid here and there the minor plateaus and hilly tracts, they bring into watercommunication with one another places thousands of miles apart.

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  • In South Wales again, where in 1811 the railways in connexion with canals, collieries and iron and copper works had a total length of nearly 150 miles, the plate-way was almost universal.

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  • In general, the British working unit supplied as public information has always been the goods-train-mile and the passengertrain-mile, these figures being the products of the number of trains into the number of miles they have travelled.

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  • For example, Michigan, in 1837, in the first session of its state legislature, made plans for the construction of 557 miles of railway under the direct control of the state, and the governor was authorized to issue bonds for the purpose.

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  • In New York and four adjacent states, having about as many miles of railway as the United Kingdom, the number in the year ending June 30, 1907, was 1552.

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  • In any comparison between British and American records the first point to be borne in mind is the difference in mileage and traffic. The American railways aggregate approximately ten times the length of the British lines; but in train miles the difference is far less.

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  • The number of employes killed in train accidents was 12.9 in 10 million train miles.

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  • One of the steepest gradients in England on an important line is the Lickey incline at Bromsgrove, on the Midland railway between Birmingham and Gloucester, where the slope is 1 in 37 for two miles.

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  • On the continent of Europe the standard gauge is generally adopted, though in France there are many miles of 4 ft.

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  • In order to keep down the expense of shunting the empty trains and engines to and from the platforms the carriage and locomotive depots should be as near the passenger station as possible; but often the price of land renders it impracticable to locate them in the immediate vicinity and they are to be found at a distance of several miles.

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  • If the speed is given in miles per hour, S say, V =1.466 S (6) The revolutions of the axle per second, n, are connected with the radians turned through per second by the relation n =w/27r = w/6.38 (7) § 2.

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  • Built in 1882, it had by the 12th of September 1891 performed the feat of running a million miles in 9 years 219 days, and it completed two million miles on the 5th of August 1902, having by that date run 5312 trips with express trains between London and Manchester.

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  • The rose gardens cover several square miles.

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  • Trajan, however, built an aqueduct nearly 20 miles long, which was restored by Theodoric in 503.

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  • The port of Ravenna, situated about 3 miles from the city, was named Classis.

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  • It was connected with Ariminum, 33 miles to the south by the coast road, the Via Popillia, which ran on north to Hatria, and joined the road between Patavium and Altinum at Ad Portum.

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  • The wish to meet people of the different sections of the country and to explain his position upon the questions of the day led the President to begin (14th September 1909), a tour which included the Pacific coast, the South-west, the Mississippi Valley and the South Atlantic states, and during which he travelled 13,000 miles and made 266 speeches.

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  • Aarau, an ancient fortress, was taken by the Bernese in 1415, and in 1798 became for a time the capital of the Helvetic republic. Eight miles by rail N.E.

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  • This is an inappreciable distance when compared with the diameter of the sun, which is nearly a million of miles, but the significance for our present purpose depends upon the fact that this contraction is always taking place.

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  • It is navigable only for a few miles above the mouth, but its salmon fisheries are both attractive to sportsmen and of considerable commercial value.

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  • The famous city, within easy reach of the southern desert and central Palestine (to Hebron and to Samaria the distances are about 18 and 35 miles respectively), had already entered into Palestinian history in the " Amarna " age (§ 3).

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  • However, Baasha at length seized Ramah about five miles north of Jerusalem, and the very existence of Judah was threatened.

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  • The two sections of the Hebrews who had had so much in common were scarcely severed by a border-line only a few miles to the north of Jerusalem.

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  • Among the most important of these were - Lyttus or Lyctus, in the interior, south-east of Cnossus; Rhaucus, between Cnossus and Gortyna; Phaestus, in the plain of Messara, between Gortyna and the sea; Polyrrhenia, near the north-west angle of the island; Aptera, a few miles inland from the Bay of Suda; Eleutherna and Axus, on the northern slopes of Mount Ida; and Lappa, between the White Mountains and the sea.

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  • Three miles east of Stranraer is Lochinch, the residence of the earl of Stair, a modern structure in the Scots Baronial style.

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  • Four miles west by north of Stranraer is situated Lochnaw Castle, the ancient seat of the Agnews, who were hereditary sheriffs of Galloway till 1747, when hereditable jurisdictions were abolished.

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  • In 1880 he was in virtual control of Io,000 miles of railway, about one-ninth of the railway mileage of the United States at that time.

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  • The valleys vary in width from a few hundred yards to several miles.

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  • Deposits of the Tertiary period form the basis of more than half the state, extending from the border of the Cretaceous westward nearly to the Yazoo Delta and the Mississippi Bottom, and southward to within a few miles of the Gulf coast.

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  • The Grand Gulf group, of formations of different ages, consisting of sands, sandstones and clays, and showing a few fossil plants, but no marine fossils, extends southward from the last to within a few miles of the coast, and is 750-800 ft.

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  • Miles made his adventurous journey through Oman, while Theodore Bent threw searchlights backwards into ancient Semitic history by his investigations in the Bahrein Islands in 1888 and in Hadramut in 1894 - 181n northern Asia it is impossible to follow in detail the results of the organized Russian surveys.

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  • E Arabian Sea Ba Of G A L e Geological information incomplete Desert Deposits Quaternary Tertiary Mesozoic Palaeozoic Archaean and Metamorphic Younger Volcanic Rocks English Miles b iuHi iiiiuiiiiii after llargl,aua Geology The geology of Asia is so complex and over wide areas so little known that it is difficult to give a connected account of either the structure or the development of the continent, and only the broader features can be dealt with here.

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  • Of the Clupeidae, or herrings, numerous forms occur in Asiatic waters, ascending the rivers many hundred miles; one of the best-known of Indian fishes, the hilsa, is of this family.

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  • War broke out between the two parties at Gibeon a few miles north of Jerusalem.

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  • Three miles south of Beauly is Beaufort Castle, the chief seat of the Lovats, a fine modern mansion in the Scottish baronial style.

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  • The roadstead is very shallow, and exposed to winds which cause great variations in the height of the water; it is, moreover, rapidly silting up. At the quay the depth of water is only 8 to 9 feet, and large ships have to lie 5 to 13 miles from the town.

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  • Two miles north-east of the city is the National Cemetery, with graves of 6571 Federal soldiers (5700 unknown) most of whom were killed in the actions near Richmond.

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  • The result is that the plain is being gradually extended in an easterly direction, and cities like Ravenna, Adria and Aquileia, which were once seaports, lie now many miles inland.

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  • The encroachment of land on sea has been calculated at the rate of about three miles in a thousand years.

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  • The entire circuit of the arsenal, about two miles in extent, is protected by a lofty wall with turrets.

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  • Three miles below the Laagen forms a fine fall of 140 ft.

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  • In the month of February, or in some years as early as the end of January, the first large schools appear at the entrance of the English Channel, and are met by the more adventurous of the driftnet fishers many miles west of the Scilly Islands.

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  • The rest of the original Manchurian system (1088 miles) remains under Russian control.

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  • Hutchinson of New York, laid a short line from the Tarr Farm wells to the refinery, which passed over a hill, the oil being moved on the syphon principle, and a year later constructed another three miles long to the railway.

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  • Nearly two miles inland to the north-west is Madron (an urban district with a population of 3486).

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  • Three miles north-east is the urban district of Ludgvan (pop. 2274), and to the south is Paul (6332), which includes the village of Newlyn.

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  • It soon becomes the boundary for a while between the departments of the HautesAlpes and of the Basses-Alpes, and receives successively the considerable Ubaye river, flowing from near the foot of Monte Viso past Barcelonnette (left), and then the small stream of the Luye (right), on which, a few miles above, is Gap. It enters the Basses-Alpes shortly before reaching Sisteron, where it is joined (right) by the wild torrent of the Busch, flowing from the desolate region of the Devoluy, and receives the Bleone (left) (on which Digne, the capital of the department, is situated) and the Asse (left), before quitting the department of the Basses-Alpes just as it is reinforced (left) by the Verdon, flowing from the lower summits of the Maritime Alps past Castellane.

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  • In a certain church, a few miles before Rome, whilst in prayer he was aware of a stirring and a change in his soul; and so openly did he see God the Father placing him with Christ, that he could not dare to doubt that God the Father had so placed him.

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  • Twenty-two miles due south of Kali-zan stands Hakumosha-zan (5282 ft.), and just 20 m.

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  • Six miles inland from Takau is a prosperous Chinese town called Fengshan (Japanese, Hozan).

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  • General Miles's policy in affording employment for the natives likewise served to make the new American regime acceptable.

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  • Four miles south of the centre of Atlanta is Fort McPherson, an important United States military post, occupying a reservation of 40 acres and having barracks for the accommodation of 1000 men.

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  • Three miles south-east of the city is a (state) soldiers' home, for aged, infirm and disabled Confederate veterans.

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  • In 1865 he started on a long canoeing cruise in his " Rob Roy " canoe, and in this way made a prolonged water tour through Europe, a record of which he published in 1866 as A Thousand Miles in the Rob Roy Canoe.

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  • The extremities stretch two good miles, with raised convolutions..

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  • Nine or ten miles before reaching its outfall the river enters St Petersburg, and 5 or 6 m.

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  • Two miles south of Rotorua is another native village, Whakarewarewa, where there are geysers as well as hot springs.

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  • Four miles from Rotorua, near the centre of the lake, the island of Mokoia rises to 1518 ft.

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  • Formerly map makers contented themselves with placing upon their maps a linear scale of miles, deduced from the central meridian or the equator.

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  • Each chart was furnished with a scale of miles.

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  • These miles, however, were not the ordinary Roman miles of l000 paces or 5000 ft., but smaller miles of Greek or Oriental origin, of which six were equal to five Roman miles, and as the latter were equal to 1480 metres, the Portolano miles had a length of only 1233 metres, and 75 2 of the former, and 90 3 of the latter were equal to a degree.

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  • One account says that it was caused by a broken bridge which delayed the Conqueror's advance to the north, but this is known to have been at Ferrybridge, three miles away; a second says that the new name was derived from a Norman town called Pontfrete, which, however, never existed; and a third that it was caused by the breaking of a bridge in 1153 on the arrival of the archbishop of York, St William,.

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  • Within a hundred miles of the mountains there is constantly in view, in clear weather, the beautiful line of snowy peaks along the western horizon.

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  • This continues for hundreds of miles north-westward.

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  • The peaks of these mountains are majestic, many of them reaching a height of more than two miles above the sea.

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  • After descending north-eastward to within a few miles of Lake Athabasca, it is met by a stream emerging from that lake.

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  • On the north side of the Saskatchewan river forests prevail for scores and even hundreds of miles.

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  • Vast beds of coal are found extending for hundreds of miles, a short distance below the surface of the plains.

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  • The existence, a few miles beyond the Nepalese frontier, of an inscribed pillar had been known for some years when, in 1895, the discovery of another inscribed pillar at Nigliva, near by, led to the belief that this other, hitherto neglected, one must also be an Asoka pillar, and very probably the one mentioned by Hsuan Tsang.

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  • The line was thus continued to a station taking its name from Bulgurlu, a small straggling village four miles away, between which and Eregli there is not a single habitation.

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  • On the 16th Berthier went on to Augsburg, where he learnt that Lefebvre's advanced troops had been driven out of Landshut, thus opening a great gap seventy-six miles wide between the two wings of the French army.

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  • He accordingly fell back a few miles next morning to a strong position covering the exits from the Bar-sur-Aube defile.

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  • This canal, the Sakhlawieh (formerly Isa), leaves the Euphrates a few miles above Feluja and the bridge of boats, near the ruins of the ancient Anbar.

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  • Five miles south-east of Tunbridge Wells is Bayham Abbey, founded in 1200, where ruins of a church, a gateway, and dependent buildings adjoin the modern Tudor mansion.

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  • Three miles south, in Sussex, the village of Frant stands on a hill which is perhaps the finest of the many view-points in this district, commanding a wide prospect over some of the richest woodland scenery in England.

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  • The parish lies a few miles south-east of Glasgow, and contains High Blantyre (pop. 2521), Blantyre Works (or Low Blantyre), Stonefield and several villages.

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  • As they neared Barrosa, Victor attacked them, the Allies numbering in the battle about 13,000 with 24 guns, 4000 being British; the French 9000, actually engaged, with 14 guns; but with 5000 more a few miles off and others in the French lines.

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  • It was now late and the Allies, after moving a few miles down both banks of the Nivelle, bivouacked, while Soult, taking advantage of the respite, withdrew in the night to Bayonne.

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  • Wellington's columns, under Beresford, were now called upon to make a flank march of some two miles, under artillery, and occasionally musketry, fire, being threatened also by cavalry, and then, while the Spanish troops assaulted the north of the ridge, to wheel up, mount the eastern slope, and carry the works.

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  • The view of the three from the south, presenting a continuous river frontage of six miles, the river crowded with shipping and the densely packed houses surmounted by church towers - of which three are higher than the dome of St Paul's in London - is one of great magnificence.

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  • They are called from the places in France where the most typical finds of palaeolithic remains have been made - Chellian from Chelles, a few miles east of Paris; Mousterian from the cave of Moustier on the river V ezere, Dordogne; Solutrian from the cave at Solutre near Macon; and Madelenian from the rocky shelter of La Madeleine, Dordogne.

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  • Fifty miles from its source the river and the Janglam route touch each other, and from that point past Tadum (the first important place on its banks) for another 130 m., the road follows more or less closely the left bank of the river.

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  • During the rains the Brahmaputra floods hundreds of square miles of country, reaching a height of 30 to 40 ft.

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  • In 1904 Dr Carton and the abbe Leynaud discovered huge Christian catacombs with several miles of subterranean galleries to which access is obtained by a small vaulted chamber.

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  • The inhabited districts are well laid down on the best maps; but the immense areas between and beyond them are mapped only along a few routes hundreds of miles apart.

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  • The three principal rivers - the Ob, the Yenisei, and the Lena - take their rise on the high plateau or in the alpine regions fringing it, and, after descending from the plateau and piercing the alpine regions, flow for many hundreds of miles across the high plains and lowlands before they reach the Arctic, Ocean.

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  • Nine miles from Patara he discovered the ruins of Xanthus, the ancient capital of Lycia, finely situated on hills, and abounding in magnificent remains.

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  • It is spread over an extensive area, being surrounded by mud walls 18 miles in extent.

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  • The leased area comprises, besides the harbour and island, a belt of the mainland, io English miles wide, skirting the whole length of the bay.

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  • The height of Thames Head above sea-level is 35 6 ft., but that of Seven Springs, the adoption of which as the source would extend the length of the river by several miles, is 700 ft.

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  • In the succeeding paragraph the bracketed figures indicate the distance in miles above London Bridge.

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  • Thus a well-marked depression in the Cotteswolds brings the head of the (Gloucestershire) Coln, one of the head-streams of the Thames, very close to that of the Isborne, a tributary of the upper Avon; the parting between the headstreams of the Thames and the Bristol Avon sinks at one point, near Malmesbury, below 300 ft.; and head-streams of the Great Ouse rise little more than two miles from, and only some 300 ft.

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  • The Colorado lead district is in the Rocky Mountains, a few miles from the source of the Arkansas river.

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  • From Testur on the Mejerda the fossa regia can be followed by these indications for several miles along the Jebel esh-Sheid.

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  • His first ministerial charge was over a small village parish, West Roxbury, a few miles from Boston; here he was ordained as a Unitarian clergyman in June 1837 and here he preached until January 1846.

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  • The most likely distance of the sun may be stated in round numbers as 9 3,000,000 miles.

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  • It lay at the point of junction of four roads - the Via Caecilia, the Via Claudia Nova and two branches of the Via Salaria, which joined it at the 64th and 89th miles respectively.

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  • Two and a half miles north is Balcarres House, belonging to the earl of Crawford, where Lady Anne Barnard (1750-1825) was born.

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  • Forty miles lower down the Orange is joined by the first of its large tributaries, the Caledon (230 m.), which, rising on the western side of the Mont aux Sources, flows, first west and then south, through a broad and fertile valley north of the Maluti Mountains.

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  • But his reign was one continued series of the grossest enormities; his hostility to the British became evident, and accordingly a force of 10,500 men crossed the Runn in November 1815, and were within five miles of Bhuj, the capital of the country, when a treaty was concluded, by which the rao Bharmulji was confirmed in his title to the throne, on agreeing, among other stipulations, to cede Anjar and its dependencies in perpetuity to the British.

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  • Of this ancient city vast remains are left, extending several miles along the bank of the river.

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  • Of the seven degrees, those mystics not yet beyond the third, Miles, were not in full communion, and were called inrnpETOUVTES (servants); while the fourth degree, Leo, admitted them into the class of the fully initiate, the (participants).

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  • The same architect designed the superb aqueduct by which the city is supplied with water from Monte Francoa, some nine miles off.

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