This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

metric

metric

metric Sentence Examples

  • Metric Tons)

  • (Thousands of Metric Ton Metric Tons).

  • Metric Tons).

  • Production (in metric tons) 43,200 24,100 7,600

  • Metric Tons.

  • Phil., 1904), "Studies in Latin Accent and Metric" (in Trans.

  • Wagner,' his metric measurements being transposed into British units: Comparison of the Continents.

  • In 1885 Uruguay imported most of her breadstuffs; now not only is wheat grown in sufficient quantities to meet the local demand, but a surplus (about 20,000 metric tons in 1908-9) is annually available for export.

  • The metric system of weights and measures has been officially adopted, but the old Spanish system is still in general use.

  • As a producer of iron Russia nevertheless runs France neck and neck for the fourth place amongst the iron-producing countries of the world, her annual output having increased from 1,004,800 metric tons in 1891 to 2,808,000 in 1901 and to 2,900,000 in 1904.

  • His great reputation led to his being entrusted by the government with several missions; in 1865 he represented Prussia in the conference called at Frankfort to introduce a uniform metric system of weights and measures into Germany.

  • He again sat on the commission of 1799 for the construction of the metric system, and by his zealous advocacy of the decimal principle largely contributed to its adoption.

  • Debray (1827-1888) he worked at the platinum metals, his object being on the one hand to prepare them pure, and on the other to find a suitable metal for the standard metre for the International Metric Commission then sitting at Paris.

  • The metric weights and measures have been officially adopted by Venezuela, but the old Spanish units are still popularly used throughout the country.

  • At the outbreak of the war the production was about 80,000 tons; in 1905 the production of sugar and molasses amounted to 161,851 metric tons, of which 134,344 were exported.

  • In 1906 the total production reached 169,418 metric tons.

  • Production is steadily increasing, the export having been 8000 metric tons in 1900, 17,386 in 1905 and 20,000 in 1906.

  • Owing to the export tax on rubber (8 cents per kilogram on jebe and 5 cents on caucho) it is probable that the official statistics do not cover the total production, which was returned as 2539 metric tons in 1905, valued at £913,989.

  • The French metric system is the official standard of weights and measures and is in use in the custom-houses of the republic and in foreign trade, but the old units are still commonly used among the people.

  • The weights and measures were still Russian, but the introduction of the metric system was contemplated in 1921.

  • of gold to the metric ton (2000 ib), is stamped and amalgamated, and the slimes and tailings, containing about 32 dwts.

  • If this estimate is correct there exists dissolved in the ocean a quantity of silver equal to T3,300 million metric tons, that is to say 46,700 times as much silver as has been produced from all the mines in the world from the discovery of America down to 1902.

  • The number of men arrayed under one banner, the time during which they might cohere, the distances from home they could march, their ability to hold permanently what they had gained, together form an excellent metric scale of the culture grade in the several American provinces, and nowhere, even in the most favoured, is this mark high.

  • Here, as usual, the British systems of measures produce a difficulty which would not arise under the metric system.

  • With metric units, measuring P in kg., and C in litres, the G.D.

  • The metric system of weights and measures was introduced by law in 1884, but the old Spanish system is still in use.

  • Of the metric units international definitions have been stated as follows:

  • Metric Units Com.

  • The kilogram (kg.) is represented by an iridio-platinum standard weight, of cylindrical form, by which all other metric weights, and all measures having reference to metric weight, are ascertained in the United Kingdom.

  • In the United Kingdom the metric standard of capacity is the litre, represented (Order in Council, 19th May 1890) by the capacity of a hollow cylindrical brass measure whose internal diameter is equal to one-half its height, and which at 0° C., when filled to the brim, contains one kg.

  • System; Unites et Etalons, Guillaume (Paris, 1890); Lupton's Numerical Tables, 1892; Metric Equivalent Cards, 1901; Dictionary of Metric Measures, L.

  • The standards of the British Empire, so far as they relate to the imperial and metric systems, are in the custody of the Board of Trade.

  • Authoritative standards and instruments for the measurement of electricity, based on the fundamental units of the metric system, have been placed in the Electrical Laboratory of the Board of Trade.

  • In the measurement of temperature the Fahrenheit scale is still followed for imperial standards, and the Centigrade scale for metric standards.

  • Represented Great Britain at the International Conference on the Metric System, 1901.

  • The idea of connecting volume and weight has received an immense impetus through the metric system, but it is not very prominent in ancient times.

  • It is remarkable how near this early decimal system of Germany and Britain is the double of the modern decimal metric system.

  • 2: The international trade metric weights and measures (1897) handled in shops, &c., of which there are also Board of Trade standards, are set out as follows: --

  • with a duplicate weight of "2.") (Metric Equivalents, King's Printers (1898).

  • -- The metric equivalents of the units of the metric system in terms of the imperial system, as recalculated in 1897, are as follows: -

  • .........................Imperial to Metric...........................

  • The equivalents of the Russian weights and measures, in terms also of the imperial and metric weights and measures, were re-calculated in 1897.

  • In Russia, as in the United Kingdom and the United States, the national weights and measures are followed (paragraph 3 above), although the use of metric weights and measures is permissive.

  • The metric system was also introduced, mainly for railway purposes, in 1870 and 1871 (Indian Acts).

  • For all pharmaceutical purposes, however, the use of the metric system alone is employed in all paragraphs relating to analysis, whether gravimetric or volumetric. For measures of capacity the Pharmacopoeia continues to use imperial measuring vessels graduated at the legal temperature of 62° F.

  • The official names of the metric capacity units are defined at 4° C., as generally on the Continent.

  • The new Pharmacopoeia also follows foreign practice, and employs metric measures of capacity and volumetric vessels graduated at 15.5 C., or 60° F.

  • It appears to be desirable, as the Committee of Council on Education have done, to recognize only the legal systems of weights and measures -- the imperial and metric. The Education Code of Regulations for 1900 prescribes that the tables of weights and measures to be learned include those only which are in ordinary use, viz.

  • Instruction in the principles of the metric system, and in the advantages to be gained from uniformity in the method of forming multiples and sub-multiples of the unit, are, under this Code, to be given to the scholars in Standards IV., V., VI.

  • Table of the Principal Foreign Weights and Measures now in use, and of their Equivalents in Imperial or in Metric Weights and Measures.

  • The sugar crop of1907-1908was reported as 123,285 metric tons, in addition to which the molasses output was estimated at 70,947.5 metric tons, and " panela " at 50,000 tons.

  • Mexico adopted the metric system in 1862, and it is used in all official transactions, land measurements, railway calculations and public school work.

  • The old Spanish weights and measures, modified in many particulars, continued in private use, however, and in 1895 it became necessary to declare the metric system the only legal system and to make;its use compulsory after the 16th of September 1896.

  • From 1847 to 1862 he was advising astronomer to the headquarters of the army and navy; chairman of the International Astronomical Congress from 1867-1878; acting president of the International Metric Commission in 1872; and president of the International Congress for a Photographic Survey of the Stars in 1887, in which year he was also made a privy councillor.

  • The metric system of weights and measures has been adopted, but the old Spanish standards remain in general use.

  • The metric system of weights and measures has been adopted so widely that it forms the most suitable basis for the titrage or counts of yarns.

  • The system it inaugurated has now extended its scope to telegraphs, copyright, industrial property, railway, traffic, the publication of customs tariffs, metric measures,) monetary systems and agriculture.

  • The international bureau of weights and measures at Paris was created by a convention signed there in 1875, for the purpose of comparing and verifying weights and measures on the metric system, and preserving their identity for the contracting states.

  • The production of this field increased from 1730 tons in 1892 to 78,500 metric tons in 1899.

  • Taking the average of the six years 1900-1905, the crop of wheat amounted to 3,550,033 tons (metric), rye to 9,296,616 tons, barley to 3,102,883 tons, and oats to 7,160,883 tons.

  • The number of factories was, in 1905, 376, and the amount of raw sugar and molasses produced amounted to 2,643,531 metric tons, and of refined sugar 1,711,063 tons.

  • In 1903 371,084,000 metric tons of goods, including animals, were conveyed by the German railways, yielding 68,085,000 sterling, and the number of passengers carried was 957,684,000, yielding 29,300,000.

  • The trade of the port increased from well under 1,000,000 tons in 1876 to 6,164,873 metric tons in 1906 (the latter figure, however, includes home trade in a proportion of about 12%).

  • Under a law of the 4th of May 1907 it was enacted that the metric system of weights and measures should come into official use in three years from that date, and into general use in five years.

  • The table gives the outputs in metric tons of the most important producers in 1900 and 1905 (from Rothwell, Mineral Industry, 1908).

  • Salt Production in Metric Tons.

  • The metric system of weights and measures has been in force since 1878.

  • The metric system of weights and measures was legalized in January 1893.

  • The estimated total production for each decade of the 19th century in metric tons is here shown: 1801-1810 -1811-1820 1821-1830 -1831-1840 1841-1850 -1851-1860 1861-1870 -1871-1880 1881-1890 -1891-1900 The following table gives the output of various countries and the world's production for the years 1895, 1900, 1905, 907 As the stock on hand rarely exceeds three months' demand, and is often little more than a month's supply, it is evident that consumption has kept close pace with production.

  • m.) and to contain 2316 millions of metric quintals (254,760,000 short tons).

  • The metric system of weights and measures is the legal standard in Chile, but the old Spanish standards are still widely used, especially in handling mining and farm produce.

  • Nitrate of soda is estimated in Chilean quintals (101.41 lb) in the field, and metric quintals (220.46 lb) at the port of shipment.

  • On the metric system it is reckoned as 4500 kilogram-metres a minute, and the French cheval-vapeur is thus equal to 32,549 foot-pounds a minute, or 0.9863 of an English horse-power, or 736 watts.

  • The most prominent and profitable of these is that of rubber-collecting, which was begun in Bolivia between 1880 and 1890, and which reached a registered annual output of nearly 35 oo metric tons just before Bolivia's best rubber forests were transferred to Brazil in 1903.

  • To simplify calculation and to enable the assayer to use the metric system of weights employed in all chemical calculations, the "assay ton" ("A.T."

  • The total output, coming chiefly from the departments of Bacau, Buzeu, Dimbovitza and Prahova, was 250,000 metric tons in 1900, 615,000 in 1905, and 1,300,000 in 1909.

  • The metric system of weights and measures has.

  • Metric System 12.1.2 119.

  • Over a large part of the civilized world the introduction of the metric system (§ 118) has caused the notation of all numerical quantities to be in the denary scale.

  • Similarly, in the metric system he cannot mentally compare two units, one of which is t000 times the other.

  • The metric system was adopted in France at the end of the 18th century.

  • The metric system is now in use in the greater part of the civilized world, but some of the measures retain the names of old disused measures.

  • For the restricted use of "metre" as a unit of measurement, see Metric System below.

  • Metric System >>

  • METRIC SYSTEM (adapted from Gr.

  • The metric system is now obligatory in Argentina, Austria,-Hungary, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Peru, Portugal, Rumania, Servia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.

  • In England action has frequently been taken both by individuals and by associations of commercial men for the purpose of endeavouring to make the metric system compulsory.

  • A bill was introduced into parliament in 1864 to make the metric system compulsory for certain purposes, but owing to government objections a permissive bill was substituted and subsequently became law as the Metric Act 1864.

  • But in 1897 a statute was passed, the Weights and Measures (Metric System) Act, which legalized the use in trade of the metric system, and abolished the penalty for using or having in one's possession a weight or measure of that system.

  • But with views reaching beyond equality of rights to a certain equality of property, the committees, as regards legislation, poor relief and instruction, laid down principles which have never been realized, save in the matter of the metric system; so that the Convention which was dispersed on the 16th of October 1795 made a greater impression on political history and social ideas than on institutions.

  • Currencv, Weidhts and Measures.The metric system of weights and measures was officially adopted in Spain in 1859 and the decimal monetary system in 1871.

  • He was one of the founders of the Ecole Polytechnique, and shared in the establishment of the Institute of France; the adoption of the metric system and the foundation of the bureau of longitude were also due to his efforts.

  • adopted metric without major problems back in the 1970s.

  • It was here that depleted uranium ammunition was used for the first time - more than 30 metric tons - 300,000 rounds in all.

  • Find out why using metric can help you in buying household appliances.

  • Cost per QALY is a useful metric, although more often a rather broad-brush assessment of value.

  • cogeneration capacity reduces CO 2 emissions by approximately 9 million metric tons annually.

  • Free tools are provided to help with imperial to metric conversions.

  • depleted uranium ammunition was used for the first time - more than 30 metric tons - 300,000 rounds in all.

  • enriched uranium, plus 150 metric tons of plutonium.

  • By 1980 the catch nearly halved to 45,000 metric tons.

  • Some strategies for applying the metric heuristics to translation are provided.

  • Shoppers are frequently unable to compare the prices of similar products without using a calculator to convert imperial into metric.

  • In 1897, the use of metric units for trade was made lawful.

  • The use of metric weights and measures in trade only became lawful in Britain in 1897.

  • Meanwhile, the metric martyrs have kept themselves busy.

  • Measurements and weights metric measurements and weights metric measurements for products are followed by the imperial equivalent and are approximate.

  • On the other hand there, R is the completion of Q under the Euclidean metric.

  • Footnotes An equivalent technique for mapping a quantitative metric to a utility scale is described in [5] .

  • Now, we'd decided that the key metric was how much sooner would we be able to capture the benefit.

  • metric tons of rice to the people of Tanzania.

  • metric tons, can be changed in just over ten minutes.

  • metric martyrs have kept themselves busy.

  • metric converters, world time and more.

  • metric measurements including recipes.

  • metric equivalents are a pound = 454 grams, an ounce is 28 grams.

  • This is marked as a repeat if this distance metric falls below a small threshold.

  • Russia has over a thousand metric tons of highly enriched uranium, plus 150 metric tons of plutonium.

  • metric ton of carbon dioxide prevented from entering the atmosphere.

  • metric tons of rice to the people of Tanzania.

  • metric tons of wheat grain per month.

  • metric tons of fish and shellfish every year as by-catch from their operations.

  • metric tons of water.

  • The proposed US facility would be capable of destroying 800 metric tons of weaponized agents each year.

  • metric tons per hectare or higher.

  • Worse still the 1999 Mars climate orbiter ended in pieces simply through failure to spot a mix-up of metric and imperial units.

  • permeance of the coating (in metric perms) can be calculated.

  • Incidentally, all of the screw in water pipe fittings on my (TR7) engine are METRIC!

  • The default file includes definitions for all familiar units, abbreviations and metric prefixes.

  • One can give its metric in terms of coordinates, sigma, chi, theta and phi.

  • singularityan>orbifold singularities in the backgrounds could be resolved, by replacing a small neighborhood of the nut, by an ALE metric.

  • Metric Sodium sulfite (anhydrous) 2 ozs 70 grams Hydroquinone 176 grains 10 grams sodium carbonate (anhydrous) 1 oz.

  • This would be a relatively sudden and dramatic increase over and above the 730 billion metric tons already in the atmosphere.

  • metric tensor,, and a distance between points; a scalar product of two vectors.

  • Russia has over a thousand metric tons of highly enriched uranium, plus 150 metric tons of plutonium.

  • In July, Taiwan donated 40 metric tons of rice to the people of Tanzania.

  • tonne tools which weigh up to 50 metric tons, can be changed in just over ten minutes.

  • Finally, the authors propose a new metric that tries to overcome the weaknesses of the evaluated metrics.

  • Metric Tons)

  • The production of coal and lignite averaging 33,465,000 metric tons in the years 1901-1905 represents about 73% of the total consumption of the country; the surplus is supplied from Great Britain, Belgium and Germany.

  • (Thousands of Pit Mouth Metric Tons).

  • (Thousands of Metric Ton Metric Tons).

  • Metric Tons).

  • (Thousinds ue, (Thousands ~ a ue of Metric OUsaji i of Metric ousan S

  • Production (in metric tons) 43,200 24,100 7,600

  • Metric Tons.

  • Phil., 1904), "Studies in Latin Accent and Metric" (in Trans.

  • Wagner,' his metric measurements being transposed into British units: Comparison of the Continents.

  • In 1885 Uruguay imported most of her breadstuffs; now not only is wheat grown in sufficient quantities to meet the local demand, but a surplus (about 20,000 metric tons in 1908-9) is annually available for export.

  • The metric system of weights and measures has been officially adopted, but the old Spanish system is still in general use.

  • As a producer of iron Russia nevertheless runs France neck and neck for the fourth place amongst the iron-producing countries of the world, her annual output having increased from 1,004,800 metric tons in 1891 to 2,808,000 in 1901 and to 2,900,000 in 1904.

  • On the one hand we may state that non-unitary sym metric functions of the roots of aox n - a l x n - 1 -{-a 2 x n - 2 - ...

  • His great reputation led to his being entrusted by the government with several missions; in 1865 he represented Prussia in the conference called at Frankfort to introduce a uniform metric system of weights and measures into Germany.

  • He again sat on the commission of 1799 for the construction of the metric system, and by his zealous advocacy of the decimal principle largely contributed to its adoption.

  • Debray (1827-1888) he worked at the platinum metals, his object being on the one hand to prepare them pure, and on the other to find a suitable metal for the standard metre for the International Metric Commission then sitting at Paris.

  • The metric weights and measures have been officially adopted by Venezuela, but the old Spanish units are still popularly used throughout the country.

  • At the outbreak of the war the production was about 80,000 tons; in 1905 the production of sugar and molasses amounted to 161,851 metric tons, of which 134,344 were exported.

  • In 1906 the total production reached 169,418 metric tons.

  • Production is steadily increasing, the export having been 8000 metric tons in 1900, 17,386 in 1905 and 20,000 in 1906.

  • Owing to the export tax on rubber (8 cents per kilogram on jebe and 5 cents on caucho) it is probable that the official statistics do not cover the total production, which was returned as 2539 metric tons in 1905, valued at £913,989.

  • The French metric system is the official standard of weights and measures and is in use in the custom-houses of the republic and in foreign trade, but the old units are still commonly used among the people.

  • The weights and measures were still Russian, but the introduction of the metric system was contemplated in 1921.

  • of gold to the metric ton (2000 ib), is stamped and amalgamated, and the slimes and tailings, containing about 32 dwts.

  • If this estimate is correct there exists dissolved in the ocean a quantity of silver equal to T3,300 million metric tons, that is to say 46,700 times as much silver as has been produced from all the mines in the world from the discovery of America down to 1902.

  • The number of men arrayed under one banner, the time during which they might cohere, the distances from home they could march, their ability to hold permanently what they had gained, together form an excellent metric scale of the culture grade in the several American provinces, and nowhere, even in the most favoured, is this mark high.

  • Here, as usual, the British systems of measures produce a difficulty which would not arise under the metric system.

  • With metric units, measuring P in kg., and C in litres, the G.D.

  • The metric system of weights and measures was introduced by law in 1884, but the old Spanish system is still in use.

  • Of the metric units international definitions have been stated as follows:

  • Metric Units Com.

  • The kilogram (kg.) is represented by an iridio-platinum standard weight, of cylindrical form, by which all other metric weights, and all measures having reference to metric weight, are ascertained in the United Kingdom.

  • In the United Kingdom the metric standard of capacity is the litre, represented (Order in Council, 19th May 1890) by the capacity of a hollow cylindrical brass measure whose internal diameter is equal to one-half its height, and which at 0° C., when filled to the brim, contains one kg.

  • System; Unites et Etalons, Guillaume (Paris, 1890); Lupton's Numerical Tables, 1892; Metric Equivalent Cards, 1901; Dictionary of Metric Measures, L.

  • The standards of the British Empire, so far as they relate to the imperial and metric systems, are in the custody of the Board of Trade.

  • Authoritative standards and instruments for the measurement of electricity, based on the fundamental units of the metric system, have been placed in the Electrical Laboratory of the Board of Trade.

  • In the measurement of temperature the Fahrenheit scale is still followed for imperial standards, and the Centigrade scale for metric standards.

  • Represented Great Britain at the International Conference on the Metric System, 1901.

  • The idea of connecting volume and weight has received an immense impetus through the metric system, but it is not very prominent in ancient times.

  • It is remarkable how near this early decimal system of Germany and Britain is the double of the modern decimal metric system.

  • 2: The international trade metric weights and measures (1897) handled in shops, &c., of which there are also Board of Trade standards, are set out as follows: --

  • with a duplicate weight of "2.") (Metric Equivalents, King's Printers (1898).

  • -- The metric equivalents of the units of the metric system in terms of the imperial system, as recalculated in 1897, are as follows: -

  • .........................Imperial to Metric...........................

  • The equivalents of the Russian weights and measures, in terms also of the imperial and metric weights and measures, were re-calculated in 1897.

  • In Russia, as in the United Kingdom and the United States, the national weights and measures are followed (paragraph 3 above), although the use of metric weights and measures is permissive.

  • The metric system was also introduced, mainly for railway purposes, in 1870 and 1871 (Indian Acts).

  • For all pharmaceutical purposes, however, the use of the metric system alone is employed in all paragraphs relating to analysis, whether gravimetric or volumetric. For measures of capacity the Pharmacopoeia continues to use imperial measuring vessels graduated at the legal temperature of 62° F.

  • The official names of the metric capacity units are defined at 4° C., as generally on the Continent.

  • The new Pharmacopoeia also follows foreign practice, and employs metric measures of capacity and volumetric vessels graduated at 15.5 C., or 60° F.

  • It appears to be desirable, as the Committee of Council on Education have done, to recognize only the legal systems of weights and measures -- the imperial and metric. The Education Code of Regulations for 1900 prescribes that the tables of weights and measures to be learned include those only which are in ordinary use, viz.

  • Instruction in the principles of the metric system, and in the advantages to be gained from uniformity in the method of forming multiples and sub-multiples of the unit, are, under this Code, to be given to the scholars in Standards IV., V., VI.

  • Table of the Principal Foreign Weights and Measures now in use, and of their Equivalents in Imperial or in Metric Weights and Measures.

  • The sugar crop of1907-1908was reported as 123,285 metric tons, in addition to which the molasses output was estimated at 70,947.5 metric tons, and " panela " at 50,000 tons.

  • Mexico adopted the metric system in 1862, and it is used in all official transactions, land measurements, railway calculations and public school work.

  • The old Spanish weights and measures, modified in many particulars, continued in private use, however, and in 1895 it became necessary to declare the metric system the only legal system and to make;its use compulsory after the 16th of September 1896.

  • From 1847 to 1862 he was advising astronomer to the headquarters of the army and navy; chairman of the International Astronomical Congress from 1867-1878; acting president of the International Metric Commission in 1872; and president of the International Congress for a Photographic Survey of the Stars in 1887, in which year he was also made a privy councillor.

  • The metric system of weights and measures has been adopted, but the old Spanish standards remain in general use.

  • The metric system of weights and measures has been adopted so widely that it forms the most suitable basis for the titrage or counts of yarns.

  • The system it inaugurated has now extended its scope to telegraphs, copyright, industrial property, railway, traffic, the publication of customs tariffs, metric measures,) monetary systems and agriculture.

  • The international bureau of weights and measures at Paris was created by a convention signed there in 1875, for the purpose of comparing and verifying weights and measures on the metric system, and preserving their identity for the contracting states.

  • The production of this field increased from 1730 tons in 1892 to 78,500 metric tons in 1899.

  • - The metric system is officially adopted, but the weights in common use are the tonelada (2025 lb), the quintal (101.4 lb), the arroba (2 5.35 lb), the libra (1.014 Ib) and the onza (.

  • Taking the average of the six years 1900-1905, the crop of wheat amounted to 3,550,033 tons (metric), rye to 9,296,616 tons, barley to 3,102,883 tons, and oats to 7,160,883 tons.

  • The number of factories was, in 1905, 376, and the amount of raw sugar and molasses produced amounted to 2,643,531 metric tons, and of refined sugar 1,711,063 tons.

  • In 1903 371,084,000 metric tons of goods, including animals, were conveyed by the German railways, yielding 68,085,000 sterling, and the number of passengers carried was 957,684,000, yielding 29,300,000.

  • The trade of the port increased from well under 1,000,000 tons in 1876 to 6,164,873 metric tons in 1906 (the latter figure, however, includes home trade in a proportion of about 12%).

  • Under a law of the 4th of May 1907 it was enacted that the metric system of weights and measures should come into official use in three years from that date, and into general use in five years.

  • The table gives the outputs in metric tons of the most important producers in 1900 and 1905 (from Rothwell, Mineral Industry, 1908).

  • Salt Production in Metric Tons.

  • The metric system of weights and measures has been in force since 1878.

  • The metric system of weights and measures was legalized in January 1893.

  • The estimated total production for each decade of the 19th century in metric tons is here shown: 1801-1810 -1811-1820 1821-1830 -1831-1840 1841-1850 -1851-1860 1861-1870 -1871-1880 1881-1890 -1891-1900 The following table gives the output of various countries and the world's production for the years 1895, 1900, 1905, 907 As the stock on hand rarely exceeds three months' demand, and is often little more than a month's supply, it is evident that consumption has kept close pace with production.

  • m.) and to contain 2316 millions of metric quintals (254,760,000 short tons).

  • The metric system of weights and measures is the legal standard in Chile, but the old Spanish standards are still widely used, especially in handling mining and farm produce.

  • Nitrate of soda is estimated in Chilean quintals (101.41 lb) in the field, and metric quintals (220.46 lb) at the port of shipment.

  • On the metric system it is reckoned as 4500 kilogram-metres a minute, and the French cheval-vapeur is thus equal to 32,549 foot-pounds a minute, or 0.9863 of an English horse-power, or 736 watts.

  • The metric system of weights and measures has been officially adopted, but many older standards are used, such as the libra (1.012 lb avoirdupois), alqueire (0.36 imperial bushel), moio (2.78 imp. bushels), almude of Lisbon (3.7 imp. gallons) and almude of Oporto (5.6 imp. gallons).

  • The most prominent and profitable of these is that of rubber-collecting, which was begun in Bolivia between 1880 and 1890, and which reached a registered annual output of nearly 35 oo metric tons just before Bolivia's best rubber forests were transferred to Brazil in 1903.

  • To simplify calculation and to enable the assayer to use the metric system of weights employed in all chemical calculations, the "assay ton" ("A.T."

  • The total output, coming chiefly from the departments of Bacau, Buzeu, Dimbovitza and Prahova, was 250,000 metric tons in 1900, 615,000 in 1905, and 1,300,000 in 1909.

  • The metric system of weights and measures has.

  • Metric System 12.1.2 119.

  • Over a large part of the civilized world the introduction of the metric system (§ 118) has caused the notation of all numerical quantities to be in the denary scale.

  • Similarly, in the metric system he cannot mentally compare two units, one of which is t000 times the other.

  • The metric system was adopted in France at the end of the 18th century.

  • The metric system is now in use in the greater part of the civilized world, but some of the measures retain the names of old disused measures.

  • For the restricted use of "metre" as a unit of measurement, see Metric System below.

  • Metric System >>

  • METRIC SYSTEM (adapted from Gr.

  • The metric system is now obligatory in Argentina, Austria,-Hungary, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Peru, Portugal, Rumania, Servia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.

  • In England action has frequently been taken both by individuals and by associations of commercial men for the purpose of endeavouring to make the metric system compulsory.

  • A bill was introduced into parliament in 1864 to make the metric system compulsory for certain purposes, but owing to government objections a permissive bill was substituted and subsequently became law as the Metric Act 1864.

  • But in 1897 a statute was passed, the Weights and Measures (Metric System) Act, which legalized the use in trade of the metric system, and abolished the penalty for using or having in one's possession a weight or measure of that system.

  • But with views reaching beyond equality of rights to a certain equality of property, the committees, as regards legislation, poor relief and instruction, laid down principles which have never been realized, save in the matter of the metric system; so that the Convention which was dispersed on the 16th of October 1795 made a greater impression on political history and social ideas than on institutions.

  • Currencv, Weidhts and Measures.The metric system of weights and measures was officially adopted in Spain in 1859 and the decimal monetary system in 1871.

  • He was one of the founders of the Ecole Polytechnique, and shared in the establishment of the Institute of France; the adoption of the metric system and the foundation of the bureau of longitude were also due to his efforts.

  • Every other metric is still climbing: data throughput, mobile phone usage, messages sent, websites created, amount of information online, data transfer speed, and CPU speed.

  • One can give its metric in terms of coordinates, sigma, chi, theta and phi.

  • These orbifold singularities in the backgrounds could be resolved, by replacing a small neighborhood of the nut, by an ALE metric.

  • Metric Sodium sulfite (anhydrous) 2 ozs 70 grams Hydroquinone 176 grains 10 grams Sodium carbonate (anhydrous) 1 oz.

  • This would be a relatively sudden and dramatic increase over and above the 730 billion metric tons already in the atmosphere.

  • Metric tensor, , and a distance between points; a scalar product of two vectors.

  • The annual rate of soil loss in the SALT farm is 3.4 metric tons per hectares, well within the tolerable limits.

  • Distance metrics Any measure that we use should be a distance metric (non-negative, symmetric and respecting triangle inequality).

  • Finally, the authors propose a new metric that tries to overcome the weaknesses of the evaluated metrics.

  • For a metric rough guide divide your weight in kilograms by 32.6 to give liters required per day.

  • Plans are available in U.S. standard as well as metric measurements, so make sure you pick a plan that will be compatible with your tools.

  • Ease of Use - Plans are available in metric and standard U.S. measurements, so buy a plan that's easy for you to understand and use.

  • Some diagrams are so crammed with information, with metric conversions and notations, that they can be hard to decipher.

  • According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the United States emitted more than 7.2 billion metric tons of greenhouse gases in 2005.

Browse other sentences examples →