Metres sentence example

metres
  • He found the gradient nearly uniform for heights up to 30 to 40 metres above the ground.
    4
    1
  • Its diameter is 3.25 metres.
    3
    0
  • Five plays have been translated in the metres of the original by Sugden (1893).
    2
    0
  • This curve with the values reduced from metres to feet is reproduced below.
    2
    0
  • His poems, both secular and religious, contained in his Diwan and scattered in the liturgy, are all in Hebrew, though he employed Arabic metres.
    2
    0
    Advertisement
  • In his translation he discarded the native Saturnian metre, and adopted the iambic, trochaic and cretic metres, to which Latin more easily adapted itself than either to the hexameter or to the lyrical measures of a later time.
    1
    0
  • These uprights are supported on huge piers of masonry and concrete, the foundations for which were carried down, by the aid of iron caissons and compressed air, to a depth of about 15 metres on the side next the Seine, and about 9 metres on the other side.
    1
    0
  • The new comedy of Greece was probably limited for the most part to scenes written in the metres of dialogue; it remained for Plautus, as Leo has shown, to enliven his plays with cantica modelled on the contemporary lyric verse of Greece or Magna Graecia, which was in its turn a development of the dramatic lyrics of Euripides.
    0
    0
  • The lyrical metres of Plautus are wonderfully varied, and the textual critic does well not to attempt to limit the possibilities of original metrical combinations and developments in the Roman comedian.
    0
    0
  • It contains also an account of the metres used by Boetius in the Consolatio, and a list of the passages which he has borrowed from the tragedies of Seneca.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • A straight length of not less than 60 metres for the largest gauge and 40 metres for the smallest must be made between two curves having opposite directions.
    0
    0
  • Except in special cases, gradients must not exceed 3 in moo; and between gradients in the opposite sense there must be not less than 60 metres of level for 1.44 m.
    0
    0
  • Dorpfeld, we assume an Attic stadium of 200 steps (500 ft.) to be equal to 164 metres, a degree of 700 stad.
    0
    0
  • These miles, however, were not the ordinary Roman miles of l000 paces or 5000 ft., but smaller miles of Greek or Oriental origin, of which six were equal to five Roman miles, and as the latter were equal to 1480 metres, the Portolano miles had a length of only 1233 metres, and 75 2 of the former, and 90 3 of the latter were equal to a degree.
    0
    0
  • Their diameter is nearly 5 metres.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • That which Colonel Langlois erected in the"Champs Elysees(1824) had a diameter of 39 metres.
    0
    0
  • The hills are hachured and in some instances contours at intervals of 50 metres are introduced.
    0
    0
  • The features of the ground on most of these maps are shown by contours at intervals of 10 metres.
    0
    0
  • The last is printed in five colours, the ground is shown in contours of io metres interval and grey stippling.
    0
    0
  • About a hundred epigrams by him in various metres (the elegiac predominating) have been preserved.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The fixed rent is pp piastres per jerib (about 10,000 square metres), to he paid whether the mine is worked or not.
    0
    0
  • It became clear that only very rough estimates of the numbers of planktonic organisms in a volume of sea-water as large as (say) 10 cubic metres could be made, but that these estimates could nevertheless be trusted to show very marked regional and seasonal differences.
    0
    0
  • Daux, discovered the jetties and the moles of the commercial harbour, and the line of the military harbour (Cothon); both harbours, which were mainly artificial, are entirely silted up. There remains a fragment of the fortifications of the Punic town, which had a total length of 6410 metres, and remains of the substructions of the Byzantine acropolis, of the circus, the theatre, the water cisterns, and of other buildings, notably the interesting Byzantine basilica which is now used as an Arab cafe (Kahwat-el-Kubba).
    0
    0
  • This observatory, the foundations of which were fixed in the snow that appears to cover the summit to a depth of ten metres, was built in September 1893, and Janssen, in spite of his sixty-nine years, made the ascent and spent four days taking observations.
    0
    0
  • The average rainfall throughout the whole Amazon valley is estimated by Reclus as " probably in excess of 2 ' metres " (78.7 in.), and the maximum rise of the great flood is about 45 ft.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Of the water received by Albert Nyanza annually (omitting the Victoria Nile from the calculation) between 50 and 60% is lost by evaporation, whilst 24,265,000,000 cubic metres are annually withdrawn by the Bahr-el-Jebel.
    0
    0
  • The broad worm, Dibothriocephalus latus, is similarly estimated to discharge 15 to 20 metres of proglottides, weighing 140 grammes.
    0
    0
  • Other metres were introduced later until sixteen altogether were recognized.
    0
    0
  • The reproduction of tsetse-flies is highly remarkable; instead of laying eggs or being ovovivi parous the females deposit at intervals of about a fortnight or three weeks a single full-grown larva, which forthwith buries itself in the ground to a depth of several centi metres, and assumes the pupal state.
    0
    0
  • An irrigation canal, deriving water from the Sega, furnishes 112 cubic metres per second to the fields of the upper Veronese district.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Massimo to the suburb of Tombetta, furnishes 26 cubic metres of water per second, and generates 4000 horse-power.
    0
    0
  • These schist ridges rich in quartz show, to a depth of 20 metres, considerable disintegration.
    0
    0
  • A comparison of the force habitually developed by the wind in various parts of the islands shows that at Suttsu in Yezo the average strength is 9 metres per second, while Izuhara in the island Tsu-shima, Kumamoto in KiOshi and Gifu in the east centre of the main island stand at the bottom of the list with an average wind velocity of only 2 metres.
    0
    0
  • Very remarkable is the giant Taka-ashi long legs (Macrocheirus Kaempfeni), which has legs 14 metres long and is found in the seas of Japan and the Malay archipelago.
    0
    0
  • Another work was the Saturae, written in various metres, but chiefly in the trochaic tetrameter.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • His greatest contribution to poetic art consisted in the perfection which he attained in the phalaecian, the pure iambic, and the scazon metres, and in the ease and grace with which he used the language of familiar intercourse, as distinct from that of the creative imagination, of the rostra, and of the schools, to give at once a lifelike and an artistic expression to his feelings.
    0
    0
  • The imitative impulse, which had much of the character of a creative impulse, and had resulted in the appropriation of the forms of poetry suited to the Roman and Italian character and of the metres suited to the genius of the Latin language, no longer stimulated to artistic effort.
    0
    0
  • Thus for instance the capacity in free space of a sphere 2 metres in diameter would be 100/900,000 = 1/9000 of a microfarad.
    0
    0
  • Mr Hore often failed to find bottom with a line of 168 fathoms. The French explorer, Victor Giraud, reported 647 metres (about 350 fathoms) off Mrumbi on the west coast, and Moore depths of 200 fathoms and upwards near the south end.
    0
    0
  • The length of the opening is over 21 metres; its depth 14 metres, and the height of roof above the undisturbed ash deposit varied from 1 m.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The ash surface was staked off into square metres, and the substance carefully removed in order.
    0
    0
  • A rope of this class for a pit 1200 metres deep, tapered from 15.6 in.
    0
    0
  • In Belgium it was tried in a pit 940 metres deep, where it has been replaced by flat hempen ropes, and is now restricted to shallower workings.
    0
    0
  • Belgium 950 3117 The greatest depth attained in the Westphalian coal is at East Recklinghausen, where there are two shafts 841 metres (2759 ft.) deep.
    0
    0
  • The chief faults of the book are obscurity, verbal conceits and a forced ingenuity which shows itself in grotesque puns, odd metres and occasional want of taste.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The typical species, Iguanodon mantelli, measures 5 to 6 metres in length, while I.
    0
    0
  • In the memoir cited above Regnault gives an account of determinations of the velocity in air in pipes of great length and of diameters ranging from o 108 metres to i i metres.
    0
    0
  • At present we cannot assign a more exact value than Uo = 331 metres per second.
    0
    0
  • The amplitude of the fork was observed when the sound just ceased to be audible at 27.4 metres away, and the rate of energy emission from the resonator was calculated to be 42 .
    0
    0
  • For an iron wire Y is about 10 12 /4, so that for a frequency of 500 in a wire fixed at both ends a length about 5 metres is required.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The length of the wah has been fixed at two metres.
    0
    0
  • The number of poems in one or other of these two metres is very great, and includes verses on almost every theme.
    0
    0
  • Priscian's three short treatises dedicated to Symmachus are on weights and measures, the metres of Terence, and some rhetorical elements (exercises translated from the Hpoyvµvaaµara of Hermogenes).
    0
    0
  • The Habra barrage holds 38,000,000 cubic metres; that on the Sig 18,000,000.
    0
    0
  • In the intermediate levels, down to depths not exceeding woo metres, a remarkable distribution appears.
    0
    0
  • Humboldt states that it was 6600 metres long, 31wide and 4 high.
    0
    0
  • Not far from Turin are also the castles of Moncalieri, Stupinigi, Rivoli, Racconigi, Agle, Venaria, and the ancient monastery of the Sagra di San Michele (753 metres above sea-level), famous for its view of the Alps as far as the beginning of the Lombard plain.
    0
    0
  • As the outer flossy threads and the inner vests are not reelable, it is difficult to estimate the total length of thread produced by the silkworm, but the portion reeled varies in length and thickness, according to the condition and robustness of the cocoon, in some breeds giving a result as low as Soo metres, and in others 900 to 1200 metres.
    0
    0
  • Thus number loo would be 100 metres per gramme calculated on the single strand.
    0
    0
  • The length of skein adopted was 450 metres and the unit of length the half decigramme.
    0
    0
  • Thus the count of silk is expressed by the number of half decigrammes which the length of 450 metres weighs.
    0
    0
  • This latter differs very little in actual practice from the previous method of determination by the number of deniers per 476 metres, the denier being calculated on the equivalent of 0.0531 gramme, the English equivalent showing 333 deniers per one dram avoirdupois.
    0
    0
  • In the case of hydrogen rendered luminous in a vacuum tube we may put approximately u equal to 2000 metres per second, if the translatory motion of the luminous molecules is about the same as that at the ordinary temperature.
    0
    0
  • If the motion were that of a body at white heat, or say a temperature of loco, the velocity of mean square would be 39co metres per second and the apparent width of the band would be doubled.
    0
    0
  • The velocities ranged from about 400 to 1900 metres, the metals of small atomic weight giving as a rule the higher velocities.
    0
    0
  • Scale of Metres o co 20 30 40 5 Scale of Yards 0 i p zo g o 40 ?o climbing plants with slender herbaceous or shrubby shoots, to which belong the yam and the British black bryony, Tamus communis.
    0
    0
  • From the state of the ground the German explorers inferred that the length of the hippodrome was 770 metres or 4 Olympic stadia.
    0
    0
  • Walls, inclined to each other at obtuse angles, enclosed a plot of ground having in the middle a low tumulus of elliptic form, about 35 metres from east to west by 20 from north to south.
    0
    0
  • The building consisted of a circular Ionic colonnade (of eighteen columns), about 15 metres in diameter, raised on three steps and enclosing a small circular cella, probably adorned with fourteen Corinthian half-columns.
    0
    0
  • This periscope is considerably larger than any others, and was designed for observing over obstacles of between 9 and 26 metres in height.
    0
    0
  • Zeiss made a periscope 7 metres long, main tune 150 mm.
    0
    0
  • The throw of this fault may be as much as 2000 metres, and the drop is on its south-east side, i.e.
    0
    0
  • It has been found that the " carbons " in drills can safely be subjected to a pressure of over 60 kilograms per square millimetre, and a speed of 25 metres per second.
    0
    0
  • It was built to consist of two bridges one over the eastern or Damietta branch of the river having 71 arches, the other, over the Rosetta branch, having 61 arches, each arch being of 5 metres or 16.4 ft.
    0
    0
  • The gates were intended to hold up the water 4.5 metres, FIG.
    0
    0
  • It consists of a bridge of i i 1 arches, each 5 metres span, with piers of 2 metres thickness.
    0
    0
  • There is a lock 80 metres long and 16 metres wide at the left or western end of the weir, and adjoining it are the regulating sluices of the Ibrahimia canal.
    0
    0
  • In 1885 Messrs Garde and Eherlin made similar observations at Nanortalik near Cape Farewell in Greenland, but using a base of only 1250 metres (about 4 m.).
    0
    0
  • A number of metallic points, supported on insulators, were connected by wires enclosing several hundred square metres on the top of a hill.
    0
    0
  • With pendulums of shorter length, say metres, it is necessary to have a multiplication 80 to too fold by a double system of very light levers, in order to render the extremely slight tilting of their support perceptible.
    0
    0
  • The saturae of Ennius were collections of writings on various subjects, written in various metres and contained in four (or six) books.
    0
    0
  • The rudeness of early art is most apparent in the inequality of the metres in which both the dialogue and the "recitative" are composed.
    0
    0
  • It is propagated along the muscle fibres of the skeletal muscles at a rate of about 3 metres per second.
    0
    0
  • Thus red light is reduced to such an extent as to be insufficient for growth at a depth of 34 metres, yellow light at a depth of 1 7 7 metres and green light at 322 metres.
    0
    0
  • The enormous temple at Didymi was cleared and all its columns were found to be standing to the height of several metres.
    0
    0
  • A hundred metres from the columns they struck the west end of a temple, and found that more of the structure was preserved as the covering of soil became deeper.
    0
    0
  • He introduced foreign thoughts and metres, but at the same time revived the metres of the Icelandic classical poets.
    0
    0
  • Erected for the exposition of 1889, the Eiffel Tower, in the Champ de Mars, Paris, is by far the highest artificial structure in the world, and its height of 300 metres (984 ft.) surpasses that of the obelisk at Washington by 42 9 ft., and that of St Paul's cathedral by 580 ft.
    0
    0
  • Its framework is composed essentially of four uprights, which rise from the corners of a square measuring loo metres on the side; thus the area it covers at its base is nearly 22 acres.
    0
    0
  • Nearly 25 metres higher up still is the lantern, with a gallery 5 metres in diameter.
    0
    0
  • In their first ascent from the garden of the Conservatoire des Arts on the 24th of August 1804 an altitude of 4000 metres (about 13,000 ft.) was attained.
    0
    0
  • But this elevation was not considered sufficient by Gay-Lussac, who therefore made a second ascent by himself on the 16th of September, when the balloon rose 7016 metres (about 23,000 ft.) above sea-level.
    0
    0
  • For the purposes of this determination he set up a continuous column of mercury, constructed with 13 sections of glass tube each 2 metres long and 5 mm.
    0
    0
  • Sidney followed with the sestine and terza rima and with various experiments in classic metres, none of which took root on English soil.
    0
    0
  • Lamy has estimated that, in this class of poems, there are as many as 66 different varieties of metres to be found in the works of Ephraim.
    0
    0
  • He studied the phenomena of electrical oscillations from 1869 to 1871, and in the latter year he announced that the velocity of the propagation of electromagnetic induction was about 314,000 metres per second.
    0
    0
  • The metres employed by Epicharmus were iambic trimeter, and especially trochaic and anapaestic tetrameter.
    0
    0
  • A brief tract on comic metres (De comicis dimensionibus) and a work De causis linguae Latinae - the earliest Latin grammar on scientific principles and following a scientific method - were his only other purely literary works published in his lifetime.
    0
    0
  • A pair of wings of the toothless Pteranodon from the Chalk of Kansas, now in the British Museum, measures about five and a half metres in span.
    0
    0
  • With this apparatus he traversed on the 12th of November 1906 a distance of 220 metres in 21 seconds.
    0
    0
  • As they were each about 2 metres wide their total area was about 50 sq.
    0
    0
  • The rudder for lateral steering was placed about 21 metres behind the main surfaces and was formed of two vertical pivoted aeroplanes.
    0
    0
  • Making about 1200 revolutions a minute, it developed about 24 horse-power, and was connected by chain gearing to two wooden propellers, 21metres in diameter and 31 metres apart, the speed of which was about 450 revolutions a minute.
    0
    0
  • The Gathas proper, arranged according to the metres in which they are written, fall into five subdivisions (28 -34, 43-4 6, 47-5 0, 51, 53).
    0
    0
  • He was the author of a treatise (incomplete) in four books (written chiefly in hexameters), on letters, syllables, feet and metres, of which considerable use was made by later writers on similar subjects.
    0
    0
  • The most important part of it is that which deals with metres, based on the work of Caesius Bassus, ' See Ep. ad Fam.
    0
    0
  • Though written in a metre deemed foreign to English ears, the poem immediately attained a wide popularity, which it has never lost, and secured to the dactylic hexameter a recognized place among English metres.
    0
    0
  • The stout columnar stem may reach a height of 20 metres, and a diameter of half a metre; it remains either unbranched or divides near the summit into several short 4'`.C.
    0
    0
  • Ginkgo biloba, which may reach a height of over 30 metres, forms a tree of pyramidal shape with a smooth grey bark.
    0
    0
  • Florus is important as being the first in order of a number of 2nd-century African writers who exercised a considerable influence on Latin literature, and also the first of the poetae neoterici or novelli (new-fashioned poets) of Hadrian's reign, whose special characteristic was the use of lighter and graceful metres (anapaestic and iambic dimeters), which had hitherto found little favour.
    0
    0
  • The corresponding intensity at the sun's surface is 4.62 X Io 4 as great, or 6.79 X Io 4 kilowatts per square metre = 7.88 X Io 4 horse-power per square yard - enough to melt a thickness of 13.3 metres (=39.6 ft.) of ice, or to vaporize 1.81 metres (=5.92 ft.) of water per minute.
    0
    0
  • It is easy to calculate that this would be produced by an annual fall of matter equal to one nineteen millionth of the sun's mass, which would make an envelope eight metres thick, at the sun's mean density; this would be collected during the year from a spherical space extending beyond the orbit of Jupiter.
    0
    0
  • Numerical quantities, to be added or subtracted, must be in the same denomination; we cannot, for instance, add S5 shillings and loo pence, any more than we can add 3 yards and 2 metres.
    0
    0
  • Below the mouth of the Tambopata, the flow is estimated at 191,250 cubic metres per minute.
    0
    0
  • Along the Swedish coast a deep channel runs northward from outside the island of Oland; this is entirely cut off to the south and east by a bank which sweeps eastward and northward from near Karlskrona, and on which the island of Gotland stands, but it communicates at its northern end with the Gotland deep, and near the junction opposite Landsort is the deepest hole in the Baltic (420 metres = 2 3 o fathoms).
    0
    0
  • At this time the Gulf of Bothnia must have suffered greater depression than the Baltic proper, for the deposits of that epoch show a thickness of 100 metres (328 ft.) near Hernosand, but of only 25 metres (82 ft.) in the neighbourhood of Gotland.
    0
    0
  • Levellings from Swinemunde show that the mean level of the surface of the Baltic at that point is 0.093 metres (_ 305 ft.) below.
    0
    0
  • In the great basins and hollows from Rugen to the Gulfs of Bothnia and Finland the upper layers of water, from 30 to 70 metres (16 to 38 fathoms) in thickness, have almost the same salinity throughout.
    0
    0
  • The Galata quay, completed in 1889, is 756 metres long and 20 metres wide; the Stamboul quay, completed in 1900, is 378 metres in length.
    0
    0
  • The change in the phonesis of the language is well illustrated by the new metres as compared with the old Icelandic. drott-kvicedi in its varied forms. Most of the older rimur and diktur are as yet unprinted.
    0
    0
  • Among the innovations of this poet we may note a predilection for new metres, sometimes adopted from foreign languages, sometimes invented by himself, a thing practised rarely and generally with small success by the Icelandic poets.
    0
    0
  • Such facile metres are called "political," in the sense of "commonplace," "of the city."
    0
    0
  • Hommel is right, to 2400 metres.
    0
    0
  • There were three courts, the outer or great court, the middle court of Ishtar and Zamama, and the inner court on the east side of which was the tower of seven stages (known as the House of the Foundation of Heaven and Earth), 90 metres high according to Hommel's calculation of the measurements in the tablet; while on the west side was the temple proper of Merodach and his wife Sarpanit or Zarpanit, as well as chapels of Anu, Ea and Bel on either side of it.
    0
    0
  • Their poetry has well-defined metres, and a sort of rhyme.
    0
    0
  • The general object of the works was to obtain a navigable depth of water at all seasons of 2 metres (6.56 ft.) on that portion of the river above Orsova, and a depth of 3 metres (9.84 ft.) below that town.
    0
    0
  • The mean elevation, estimated by Elie de Beaumont at 1500 metres (4900 ft.), has been sensibly diminished by the addition of that zone to the system, and it must now be placed at only 1200 metres (3930 ft.) for the range as a whole; so important a part is played by the above-mentioned plateaux of small elevation in a chain whose highest summit reaches 11,168 ft., while the passes show a greater altitude than those of the Alps.
    0
    0
  • At 300 metres its density is 1.253.
    0
    0
  • The Calamarieae, now known to have been the chief Palaeozoic representatives of the Horsetail stock, attained the dimensions of trees, reaching, according to Grand' Eury, a height of from 30 to 60 metres, and showed in all respects a higher and more varied organization than their recent successors.
    0
    0
  • The discovery of the fossil trunks and of their rooted bases has shown that the Cordaiteae were large trees, reaching 30 metres or more in height; the lofty shaft bore a dense crown of branches, clothed with long simple leaves, spirally arranged.
    0
    0
  • The height, h, and the distance from the wall, 1, where the potential is measured are given in metres when known.
    0
    0
  • So again, a few days' observations on the top of Mont Blanc (4810 metres) by le Cadet (26) in August and September 1902, showed only a single period, with maximum between 3 and 4 P. M., and minimum about 3 A.M.
    0
    0
  • At heights from 1500 to 6000 metres his observations agreed well with the formula dV/dh= 34 - o o06 h, V denoting the potential, h the height in metres.
    0
    0
  • The formula makes the gradient diminish from 25 volts per metre at 1500 metres height to To volts per metre at 4000 metres.
    0
    0
  • Accepting Linke's formula, the potential at 4000 metres is 43,750 volts higher than at 1500 metres.
    0
    0
  • If the mean of the gradients observed at the ground and at 1500 metres be taken as an approximation to the mean value of the gradient throughout the lowest 1500 metres of the atmosphere, we find for the potential at 1500 metres level 112,500 volts.
    0
    0
  • Suppose, for instance, that in the absence of the wire the potential falls from 264 to 255 volts in 15 minutes, whilst when the wire (io metres long) is introduced it falls from 264 to 201 volts in io minutes, then IoA=(264-201)x6-(264-255)x4=342; or A=34.2.
    0
    0
  • Taking Linke's (28) figures as given in § 10, and supposing h, = o, h 2 = 15 X 10 4, we find for the charge in the unit tube between the ground and 1500 metres level, remembering that the centimetre is now the unit of length, M = (I/41r) (125-25)/100.
    0
    0
  • Of the corresponding positive charge, 265 X106 lies below the 1500 metres level, 40 X10-6 between this and the 4000 metres level, and only 26 X 10- 6 above 4000 metres.
    0
    0
  • The error due to the neglect of the former would at most amount to 1%, while a reduction to the mean level of the sea necessitates but a trifling reduction, amounting, in the case of a base-line 300,000 metres in length, measured on a plateau of 3700 metres (12,000 ft.) in height, to 57 metres only.
    0
    0
  • In the 16th century we find another Piccolomini (Alexander), bishop of Patras, author of a curious dialogue, Della bell y creanza delle donne; another bishop, Claudio Tolomei, diplomatist, poet and philologist, who revived the use of ancient Latin metres; and Luca Contile, a writer of narratives, plays and poems. Prose fiction had two representatives in this century - Scipione Bargagli, a writer of some merit, and Pietro Fortini, whose productions were trivial and indecent.
    0
    0
  • Some of the " deeps " to which names have been given disappear or are divided into two or three smaller deeps when the contour lines representing hundreds of fathoms are translated into contour lines representing hundreds of metres.
    0
    0
  • A similar change in the contour lines may result from the substitution of lines in fathoms for those originally drawn in metres, and hence it is extremely desirable that specific names should only be given to such features as are pronounced enough to appear on maps drawn with either unit.
    0
    0
  • Moses ben Ezra says of him that he imitated Moslem models, and was the first to open to Jewish poets the door of versification,' meaning that he first popularized the use of Arabic metres in Hebrew.
    0
    0
  • At first they curve upwards at an angle of 54 0; then they gradually become straighter, until they unite in a single shaft rather more than half-way up. The first platform, at a height of 57 metres, has an area of 5860 sq.
    0
    0
  • The next, accessible by lifts only, is 115 metres up, and has an area of 32 sq.
    0
    0
  • About 3 metres in front of them was arranged a pair of smaller horizontal j aeroplanes, shaped like a long narrow ellipse, which formed the rudder that effected changes of elevation, the driver being able by means of a lever to incline them up or down according as he desired to ascend or descend.
    0
    0
  • A line of levels from Swinemunde through Eger to the Adriatic showed the mean level of the surface of the Baltic to be o 499 metres (1.6 ft.) above that of the Adriatic Sea.
    0
    0
  • The mean level of the surface of the Baltic rises about 0.5 metres (1.6 ft.) from the coast of Holstein to Memel, probably as a result of the prevailing westerly winds; this mean difference is exceeded with strong westerly winds, and disappears or is reversed with easterly winds.
    0
    0
  • Thus at 4000 metres the potential seems of the order of 150,000 volts.
    0
    1
  • Between 1500 and 4000 metres the charge inside the unit tube is much less, only 0.000040.
    0
    1
  • The velocity of propagation of electric waves is the same as that of light, viz., about moo million feet, or 300 million metres, per second.
    2
    3
  • The only part of the sea-bed the configuration of which is at all well known is the zone bordering the coasts where the depth is less than about loo fathoms or 200 metres, i.e.
    1
    1
  • It is printed in three colours, and gives contours at intervals of io metres.
    0
    1
  • They are printed in three colours, contours at intervals of 10 and 20 metres being in brown, incidental features (ravines, cliffs, glaciers) in black or blue.
    0
    1