Middle-ear sentence example

middle-ear
  • As the vibrations from the bones in the middle ear enter the cochlea, they cause the fluid to move.
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  • The bones of the middle ear have also begun to harden.
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  • A build-up of fluid in the middle ear after a cold can also cause mild earache but this fluid usually drains away by itself.
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  • The three middle ear bones â the ossicles â are called the malleus, the incus and the stapes.
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  • Three small bones (called the ossicles) in the middle ear link the eardrum to the inner ear.
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  • This, in turn, causes vibration of tiny bones in the middle ear (the ear ossicles ).
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  • Fluid builds up inside the middle ear and goes sticky like glue.
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  • Doctors treating chronic otitis media (or glue ear) often puncture the eardrum on purpose to drain pus from the middle ear.
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  • In mammals the quadrate bone is incorporated into the middle ear as the malleus.
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  • The middle ear needs to be full of air to let the eardrum and small bones vibrate freely.
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  • The doctor can withdraw fluid from the middle ear through the incision.
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  • In this case, the effusion collects in the child's middle ear.
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  • Initially, acute inflammation of the middle ear with effusion is treated with one or two courses of antibiotic drugs.
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  • Myringotomy with or without the insertion of ear tubes is not recommended as the initial treatment for otherwise healthy children with middle ear inflammation with effusion.
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  • While in place, the tubes keep the incision from closing, forming an open channel between the middle ear and the outer ear.
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  • This channel allows fresh air to reach the middle ear, allows fluid to drain out, and prevents pressure from building up in the middle ear.
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  • It is also possible that the ear tube will move inward and get trapped in the middle ear rather than move out into the external ear, where it either falls out on its own or can be retrieved by a doctor.
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  • Acute otitis media-Inflammation of the middle ear with signs of infection lasting less than three months.
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  • Chronic otitis media-Inflammation of the middle ear with signs of infection lasting three months or longer.
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  • Tympanic membrane-The eardrum, a thin disc of tissue that separates the outer ear from the middle ear.
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  • A tympanostomy tube is small tube made of metal or plastic that is inserted during myringotomy to ventilate the middle ear.
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  • Air conduction establishes the extent of sound transmission through the bones of the middle ear.
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  • Otoacoustic emission testing (OAE) records spontaneous emissions from the ear and can detect middle ear problems.
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  • Mastoiditis is usually a consequence of a middle ear infection called acute otitis media (AOM).
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  • The mastoid bone is composed of air cells that are in communication with the middle ear.
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  • A head CT scan or CT of the ear may show a fluid-filled middle ear and an abnormality in the mastoid bone.
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  • Mastoiditis-An inflammation of the bone behind the ear (the mastoid bone) caused by an infection spreading from the middle ear to the cavity in the mastoid bone.
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  • Myringotomy-A surgical procedure in which an incision is made in the eardrum to allow fluid or pus to escape from the middle ear.
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  • A perforated eardrum (tympanum perforation) is an opening or rupture in the eardrum (tympanic membrane), the thin membrane that separates the outer ear canal from the middle ear.
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  • The eardrum (tympanic membrane) is a thin, semi-transparent membranous wall that stretches across the ear canal and separates the outer ear from the middle ear.
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  • The middle ear is connected to the nose by the eustachian tube, a narrow channel that runs from the eardrum to the back of the throat.
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  • In addition to conducting sound, the eardrum also protects the middle ear from bacteria and possible infection.
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  • Severe hearing loss may follow a skull fracture that disrupts the bones in the middle ear.
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  • Bacteria that find their way from the nasopharynx into the built up fluid may cause a middle ear infection.
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  • This examination makes possible the diagnosis of eardrum perforation by allowing the doctor to see an opening in the eardrum or damage to bones in the middle ear.
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  • Complications are unusual but may include sinusitis (inflammation of the nasal sinuses), bacterial infections, or infections of the middle ear.
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  • Conductive hearing impairment is most often caused by otitis media, an infection of the middle ear.
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  • Children develop otitis media because the eustachian tubes that connect the middle ear with the back of the mouth and equalize air pressure and drain fluid are small and easily obstructed.
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  • The fluid that builds up in the middle ear is susceptible to bacterial and viral infection.
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  • A small plastic tube is inserted through the eardrum to drain fluid and equalize the air pressure between the middle ear and the ear canal.
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  • As a child grows the eustachian tubes widen and stiffen, allowing air to enter and fluid to drain from the middle ear more efficiently.
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  • Sound is conducted normally through the external and middle ear.
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  • This test is useful in detecting disorders of the middle ear.
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  • During the procedure, the surgeon makes an incision behind the ear and opens the mastoid bone (the ridge on the skull behind the ear) leading into the middle ear.
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  • Irrigation can, however, lead to infection of the outer or the middle ear if the patient has a damaged or absent eardrum.
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  • Labyrinthitis is an inflammation of the inner ear that is often a complication of infection of the middle ear (otitis media).
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  • Labyrinthitis is rare and is more likely to occur after middle ear infections, meningitis, or upper respiratory infection.
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  • Bacteria may be carried from the middle ear or the membranes that cover the brain.
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  • Some patients may require surgery to drain the inner and middle ear.
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  • The most effective preventive strategy includes prompt treatment of middle ear infections, as well as monitoring of patients with mumps, measles, influenza, or colds for signs of dizziness or hearing problems.
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  • The tiny bones in the middle ear can be seen pushing on the eardrum membrane like tent poles.
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  • In cases where the eardrum has ruptured, there may be fluid draining from the middle ear.
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  • Hemophilus infections are primarily caused by Haemophilus influenzae, a bacterium that is capable of spreading from the nasal tissues and upper airway, where it is usually found, to the chest, throat, or middle ear.
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  • Hib is the second most common cause of middle ear infection and sinusitis in children.
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  • It may be that pacifier use spreads infection or that intense sucking on pacifiers hinders proper functioning of the eustachian tube that normally keeps the middle ear open and clean.
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  • Behind the eardrum is the space called the middle ear.
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  • The eustachian tube, which connects the middle ear to the nose, normally equalizes pressure in the middle ear, allowing the eardrum and ossicles to vibrate correctly, so that hearing is normal.
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  • Its size and position allow bacteria and viruses to travel to the middle ear more easily.
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  • When these tubes are blocked, the middle ear is more likely to fill with fluid, which in turn increases the risk for infection.
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  • This condition can lead to an impaired clearance and pressure regulation in the middle ear, which, if sustained, may be followed by viruses and bacteria traveling from the nasopharynx to the middle ear.
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  • Otitis media with effusion may develop within weeks of an acute episode of middle ear infection, but in many cases the cause is unknown.
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  • It is often associated with an abnormal or malfunctioning eustachian tube, which causes negative pressure in the middle ear and leaking of fluid from tiny blood vessels, or capillaries, into the middle ear.
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  • Otitis media with effusion (OME) is the presence of middle ear fluid for six weeks or longer after the initial episode of acute otitis media.
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  • The probe measures how much sound energy bounces back off the eardrum, rather than being transmitted to the middle ear.
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  • The more energy that is returned to the probe, the more blocked the middle ear is.
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  • In some cases, a surgical perforation to drain pus from the middle ear may be performed.
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  • These small tubes are placed to aid in draining the fluid from the middle ear.
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  • Because they encircle the only connection between the middle ear and the eustachian tube, hypertrophied adenoids can also obstruct the tube and cause middle ear infections.
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  • A child with recurring middle ear infections may well have large adenoids.
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  • Only when their size causes problems by obstructing breathing or middle ear drainage do they demand intervention.
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  • Secondary bacterial infection may lead to middle ear infection (otitis media), bronchitis, pneumonia, sinus infection, or strep throat.
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  • Colds make people more susceptible to bacterial infections such as strep throat, middle ear infections, and sinus infections.
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  • Occasionally a cold will lead to a secondary bacterial infection that causes strep throat, bronchitis, pneumonia, sinus infection, or a middle ear infection.
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  • Males with Fragile X may develop enlarged testicles at the onset of puberty, and those with this syndrome can be prone to certain medical conditions, such as hernia, middle ear infections, and heart murmur, among others.
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