Milan sentence example

milan
  • In 1880 he went to Milan for the inauguration of the Mentana monument, and in 1882 visited Naples and Palermo, but was prevented by illness from being present at the 600th anniversary of the Sicilian Vespers.
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  • At the present time, so far as the Roman Catholic Church is concerned, apparelled albs are only in regular use at Milan (Ambrosian Rite), and, partially, in certain churches in Spain.
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  • In the 18th century concordats are numerous: there are two for Spain, in 1737 and 1753; two for the duchy of Milan, in 1757 and 1784; one for Poland, in 1736; five for Sardinia and Piedmont, in 1727, 1741, 1742, 1750 and 1770; and one for the kingdom of the Two Sicilies in 1741.
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  • In the RussoTurkish War the Servian army, under the personal command of King Milan, besieged Nish, and forced it to capitulate on the 10th January 1878.
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  • of Milan, 253 ft.
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  • At this time Bianca's uncle, Ludovico Sforza, was invested with the duchy of Milan in return for the substantial dowry which his niece brought to the king.
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  • (Milan, 1829).
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  • Mai edited Julius Valerius (Milan, 1817) and the Itinerarium Alexandri (Class.
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  • "And what do you think of this latest comedy, the coronation at Milan?" asked Anna Pavlovna, "and of the comedy of the people of Genoa and Lucca laying their petitions before Monsieur Buonaparte, and Monsieur Buonaparte sitting on a throne and granting the petitions of the nations?
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  • on the 1st of January 1515, was an enthusiastic young prince, dominated by the ambition of recovering Milan and Naples.
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  • vii.; Milan, 18 35); J.
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  • He rallied the Bulgarian army, now deprived of its Russian officers, to resist the Servian invasion, and after a brilliant victory at Slivnitza (November 19) pursued King Milan into Servian territory as far as Pirot, which he captured (November 27).
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  • The greater part of his life was spent at Venice and Milan, where he held a professorship and continued to teach until his death.
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  • He wrote also Bellum scodrense (1474), on account of the siege of Scodra (Scutari) by the Turks, and Antiquitates vicecomitum, the history of the Visconti, dukes of Milan, down to the death of Matteo the Great (1322).
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  • They made Milan their home; and the empire was nominally divided between them, Gratian taking the trans-Alpine provinces, whilst Italy, Illyricum in part, and Africa were to be under the rule of Valentinian, or rather of his mother, Justina.
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  • Justina was an Arian, and the imperial court at Milan pitted itself against the Catholics, under the famous Ambrose, bishop of that city.
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  • He was condemned by a Roman synod under Bishop Siricius in 390, and afterwards excommunicated by another at Milan under the presidency of Ambrose.
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  • Hence this part of the country has a cold winter climate, so that while the mean summer temperature of Milan is higher than that of Sassari, and equal to that of Naples, and the extremes reached at Milan and Bologna are a good deal higher than those of Naples, the mean winter temperature of Turin is actually lower than that of Copenhagen.
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  • Most of Jackson's clothes, especially his suits, were custom made or straight off the runway from Paris or Milan.
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  • They're by an up-and-coming designer from Milan.
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  • His first appointment was as elementary mathematical master at the gymnasium and lyceum of Cremona, and he afterwards obtained a similar post at Milan.
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  • In 1860 he was appointed to the professorship of higher geometry at the university of Bologna, and in 1866 to that of higher geometry and graphical statics at the higher technical college of Milan.
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  • Having made an alliance with Christian II., king of Denmark, and interfered to protect the Teutonic Order against Sigismund I., king of Poland, Maximilian was again in Italy early in 1516 fighting the French who had overrun Milan.
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  • In 1546 he accepted a professorial chair at Lucca, which he exchanged in 1555 for that of Greek and Latin literature at Milan.
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  • Here about 1566 his enemies renewed their activity, and in 1567 he was formally accused by Fra Angelo the inquisitor of Milan.
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  • In 387 Magnus Maximus, who had commanded a Roman army in Britain, and had in 383 (the year of Gratian's death) made himself master of the northern provinces, crossed the Alps into the valley of the Po and threatened Milan.
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  • An idea of the effects of the survey may be gathered from the fact that the assessments in the four provinces of Mantua, Ancona, Cremona and Milan, which formerly amounted to a total of I,454,696~ are now 2,788,080, an increase of 91%.
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  • Another stock, with no close allies nearer than the south of France, is found in the plain of Racconigi and Carmagnola; the mouse-colored Swiss breed occurs in the neighborhood of Milan; the Tirolese breed stretches south to Padua and Modena; and a red-coated breed named of Reggio or Friuli is familiar both in what were the duchies of Parma and Modena, and in the provinces of lJdine and Treviso.
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  • Lombardy (especially Como, Milan and Bergamo), Piedmont and Venetia are the chief silk-producing regions.
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  • Milan and Genoa are the principal centres, and also the government military pharmaceutical factory at Turin.
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  • The last named has succeeded, by means of the large establishments at Milan in supplying not only the whole Italian market but an export trade.
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  • Paper-making is highly developed in the provinces of Novara, Caserta, Milan, Vicenza, Turin, Como, Lucca, Ancona, Genoa, Brescia, Cuneo, Macerata and Salerno.
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  • Other cities where the ceramic industries keep their ground are Pesaro, Gubbio, Faenza (whose name long ago became the distinctive term for the finer kind of potters work in France, falence), Savona and Albissola, Turin, Mondovi, Cuneo, Castellamonte, Milan, Brescia, Sassuolo, Imola, Rimini, Perugia, Castelli, &c. In all these the older styles, by which these places became famous in the IthI8th centuries, have been revived.
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  • Since 1901 there have been, more than once, general strikes at Milan and elsewhere, and one in the autumn of 1905 caused great inconvenience throughout the country, and led to no effective result.
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  • Milan 4s the most important railway centre in the country, and is followed by Turin, Genoa, Verona, Bologna, Rome, Naples.
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  • in length) from Domodossola to Brigue, the St Gotthard from Milan to Chiasso (the tunnel is entirely in Swiss territory), the Brenner from Verona to Trent, the line from Udine to Tarvis and the line from Venice to Triest by the Adriatic coast.
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  • Besides these international lines the most important are those from Milan to Turin (via Vercelli and via Alessandria), to Genoa via Tortona, to Bologna via Parma and Modena, to V~rona, and the shorter lines to the district of the lakes of Lombardy; from Turin to Genoa via Savona and via Alessandria; from Genoa to Savona and Ventimiglia along the Riviera, and along the south-west coast of Italy, via Sarzana (whence a line runs to Parma) to Pisa (whence lines run to Pistoia and Florence) and Rome; from Verona to Modena, and to Venice via Padua; from Bologna to Padtia, to Rimini (and thence along the north-east coast via Ancona, Castellammare Adriatico and Foggia to Brindisi and Otranto), and to Florence and Rome; from Rome to Ancona, to Castellammare Adriatico and to Naples; from Naples to Foggia, via Metaponto (with a junction for Reggio di Calabria), to Brindisi and to Reggio di Calabria.
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  • These lines exist principally in Lombardy (especially in the province of Milan), in Piedmont, especially in the province of Turin, and in other regions of northern and central Italy.
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  • Canals lead from Milan to the Ticino, Adda and P0.
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  • There are three higher commercial schools, with academic rank, at Venice, Genoa and Ban, and eleven secondary commercial schools; and technical and commercial schools for women at Florence and Milan.
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  • The institutions which co-operate with the universities are the special schools for engineers at Turin, Naples, Rome and Bologna (and others attached to some of the universities), the higher technical institute at Milan, the higher veterinary schools of Milan, Naples and Turin, the institute for higher studies at Florence (Istituto di studi superiori, pratici e di perfezionamento), the literary and scientific academy of Milan, the higher institutes for the training of female teachers at Florence and Rome, the Institute of Social Studies at Florence, the higher commercial schools at Venice, Ban and Genoa, the commercial university founded by L.
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  • Certain peculiarities introduced by St Ambrose distinguish the ritual of Milan from that of the general church.
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  • There are in Italy six clearing houses, namely, the ancient one at Leghorn, and those of Genoa, Milan, Rome, Florence and Turin, founded since 1882.
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  • Otto entered Lombardy Saxon in 961, deposed Berengar, assumed the crown in San and FranAmbrogio at Milan, and in 962 was proclaimed conlan emperor by John XII.
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  • It is here, at the Heribert present epoch and for the next two centuries, that the and the pith and nerve of the Italian nation must be sought; Lombard and among the burghs of Lombardy, Milan, the eldest burghs.
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  • In Milan we hear for the first time the word Comune.
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  • In Milan the citizens first form themselves into a Parlamento.
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  • In Milan the archbishop organizes the hitherto voiceless, defenceless population into a community capable of expressing its needs, and an army ready to maintain its rights.
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  • Next to Milan, and from the point of view of general politics even more than Milan, Rome now claims attention.
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  • Milan undertook the irrigation works which enriched the soil of Lombardy for ever.
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  • Lombardy was, roughly speaking, divided between two parties, the one headed by Pavia professing loyalty to the empire, the other headed by Milan ready to oppose its claims. The municipal animosities of the last quarter of a century gave substance to these factions; yet neither the imperial nor, the anti-imperial party had any real community of interest with Frederick.
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  • It was only the habit of interurban jealousy which prevented the communes from at once combining to resist demands which threatened their liberty of action, and would leave them passive at the pleasure of a foreign master The diet was opened at Roncaglia near Piacenza, where Fredericli listened to the complaints of Como and Lodi against Milan, of Pavia against Tortona and of the marquis of Montferrat against Asti and Chieri.
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  • He laid waste Chieri, Asti and Tortona, then took the Lombard crown at Pavia, and, reserving Milan for a future day, passed southward to Rome.
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  • Having obtained his coronation, Frederick withdrew to Germany, while Milan prepared herself against the storm which threatened.
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  • He came in 1158 with a large army, overran Lombardy, raised his imperial allies, and sat down before the walls of Milan.
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  • of Milan, Lodi, Piacenza, Parma, Modena and Bologna.
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  • In the spring of 1176 Frederick threatened Milan.
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  • On the one side we find Vercelli, Novara, Milan, Lodi, Bergamo, Brescia, Mantua, Verona, Vicenza, Padua, Treviso, Bologna, Faenza, Modena, Reggio, Parma, Piacenza; on the other, Pavia, Genoa, Alba, Cremona, Como, Tortona, Asti, Cesarea.
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  • The Estensi made themselves lords of Ferrara; the Torriani headed the Guelphs of Milan.
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  • It is from this epoch that the supremacy of the Visconti, hitherto the unsuccessful rivals of the Guelphic Torriani for the signory of Milan, dates.
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  • He deposed Galeazzo Visconti on his downward journey, and offered Milan for a sum of money to his son Azzo upon his return.
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  • These five powers were the kingdom of Naples, the duchy of Milan, the republic of Florence, the republic of Venice and the papacy.
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  • Ren found supporters among the Italian princes, especially the Milanese Visconti, who helped him to assert his claims with arms. During the war of succession which ensued, Alfonso was taken prisoner by the Genoese fleet in August 1435, and was sent a prisoner to Filippo Maria at Milan.
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  • His uncle Lucchino succeeded, but Milan.
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  • Lucchinos brother John, arch bishop of Milan, now assumed the lordship of the city, and extended the power of the Visconti over Genoa and the whole of north Italy, with the exception of Piedmont, Verona, Mantua, Ferrara and Venice.
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  • In the next year Matteo, being judged incompetent to rule, was assassinated by order of his brothers, who made an equal partition of their subject citiesBernab residing in Milan, Galeazzo in Pavia.
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  • Seven years before his death Gian Galeazzo bought the title of duke of Milan and count of Pavia from the emperor Wenceslaus, and there is no doubt that he was aiming at the sovereignty of Italy.
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  • Filippo married and then beheaded Beatrice after a mock trial for adultery, having used her money and her influence in reuniting several subject cities to the crown of Milan.
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  • Once seated in the duchy of Milan, he displayed rare qualities as a ruler; for he not only entered into the spirit of the age, which required humanity and culture from a despot, but he also knew how to curb his desire for territory.
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  • Instead of opposing Francesco Sforza in Milan, he lent him his prestige and influence, foreseeing that the dynastic future of his own family and the pacification of Italy might be secured by a balance of power in which Florence should rank on equal terms with Milan and Naples.
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  • of Naples (1464), the murder of Galeazzo Maria Sforza at Milan (1476) and the plot of the Pazzi to destroy the Medici (1478).
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  • But the government of Milan remaned in the hands of this youths uncle, Lodovico, surnamed II Moro.
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  • Lodovico resolved to become duke of Milan.
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  • As duke of Orleans he had certain claims to Milan through his grandmother Valentina, dap~hter of Gian Galeazzo, the first duke.
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  • In 1521 he changed sides, allied himself to Charles, and died after hearing that the imperial troops had again expelled the French from Milan.
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  • He there received the imperial crown, and summoned the Italian princes for a settlement of all disputed claims. Francesco Sforza, the last and childless heir of the ducal house, was left in Milan till his death, which happened in 1535.
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  • A Spanish viceroy in Milan and another in Naples, supported by Rome and by the minor princes who followed the policy dictated to them from Madfid, were sufficient to preserve the whole peninsula in a state of somnolent inglorious servitude.
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  • He already wore the crown of the Two Sicilies, and ruled the duchy of Milan.
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  • Charles of Austria, now emperor, took Milan, Mantua, Naples and Sardinia for his portion of the Italian spoil.
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  • Milan and Mantua remained in the hands of the Austrians.
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  • The Austrians kept Milan and Tuscany.
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  • The former possessed the rich duchies Frecch of Milan (including Mantua) and Tuscany; while Revolu through a marriage alliance with the house of Este UoI, of Modena (the Archduke Ferdinand had married the heiress of Modena) its influence over that duchy was supreme.
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  • Milan and Piedmont were comparatively well governed; but repugnance to Austrian rule in the former case, and the contagion of French Jacobinical opinions in the latter, brought those populations into increasing hostility to the rulers.
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  • Plotting was rife at Milan, as also at Bologna, where the memory of old liberties predisposed men to cast off clerical rule and led to the first rising on behalf of Italian liberty in the year 1794.
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  • Already the men of Reggio, Modena and Bologna had declared for a democratic policy, in which feudalism and clerical rule should have no place, and in which manhood suffrage, TahdeaCnIes~ together with other rights promised by Bonaparte Republin to the men of Milan in May 1796, should form the basis of a new order of things.
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  • The Transpadane Republic, or, as it was soon called, the Cisalpine 7l~~ Republic, began its organized life on the 9th of July Republic. 1797, with a brilliant festival at Milan.
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  • Her former rival, Genoa, bad also been compelled, in June 1797, to bow before the young conqueror, and had undergone at his hands a remodelling on the lines already followed at Milan.
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  • Milan and Turin fell before the allies, and Moreau, who took over the command, had much difficulty in making his way to the Genoese coast-line.
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  • The republics set up by the French at Naples, Rome and Milan collapsed as soon as the French troops retired; and a reaction in favor of clerical and Austrian influence set in with great violence.
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  • Milan was the terminus of the road, and the construction of the Foro Buonaparte and the completion of the cathedral added dignity to the Lombard capital.
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  • and clerics, (c) merchants and traders, holding their sessions biennially at Milan, Bologna and Brescia respectively.
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  • The legislature at Milan having ventured to alter some details of taxation, Eugene received the following rule of conduct from his step-father: Your system of government is simple: the emperor wills it to be thus.
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  • The Austrians, under General Bellegarde, entered Milan without resistance; and this event precluded the restoration of the old political order.
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  • There had been some mild plotting against Austria in Milan, and an attempt was made to co-operate with the Piedmontese movement of 1821; already in.
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  • At Milan, where there was a division of opinion between tha monarchists under Casati and the republicans under Cattaneo, a provisional administration was formed and the question of the form of government postponed for the moment.
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  • Then came the news of the Five Days of Milan, which produced the wildest excitement in Turin; unless First war the army were sent to assist the struggling Lombards of Italy at once the dynasty was in jeopardy.
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  • On the 23rd, 24th and 25th of July (first battle of Custozza) the Piedmontese were defeated and forced to retire on Milan with Radetzkys superior force in pursuit.
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  • On the 6th of August Radetzky re-entered Milan, and three days later an armistice was concluded between Austria and Piedmont, the latter agreeing to evacuate Lombardy and Venetia.
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  • Bertolinis Storia dItalia dat 1814 al 1878, in 2 parts (Milan, 1880 1881).
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  • P. Orsis LItaiia moderna (Milan, 1901) should also be mentioned.
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  • See also Zinis Storia d Italic (4 vols., Milan, 1875); Gualterios Gil ultimi rivolgimenti italiani (4 vols., Florence, 1850) is important for the period from 1831 to 1847, and so also is L.
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  • At Faenza, Piacenza, Cremona, Pavia and Milan, where subversive associa tions were stronger, it assumed the complexion of a political revolt.
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  • From the 7th to the 9th of May Milan remained practically in Lhe hands of the mob.
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  • By these means order was restored, though not without considerable loss of life at Milan.
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  • At Milan alone the official returns confessed to eighty killed and several hundred wounded, a total generally considered below the real figures.
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  • At Milan it was more serious and lasted longer than elsewhere, as the movement was controlled by the anarchists under Arturo Labriola; the hooligans committed many acts of savage violence, especially against those workmen who refused to strike, and much property was wilfully destroyed.
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  • Certain scandals had come to light in a small convent school at Greco near Milan.
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  • In October 1907 there was again a general strike at Milan, which was rendered more serious on account of the action of the railway servants, and extended to other cities; traffic was disorganized over a large part of northern Italy, until the government, being now owner of the railways, dismissed the ringleaders from the service.
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  • The municipal elections in several of the larger cities, which had hitherto been regarded as strongholds of socialism, marked an overwhelming triumph for tJic constitutional parties, notably in Milan, Turin and Genoa, for the strikes had wrought as much harm to the working classe1 as to the bourgeoisie.
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  • de Sismondis Ripubligues ilaliennes (Brussels, I838) and Carlo Trovas Stone d Italia net medio evo are among the most valuable general works, while the large Storia Politica d Italia by various authors, ptiblished at Milan, is also importantF.
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  • Lenimis Le Origini del risorgimento italiano (Milan, 1906); E.
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  • de Castro, Stonia d Italic dal 1797 at 1814 (Milan, 1881); A.
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  • Ambrose of Milan (Epistles ix.
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  • The Sforzas having expelled the French from Milan, Cesare returned to Rome in February, his schemes checked for the moment; his father rewarded him for his successes by making him gonfaloniere of the church and conferring many honours on him; he remained in Rome and took part in bull fights and other carnival festivities.
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  • In the matter of criminal jurisdiction we paused for a moment at the edict of Milan; but we may at once trace this second or civil branch of episcopal judicature or quasi-judicature down as far as the reign of Charlemagne, when it underwent a fundamental change, and became, if either litigant once chose, no longer a matter of consent but of right.
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  • The edicts of Milan had only admitted the Christian Church among the number of lawful religions; but the tendency (except in the time of Julian) was towards making it the only lawful religion.
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  • The penalties which the spiritual court could inflict, in the period between the edict of Milan and c. 854, were properly excommunication whether generally or as exclusion from the sacraments for a term of months or years or till the day of death and (in the case of clerics) suspension or deposition.
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  • Abroad unsuccessful attempts were made by local councils to enact that officials and vicars-general should be in holy orders (Hefele on Councils of Tortosa in 1429 and Sixth of Milan in 1582).
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  • The Latin West was scarcely less productive; it is enough to mention Hilary of Poitiers, Ambrose of Milan, Augustine of Hippo, Leo of Rome, Jerome, Rufinus, and a father lately restored to his place in patristic literature, Niceta of Remesiana.'
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  • Giustina, now in the Brera Gallery in Milan, 1 453.
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  • The gospel and epistle are still read from the ambo in the Ambrosian rite at Milan.
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  • For the Italian nobility see the eight magnificent folio volumes of Count Pompeo Litta, Celebri famiglie italiane, continued by various editors (Milan, 1819-1907); for Spanish, Fernandez de Bethencourt, Hist.
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  • The magistrates in some of the Italian towns, and especially Uberto Pallavicino at Milan, expelled the flagellants with threats, and for a time the sect disappeared.
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  • The Italian translation (alluded to by Gibbon himself) was, along with Spedalieri's Confutazione, reprinted at Milan in 1823.
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  • It lies on the main line between Bologna and Milan, and is connected by branch lines with Guastalla and Sassuolo (hence a line to Modena).
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  • Lorenzo in Milan and the cathedral of Parenzo - also S.
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  • the state of things at Mediolanum, Milan).
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  • In 1860 Vera returned to Italy, where he was made professor of philosophy in the royal academy of Milan.
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  • In fact a medley from both Basil and the Physiologus exists under the title of the Hexaeineron of Eustathius; some copies of the first bear as a title IIepi diuvnoXoyc'as, and in a Milan MS. the "morals" of the Physiologus are ascribed to Basil.
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  • Biog.) argued against this date, on the ground that in 1584 and 1585 Crichton was alive and in Milan, as certain works of his published in that year testified, and regarded it as probable that he died in Mantua c. 1585/6.
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  • Both Barras and Harmand de la Meuse 5 In a bulletin dated May 17-24, Paris, and enclosed by Francis Drake (June I, 1794) at Milan to Lord Grenville, it is stated (Hist.
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  • Richemont (Henri Ethelbert Louis Victor Hebert) was in prison in Milan for seven years and began to put forward his claims in Paris in 1828.
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  • When the request was refused, and Venice was placed under Austria, he removed to Milan, where he was made member of the great council.
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  • But he soon after returned to the neighbourhood of Milan, to devote himself to scientific agriculture.
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  • On his first entry into Milan (15th of May 1796) he received a rapturous welcome as the liberator of Italy from the Austrian yoke; but the instructions of the Directory allowed him at the outset to do little more than effect the organization of consultative committees and national guards in the chief towns of Lombardy.
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  • Much of this work of reorganization was carried on at the castle of Montebello, or Mombello, near Milan, where he lived in almost viceregal pomp (May - July, 1 797).
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  • Eugene Beauharnais had been established at Milan.
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  • By the Milan Decree of the 17th of December 1807, he ordained that every ship which submitted to the right of search now claimed by Great Britain would be considered a lawful prize.
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  • Berlese, Gli Insetti (Milan, 1906), &c. (Extensive bibliographies will be found in several of the above.) Head and Appendages.
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  • (Milan, 1896-1902); G.
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  • secondo; piu recenti studii (Milan, 18 94).
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  • Formerly known as Karanovats, Kralyevo received its present name, signifying "the King's Town," from King Milan (1868-1889), who also made it a bishopric, instead of Chachak, 22 m.
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  • A peace, honourable to both parties, was brought about by Matteo Visconti, lord of Milan, in that same year.
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  • The lord of Milan again arranged a peace (1355) We have now reached the last phase of the struggle for maritime supremacy.
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  • The period with which we are now dealing is the epoch of the despots, the signori, and in pursuit of expansion on the mainland Venice was brought into collision first with the Scaligeri of Verona, then with the Carraresi of Padua, and finally with the Visconti of Milan.
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  • To the west the new duke of Milan, Filippo Maria Visconti, was steadily piecing together the fragments of his father's shattered duchy.
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  • The conflict between Venice and Milan led to three wars in 1426, 1427 and 1429.
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  • Vannutelli and C. Citerni, L'Omo (Milan, 1899); British War Office map, Africa, sheet 79.
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  • Guerrazzi's novel, Beatrice Cenci (Milan, 1872), more trustworthy.
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  • Honorius at first established his court at Milan, but, on the report of the invasion of Italy, fled to Ravenna, where he resided till his death on the 27th of August 423.
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  • (Milan, 1881); Rossi, Elogi di Bresciana illustri, p. 386.
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  • Of the work of Cyriac of Ancona, written about 1450, only some fragments remain, which are well supplemented by the contemporaneous description of the capable observer known as the " Anonymus of Milan."
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  • This brought the latter into conflict with Alexander, who determined to revenge himself by making an alliance with the king's enemies, especially the Sforza family, lords of Milan.
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  • Della Rovere, feeling that Rome was a dangerous place for him, fortified himself in his bishopric of Ostia at the Tiber's mouth, while Ferdinand allied himself with Florence, Milan, Venice, and the pope formed a league against Naples (April 25, 1493) and prepared for war.
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  • At Milan Lodovico Sforza (il Moro) ruled, nominally as regent for the youthful duke Gian Galeazzo, but really with a view to making himself master of the state.
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  • Preparations for defence were made; a Neapolitan army was to advance through the Romagna and attack Milan, while the fleet was to seize Genoa; but both expeditions were badly conducted and failed, and on the 8th of September Charles crossed the Alps and joined Lodovico it Moro at Milan.
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  • In order to consolidate his possessions still further, now that French success seemed assured, the pope determined to deal drastically with Romagna, which although nominally under papal rule was divided up into a number of practically independent lordships on which Venice, Milan and Florance cast hungry eyes.
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  • But the expulsion of the French from Milan and the return of Lodovico Sforza interrupted his conquests, and he returned to Rome early in 1500.
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  • In the north the pendulum swung back once more and the French reoccupied Milan in April, causing the downfall of the Sforzas, much to Alexander's gratification.
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  • Prima traversata della Somalia italiana (Milan, 1899) and Nel paese degli Aromi (Milan, 1903), M.
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  • Fumagalli (Milan, 1893) includes works dealing with Somaliland.
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  • GIUSEPPE FERRARI (1812-1876), Italian philosopher, historian and politician, was born at Milan on the 7th of March 1812, and died in Rome on the 2nd of July 1876.
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  • In spite of this opposition, he held chairs of philosophy at Turin, Milan and Rome in succession, and during several administrations represented the college of Gavirate in the chamber.
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  • See Marro Macchi, Annuario istorico italiano (Milan, 18 77); Mazzoleni, Giuseppe Ferrari; Werner, Die ital.
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  • Calderini, La Manomissione dei liberti in Grecia (Milan, 1908).
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  • His chief work is, perhaps, his Grammatica philosophica (Milan, 1628).
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  • Marucchi, Le Catacombe romane (Rome, 1903; also translated into French), Manuale di epigrafia cristiana (Milan, 1904); M.
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  • Meanwhile, in June 1499, war had again broken out with Venice, mainly owing to the intervention of the pope and emperor, who, with Milan, Florence and Naples, urged the sultan to crush the republic. On the 28th of July the Turks gained over the Venetians at Sapienza their first great victory at sea; and this was followed by the capture of Lepanto, at which Bayezid was present, and by the conquest of the Morea and most of the islands of the archipelago.
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  • Towards 1637 he came to Italy, was hospitably received at Milan by a Burgundian gentleman, and entered, and for three years remained in, the French military service.
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  • Having become one of the chief inspirers of the imperial policy, Marsilius accompanied Louis of Bavaria to Italy, where he preached or circulated written attacks against the pope, especially at Milan, and where he came within the sight of the realization of his wildest utopias.
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  • In recompense for his services, he seems to have been appointed archbishop of Milan, while his collaborator, John of Jandun, obtained from Louis of Bavaria the bishopric of Ferrara.
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  • After this he was for a short while in the service of the duke of Feria at Milan, then went to Rome, where he was ordained priest (1601-1602) and became agent for the English clergy.
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  • Gratian acquiesced in their choice; reserving for himself the administration of the Gallic provinces, he handed over Italy, Illyria and Africa to Valentinian and his mother, who fixed their residence at Milan.
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  • PAOLO FRISI (1728-1784), Italian mathematician and astronomer, was born at Milan on the 13th of April 1728.
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  • In 1753 he was elected a corresponding member of the Paris Academy of Sciences, and shortly afterwards he became professor of philosophy in the Barnabite College of St Alexander at Milan.
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  • In 1764 he was created professor of mathematics in the palatine schools at Milan, and obtained from Pope Pius VI.
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  • In 1777 he became director of a school of architecture at Milan.
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  • His publications include: Disquisitio mathematica in causam physicam figurae et magnitudinis terrae (Milan, 1751); Saggio della morale filosofia (Lugano, 1 753); Nova electricitatis theoria (Milan, 1 755); Dissertatio de motu diurno terrae (Pisa, 1758); Dissertationes variae (2 vols.
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  • 4to, Lucca, 1759, 1761); Del modo di regolare i fiumi e i torrenti (Lucca, 1762); Cosmographia physica et mathematica (Milan, 1 774, 1 775, 2 vols.
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  • 4to, his chief work); Dell' architettura, statica e idraulica (Milan, 1 777); and other treatises.
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  • Lines diverge from it to Turin via Asti, to Valenza (and thence to Vercelli, Mortara - for Novara or Milan - and Pavia), to Tortona, to Novi, to Acqui and to Bra.
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  • Kiilpe; Angelo Mosso, La Paura (Milan, 1884, 1900; Eng.
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  • When Constantine deposed the orthodox bishops who resisted, Auxentius was installed into the seat of Dionysius, bishop of Milan, and came to be regarded as the great opponent of the Nicene doctrine in the West.
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  • Ceriani edited this text from a Milan MS. (Monuments Sacra et Profana, v.
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  • 20) Sebastian was a native of Milan, went to Rome at the height of Diocletian's persecution, and there suffered martyrdom.
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  • of Milan by rail.
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  • Here the main line from Milan divides, one portion going on parallel to the line of the ancient Via Aemilia (which it has followed from Piacenza downwards) to Rimini, Ancona and Brindisi, and the other through the Apennines to Florence and thence to Rome.
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  • But the struggles between Guelphs and Ghibellines in Bologna itself soon followed, and the commune was so weakened that in 1337 Taddeo de' Pepoli made himself master of the town, and in 1350 his son sold it to Giovanni Visconti of Milan.
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  • In 1492 he removed to Milan, where he died in 1511.
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  • In 1387 fresh quarrels with Florence on the subject of Montepulciano led to an open war, that was further aggravated by the interference in Tuscan affairs of the ambitious duke of Milan, Gian Galeazzo Visconti.
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  • In 1431 a fresh war with Florence broke out, caused by the latter's attempt upon Lucca, and continued in consequence of the Florentines' alliance with Venice and Pope Eugenius IV., and that of the Sienese with the duke of Milan and Sigismund, king of the Romans.
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  • About the same time the republic was exposed to still graver danger by the conspiracy of some of its leading citizens to seize the reins of power and place the city under the suzerainty of Alphonso, as it had once been under that of the duke of Milan.
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  • The conspiracy of the Pazzi in 1478 led to a war in which Florence and Milan were opposed to the pope and the king of Naples, and which was put an end to by the peace of 13th March 1480.
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  • Count KhuenHedervary, as Ban of Croatia, reduced political corruption to a fine art and governed by playing off Croat and Serb against each other, and fanning the dying flames of religious bigotry: while at the same time Serbia under King Milan was reduced to the position of a mere satellite of Vienna.
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  • I I 1919 was howled down at a great meeting in Milan.
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  • In 1863 he obtained a professorship at the Milan Technical Institute; in 1867 he was appointed professor of constitutional law at Padua, whence he was transferred to the university of Rome.
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  • (Milan, 1886), which contains a biographical sketch of Luzzatti.
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  • The Hexaplar text of the LXX., as reduced by Origen into greater conformity with the Hebrew by the aid of subsequent Greek versions, was further the mother (d) of the Psalterium gallicanum - that is, of Jerome's second revision of the Psalter (385) by the aid of the Hexaplar text; this edition became current in Gaul and ultimately was taken into the Vulgate; (e) of the SyroHexaplar version (published by Bugati, 1820, and in facsimile from the famous Ambrosian MS. by Ceriani, Milan, 1874).
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  • In 1860, with the Cavour party, he opposed the work of Garibaldi, Crispi and Bertani at Naples, and became secretary of Luigi Carlo Farini during the latter's lieutenancy, but in 1865 assumed contemporaneously the editorship of the Perseveranza of Milan and the chair of Latin literature at Florence.
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  • Lombroso, Antropometria di 400 delinquenti (1872); Roberts, Manual of Anthropometry (1878); Ferri, Studi comparati di antropometria (2 vols., 1881-1882); Lombroso, Rughe anomale speciali ai criminali (1890); Bertillon, Instructions signaletiques pour l'identification anthropometrique (1893); Livi, Anthropometria (Milan, D900); Furst, Indextabellen zum anthropometrischen Gebrauch (Jena, 1902); Report of Home Office Committee on the Best Means of Identifying Habitual Criminals (1893-1894).
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  • Implicated in the Mazzinian conspiracy at Milan (February 6, 1853), he was expelled from Piedmont, and obliged to take refuge at Malta, whence he fled to Paris.
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  • In that year, however, Angelo Mai discovered in the Ambrosian library at Milan a palimpsest manuscript (and, later, some additional sheets of it in the Vatican), on which had been originally written some of Fronto's letters to his royal pupils and their replies.
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  • In spite of his declaration at the council convened by him in 372, he did not succeed in evicting Auxentius from Milan.
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  • of Milan.
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  • In the war of the Lombard League against Barbarossa, Cremona, after having shared in the destruction of Crema in 1160 and Milan in 1162, finally joined the league, but took no part in the battle of Legnano, and thus procured itself the odium of both sides.
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  • His Schiavitic e servaggio (Milan, 1868-1869) gave an account of the development and abolition of slavery and serfdom.
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  • If also the passage in Ambrose of Milan (on Luke i.
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  • The following works may also be consulted: Books - Bertolio, Coltivazione delle minere (Milan, 1902); Brown, The Organization of Gold Mining Business (Glasgow, 1897); Brough, Mine Surveying (12th ed., London, 1906); Bulman and Redmayne, Colliery Working and Management (London, 1896); Colomer, Exploitation des mines (Paris, 1899); Curle, The Gold Mines of the World (2nd ed., London, 1902); Demanet, Traite d'exploitation des mines de houille (2nd ed., Brussels, vols.
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  • The political convulsions of Italy in 1799 brought Breislak to Paris, where he remained until 1802, when, being appointed inspector of the saltpetre and powder manufactories near Milan, he removed to that city.
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  • and atlas (Milan, 1818, 1822); Descrizione geologica della provincia di Milano (1822).
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  • 286-310), on another in the Vereinigte Sammlungen at Munich, and on a third in the Trivulzi collection at Milan, where the cup is white, the inscription green and the network blue.
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  • brought Italian rock-crystal cutters from Milan to take control of the crystal and glass-cutting works he had established at Prague.
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  • A coat-of-arms was given to the inhabitants by Ladislaus for their courage during the storming of Milan; and the place is mentioned as a royal town under Ottokar II.
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  • He aided Prince Conrad in his rebellion against his father and crowned him king of the Romans at Milan in 1093, and likewise encouraged the Empress Prakedis in her charges against her husband.
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  • The potestates subsequently were foreigners, and in 1207 the dignity was conferred on Gualfredotto of Milan; a new council was formed, the consiglio del comune, while the older senate still survived.
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  • A new danger Castracani degli Antelminelli, who made himself lord of Lucca and secured help from Matteo Visconti, lord of Milan, and other Ghibellines of northern Italy.
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  • In 1351 Giovanni Visconti, lord and archbishop of Milan, having purchased Bologna and allied himself with sundry Ghibelline houses of Tuscany with a view to dominating Florence, the city made war on him, and in violation of its Guelph traditions placed itself under the protection of the emperor Charles IV.
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  • Florence, alone in resisting him, engaged Hawkwood, who with an army of 7000 men more than held his own against the powerful lord of Milan, and in 1392 a peace was concluded which the republic strengthened by an alliance with Pisa and several north Italian states.
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  • An attempt to capture Lucca led Florence, in alliance with Venice, into another costly war with Milan (1432-1433).
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  • Cosimo increased his own authority and that of the republic by aiding Francesco Sforza to become duke of Milan (1450), and he sided with him in the war against Venice (1452-1454).
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  • The death of Sforza led to a war for the succession of Milan, and the Venetians, instigated by Florentine exiles, invaded Tuscany.
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  • At the request of the Florentines the council removed to Milan, but this did not save them from the pope's wrath.
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  • shore of the Lago Maggiore past Baveno, Stresa and Arona, and so on to Milan.
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  • His biography has been written by his daughter Teresa Filangieri Fieschi-Ravaschieri, Il Generale Carlo Filangieri (Milan, 1902), an interesting, although somewhat too laudatory volume based on the general's own unpublished memoirs; for the Sicilian expedition see V.
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  • But the evidence for his having visited Rome (later tradition says also Milan) is stronger because more varied (Clem.
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  • GORGONZOLA, a town of Lombardy, Italy, in the province of Milan, from which it is 11 m.
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  • Its possession was disputed between Padua and Vicenza; it passed for a moment under the power of Gian Galeazzo Visconti of Milan, who fortified it.
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  • Another similar passage is quoted by Richter from folio 404b of the reproduction of the Codice Atlantico, in Milan, published by the Italian government.
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  • 4 a Vitruvius, with commentary by Cesare Caesariano, one of the architects of Milan cathedral, published at Como in 1521, shortly after the death of Leonardo, and some twenty years before Porta was born.
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  • " Carraresi" (1825-1835); C. Cantu, Illustrazione grande del LombardoVeneto (Milan, 1857); B.
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  • From Campania Paulinus returned to his native place and came into correspondence or personal intimacy with men like Martin of Tours and Ambrose of Milan, and ultimately (about 389) he was formally received into the church by bishop Delphinus of Bordeaux, whence shortly afterwards he withdrew with his wife beyond the Pyrenees.
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  • In the following year he went into Italy, and after visiting Ambrose at Milan and Siricius at Rome - the latter of whom received him somewhat coldly - he proceeded into Campania, where, in the neighbourhood of Nola, he settled among the rude structures which he had caused to be built around the tomb and relics of his patron saint.
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  • In 1494 the duke of Milan demanded the aid of France, and King Charles VIII.
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  • The potent duke of Milan, Ludovico Sforza, and other foes were labouring for the same end, and already in July 1495 a papal brief had courteously summoned Savonarola to Rome.
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  • One of these letters being intercepted and sent to Rome by the duke of Milan (it is said) proved fatal to the friar.
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  • Palmieri, Vesuvio ~a sun Storia (Milan, 1880); H.
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  • of Milan and 71 m.
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  • In 1389 Gian Galeazzo Visconti, duke of Milan, became by conquest lord of Verona.
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  • it is hardly mentioned, and seems to have been outstripped by other cities; such as Milan and Aquileia.
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  • The deposed tyrant took refuge with the French, whom he trusted more than the pope, and died at Milan in 1508.
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  • (Milan, 1834); P. Villari, Machiavelli (Eng.
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  • Among the contributors to the Poligrafo (1811) of Milan were Monti, Perticari, and some of the first names in Italian literature.
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  • The Biblioteca italiana (1816-1840) was founded at Milan by the favour of the Austrian government, and the editorship was offered to and declined by Ugo Foscolo.
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  • The Politecnico (1839) of Milan was suppressed in 1844 and revived in 1859.
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  • Ottino, La Stampa periodica in Italia (Milan, 1875); Raccolta dei periodici presentata all' esposizione in Milano (1881); A.
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  • It became an episcopal see dependent on Milan in the 4th century.
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  • Many bishops approved the act, but Ambrose of Milan and Martin of Tours condemned it.
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  • Beltrami, Il Castello di Soncino, Milan, 1890).
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  • The town was the seat of a Hebrew printing-press founded in 1472, but suppressed in 1597, when the Jews were expelled from the duchy of Milan.
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  • This is seen in Ambrose of Milan, with whom may be named Hilary of Poitiers and Gaudentius of Brescia, the friend of Chrysostom, and a link between him and Ambrose.
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  • In 1366 he led an expedition to the East against the Turks; and he arbitrated between Milan and the house of Montferrat (1379), between the Scaligeri and the Visconti, and between Venice and Genoa after the "War of Chioggia" (1381).
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  • He neglected .to make good the claims which he might have enforced to the duchy of Milan on the death of Filippo Maria, the last Visconti (1447).
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  • We find " suffered " in the creed of Milan, " descended into hell " in the creed of Aquileia, the Danubian lands and Syria; the words " God " and " almighty " were shortly added to clause 7 in the Spanish creed; " life everlasting " had stood from an early date in the African creed.
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  • The earliest known MS. is at Milan (Cod.
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  • On a marble slab that once adorned the public baths at Comum, his distinctions were recorded in a long inscription, which was afterwards removed to Milan.
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  • Puteolanus at Milan about fifty years later.
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  • It is connected with Milan by two lines of railway, one via Monza (the main line, which goes on to Chiasso - Swiss frontier - and the St Gotthard), the other via Saronno and also with Lecco and Varese.
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  • Como then became subject to the archbishops of Milan, but gained its freedom towards the end of the 11th century.
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  • At the beginning of the 12th century war broke out between Como and Milan, and after a ten years' war Como was taken and its fortifications dismantled in 1127.
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  • After frequent struggles with Milan, it fell under the power of the Visconti in 1 335.
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  • Thenceforth it shared the fortunes of Milan, becoming in the Napoleonic period the chief town of the department of the Lario.
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  • The revolution in Milan and Vienna aroused a fever of patriotic enthusiasm in Tuscany, where war against Austria was demanded; Leopold, giving way to popular pressure, sent a force of regulars and volunteers to co-operate with Piedmont in the Lombard campaign.
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  • Already the citizens of Milan have purchased their liberty with their blood and with a heroism of which history offers few examples..
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  • In Germany, about the 11 th century, it was usual to begin the year at Christmas; and this practice also prevailed at Milan, Rome and other Italian cities, in the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries.
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  • ed Eugenio di Savoia (Milan, 1888).
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  • The abdication of his father on the 16th of January 1556 constituted Philip sovereign of Spain with its American possessions, of the Aragonese inheritance in Italy, Naples and Sicily, of the Burgundian inheritance - the Netherlands and Franche Comte, and of the duchy of Milan, which his father separated from the empire for his benefit.
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  • To the north-west are the famous red granite quarries, which have supplied the columns for the cathedral of Milan, the church of S.
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  • Paolo fuori le Mura at Rome, the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele at Milan, and other important buildings.
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  • (Milan, 1888); and G.
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  • Cain) at Paris in 1846; and an Italian Biografia di Davide Garrick was published by C. Blasis at Milan in 1840.
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  • Ceriani (Milan, 18 97), p. 99.
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  • He, however, sympathized with, and took part in, the campaign which was begun in 1499 for the conquest of Milan.
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  • The Paterines in Milan (1045) raised a protest against simony and other abuses of the clergy, and Pope Gregory VII.
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  • BUSTO ARSIZIO, a town of Lombardy, Italy, in the province of Milan, 21 m.
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  • by rail from the town of Milan.
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  • Originally intended for the church, he took orders, but renounced them in 1796 and went to Milan, where he devoted himself to the study of political economy.
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  • In 1885 he interfered after the battle of Slivnitza to arrest the advance of the Bulgarians on Belgrade, but he lost influence in Servia after the abdication of King Milan.
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  • He returned in 181o to Milan, where he became professor of French in the Collegio degli Orfani Militari.
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  • His tragedy Francesca da Rimini, was brought out with success by Carlotta Marchionni at Milan in 1818.
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  • In southern Italy, probably under Greek influence, and in Milan (where the custom still survives) the diaconal stole was put on over the dalmatic. Similarly in Spain and Gaul, anterior to the Carolingian age, the stole was worn by deacons over the alba or outer tunic.
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  • He rashly proclaimed Milan king of Servia in September, and in October Aleksinats and Deligrad were in the hands of the Turks, and the road open to Belgrade.
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  • In 355 Liberius was one of the few who, along with Eusebius of Vercelli, Dionysius of Milan and Lucifer of Cagliari, refused to sign the condemnation of Athanasius, which had anew been imposed at Milan by imperial command upon all the Western bishops; the consequence was his relegation to Beroea in Thrace, Felix II.
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  • north of Marseilles, and the second in the following year on the Raudian plain near Vercellae (Vercelli), about midway between Turin and Milan.
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  • Commerce is chiefly agricultural and is stimulated by a good position in the railway system, and by a canal which opens a water-way by the Panaro and the Po to the Adriatic. Modena is the point at which the railway to Mantua and Verona diverges from that between Milan and Bologna, and has several steam tramways to neighbouring places.
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  • Meanwhile the tendency which gave rise to the metropolitan system resulted in the grouping together of the churches of a number of contiguous provinces under the headship of the bishop of the most important city of the district, as, for instance, Antioch, Ephesus, Alexandria, Rome, Milan, Carthage, Arles.
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  • (1185-1187), was archpriest and chancellor at Milan.
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  • HENRI CERNUSCHI (1821-1896), Italian politician and economist, was born of wealthy parents at Milan in 1821, and was destined for the legal profession.
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  • He played a conspicuous part in the insurrection at Milan in 1848, and also at Rome in 1849, where he had a seat in the National Assembly.
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  • which were ultimately dispersed among the libraries of Rome, Milan and Turin.
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  • The printing of Greek began at Milan with the Greek grammar of Constantine Lascaris (1476).
    0
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  • The greater part of this work is still extant; the poetical and prophetical books have been preserved in the Codex Ambrosianus at Milan (published in photolithography by Ceriani, Mon.
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  • 137 (a 364) at Milan, a valuable " Western " text of the Acts; a 78 (not in Gregory) in the Laura on Mt.
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  • 1843 (Milan); of Etienne Jules d'Archiac, Histoire du progres de la geologie de 1834 1862 (Paris, Soc. Geol.
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  • to Italy, and distinguished himself at the storming of Milan.
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  • Railway communication in Venetia is fairly good; there is a main line from Milan to Mestre (the junction for Venice) and thence to Trieste by a line near the coast, or by Treviso, Udine and Pontebba (Pontafel) into Austria.
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  • The easiness of the Brenner pass and the abundance of communication with the sea led to the rise of such towns as Verona, Padua and Aquileia: and Milan only became more important than any of these when the German attacks on Italy were felt farther west.
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  • The political events of 1808 necessitated his withdrawal from Rome (to which he had meanwhile returned) to Milan, where in 1813 he was made custodian of the Ambrosian library.
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  • To the period of his residence at Milan belong: Fragments of Cicero's Pro Scauro, Pro Tullio, Pro Flacco, In Clodium et Curionem, De aere alieno Milonis, De rege (Alexandrino (1814); M.
    0
    0
  • Luzio, whose account in Profili e bozzetti storici (Milan, 1906) gives the latest information on the subject, has demolished Amante's arguments.
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    0
  • In the general confusion following on Charles Albert's defeat on the Mincio and his retreat to Milan, where the people rose against the unhappy king, Fanti's courage and tact saved the situation.
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  • It was called Milan in 1809, South Salina in 1809-1814, Cossitt's Corners -in 1814-1817, and Cossitt in 1817-1824.
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  • Before long, however, Ricimer moved to Milan, ready to declare war upon Anthemius.
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  • St Epiphanius, bishop of Milan, patched up a truce, but in 472 Ricimer was again before Rome with an army of Germans,.
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  • The two existing manuscripts of the Liber are in the Vatican library, Rome, and in the library of St Ambrose at Milan.
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  • The opening of the St Gothard tunnel exercised a prejudicial influence upon the traffic of the network of railways of which Turin is the centre, and Milan, owing to its nearness both to this and to the Simplon, has become the most important railway centre of Italy.
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  • Main lines run also from Turin toVercelli and thence to Novara and Milan (the direct route), to Casale Monferrato, to Alessandria (and thence to Piacenza or Genoa), to Genoa via Asti and Acqui, to Bra and Savona, and branch lines to Lanzo, Torre Pellice, Aosta, Rivoli, Rivarolo, &c., and steam tramways in various directions.
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  • When a prisoner in the hands of Filipo Maria Visconti, duke of Milan, in 1435, Alphonso persuaded his ferocious and crafty captor to let him go by making it plain that it was the interest of Milan not to prevent the victory of the Aragonese party in Naples.
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  • (Anselmo Baggio), pope from 1061 to 10 73, was a native of Milan.
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  • The cultivation and manufacture spread northwards to Florence, Milan, Genoa and Venice - all towns which became famous for silken textures in medieval times.
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  • brought from Milan silkworm eggs, which were reared in the Rhone valley.
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  • Up to the year 1860 the bulk of the silks from the East was shipped to London, but subsequently, owing to the importance of continental demands, a large portion of the supplies has been unshipped at Genoa and Marseilles (especially the finer reeled silks from Japan and Canton), which are sold in the Milan and Lyons markets.
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  • of Lyons, Marseilles and Milan, and issued in 1905.
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  • The different qualities of " waste," of which there are many, vary in colour from a rich yellow to a creamy white; the chief producing countries being China, Japan, India, Italy, France and the countries in the Near East; and the best-known qualities are: steam wastes, from Canton; knubs, from China and from Italy and other Western countries; frisons, from various sources; wadding and blaze, Shanghai; china, Hangchow; and Nankin buttons; Indian and Szechuen wastes; punjum, the most lustrous of wastes; China curlies; Japan wastes, known by such terms as kikai, ostue, &c.; French, Swiss, Italian, China, Piedmont, Milan, &c. There are yellow wastes from Italy, and many more far too numerous to mention.
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  • His efforts to establish peace between France and England and to aid the Eastern Christians against the Turks were fruitless, but he prevented the Visconti of Milan from making further encroachments on the States of the Church.
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  • Magistretti, Monumenta veteris Liturgiae Ambrosianae, Pontificale (Milan, 1 897).
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  • Among the first of those whom we know to have attached importance to the placing of relics in churches is Ambrose of Milan (Ep. 22), and the 7th general council of Nicaea (787) forbade the consecration of churches in which relics were not present, under pain of ex communication.
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  • The most famous relics discovered during the middle ages, were those of the apostle James at St Jago de Compostella in Spain (see Pilgrimage), the bodies of the three kings, which were brought from Milan to Cologne in 1164 by the emperor Frederick I.
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  • LORENZO CAMPEGGIO (1464-1532), Italian cardinal, was born at Milan of a noble Bolognese family.
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  • Such an altar still remains in Sant' Ambrogio at Milan, dating from the 9th century (see fig.
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  • An authoritative record of the outlines of his life was only discovered early in the 19th century in a writing of Auxentius of Milan, his pupil and companion.
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  • The railways were built between 1856 and 1862, while the opening of the Simplon tunnel (1906) greatly increased the commercial importance of Lausanne, which is now on the great international highway from Paris to Milan.
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  • (Leipzig, 1898); P. del Giudice, Studi di storia e diritto (Milan, 1889); and U.
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  • Balzani, Le Cronache italiane nel medio evo (Milan, 1884).
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  • However, side by side with the Roman see was that of Milan, which was also the capital of the Western Empire.
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  • From time to time it seemed as if Milan would become to Rome what Constantinople was to Alexandria.
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  • All of them, even down to the metropolitan sees of Milan and Aquileia, practised a certain degree of autonomy, and in the 6th century this developed into what is called the Schism of the Three Chapters.
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  • He suspended an archbishop of Sens (1136) who had neglected to take into consideration the appeal to Rome, summoned an archbishop of Milan to Rome to receive the pallium from the pope's hands, lavished exemptions, and extended the right of appeal to such abnormal lengths that a Byzantine ambassador is reported to have exclaimed to Lothair III., Your Pope Innocent is not a bishop, but an emperor."
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  • But he was soon confronted with an extremely dangerous enemy, in the person of Duke Gian Galeazzo Visconti of Milan, who was aiming at the sovereignty of all Italy.
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  • cardinal-archbishop of Milan, the Greek Petros Filargis, who assumed the title of Alexander V.
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  • The conquest of Milan by the French led to a personal interview at Bologna, where the " Concordat " with France was concluded.
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  • He had not enough courage and perspicacity to await in patience the result of the race between France and Germany for the duchy of Milan - a contest which was decided at Pavia (Feb.
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  • At the same period Carlo Borromeo made his diocese of Milan the model of a reformed bishopric. The pope supported Mary Stuart with money; his troops assisted Charles IX.
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  • Since 1559 the popes had been without exception in favour of Spain, which, viii., firmly possessed of Milan on the north and of Naples 1592-1605.
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  • Milan Obrenovich IV >>
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  • AMBROSIANS, the name given to several religious brother hoods which at various times since the 14th century have sprung up in and around Milan; they have about as much connexion with St Ambrose as the "Jeromites" who were found chiefly in upper Italy and Spain have with their patron saint.
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  • addressed to the monks of the church of St Ambrose outside Milan.
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  • Subsequently the order had a number of independent establishments in Italy which were united into one congregation by Eugenius IV., their headquarters being at Milan.
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  • Venturi, Storia dell' ante italiana (Milan, 1904), iii.
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  • The Order of the White Eagle, the principal order, was founded by Milan I.
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  • About 1480 the collection of Planudes was brought out at Milan by Buono Accorso (Accursius), together with Ranuzio's translation.
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  • BECCARIA - BONESANA, CESARE, Marchese De (1735-1794), Italian publicist, was born at Milan on the 15th of March 173 5.
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  • In November 1768 he was appointed to the chair of law and economy, which had been founded expressly for him at the Palatine college of Milan.
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  • He died at Milan on the 28th of November 1794.
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  • The amice is now worn under the alb, except at Milan and Lyons, where it is put on over it.
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  • some exceptional cases, as at Milan, it has become detached from the amice and is fixed like a collar to the chasuble.
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  • Schiaparelli, I Precursori di Copernico nell' Antichitd, p. (Milan, 1873).
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  • MILAN (Ital.
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  • Mailand, anc. Mediolanum, q.v.), a city of Lombardy, Italy, capital of the province of Milan, 93 m.
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  • The plain around Milan is extremely fertile, owing at once to the richness of the alluvial soil deposited by the Po, Ticino, Olona and Adda, and to the excellent system of irrigation.
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  • In shape Milan is a fairly regular polygon, and its focus is the splendid Piazza del Duomo, from which a number of broad modern streets radiate in all directions.
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  • The name of the original architect is unknown, but it is certain that many German mastermasons were called to Milan to assist the Italian builders.
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  • Among the most interesting buildings in Milan is the ancient church of S.
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  • The church was built by St Ambrose early in the 4th-century (on the site of a temple of Bacchus it is said), but as it stands it is a Romanesque basilica of the 12th century, recently well restored (like many other churches in Milan), with a brick exterior, like so many churches of Milan and Lombardy, curious galleries over the facade, and perhaps the most perfectly preserved atrium in existence.
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  • Eustorgio, one of the largest Gothic churches in Milan, with some Romanesque survivals, dates, as it stands, with its campanile, from the end of the 13th century, and has a modern facade in the old style.
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  • Satiro was Bramante's earliest work in Milan (after 1476).
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  • south of Milan, is a fine brick building in the plan of a Latin cross, with nave and two aisles with round pillars, with a lofty domed tower, in the so-called Romanesque Transition style, having comparatively slender round pillars and cross vaulting, while the exterior is still quite Romanesque.
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  • The entire edifice is covered externally with terra-cotta, and its facade, designed by the Florentine Antonio Averulino (Filarete) and begun in 1 457, is superior to any other of the kind in Milan.
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  • The Castel Sforzesco, or Castle of Milan, stands in the Parco Nuovo; it was built in 1450 by Francesco Sforza on the site of one erected by Galeazzo II.
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  • The finest of the modern thoroughfares of Milan is the Via Dante, constructed in 1888; it runs from the Piazza de' Mercanti to the spacious Foro Bonaparte, and thence to the Parco Nuovo, the great public garden in which stands the Castello Sforzesco.
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  • Milan has a royal scientific and literary academy with a faculty of philosophy, a royal technical institute, a school of veterinary science, a royal school of agriculture, a polytechnic with the Bocconi commercial school (founded 1898) and numerous other learned and educational institutions.
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  • Milan has long been famous as one of the great musical centres of Europe, and numerous students resort here for their musical education.
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  • e modern industrial development of Milan, with its suburbs and neighbouring towns, such as Monza, Gallarate, Saronno, Busto Arsizio and Legnano, has been noteworthy.
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  • The amount of silk handled and woven in Milan is greater than that dealt with at Lyons.
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  • Milan is also the centre of the Italian cotton industry.
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  • In typography Milan is renowned principally for its musical editions and for its heliotype and zincotype establishments.
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  • The manufacture of furniture of all kinds is still extensively carried on, Milan being the chief Lombard market and centre of exportation.
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  • Theatrical costumes and appliances are also made in Milan, which is an important theatrical centre.
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  • House industry is still widely diffused in Milan itself, especially as regards working in gold, silver, vulcanite, bronze and leather.
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  • from Milan; the horse-power is continually being increased owing to new needs.
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  • Milan is also a centre of the export trade in cheese; chocolate, biscuits, &c., are also manufactured.
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  • The municipal schools of Milan are as well organized as any in Italy, and the exhibit in connexion with them at the great international exhibition of 1906 was of interest.
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  • The international exhibition of 1906 held in Milan was of considerable importance, all the leading states of the world taking part in it.
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  • Among the most noteworthy exhibits were those of machinery, of automobiles and bicycles, of agriculture, of transports by sea, of modern art and architecture, of Italian home industries, of the city of Milan; besides which, all the countries exhibiting had their own separate pavilions.
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  • - After the establishment of the Lombard capital at Pavia in 569 Milan remained the centre of Italian opposition to the foreign conquest.
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  • The Lombards were Arians, and the archbishops of Milan from the days of Ambrose had been always orthodox.
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  • When the Lombard kingdom fell before the Franks under Charlemagne in 774, the archbishops of Milan were still further strengthened by the close alliance between Charles and the Church, which gave a sort of confirmation to their temporal authority, and also by Charles's policy of breaking up the great Lombard fiefs and dukedoms, for which he substituted the smaller counties.
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  • Under the confused government of Charles's immediate successors the archbishop was the only real power in Milan.
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  • But there were two classes of difficulties in the situation, ecclesiastical and political; and their presence had a marked effect on the development of the people and the growth of the commune, which was the next stage in the history of Milan.
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  • The chief result of these difficulties was that a spirit of independence and a capacity of judging and acting for themselves was developed in the people of Milan.
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  • The terror of the Hunnish invasion, in 899, further assisted the people in their progress towards freedom, for it compelled them to take arms and to fortify their city, rendering Milan more than ever independent of the feudal lords who lived in their castles in the country.
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  • The tyranny of these nobles drove the peasantry and smaller vassals to seek the protection for life and property, the equality of taxation and of justice, which could be found only inside the walled city and under the rule of the archbishop. Thus Milan grew populous, and learned to govern itself.
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  • After the battle of Legnano, in 1174, although the Lombard cities failed to reap the fruit of their united action, and fell to mutual jealousy once more, Milan internally began to grow in material prosperity.
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  • His nephew Martino followed as podesta in 1256, and in 1259 as signore of Milan - the first time such a title was heard in Italy.
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  • Martino was followed by two other Torriani, Filippo his brother (1263-1265) and Napoleone his cousin (1265-1277), as lords of Milan.
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  • Otto Visconti, archbishop of Milan (1262), the victor of Desio, became lord of Milan, and founded the house of Visconti, who ruled the city - except from 1302 to 13 10 - till 1447, giving twelve lords to Milan.
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  • Matteo was killed (1355) by his brothers, who divided the Milanese, Bernabo reigning in Milan (1354-1385) and Galeazzo in Pavia (1354-1378).
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  • Galeazzo left a son, Gian Galeazzo, who became sole lord of Milan by seizing and imprisoning his uncle Bernabo.
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  • It was under him that the cathedral of Milan and the Certosa di Pavia were begun.
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  • He was the first duke of Milan, having obtained that title from the emperor Wenceslaus.
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  • His .sons Giovanni Maria, who reigned at Milan (1402-1412), and Filippo Maria, who reigned at Pavia (1402-1447), succeeded him.
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  • In 1450 the general Francesco Sforza, who had married Filippo's only child Bianca Visconti, became duke of Milan by right of conquest if by any right.
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  • Under this duke the castello was rebuilt and the canal of the Martesana, which connects Milan with the Adda, and the Great Hospital were carried out.
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  • of France, and Milan remained for twelve years under the French crown.
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  • In the partial settlement which followed the battle of Ravenna, Massimiliano Sforza, a protege of the emperor, was restored to the throne of Milan, and held it by the help of the .Swiss till 1515, when Francis I.
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  • In 1522 the imperialists entered Milan and proclaimed Francesco Sforza (son of Lodovico).
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  • From this date till the War of the :Spanish Succession (1714) Milan was a dependency of the Spanish crown.
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  • For the results of that campaign, and for the history of Italian progress towards independence, in which Milan played a prominent part by opening the revolution of 1848, with the insurrection of the Cinque Giorvate (March 17-22), by which the Austrians were driven out; the reader is referred to the article Italy.
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  • The Lombard campaign of 1859, with the battles of Solferino and Magenta, finally made Milan a part of the kingdom of Italy.
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  • Beltrami, Il Castello di Milano (Milan, 1894); L.
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  • del Mayno, Vicende militari del Castello di Milano (Milan, 1894); F.
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  • Ady, A History of Milan under the Sforza (1907).
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  • Lacking often the protection of a strong ruler, the Lombard cities had been accustomed to act together for mutual defence, and in 1093 Milan, Lodi, Piacenza and Cremona formed an alliance against the emperor Henry IV., in favour of his rebellious son Conrad.
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  • This league or concordia was soon joined by other cities, among which were Milan, Parma, Padua, Verona, Piacenza and Bologna, and the allies began to build a fortress near the confluence of the Tanaro and the Bormida, which, in honour of Pope Alexander III., was called Alessandria.
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  • Negotiations for peace failed, and the emperor, having marched against Milan, suffered a severe defeat at Legnano on the 29th of May 1176.
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  • avowed his intention of restoring the imperial authority in Italy, the league was renewed, and at once fifteen cities, including Milan and Verona, were placed under the ban.
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  • For a full account of the Lombard League see C. Vignati, Storia diplomata della Lega Lombarda (Milan, 1866); H.
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  • On the 6th of March 1889 his father, King Milan, abdicated and proclaimed him king of Servia under a regency until he should attain his majority at eighteen years of age.
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  • In 1898 he appointed his father commander-in-chief of the Servian army, and from that time, or rather from his return to Servia in 1894 until 1900, ex-king Milan was regarded as the de facto ruler of the country.
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  • But while, during the summer of 1900, Milan was away from Servia taking waters in Carlsbad, and making arrangements to secure the hand of a German princess for his son, and while the premier, Dr Vladan Dyorevich, was visiting the Paris Universal Exhibition, King Alexander suddenly announced to the people of Servia his engagement to Mme Draga Mashin, a widow, formerly a lady-in-waiting to Queen Natalie.
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  • Ex-King Milan resigned his post; so did the government; and King Alexander had great difficulty in forming a new cabinet.
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  • Lefevre (Milan, 1894), on which see Haureau in the Journal des savants for 1895.
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  • of Milan by rail, and 26 m.
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  • Railways radiate from it to Lecco, Ponte della Selva, Usmate (for Monza or Seregno), Treviglio (on the main line from Milan to Verona and Venice) and (via Rovato) to Brescia, and steam tramways to Treviglio, Sarnico and Soncino.
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  • From 1264 to 1428 it was under Milan, but then became Venetian, and remained so until 1797.
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  • PUBLIUS SEPTIMIUS GETA (189-212), younger son of the Roman emperor Septimius Severus, was born at Mediolanum (Milan).
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  • Before his time four Italian towns had won the honours of Greek publications: Milan, with the grammar of Lascaris, Aesop, Theocritus, a Greek Psalter, and Isocrates, between 1476 and 1493; Venice, with the Erotemata of Chrysoloras in 1484; Vicenza, with reprints of Lascaris's grammar and the Erotemata, in 1488 and 1490; Florence, with Alopa's Homer, in 1488.
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  • Other presses were at work in Italy; and, as the classics issued from Florence, Rome or Milan, Aldo took them up, bestowing in each case fresh industry upon the collation of codices and the correction of texts.
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  • He had not indeed "penetrated to the city," but his invasion of Italy had produced important results; it had caused the imperial residence to be transferred from Milan to Ravenna, it had necessitated the withdrawal of the Twentieth Legion from Britain, and it had probably facilitated the great invasion of Vandals, Suevi and Alani into Gaul, by which that province and Spain were lost to the empire.
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  • Having visited Milan and Pavia, and resided for several years at Venice, he went to Rome upon the invitation of Bruni Leonardo, who had been his pupil, and was then secretary to Gregory XII.
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  • of Milan and 40 m.
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  • Brescia is situated on the main railway line between Milan and Verona, and has branch railways to Iseo, Parma, Cremona and (via Rovato) to Bergamo, and steam tramways to Mantua, Soncino, Ponte Toscolano and Cardone Valtrompia.
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  • In 1258 it fell into the hands of Eccelino of Verona, and belonged to the Scaligers (della Scala) until 1421, when it came under the Visconti of Milan, and in 1426 under Venice.
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  • Malthus (Milan, 1895); and Ricardo, Letters to Malthus, ed.
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  • e l'Italia de' suoi tempi (Milan, 1887); E.
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  • Barbarossa brought their bones from Milan in 1162, and had them buried in Cologne cathedral, and miraculous powers of healing were attributed to these relics.
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  • in length from Andeer to Gallivaggio, it was calculated that the Spliigen line would become the shortest route from southern Germany to Milan, while at Chiavenna it would receive the traffic from the upper Engadine.
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  • Schiaparelli, Le Sfere omocentriche di Eudosso (Milan, 1876); T.
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  • Milan, 1885); E.
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  • The lower course of the Adda was formerly the boundary between the territories of Venice and of Milan; and on its banks several important battles have been fought, notably that of Lodi, where Napoleon defeated the Austrians in 1796.
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  • In 1037 he issued from Milan his famous edict for the kingdom of Italy which decreed that upon the death of a landholder his fief should, descend to his son, or grandson, and that no fiefholder should be deprived of his fief without the judgment of his peers.
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  • that he was obliged to resign the claims of Austria to the Spanish throne, and to content himself with the Spanish Netherlands, Milan, Naples and Sardinia.
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  • Soon after he was raised to the archbishopric of Milan.
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  • In 1576, when Milan was visited by the plague, he went about giving directions for accommodating the sick and burying the dead, avoiding no danger and sparing no expense.
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  • The number of his enemies was increased by his successful attack on his Jesuit confessor Ribera, who with other members of the college of Milan was found to be guilty of unnatural offences.
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  • He was seized with an intermittent fever, and died at Milan on the 4th of November 1584.
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  • Sax (5 vols., Milan, 1747-1748), and have been translated into many languages.
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  • The record of his episcopate is to be found in the two volumes of the Ada Ecclesiae Mediolanensis (Milan, 1599).
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  • Contrary to his last wishes a memorial was erected to him in Milan cathedral, as well as a statue 70 ft.
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  • His nephew, Federigo Borromeo (1564-1631), was archbishop of Milan from 1595, and in 1609 founded the Ambrosian library in that city.
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  • Sala, Documenti circa la vita e la gesta di Borromeo (4 vols., Milan, 1857-1859); Chanoine Silvain, Histoire de St Charles Borromee (Milan, 1884); and A.
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  • The Cathar Eucharist was equally primitive, and is thus described by a contemporary writer in a 13th-century MS. of the Milan Library: "The Benediction of bread is thus performed by the Cathars.
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  • The poet Petrarch, who was the doge's intimate friend, was sent to Venice on a peace mission by Giovanni Visconti, lord of Milan.
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  • Of the four main lines which centre on Genoa - (1) to Novi, which is the junction for Alessandria, where lines diverge to Turin and France via the Mont Cenis, and toNovaraandSwitzerland and France via the Simplon, and for Milan; (2) to Acqui and Piedmont; (3) to Savona, Ventimiglia and the French Riviera, along the coast; (4) to Spezia and Pisa - the first line has to take no less than 78% of the traffic. It has indeed two alternative double lines for the passage over the Apennines, but one of them has a maximum gradient of 1: 18 and a tunnel over 2 m.
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  • Alternate victories and defeats of the Venetians and Genoese - the most terrible being the defeat sustained by the Venetians at Chioggia in 1380 - ended by establishing the great relative inferiority of the Genoese rulers, who fell under the power now of France, now of the Visconti of Milan.
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  • It was encouraged by the news from Italy, where, on the 25th of July, Radetzky had won the battle of Custozza, and on the 6th of August the Austrian standard once more floated over the towers of Milan.
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  • The chief objects of the government in recent years have been to maintain Austro-Hungarian trade and influence in the Balkan states by the building of railways, by the opening of the Danube for navigation, and by commercial treaties with Rumania, Servia and Bulgaria; since the abdication of King Milan especially, the affairs of Servia and the growth of Russian influence in that country have caused serious anxiety.
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  • Gregory's Letters are largely occupied with the affairs of the great Sicilian estates held by the Roman church, as by the churches of Milan and Ravenna.
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  • GALLARATE, a town of Lombardy, Italy, in the province of Milan, from which it is 25 m.
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  • (Milan, 1905), ii.
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  • (Milan, 1907); Frants Buhl, Muhammeds Liv (Copenhagen, 1903).
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  • By the edict of Milan (AD.
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  • Milan, 1904, 642 seq.).
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  • della citta di Gaeta (Milan, 1879); C. Ravizza, Il Golfo di Gaeta (Novara, 1876).
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  • XVI (Milan, 1884).
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  • He studied at the Jesuit college at Monza, entered the order, and was appointed in 1755 professor of eloquence in the university of Milan.
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  • The decisive battle of Pavia, which gave Lombardy into the hands of the emperor, compelled Bandello to fly; his house at Milan was burnt and his property confiscated.
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  • According to legend, the ship conveying the relics of the three kings and of Bishop Apollinaris from Milan to Cologne in 1164 could not be got to move away from the spot until the bones of St Apollinaris had been interred .in St Martin's chapel.
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  • The Louvre also possesses some good examples, and many others are dispersed in various public collections, as in the Musee Bonnat at Bayonne, at Munich, Hamburg, Bremen, Frankfort, Dresden, Basel, Milan, Florence and Oxford, as well as in private hands all over Europe.
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  • MARIA GAETANA AGNESI (1718-1799), Italian mathematician, linguist and philosopher, was born at Milan on the 16th of May 1718, her father being professor of mathematics in the university of Bologna.
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  • The most valuable result of her labours was the Instituzioni analitiche ad use della gioventu italiana, a work of great merit, which was published at Milan in 1748.
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  • After holding for some years the office of directress of the Hospice Trivulzio for Blue Nuns at Milan, she herself joined the sisterhood, and in this austere order ended her days on the 9th of January 1799.
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  • Her sister, Maria Teresa Agnesi (1724-1780), a well-known Italian pianist and composer, was born at Milan in 1724.
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  • Agnesi (Milan, 1836); J.
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  • LEGNANO, a town of Lombardy, Italy, in the province of Milan, 17 m.
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  • "SIX TUS V.") Vita de Donna Olimpia Maidalchina (1666) is gossipy and untrustworthy; Capranica's Donna Olympia Pamfili (Milan, 1875, 3rd ed.) is fanciful and historically of no value.
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  • The pilgrim age with a predetermined goal was not recognized by the books of penance; but, in 1059, Peter Damiani imposed a pilgrimage to Rome or Tours on the clerics of Milan, whom he had absolved (Ada mediol.
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  • In 10J9, Archbishop Wido of Milan journeyed to St James (Damiani, Acta mediol.
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  • In the 8th century it belonged to the bishop of Como, while in the 13th and 14th centuries it was tossed to and fro between the cities of Milan and Como.
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  • In 1402 it was taken from Milan by Albert von Sax, lord of the Val Mesocco, who in 1419 sold it to Uri and Obwalden, which, however, lost it to Milan in 1422 after the battle of Arbedo.
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  • The works of Carlo Botta are Storia naturale e medica dell' Isola di Corfu (1798); an Italian translation of Born's Joannis Physiophili specimen monachologiae (1801); Souvenirs d'un voyage en Dalmatie (1802); Storia della guerra dell' Independenza d'America (1809); Camillo, a poem (1815); Storia d'Italia dal 1789 al 1814 (1824, new ed., Prato, 1862); Storia d'Italia in continuazione al Guiccaardini (1832, new ed., Milan, 1878).
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  • Moreover, in writing to Innocent, bishop of Rome, he addresses him as a brother metropolitan, and sends the same letter to Venerius, bishop of Milan, and Chromatius, bishop of Aquileia.
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  • at the assembly of princes at Milan; and he wrote his Crebratio Alcorani, a treatise against Mahommedanism, in support of the expedition against the Turks proposed at that assembly.
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  • He studied in Switzerland, at Milan, and in German universities.
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  • For his work on La Proprieta fondiaria Lombardia (Milan, 1856) he received a prize from the Milanese Societa d'incoraggiamento di scienze e lettere and was made a member of the Istituto Lombardo.
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  • In another work, Sidle condizioni economiche della Valtellina (Milan, 1858, translated into English by W.
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  • (Milan, 1888), contains a short sketch of Jacini's life.
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  • out of Milan by financing an expedition led by the emperor Maximilian in 1516.
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  • Of his numerous works, of which a collected edition in 17 volumes was issued at Milan (1842-44), supplemented by Opere postume in 5 vols.
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  • (July 1861); and numerous recent Italian works, for which Baldwin's Dictionary of Philosophy or Pagliani's Catalogo Generale (Milan, 1905) should be consulted.
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  • His writings include: Della economia pubblica e delle sue attinenze con la morale e col diritto (Bologna, 1859), and La Chiesa e lo Stato (Milan, 1878).
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  • One of the most important early specimens of metal-work is the gold and silver altar of Sant' Ambrogio [in Milan.
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  • The most important existing work of art in metal of the 13th century is the great candelabrum now in Milan Cathedral.
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  • He was educated at Milan by his uncle, Antonio, himself a scholar and a poet of eminence, and afterwards at Rome and Padua.
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  • The bishops of Liguria and Aemilia, headed by the archbishop of Milan, and those of Istria and Venice, headed by Paulinus of Aquileia, also withheld their fellowship; but Narses resisted the appeals of Pelagius, who would have invoked the secular arm.
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  • MONZA (locally Monscia), a city of Lombardy, Italy, in the province of Milan, 8 m.
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  • During the period of the republics Monza was sometimes independent, sometimes subject to Milan.
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  • His ambition led him into foreign entanglements; he made a secret treaty with the duke of Savoy which was to give him right of way to Genoa, and made arrangements for a partition of the duchy of Milan.
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  • In Milan he helped to place Lodovico it Moro in power in 1479, but he reaped less from this supple tyrant than he had expected.
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  • Sirturus, in his De Telescopio (1618), states that "a Frenchman proceeded to Milan in the month of May 1609 and offered a telescope for sale to Count di.
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  • ab Aragonia (Naples, 1588); several chapters in the Storia politica d'Italia (Milan, 1875-1882); F.
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  • In March 313 he married Constantia, half-sister of Constantine, at Mediolanum (Milan), in the following month inflicted a decisive defeat on Maximinus at Heraclea Pontica, and established himself master of the East, while his brother-in-law, Constantine, was supreme in the West.
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  • Guerrazzi's Vita di Andrea Doria (3rd ed., Milan, 1874); among the earlier works L.
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  • By dissolving the Chamber early in 1897 and favouring Radical candidates in the general election, he paved the way for the outbreak of May 1898, the suppression of which entailed considerable bloodshed and necessitated a state of siege at Milan, Naples, Florence and Leghorn.
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  • Martini, Nell' Africa Italiana (3rd ed., Milan, 1891); A.
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  • Allori compiled a Piccolo Dizionario eritreo, italianoarabo-amarico (Milan, 1895).
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  • of Milan, 1903-1904; and articles by G.
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  • Fumagalli's Bibliografia Etiopica (Milan, 1893) and in the Riv.
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  • He expounded his ideas in a review founded by him at Milan in 1837, called Il Politecnico.
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  • But when the revolution of 1848 broke out he threw himself heart and soul into the fray, and became one of the leading spirits of the insurrection against the Austrians, known as the Five Days of Milan (March 18-2 2, 1848).
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  • On the expulsion of the Austrians the question arose as to the future government of Milan and Italy.
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