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mile

mile

mile Sentence Examples

  • They found the problem about a mile down the creek.

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  • We drove another mile before spotting a corner variety store.

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  • They lived about a mile off through the woods, and were quite used to the route.

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  • The house sits more than a mile off the snow plow route, so sometimes I'm snowed in for a week or so.

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  • At the fourth mile marker, she paused.

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  • Of that of Hephaestus only two columns remain, while of that of Asclepius, a mile to the south of the town, an anta and two pillars are preserved.

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  • Maybe that was because Josh was only a mile down the road.

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  • I might have got good limestone within a mile or two and burned it myself, if I had cared to do so.

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  • She scowled down at him, her heart beating a mile a minute.

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  • The drive from the station to the house, a distance of one mile, was very lovely and restful.

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  • Her body shook off the chill by the first mile marker and by the second, the moon was directly overhead.

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  • He promised to return in an hour and ferry the group back to Bird Song, which was less than a mile away.

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  • He had a sentimental streak in him a mile wide, but he'd never admit it.

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  • and reaching back a mile or so from the river to highlands which rise to a height of 400 ft., with Mt Ida (240 ft.

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  • and reaching back a mile or so from the river to highlands which rise to a height of 400 ft., with Mt Ida (240 ft.

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  • They drove south from town and in less than a quarter mile, turned right onto what was locally known as the Camp Bird Mine Road.

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  • They drove south from town and in less than a quarter mile, turned right onto what was locally known as the Camp Bird Mine Road.

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  • The school was more than a mile from their home, and the children trotted along as fast as their short legs could carry them.

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  • They had walked a mile or two towards home, when they came to the edge of a narrow and deep ravine.

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  • About a mile distant there was a trestle spanning a deep gorge.

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  • It was a short distance from Surry Mountain Lake and park, and about seven mile from our recently established office in town.

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  • In accordance with his former action on all questions of religious toleration he opposed the shameful Five Mile Act of 1665.

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  • Since I wrote you, Helen and I have gone to live all by ourselves in a little garden-house about a quarter of a mile from her home, only a short distance from Ivy Green, the Keller homestead.

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  • This is particularly distinct to one standing on the middle of the pond in winter, just after a light snow has fallen, appearing as a clear undulating white line, unobscured by weeds and twigs, and very obvious a quarter of a mile off in many places where in summer it is hardly distinguishable close at hand.

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  • Flint's, or Sandy Pond, in Lincoln, our greatest lake and inland sea, lies about a mile east of Walden.

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  • I amused myself one winter day with sliding this piecemeal across the pond, nearly half a mile, skating behind with one end of a log fifteen feet long on my shoulder, and the other on the ice; or I tied several logs together with a birch withe, and then, with a longer birch or alder which had a hook at the end, dragged them across.

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  • Flint's Pond, a mile eastward, allowing for the disturbance occasioned by its inlets and outlets, and the smaller intermediate ponds also, sympathize with Walden, and recently attained their greatest height at the same time with the latter.

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  • The watering-place of Royat lies a little more than a mile to the west.

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  • After all, the man whose horse trots a mile in a minute does not carry the most important messages; he is not an evangelist, nor does he come round eating locusts and wild honey.

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  • My nearest neighbor is a mile distant, and no house is visible from any place but the hill-tops within half a mile of my own.

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  • I could always tell if visitors had called in my absence, either by the bended twigs or grass, or the print of their shoes, and generally of what sex or age or quality they were by some slight trace left, as a flower dropped, or a bunch of grass plucked and thrown away, even as far off as the railroad, half a mile distant, or by the lingering odor of a cigar or pipe.

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  • Barely visible a half mile or more across the water were a few other camps.

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  • long, with a mean breadth of half a mile and over i m.

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  • bank by the Romans; it is now about one mile inland.

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  • The hair on the back of his neck had been standing for the past mile he'd walked, only he wasn't entirely certain why.

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  • "An hour jogging.  Their scouts don't start until about half a mile from the castle," Rhyn answered.

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  • Josh's house wasn't visible, but it was only about a quarter of a mile from her drive.

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  • The Presbyterianism now visible in England is of Scottish origin and Scottish type, and beyond the fact of embracing a few congregations which date from, or before, the Act of Uniformity and the Five Mile Act, has little in common with the Presbyterianism which was for a brief period by law established.

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  • A mile and a half northeast are the Falls of Bracklinn (Gaelic, "white-foaming pool"), formed by the Keltie, which takes a leap of 50 ft.

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  • The remnants of this monument are still kept up. It stands half a mile to the east from Nish, and is called to this day by the Turkish name "Tyele-Koula," "the Tower of Skulls."

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  • LANARK, a royal, municipal and police burgh, and county town of Lanarkshire, Scotland, standing on high ground about half a mile from the right bank of the Clyde, 31 m.

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  • They found the ruins about a mile further where the creek followed a gorge between two high cliffs.

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  • The whole bank, which is from twenty to forty feet high, is sometimes overlaid with a mass of this kind of foliage, or sandy rupture, for a quarter of a mile on one or both sides, the produce of one spring day.

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  • They tried to make their way forward to the opposite bank and, though there was a ford one third of a mile away, were proud that they were swimming and drowning in this river under the eyes of the man who sat on the log and was not even looking at what they were doing.

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  • The colonel said that the commander of the division was a mile and a quarter away and would receive Balashev and conduct him to his destination.

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  • He said that Murat was spending the night less than a mile from where they were, and that if they would let him have a convoy of a hundred men he would capture him alive.

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  • It was necessary to let the French reach Shamshevo quietly without alarming them and then, after joining Dolokhov who was to come that evening to a consultation at a watchman's hut in the forest less than a mile from Shamshevo, to surprise the French at dawn, falling like an avalanche on their heads from two sides, and rout and capture them all at one blow.

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  • With every mile they traveled closer to the ranch, her anxiety increased.

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  • We have this pledge among ourselves not getting a Texas mile near any of these cases.

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  • It took us two hours to come ten miles from the airport and Julie had to direct him the last mile and she just got here herself.

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  • The hundred mile drive up the coast to Santa Barbara took more than two hours during which we chatted the entire way.

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  • Frequently he would leave his dinner in the bushes, when his dog had caught a woodchuck by the way, and go back a mile and a half to dress it and leave it in the cellar of the house where he boarded, after deliberating first for half an hour whether he could not sink it in the pond safely till nightfall--loving to dwell long upon these themes.

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  • On October 11, 1805, one of the infantry regiments that had just reached Braunau had halted half a mile from the town, waiting to be inspected by the commander-in-chief.

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  • To expiate his huntsman's offense, Ilagin pressed the Rostovs to come to an upland of his about a mile away which he usually kept for himself and which, he said, swarmed with hares.

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  • When they had gone a little less than a mile, five more riders with dogs appeared out of the mist, approaching the Rostovs.

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  • Detective Carl Dick remained on the line with Jackson for most of the three mile trip.

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  • She looked around when she reached the third mile marker, aware she was a sitting duck.

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  • Katie sought an entrance into the palatial estate, not seeing one along this side.  She ran alongside the marble structure.  It was well over quarter mile in length.  Toby pulled away from her suddenly, and she stopped so fast, she tripped.

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  • The park was over a mile on each side, hedged by a wall.

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  • More than likely his mind was going a mile a minute like hers was.

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  • On land their general Myronides beat off two Corinthian attacks on Megara, which had been further secured by long walls drawn between the capital and its port Nisaea, nearly a mile distant.

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  • If Arthur Atherton had been within a mile, Dean would have beaten him to death with his bare hands.

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  • He had covered only 23 miles but each mile had given him a sense of accomplishment that astonished him.

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  • It would be better if there were but one inhabitant to a square mile, as where I live.

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  • I also heard the whooping of the ice in the pond, my great bed-fellow in that part of Concord, as if it were restless in its bed and would fain turn over, were troubled with flatulency and had dreams; or I was waked by the cracking of the ground by the frost, as if some one had driven a team against my door, and in the morning would find a crack in the earth a quarter of a mile long and a third of an inch wide.

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  • The fog had begun to clear and enemy troops were already dimly visible about a mile and a half off on the opposite heights.

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  • After going through the wood for about a mile and a half they came out on a glade where troops of Tuchkov's corps were stationed to defend the left flank.

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  • But in the yard there was a light from the fire at Little Mytishchi a mile and a half away, and through the night came the noise of people shouting at a tavern Mamonov's Cossacks had set up across the street, and the adjutant's unceasing moans could still be heard.

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  • To the left of the road between Mikulino and Shamshevo there were large forests, extending in some places up to the road itself though in others a mile or more back from it.

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  • The destruction disappeared by mile marker five, only a few hundred meters from the turnoff to her condo community.

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  • Most of these commuters lived on the eastern perimeter, as if the extra mile or two made their daily trek somehow more acceptable.

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  • Dean and Sackler drove about a mile down old Route 22 to a chrome and Formica railroad-car diner straight out of the fifties.

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  • Slowly munching an apple at mile 23, he noted with satisfac­tion that his legs felt good in spite of the lack of practice.

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  • He had already stopped for lunch and was rolling toward mile 47 when a sudden thought from nowhere hit him between the eyes.

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  • Like the water, the Walden ice, seen near at hand, has a green tint, but at a distance is beautifully blue, and you can easily tell it from the white ice of the river, or the merely greenish ice of some ponds, a quarter of a mile off.

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  • At dawn on the sixteenth of November, Denisov's squadron, in which Nicholas Rostov served and which was in Prince Bagration's detachment, moved from the place where it had spent the night, advancing into action as arranged, and after going behind other columns for about two thirds of a mile was stopped on the highroad.

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  • The French were supposed to be a mile and a half away, but had suddenly and unexpectedly appeared just in front of us.

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  • (This meant that the she-wolf, about whom they both knew, had moved with her cubs to the Otradnoe copse, a small place a mile and a half from the house.)

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  • Martha would drive Howie to Boston's Logan Airport for his flight back to California while Quinn would remain to pack up his equipment before leaving later for a hundred mile drive to their home in nearby Peabody, Mass.

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  • The ocean was visible; she estimated they were about half a mile from the orchard.

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  • What was going on behind those fantastic eyes, she couldn't say, but Pete's jaw must have dropped a mile.

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  • He kept trying, and we learned later, he maintained contact for nearly a mile.

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  • They proved unnecessary as a patrol car caught up with me and escorted me the last mile.

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  • At this spot, a bridge spanning the Uncompahgre River bisected the two main climbing sections that extended almost a mile.

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  • This is also the length of $th of the statute mile.

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  • "Furlong" was as early as the 9th century used to translate the Latin stadium, s th of the Roman mile.

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  • Kyaukse town is situated on the Zawgyi River and on the Rangoon-Mandalay railway line, and is well laid out in regular streets, covering an area of about a square mile.

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  • in a mile.

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  • When they were discovered, a mere raft of reeds in which they could scarcely venture a mile from shore was their only means of navigation.

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  • The city stands at the foot of low bluffs, about a mile from the shore line.

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  • Half a mile east of Kabul it is joined by the Logar, a much larger river, which rises beyond Ghazni among the slopes of the Gul Koh (14,200 ft.), and drains the rich and picturesque valleys of LGgar and Wardak.

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  • It is celebrated for the ruins of early aboriginal buildings still extant, about half a mile from its present site.

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  • The city was burnt, we are told, with the exception of the temples of Vulcan and Juno - the massive Etruscan terrace-walls, naturally, can hardly have suffered at all - and the town, with the territory for a mile round, was allowed to be occupied by whoever chose.

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  • 84, 8.88 and 6.66 standard ohms per statute mile respectively.

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  • The sizes of copper wire employed have weights of too, 150, 200 and 400 lb per statute mile, and have electrical resistances (at 60° F.) of 8.782, 5.8 55, 4.39 1 and 2.195 standard ohms respectively.

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  • Copper wire weighing 600 and 800 lb per mile has also been used to some extent.

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  • Gutta-percha-covered copper wires were formerly largely used for the purpose of underground lines, the copper conductor weighing 40 lb per statute mile, and the gutta-percha covering 50 lb (90 lb total).

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  • Between London and Birmingham a paper cable 116 m long and consisting of 72 copper conductors, each weighing 150 lb per statute mile, was laid in 1900.

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  • 5-7), as usually manufactured, consists of a core a in the centre of which is a strand of copper wires varying in weight for different cables between 70 and 650 lb to the nautical mile.

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  • The central conductor is covered with several continuous coatings of guttapercha, the total weight of which varies between 70 and 650 lb to the mile.

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  • In many cases a still heavier type is used for the first mile or two from shore, and several intermediate types are often introduced, tapering gradually to the thin deep-water type.

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  • The cost of the cable before laying depends on the dimensions of its core, the gutta-percha, which still forms the only trustworthy insulator known, constituting the principal item of the expense; for an Atlantic cable of the most approved construction the cost may be taken at f250 to £300 per nautical mile.

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  • The different coils are prevented from adhering by a coating of whitewash, and the end of each nautical mile is carefully marked for future reference.

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  • This is checked by the mile marks, the known position of the joints, &c., as they pass.

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  • Experiments of this kind were actually tried by Graham Bell in 1882, with boats on the Potomac river, and signals were detected at a distance of a mile and a half.

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  • In 1885 Preece and Heaviside proved by experiments made at Newcastle that if two completely insulated circuits of square form, each side being 440 yds., were placed a quarter of a mile apart, telephonic speech was conveyed from one to the other by induction, and signals could be perceived even when they were separated by 1000 yds.

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  • Rutherford used this detector to make evident the passage of an electric or Hertzian wave for half a mile across Cambridge, England.

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  • As subscribers' lines are invariably short, the smallest gauge of wire possessing the mechanical strength necessary to withstand the stresses to which it may be subjected can be employed, and bronze wire weighing 40 lb per mile is commonly used.

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  • The conductors used for subscribers' circuits are of copper weighing from 10 to 20 lb per mile.

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  • Wire weighing between 150 and 400 lb per mile is generally used.

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  • 8 Birmingham), weighing 435 lb per mile and having a resistance of 2.05 ohms per mile.

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  • In circuits possessing high resistance and capacity and low inductance per mile, telephonic currents are rapidly attenuated, and the higher the frequency the more rapid is the attenuation.

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  • for subscribers within half a mile of the exchange, £1, 5s.

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  • The Postmaster-General also agreed to lay underground wires for the company at an annual rental of L1 per mile of double wire in any local area in which the company was operating, but not in areas in which the municipalities had established exchanges.

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  • Comparing the state of things in 1901 with that of 1881, for the whole country, we find the passenger and goods traffic almost doubled (except the cattle traffic), the capital expenditure almost doubled, the working expenses per mile almost imperceptibly increased, and tI~ gross receipts per mile slightly lower.

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  • per mile.

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  • Three years later, however, the whole road was paved with silex from the temple to Bovillae, and in 191 B.C. the first mile from the gate to the temple was similarly treated.

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  • The burgh, which stretches for a mile along the south shore of the Firth of Forth, is intersected by the Esk and embraces the village of Fisherrow on the left bank of the river.

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  • Extensive use is made of building materials from the Roman station of Corstopitum (also called Corchester), which lay half a mile west of Corbridge at the junction of the Cor with the Tyne.

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  • About three-quarters of a mile away, on the banks of the river Ganges, is the Massacre Ghat.

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  • At the ferry on the Malatia-Kharput road (cuneiform inscription) it flows eastwards in a valley about a quarter of a mile wide, but soon afterwards enters a remarkable gorge, and forces its way through Mount Taurus in a succession of rapids and cataracts.

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  • Through this part of its course the current of the river, except where restricted by floating bridges - at Feluja, Mussaib, Hillah, Diwanieh and Samawa - does not normally exceed a mile an hour, and both on the main stream and on its canals the jerd or oxbucket takes the place of the naoura or water-wheel for purposes of irrigation.

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  • Even in the 3rd century the cult of Celtic deities (Hercules Magusanus, Deusoniensis, &c.) were revived, the Celtic leuga reintroduced instead of the Roman mile on official milestones, and a brief effort made to establish an independent, though romanized, Gaul under Postumus and his short-lived successors (A.D.

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  • The town has three parts: the Upper, built on the sides of a lofty foreland known as North Hill; the Lower; and the Quay Town, with many ancient houses, stretching for about a mile beside the harbour.

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  • A mean degree of the meridian being assumed to be 69-09 statute miles of 5280 ft., the nautical mile (A l b - degree) is taken as 6080 ft., which is a sufficiently close approximation for practical purposes, and the distances between the knots are made to bear the same relation to 6080 ft.

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  • (= five nautical miles) an hour; hence the common use of knot as equivalent to a nautical mile.

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  • Owing to the increased friction produced by a rotator making approximately 900 revolutions per mile, towed at the end of a line varying from 40 fathoms for a 12 -knot FIG.

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  • By means of an electric installation between the log register aft and the electric register in the chart room, every tenth of a mile indicated by the former is recorded by the latter.

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  • Inversnaid was in the heart of the Macgregor country, and the name of Rob Roy is still given to his cave on the loch side a mile to the north and to his prison 3 m.

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  • of Java, from which it is separated by Bali Strait, which is shallow, and scarcely over a mile in width at its narrowest point.

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  • One mile west of Lerwick is Clickimin Loch, separated from the sea by a narrow strip of land.

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  • in length, and was in the first instance laid with a single track, passing-places being provided at intervals of a quarter of a mile.

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  • to one-fifth of a penny per ton per mile, and that of minerals from 7d.

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  • per ton per mile.

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  • The total paid-up railway capital of the United Kingdom amounted, in 1908, to £1,310,533,212, or an average capitalization of £56,476 per route mile, though it should be noted that this total included £196,364,618 of nominal additions through " stock-splitting," &c. Per mile of single track, the capitalization in England and Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the United Kingdom, is shown in Table VIII.

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  • Table Viii.-Paid-Up Capital, 1908 The table excludes sidings, because they cannot fairly be compared with running tracks, mile for mile.

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  • per Mile.

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  • But there are long stretches of pine loam in the South where branch lines can be, and are, built and equipped for £2400 or less per mile, while the construction of new main line in the prairie region of the West ought not to cost more than £4000 per single-track-mile, under present conditions.

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  • Of trespassers the number killed per mile of line is about as large in England as in America, the density of population and of traffic in Great Britain apparently counterbalancing the laxity of the laws against trespassing in America.

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  • On some of the earlierEnglish main lines no curves were constructed of a less radius than a mile (80 chains), except at places where the speed was likely to be low, but in later practice the radius is sometimes reduced to 40 or 30 chains, even on high-speed passenger lines.

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  • measured horizontally expressed as a percentage, or by the number of feet rising vertically in a mile.

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  • a mile.

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  • a mile, third-class passengers paying 14 d.

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  • a mile had little consideration bestowed on their comfort, and were excluded from the fast trains till 1872, when the Midland railway admitted them to all its trains.

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  • a mile or less, and the money obtained from third-class travellers forms by far the most important item in the revenue from passenger traffic. Since the Midland railway's action in 1875 several other English companies have abandoned second-class carriages either completely or in part, and in Scotland they are entirely unknown.

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  • In Hungary and Russia a zone-tariff system is in operation, whereby the charge per mile decreases progressively with the length of the journey, the traveller paying according to the number of zones he has passed through and not simply according to the distance traversed.

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  • per mile per passenger.

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  • Intra-urban railways, as compared with ordinary railways, are characterized by shortness of length, great cost per mile, and by a traffic almost exclusively passenger, the burden of which is enormously heavy.

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  • One pair of tracks is used for a local service with stations about one-quarter of a mile apart, following the general plan of operation in vogue on all other intra-urban railways.

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  • As a general rule the interval varies from one-quarter to one-half mile; on the express lines of the New York underground railway, the inter-station interval averages about r1 m.

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  • The cost of building an ordinary two-track elevated railway according to American practice varies from $300,000 to $400,000 a mile, exclusive of equipment, terminals or land damages.

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  • exclusive, in like manner, of equipment, terminals or land damages, is about b70,000 to L200,000 a mile.

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  • working in France, costing on an average £4500 per mile, earning £275 per mile per annum; 3730 miles in Prussia costing £4180 per mile, earning £310 per mile per annum; 1430 m.

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  • As far as possible, these railways are laid beside roads, in preference to independent formation; the permanent way costs £977 per mile in the former as against £793 in the latter.

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  • If laid in paving, the price varies between £1108 and £2266 per mile.

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  • long - to a mile, laid 2 ft.

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  • The total cost per mile of such a line, including all bolts, nuts, fish-plates and fastenings, ready for laying,, delivered in the United Kingdom, is under Soo a mile.

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  • East Falkland is almost bisected by two deep fjords, Choiseul and Brenton Sounds, which leave the northern and southern portions connected only by an isthmus a mile and a half wide.

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  • As lately as the middle of the 18th century the town stood a quarter of a mile from the river, but is now on the bank, the intervening space having been washed away, together with a large part of the town, by the stream continually encroaching on its left bank.

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  • of Tonopah, in what became known as the Manhattan District, and by March 1906 the village of Manhattan was a mile in length and contained 3000 inhabitants.

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  • In the tropics "no European house should be located nearer to a native village than half a mile" (Manson), and, since children are almost universally infected, "the presence of young natives in the house should be absolutely interdicted" (Manson).

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  • Thirteen churches, including the Troitskiy (Trinity) and Uspenskiy cathedrals, a bell-tower, a theological academy, various buildings for monks and pilgrims, and a hospital stand within the precincts, which are two-thirds of a mile in circuit.

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  • It is situated on the Findhorn, which sweeps past the town and is crossed by a suspension bridge about a mile to the W., 11 m.

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  • A mile south are the green mounds marking the site of the abbey of Saulseat, founded for Premonstratensian monks by Fergus, "king" of Galloway, early in the 12th century.

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  • The estuary of the Urr, known as Rough Firth, is navigable by ships of from 80 to 100 tons, and small vessels can ascend as far as the mouth of Dalbeattie Burn, within a mile of the town.

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  • In the neighbourhood are remains of Coptic buildings, including a subterranean church (discovered 1895) in the desert half a mile beyond the limits of cultivation.

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  • There are no public buildings of any importance,, and the only places of interest are the bazars, which extend fully a mile in length, and consist of substantially built ranges of shops covered with roofs.

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  • to the mile.

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  • The site proving unfavourable, the colony was transferred to Twentyseven Mile Bluff, on the Mobile River, in 1702, and later to Mobile (1710).

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  • In 1907 there was a serious clash between the state authorities and the Federal judiciary, arising from an act of the legislature of that year which fixed the maximum railway fare at 21 cents a mile and imposed enormous fines for .its violation.

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  • Mafeking was originally the headquarters of the Barolong tribe of Bechuana and is still their largest station, the native location (pop. 2860) being about a mile distant from the town.

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  • In earlier times a bridge here crossed the Fleet, leading from Newgate, while a quarter of a mile west of the viaduct is the site of Holborn Bars, at the entrance to the City, where tolls were levied.

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  • m., and the population in 1905 was 1,684,125, showing a density of 145 inhabitants to the square mile.

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  • About a mile and a half east of Kano is Nassarawa, formerly the emir's suburban residence, but since 1902 the British Residency and barracks.

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  • The dock railway station lies a mile from the town station.

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  • In order to reach water sufficiently deep for the steamers, the railway tracks have been carried by earth filling about seven-eighths of a mile into the bay.

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  • The lower fort lies at the eastern base of the rock and measures about half a mile in diameter.

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  • Half a mile N.W.

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  • The magnificent bridge here spanning the Elbe, one mile in length, was built in 1851 at a cost of £237,500.

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  • He was present in person at an extraordinary affray in Sidney St., Mile End Road, on Jan.

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  • per mile, while that of the Sandusky decreases from about 7 ft.

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  • per mile at Upper Sandusky to 2.5 ft.

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  • per mile below Fremont.

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  • of it, and their average fall per mile is much less.

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  • west of Limasol, about a mile inland on the left bank of the Diorizo River (anc. Bocarus), the mouth of which formed its harbour.

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  • A jetty exceeding a quarter of a mile in length permits the approach of vessels at all tides.

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  • In its long course it varies greatly both in depth and width, in some parts being only a few feet deep and spreading out to a width of more than a mile, while in other and mountainous portions of its course its channel is narrowed to 300 or 400 ft., and its depth is increased in inverse ratio.

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  • They need not be horizontal, and sometimes have a dip of a few feet per mile, as in the case of the Ohio and Indiana oil fields, where the amount varies from one to ten feet.

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  • about 51 persons to the square mile.

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  • Phoenicia and the Lebanon have the densest population, over 70 to the square mile, while Palestine, the north part of the western plateau east of Jordan, the oases of Damascus and Aleppo, the Orontes valley, and parts of Cornmagene, are well peopled.

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  • It lies on the Uska-Nepal road at mile 19.75; and about half a mile south of the boundary pillar numbered 44 on the frontier line between British and Nepalese 1 A surname given to Pippin III.

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  • The famous seat of the Platonic philosophy was a gymnasium enlarged as a public park by Cimon; it lay about a mile to the north-west of the Dipylon Gate, with which it was connected by a street bordered with tombs.

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  • The main part of the town extends for a mile along the broad straight Roman road, Watling Street; the high road from Luton to Tring, which crosses it in the centre of the town, representing the ancient Icknield Way.

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  • None of the rivers is navigable for more than a mile or two from the coast.

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  • Porthilechog, or Bull Bay (so called from the Bull Rock), at a mile's distance, is a small but favourite watering-place.

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  • north of the present city, where ruins of brick and stone buildings, with three lofty stupas still standing, cover an area about half a mile long by a quarter broad.

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  • A breakwater three-quarters of a mile long protects the entrance to the harbour.

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  • The spa, a mile to the north of the town, was acquired by the burgh commissioners in 1898, and there are also spas at Hartfell (32 m.

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  • to a mile (1: 63,360).

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  • to a mile (1: 10,560), it was determined in 1840, after the whole of England and Wales, with the exception of Lancashire and Yorkshire, had been completed on one-inch scales, to adopt that scale for the whole of the United Kingdom.

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  • from that cape is Ras Hafun or Medudda - the most easterly point of the continent of Africa - being in 10° 45' S., 51° 27' 52" E., or about a mile and a half east of Guardafui.

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  • In the course of centuries this mole has been silted up and is now an isthmus half a mile wide.

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  • Another breakwater starts from the Gabbari side, the opening between the two works being about half a mile.

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  • Alexandria consisted originally of little more than the island of Pharos, which was joined to the mainland by a mole nearly a mile long and called the Heptastadium.

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  • One mile W.N.W., on the hill above Le Ferriere, remains of an archaic temple, ascribed to Mater Matuta, were discovered by excavation in 1896.

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  • At the ninth mile the road crosses a ravine by the well-preserved and lofty Ponte di Nona, with seven arches, the finest ancient bridge in the neighbourhood of Rome.

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  • to a quarter of a mile in breadth, which crosses the island from S.

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  • A mile and a half E.N.E.

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  • The average of settlement per square mile varied from 169.7 in Havana province to 11.8 in Camaguey, and was 46.4 for all of Cuba; the percentage of urban population (in cities, that is, with more than 1000 inhabitants) in the different provinces.

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  • The citadel is half a mile north-east of the city, and is surrounded by a rampart with bastions.

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  • This lowlying fertile belt stretches along the river for about 300 m., but is not more than a mile or two wide.

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  • About half a mile to the north-west of the village is the Menec system, which consists of eleven lines, numbers 874 menhirs, and extends a distance of 3376 ft.

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  • About a mile east of the village is a small piece of moorland called the Bossenno, from the bocenieu or mounds with which it is covered; and here, in 1874, the explorations of James Miln, a Scottish antiquary, brought to light the remains of a Gallo-Roman town.

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  • The total population of the Turkish Empire in 1910, including Egypt and other regions nominally under the sultan's suzerainty, was 36,323,539, averaging 25 to the square mile; in the provinces directly under Turkish government, 25,926,000.

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  • The line was designed, surveyed and constructed by Turkish engineers - employing Ottoman navvies and labourers - in a highly efficient and economical manner, the average cost per mile having been £3230, although considerable engineering difficulties had to be overcome, especially in the construction of the Haifa branch.

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  • Where formerly 15,000 men to the mile of front had been considered ample for the occupation of a position or the execution of an attack, double that number now often proved insufficient, and their front was broken before reinforcements could arrive.

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  • By nightfall upwards of 100,000 men, encumbered with at least 20,000 wounded, were crowded together on the little island scarcely a mile square, short of provisions and entirely destitute of course of all hospital accessories.

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  • On the other hand, Blucher carried the village of Mbckern and came within a mile of the gates of the town.

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  • It was a mile in diameter, built in concentric circles, with the mosque and palace of the caliph in the centre, and had four gates toward the four points of the compass.

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  • About half a mile from the town is the Albert Memorial Middle Class College, opened in 1865, and capable of accommodating 300 boys.

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  • On Rusthall Common about a mile from the town is the curiously shaped mass of sandstone known as the Toad Rock, and a mile and a half south-west is the striking group called the High Rocks.

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  • In this period of anarchy the native princes of Glamorgan had their principal demesne, not at the camp but a mile to the north at Llystalybont, now merely a thatched farmhouse, while some Saxon invaders threw up within the camp a large moated mound on which the Normans about the beginning of the 12th century built the great shellkeep which is practically all that remains of their original castle.

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  • It affords facilities for the transport of logs by means of booms above Minneapolis, and is navigable below St Paul; being half a mile broad where it reaches the border of the state at Hastings.

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  • The present city is half a mile north of the site of the old town, which was destroyed by an earthquake and tidal wave in 1746.

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  • Polinos, Polybos or Polivo (anc. Polyaegos) lies rather more than a mile south-east of Kimolos.

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  • The picturesque ruins of Edzell Castle lie a mile to the west of the town.

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  • An earthwork known as Castle Rough, in the marshes below Milton, was probably the work of Hasten the Dane in 892, and Bayford Castle, a mile distant, occupies the site of one said to have been built in opposition by King Alfred, Tong Castle is about 2 m.

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  • S., where (in a former mansion) some of the conspirators in the Gunpowder Plot defied search for eight days (1605); and Westwood, a fine hall of Elizabethan and Carolean date on the site of a Benedictine nunnery, a mile west of Droitwich, which offered a retreat to many Royalist cavaliers and churchmen during the Commonwealth.

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  • At Inglesham, threequarters of a mile above Lechlade, the Thames and Severn canal has its junction with the Thames.

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  • A mile S.W.

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  • The town is the centre of a pastoral district and has a large trade in furs, while at Bushy Hill, a mile from the town, is a small gold-field.

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  • 1896), has been established on a slight elevation overlooking the river at the point below the rapids where steamers come to anchor, about one mile below Ahvaz.

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  • There are coalmines, several ironworks - one is among the largest in Scotland - and, on the sandhills along the shore, the works of Nobel's Explosives Company, which cover an area of a mile, the separatehut principle being adopted to minimize the risks attendant upon so dangerous an occupation.

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  • The Amazon plain is heavily forested and has a slope of less than one inch to the mile within Brazilian territory - one competent authority placing it at about one-fifth of an inch per mile.

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  • A mile south of Dunkeld, on the left bank of the Tay, is the village of Birnam (pop. 389), where Sir John Everett Millais, the painter, made his summer residence.

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  • Of palms there are two varieties, the ilala (Hyphaene crinita), found only by the sea shore and a mile or two inland, and the isundu (Phoenix reclinata), more widespread and found at heights up to 2000 ft.

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  • beyond Charlestown reaches the Transvaal frontier at mile 307.

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  • Population.-Hungary had in 1900 a population of 19,254,559, equivalent to 153.7 inhabitants per square mile.

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  • N., the Caledonian canal begins, the series of locks between here and Banavie - within little more than a mile - being known as "Neptune's Staircase."

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  • A mile and a half from the town, on the Lochy, stands the grand old ruin of Inverlochy Castle, a massive quadrangular pile with a round tower at each corner, a favourite subject with landscape painters.

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  • Reaching Blackheath on the 12th, the insurgents burnt the prisons in Southwark and pillaged the archbishop's palace at Lambeth, while another body of rebels from Essex encamped at Mile End.

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  • At Mile End the king met Wat Tyler; a lengthy and tumultuous conference, during which several persons were slain, took place, in which Tyler demanded the immediate abolition of serfdom and all feudal services, and the removal of all restrictions on freedom of labour and trade, as well as a general amnesty for the insurgents.

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  • The enfranchisement of villeins granted by Richard at the Mile End conference was revoked by parliament in 1382, and no permanent results were obtained for the peasants by Wat.

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  • Ruins of a fortress crown the rock of Harlech, about half a mile from the sea.

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  • Its railway station, which is the chief terminus of the South Wales system of the Great Western railway, is at the hamlet of Goodwick across the bay, a mile distant to the south-west.

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  • m., and a population (1905) of 885,280, showing a density of 386.9 to the square mile.

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  • within a mile of the city furnishes a valuable water-power, which has been utilized for public and private enterprises.

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  • in length by a quarter of a mile in breadth there exists an exposed mass of rock-salt with several large hillocks of salt on either side.

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  • long by half a mile broad, and the salt is hewn out in large blocks with picks and wedges.

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  • The branches of the Stour dividing near Sarre take the place of the former Wantsume, a sea-passage which had diminished in breadth to half a mile in the time of Augustine.

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