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metre

metre

metre Sentence Examples

  • A lens of twice its strength has a refractive power of 2 D, and a focal length of half a metre, and so on.

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    23
  • The line is of metre gauge.

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  • Without rhyme, without variety of metre, IV.

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    9
  • Without rhyme, without variety of metre, IV.

    25
    9
  • At Such Times Gradients Of 400 Or 500 Volts Per Metre Are By No Means Unusual At Kew, And Voltages Of 700 Or Boo Are Occasionally Met With.

    18
    9
  • The next step was the introduction of metre into the body of the sentence and the restriction of the passages to a definite length.

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    12
  • The next step was the introduction of metre into the body of the sentence and the restriction of the passages to a definite length.

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    12
  • The line is of m metre gauge, with steel rails weighing 212 kilos (42 lb) per yard.

    17
    10
  • There is no English metre with this peculiar cadence.

    10
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  • There is no English metre with this peculiar cadence.

    10
    8
  • From the observed motion of the node of Venus, as shown by the four transits of 1761, 1769, 1874 and 1882, is found Mass of (earth +moon) _Mass of sun 332600 In gravitational units of mass, based on the metre and second as units of length and time, Log.

    9
    6
  • This metre was employed in ritual hymns, which seem to have assumed definite shapes out of the exclamations of a primitive priesthood engaged in a rude ceremonial dance.

    9
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  • They are distinguished by artistic form, purity of expression and strict attention to the laws of metre and prosody, qualities which, however good in themselves, do not compensate for want of originality, freshness and power.

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  • But there is immense wit, a wonderful command of such metre and language as the taste of the time allowed to the poet, occasionally a singular if somewhat artificial grace, and a curious felicity of diction and manner.

    7
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  • But there is immense wit, a wonderful command of such metre and language as the taste of the time allowed to the poet, occasionally a singular if somewhat artificial grace, and a curious felicity of diction and manner.

    7
    6
  • He also put into elegiac metre, in 106 epigrams, some of Augustine's theological dicta.

    6
    5
  • Each play has an argument in metre by Sulpicius Apollinaris (2nd century of our era).

    5
    4
  • They studied criticism, grammar, prosody and metre, antiquities and mythology.

    5
    4
  • Seven-tenths of a cubic metre of animal bones were found: deer, bear, wolf, raccoon, opossum, beaver, buffalo, elk, turkey, woodchuck, tortoise and hog; all contemporary with man's occupancy.

    5
    7
  • The south-west line of the Madras railway runs through the district, and the South Indian railway (of metre gauge) joins this at Erode.

    5
    8
  • The other feature, peculiar to the long poem (gasida, elegy), is that, whatever its real object, whatever its metre, it has a regular scheme in the arrangement of its material.

    4
    3
  • The old chant of the Salii, called axamenta, was written in the old Saturnian metre, in language so archaic that even the priests themselves could hardly understand it.

    4
    5
  • The psalms rendered into metre were formerly the only vehicle of the Church's public praise, but hymns are now also used in most Presbyterian churches.'

    4
    6
  • Above the level plain of absolutely smooth surface, devoid of houses or vegetation, the equipotential surfaces under normal conditions would be strictly horizontal, and if we could determine the potential at one metre above the ground we should have a definite measure of the potential gradient at the earth's surface.

    4
    7
  • He supposes the field near the earth to be ioo volts per metre, or 1/300 electrostatic units.

    3
    3
  • A is the upper end of a glass tube, half a metre or so in length, which is clamped in a vertical position.

    2
    2
  • But it was rather in the chants and litanies of the ancient religion, such as those of the Salii and the Fratres Arvales, and the dirges for the dead (neniae), and in certain extemporaneous effusions, that some germs of a native poetry might have been detected; and finally in the use of Saturnian verse, a metre of pure native origin, which by its rapid and lively movement gave expression to the vivacity and quick apprehension of the Italian race.

    2
    2
  • Duhm, in his epoch-making commentary, distinguishes on the grounds of metre and contents the four servantpassages, in the last of which (lii.

    2
    3
  • per metre, which, for practical purposes, Wertheim takes as giving the limit of elasticity; column 4 gives the breaking strain.

    2
    3
  • The extant writings of Paulinus consist of some fifty Epistolae, addressed to Sulpicius Severus, Delphinus, Augustine, Jerome and others; thirty-two Carmina in a great variety of metre, including a series of hexameter "natales," begun about 393 and continued annually in honour of the festival of St Felix, metrical epistles to Ausonius and Gestidius, and paraphrases of three psalms; and a Passio S.

    2
    3
  • The metre was also employed in commemorative poems, accompanied with music, which were sung at funeral banquets in celebration of the exploits and virtues of distinguished men.

    2
    3
  • Schott gives the following as the result of measurements of transparency by means of a white disk at 23 stations in the open ocean, where quantitative observations of the plankton under i square metre of surface were made at the same time.

    2
    3
  • Underneath is the true floor of the cave, a mass of homogeneous yellow clay, one metre in thickness.

    2
    3
  • per metre, which, for practical purposes, Wertheim takes as giving the limit of elasticity; column 4 gives the breaking strain.

    2
    3
  • Schott gives the following as the result of measurements of transparency by means of a white disk at 23 stations in the open ocean, where quantitative observations of the plankton under i square metre of surface were made at the same time.

    2
    3
  • The unit to which they are ordinarily referred is I electrostatic unit of electricity per cubic metre of air.

    2
    4
  • The radioactivity is denoted by A, and A = signifies that the potential of the dissipation apparatus fell I volt in an hour per metre of wire introduced.

    2
    4
  • 3.37 in.), or 75 metre (2 ft.

    2
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  • Hence 1000Æ is the elongation in millimetres per metre length per kilo.

    2
    4
  • Khalil ibn Ahmad (718-791), an Arab from Oman, of the school of Basra, was the first to enunciate the laws of Arabic metre and the first to write a dictionary.

    2
    4
  • He took part in revising the Dutch translation of the Old Testament in 1633, and after his death a book by him, called the Lyra Davidis, was published, which sought to explain the principles of Hebrew metre, and which created some controversy at the time, having been opposed by Louis Cappel.

    2
    4
  • Khalil ibn Ahmad (718-791), an Arab from Oman, of the school of Basra, was the first to enunciate the laws of Arabic metre and the first to write a dictionary.

    2
    4
  • 8.7 in.), or 1 metre (3 ft.

    2
    5
  • John Van Metre, an Indian trader, penetrated into the northern portion in 1725, and Morgan ap Morgan, a Welshman, built a cabin in the present Berkeley county in 1727.

    1
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  • Recent criticism has been far more impartial, and almost too much respect has been paid to his attainments, especially in the matter of metre, though Lydgate himself, with offensive lightheartedness, admits his poor craftsmanship.

    1
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  • Somewhat reluctantly it was accepted by Scottish Presbyterianism as a substitute for an older version with a greater variety of metre and music. "Old Hundred" and "Old 124th" mean the moth and 124th Psalms in that old book.

    1
    3
  • The altar itself is constructed in the form of a bird, because Soma was supposed to have been brought down from heaven by the metre Gayatri which had assumed the form of an eagle.

    1
    3
  • In his translation he discarded the native Saturnian metre, and adopted the iambic, trochaic and cretic metres, to which Latin more easily adapted itself than either to the hexameter or to the lyrical measures of a later time.

    1
    3
  • In France and other European countries there is also an important mileage of metre gauge, and even narrower, on lines of local or secondary importance.

    1
    3
  • The metre, which by a curious naivete Tennyson long believed that he had invented, served by its happy peculiarity to bind the sections together, and even to give an illusion of connected movement to the thought.

    1
    3
  • But rhyme was not attempted, and the syllabic metre of Japan was preserved, the alternation of 5 and 7 being, however, dispensed with.

    1
    3
  • When this building of railways began in Japan, much discussion was taking place in England and India as to the relative advantages of the wide and narrow gauges, and so strongly did the arguments in favor of the latter appeal to the English advisers of the Japanese government that the metre gauge was chosen.

    1
    3
  • For iron n/p is of the order 10 11, so that the frequency for a rod 1 metre long is about 3000.

    1
    3
  • Somewhat reluctantly it was accepted by Scottish Presbyterianism as a substitute for an older version with a greater variety of metre and music. "Old Hundred" and "Old 124th" mean the moth and 124th Psalms in that old book.

    1
    3
  • In France and other European countries there is also an important mileage of metre gauge, and even narrower, on lines of local or secondary importance.

    1
    3
  • The stout columnar stem may reach a height of 20 metres, and a diameter of half a metre; it remains either unbranched or divides near the summit into several short 4'`.C.

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  • 1 the earth is therefore receiving energy at the rate of 1.47 kilowatts per square metre, or 1.70 horse-power per square yard.

    0
    0
  • The corresponding intensity at the sun's surface is 4.62 X Io 4 as great, or 6.79 X Io 4 kilowatts per square metre = 7.88 X Io 4 horse-power per square yard - enough to melt a thickness of 13.3 metres (=39.6 ft.) of ice, or to vaporize 1.81 metres (=5.92 ft.) of water per minute.

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  • To the classical scholar the metre alone is of interest.

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  • The Delphian poetess Boeo attributed to him the introducion of the cult of Apollo and the invention of the epic metre.

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  • The metre and the kilometre, for instance, or the metre and the millimetre, are not directly comparable; but the metre can be conceived as containing too centimetres.

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  • The principal units of length, weight and volume are the metre, gramme (or gram) and litre.

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  • The metre and the gramme are defined by standard measures preserved at Paris.

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  • The latter has an average calorific power of 1732 calories per cubic metre, or 161 B.T.U.

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  • metre.

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  • metre water-gas and 3.13 Siemens gas.

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  • At Stockholm the rate of elevation is approximately 0.47 metre (=1.54 ft.) in a century.

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  • METRE (/.L€Tpudl, sc. TEXvfl, from Gr.

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  • For the restricted use of "metre" as a unit of measurement, see Metric System below.

    0
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  • In form all these poems belong to two or three classes: - kvioa, an epic " cantilena "; tal, a genealogical poem; drapa, songs of praise, &c., written in modifications of the old Teutonic metre which we know in Beowulf; galdr and lokkr, spell and charm songs in a more lyric measure; and mal, a dialogue poem, and liod, a lay, in elegiac measure suited to the subject.

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  • Sigurd II., Fafnis's Lay, Sigrdrifa's Lay) and Hamdismal, all continental, and all entirely consonant to the remains of Old English poetry in metre, feeling and treatment, one can see that it is with this school that the Icelandic " makers " are in sympathy, and that from it their verse naturally descends.

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  • The last part, Hattatal, a treatise on metre, was written for Earl Skuli about 1222, in imitation of Earl Rognvald and Hall's Hattalykill (Clavis metrica) of 1150.

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  • 1 "Political" verse or metre is the name given to a kind of verse found as early as the 6th century in proverbs, and characteristic of Byzantine and modern Greek poetry.

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  • that system of weights and measures of which the metre is the fundamental unit.

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  • The theory of the system is that the metre is a 1000-1000Y Part of a quandrant of the earth through Paris; the litre or unit of volume is a cube ofmetre side; the gramme or unit of weight is (nominally) 10 water at 4° C. The idea of adopting scientific measurements had been suggested as early as the 17th century, particularly by the astronomer Jean Picard (1620-1682), who proposed to take as a unit the length of a pendulum beating one second at sealevel, at a latitude of 45°.

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  • Another commission was also appointed to draw up a system of weights and measures based on the length of the metre and to fix the nomenclature, which on the report of the commission was established in 1795.

    0
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  • It was not until 1799 that the report on the length of the metre was made.

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  • This was followed by the law of the 10th of December 1799 fixing definitely the value of the metre and of the kilogramme, or weight of a litre of water, and the new system became compulsory in 180r.

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  • The object of the Bureau is to make and provide prototypes of the metre and kilogramme, for the various subscribing countries.

    0
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  • In northern Angola the railway (metre gauge) from Loanda was carried to Malanje (375 m.) and was bought in July 1918 by the Portuguese Government.

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  • This remarkable poem, written in the metre of the old Servian ballads, gives a vivid description of life in Bosnia under Turkish rule, and of the hereditary border feuds between Christians and Moslems. In later life Mazuranic distinguished himself as a statesman, and became ban of Croatia from 1873 to 1880.

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  • True coal has also been obtained in the same district, the deposits varying from a third to half a metre in thickness.

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  • Saturnian Metre >>

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  • It is written in pure Baiswari or Eastern Hindi, in stanzas called chaupais, broken by dohas or couplets, with an occasional soratha and chhand - the latter a hurrying metre of many rhymes and alliterations.

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  • The leaves as a rule far exceeded in size those of any of the Coniferae, attaining in some species a length of a metre.

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  • The poem was first written down by a wandering minstrel about 971 to 991, was remodelled about 1140 by Konrad,' who introduced interpolations in the spirit of chivalry and was perhaps responsible for the metre; during the wars and miseries of the next fifty years manners and taste became barbarized and the fine traditions of the old popular poetry were obscured, and it was under this influence that, about 1190, a jongleur (Spielmann) revised the poem, this recension being represented by group B.

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  • metre just need to be able to swim 150 meters in light clothing.

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  • metre Government constructed a borewell for the school some years ago which is situated just a few meters from the main school building.

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  • metre overall increase in exhibition space will be from 6,000 sq meters to almost 13,000.

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  • metre inner room and veranda area on the ground floor comprise a sq.are meter area of 13.8 sq. meters.

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  • metre other two went to Domenico Fioravanti in the 100 and 200 meters breaststroke.

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  • metre Robinson chipped over the last man and gathered his own kick but was help up over the line for a 5 meter scrum.

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  • metre circle is 23 meters in diameter with a leaning pillar at its center.

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  • With a view to this, it has become increasingly common of late years to publish not the voltages actually observed, but values deduced from them for the potential gradient in the open in volts per metre.

    0
    0
  • Above the level plain of absolutely smooth surface, devoid of houses or vegetation, the equipotential surfaces under normal conditions would be strictly horizontal, and if we could determine the potential at one metre above the ground we should have a definite measure of the potential gradient at the earth's surface.

    0
    0
  • Liideling (9) found for the mean value for 1904 in volts per metre 242.

    0
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  • At Such Times Gradients Of 400 Or 500 Volts Per Metre Are By No Means Unusual At Kew, And Voltages Of 700 Or Boo Are Occasionally Met With.

    0
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  • These mean values, ranges and amplitudes are all measured in volts per metre (in the open).

    0
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  • h is the height in metres, P the gradient in volts per metre.

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  • The formula makes the gradient diminish from 25 volts per metre at 1500 metres height to To volts per metre at 4000 metres.

    0
    0
  • The unit to which they are ordinarily referred is I electrostatic unit of electricity per cubic metre of air.

    0
    0
  • The radioactivity is denoted by A, and A = signifies that the potential of the dissipation apparatus fell I volt in an hour per metre of wire introduced.

    0
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  • The charge on the earth itself has its surface density given by v = - (I/47r) X125 volts per metre, =0.000331 in electrostatic units.

    0
    0
  • Gerdien (61), near the ground a mean value for d 2 V/dh 2 is -(I/io) volt/(metre) 2.

    0
    0
  • He supposes the field near the earth to be ioo volts per metre, or 1/300 electrostatic units.

    0
    0
  • The charge on an ion being 3.4 X 1010 Mache deduces for the ionic charge, I + or I_, per cubic metre 1800X3'4 X 10 -1 ° X Io 6, or o 6.

    0
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  • John Van Metre, an Indian trader, penetrated into the northern portion in 1725, and Morgan ap Morgan, a Welshman, built a cabin in the present Berkeley county in 1727.

    0
    0
  • Recent criticism has been far more impartial, and almost too much respect has been paid to his attainments, especially in the matter of metre, though Lydgate himself, with offensive lightheartedness, admits his poor craftsmanship.

    0
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  • The psalms rendered into metre were formerly the only vehicle of the Church's public praise, but hymns are now also used in most Presbyterian churches.'

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  • and the Transandine of one metre.

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  • Metre And Prosody.

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  • The altar itself is constructed in the form of a bird, because Soma was supposed to have been brought down from heaven by the metre Gayatri which had assumed the form of an eagle.

    0
    0
  • In his translation he discarded the native Saturnian metre, and adopted the iambic, trochaic and cretic metres, to which Latin more easily adapted itself than either to the hexameter or to the lyrical measures of a later time.

    0
    0
  • 6 in., but there is a large mileage of other gauges, especially metre.

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  • 8.7 in.), or 1 metre (3 ft.

    0
    0
  • 3.37 in.), or 75 metre (2 ft.

    0
    0
  • The line is of m metre gauge, with steel rails weighing 212 kilos (42 lb) per yard.

    0
    0
  • Duhm, in his epoch-making commentary, distinguishes on the grounds of metre and contents the four servantpassages, in the last of which (lii.

    0
    0
  • Gudrun is composed in stanzas similar to those of the Nibelungenlied, but with the essential difference that the last line of each stanza is identical with the others, and does not contain the extra accented syllable characteristic of the Nibelungen metre.

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  • ft., and the total area of all the storeys would form a causeway 1 metre in breadth and 95 m.

    0
    0
  • If it occurs uniformly over the sea to a depth of only one metre it leads to a production of about 6 tons of carbohydrate per sq.

    0
    0
  • A state railway on the metre gauge from Wadhwan to the town of Dhrangadra, a distance of 21 m., was opened for traffic in 1898.

    0
    0
  • From the observed motion of the node of Venus, as shown by the four transits of 1761, 1769, 1874 and 1882, is found Mass of (earth +moon) _Mass of sun 332600 In gravitational units of mass, based on the metre and second as units of length and time, Log.

    0
    0
  • A is the upper end of a glass tube, half a metre or so in length, which is clamped in a vertical position.

    0
    0
  • Debray (1827-1888) he worked at the platinum metals, his object being on the one hand to prepare them pure, and on the other to find a suitable metal for the standard metre for the International Metric Commission then sitting at Paris.

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    0
  • Mag., 1887) that the angular measurements present less difficulty than the comparison of the grating interval with the standard metre.

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  • His favourite metre was the pentasyllabic. Cyrillona composed a poem on the invasion of the Huns in 395, 9 and is by some regarded as identical with Ephraim's nephew Abhsamya, who in 403-404 " composed hymns and discourses on the invasion of the Roman empire by the Huns."

    0
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  • 8 It is in Ephraim's favourite metre, the heptasyllabic, and all the MSS.

    0
    0
  • Each play has an argument in metre by Sulpicius Apollinaris (2nd century of our era).

    0
    0
  • Hence 1000Æ is the elongation in millimetres per metre length per kilo.

    0
    0
  • The other feature, peculiar to the long poem (gasida, elegy), is that, whatever its real object, whatever its metre, it has a regular scheme in the arrangement of its material.

    0
    0
  • The extant writings of Paulinus consist of some fifty Epistolae, addressed to Sulpicius Severus, Delphinus, Augustine, Jerome and others; thirty-two Carmina in a great variety of metre, including a series of hexameter "natales," begun about 393 and continued annually in honour of the festival of St Felix, metrical epistles to Ausonius and Gestidius, and paraphrases of three psalms; and a Passio S.

    0
    0
  • Owing principally to differences in the length of the inch in various countries this method had great inconveniences, and now the unit is the refractive power of a lens whose focal length is one metre.

    0
    0
  • A lens of twice its strength has a refractive power of 2 D, and a focal length of half a metre, and so on.

    0
    0
  • The south-west line of the Madras railway runs through the district, and the South Indian railway (of metre gauge) joins this at Erode.

    0
    0
  • Tennyson was already writing copiously - "an epic of 6000 lines" at twelve, a drama in blank verse at fourteen, and so on: these exercises have, very properly, not been printed, but the poet said of them at the close of his life, "It seems to me, I wrote them all in perfect metre."

    0
    0
  • The metre, which by a curious naivete Tennyson long believed that he had invented, served by its happy peculiarity to bind the sections together, and even to give an illusion of connected movement to the thought.

    0
    0
  • But rhyme was not attempted, and the syllabic metre of Japan was preserved, the alternation of 5 and 7 being, however, dispensed with.

    0
    0
  • When this building of railways began in Japan, much discussion was taking place in England and India as to the relative advantages of the wide and narrow gauges, and so strongly did the arguments in favor of the latter appeal to the English advisers of the Japanese government that the metre gauge was chosen.

    0
    0
  • But it was rather in the chants and litanies of the ancient religion, such as those of the Salii and the Fratres Arvales, and the dirges for the dead (neniae), and in certain extemporaneous effusions, that some germs of a native poetry might have been detected; and finally in the use of Saturnian verse, a metre of pure native origin, which by its rapid and lively movement gave expression to the vivacity and quick apprehension of the Italian race.

    0
    0
  • This metre was employed in ritual hymns, which seem to have assumed definite shapes out of the exclamations of a primitive priesthood engaged in a rude ceremonial dance.

    0
    0
  • The metre was also employed in commemorative poems, accompanied with music, which were sung at funeral banquets in celebration of the exploits and virtues of distinguished men.

    0
    0
  • In the next century we have Velius Longus's treatise De Orthographia, and then a much more important work, the Noctes Atticae of Aulus Gellius, and (c. 200) a treatise in verse by Terentianus, an African, upon Latin pronunciation, prosody and metre.

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  • The old chant of the Salii, called axamenta, was written in the old Saturnian metre, in language so archaic that even the priests themselves could hardly understand it.

    0
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  • Underneath is the true floor of the cave, a mass of homogeneous yellow clay, one metre in thickness.

    0
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  • Seven-tenths of a cubic metre of animal bones were found: deer, bear, wolf, raccoon, opossum, beaver, buffalo, elk, turkey, woodchuck, tortoise and hog; all contemporary with man's occupancy.

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    0
  • They studied criticism, grammar, prosody and metre, antiquities and mythology.

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  • They are distinguished by artistic form, purity of expression and strict attention to the laws of metre and prosody, qualities which, however good in themselves, do not compensate for want of originality, freshness and power.

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  • He also put into elegiac metre, in 106 epigrams, some of Augustine's theological dicta.

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  • Reiske's linguistic knowledge was great, but he used it only to understand his authors; he had no feeling for form, for language as language, or for metre.

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  • The line is of metre gauge.

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  • He took part in revising the Dutch translation of the Old Testament in 1633, and after his death a book by him, called the Lyra Davidis, was published, which sought to explain the principles of Hebrew metre, and which created some controversy at the time, having been opposed by Louis Cappel.

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  • In 1856 he published a valuable essay on Calderon,with a translation of a portion of Life is a Dream in the original metre.

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  • with a probable error estimated at o Io metre.

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  • For iron n/p is of the order 10 11, so that the frequency for a rod 1 metre long is about 3000.

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  • A battery of 11-inch howitzers was Metre fist established only one mile away.

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  • The siege was now pressed with vigour by the construction of batteries at and around 203 Metre, by an infantry advance against the main western defences, and by renewed operations against the eastern forts.

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  • There are several quite distinct forms of metre, of which those most commonly used are the Klong, the Kap and the Klon.

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  • Of the little love songs in Klon metre, called Klon pet ton, there are many hundreds.

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  • A fourth poetical metre is Chan, which, however, is not so much used as the others.

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  • During the Revolution, he was one of the three members of the council established to introduce the decimal system, and he was also a member of the commission appointed to determine the length of the metre, for which purpose the calculations, &c., connected with the arc of the meridian from Barcelona to Dunkirk were revised.

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  • It is written with much feeling and elegance, and in a most harmonious metre.

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  • It was governed by three aediles: Horace's jest against the officious praetor (sic) is due to the exigencies of metre (Th.

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  • The metre is discussed first, each verse is scanned, and each word thoroughly and instructively examined.

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  • He announced the existence of hydrogen, among other elements, in the sun's atmosphere in 1862, and in 1868 published his great map of the normal solar spectrum which long remained authoritative in questions of wave-length, although his measurements were inexact to the extent of one part in 7000 or 8000 owing to the metre which he used as his standard having been slightly too short.

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  • The two standards, the cubic inch and the cubic decimetre, may not be strictly comparable owing to a difference in the normal temperature (Centigrade and Fahrenheit scales) of the two units of extension, the metre and the yard.

    0
    0
  • That is to say, the metre might be redetermined or restored as to its length within one ten-millionth part, by reference to, e.g., 1553163.5 wave-lengths of the red ray of the spectrum of cadmium, in air at 15° C. and 760 mm.

    0
    0
  • See: Valeur du Metre, A.

    0
    0
  • For the metre of the form shown in fig.

    0
    0
  • on the metre.

    0
    0
  • have adopted as a normal thermometric scale the Centigrade scale of the hydrogen thermometer, having for fixed points the temperature of pure melting ice (0°C) and that of the vapour of boiling distilled water (100°C), under a normal atmospheric pressure; hydrogen being taken under an initial manometric pressure of 1 metre, that is to say, at 1000/750 = 1.3158 times the normal atmospheric pressure.

    0
    0
  • The length of the metre is independent of the thermometer so far that it has its length at a definite physical point, the temperature of melting ice (0° C.), but there is the practical difficulty that for ordinary purposes measurements cannot be always carried out at 0° C.

    0
    0
  • The International Geodetic Committee have adopted the metre as their unit of measurement.

    0
    0
  • foot, and repressed by statutes both against its yard and mile, we should need but a small change to place our measures in accord with the metre.

    0
    0
  • -- Decametre or 10 metres; double metre; metre or 1000 millimetres; decimetre or 0.1 metre; centimetre or 0.001 metre; millimetre.

    0
    0
  • Bentley calls Prudentius " the Horace and Virgil of the Christians," but his diction is stilted and his metre often faulty.

    0
    0
  • On the continent of Europe osiers or willows are bunched in sizes of one metre in girth at the butts and (except in Belgium) are also sold by weight.

    0
    0
  • His reputation does not seem justified; his works, as Plutarch says (De audiendis poetis, 16), have nothing poetical about them except the metre, and the style is bombastic and obscure; but they contain some interesting information as to ancient belief on the subjects treated.

    0
    0
  • He substitutes an order of words which, in respect of syntax, metre or rhythm is more familiar to him.

    0
    0
  • The most frequent motive is the removal of some difficulty in the sense, expression or metre of the text, and especially obvious gaps or corruptions which the interpolator endeavours to fill or to heal.

    0
    0
  • It is no answer to the objection that a reading in some Roman poet makes nonsense to say that its Latinity is perfect or its metre excellent.

    0
    0
  • Amongst the legitimate reasons for suspecting the correctness of a text are patent contradictions in a passage or its immediate neighbourhood, proved and inexplicable deviations from the standards for forms, constructions and usages (mere rarity or singularity is not enough), weak and purposeless repetitions of a word (if there is no reason for attributing these to the writer), violations of the laws of metre and rhythm as observed by the author, obvious breaks in the thought (incoherence) or disorderly sequence in the same (double or multiple incoherence).

    0
    0
  • The permanent committee of the Paris International Congress of 1900, which was held for the purpose of unification of the numerotage of counts, unanimously decided - (a) With reference to cotton, silk and other textiles spun from fibres, that they should be based on a fixed weight and variable length, the unit being one metre to one gramme.

    0
    0
  • Perot and C. Fabry, employing their interferometer methods, have compared the wave-length of the red cadmium line with the standard metre in Paris and found it to be equal to 6438.4696 A, the observations being taken in dry air at 18° C and at a pressure of 76 cms. (g = 980.665).

    0
    0
  • or 192.27 metres - an important result, as it determines the Olympian foot to be 0.3204 metre or a little more than an English foot (I.

    0
    0
  • In the Heraeum at Olympia, it may be remarked, the unit adopted was not this Olympian foot, but an older one of 0.297 metre, and in the temple of Zeus an Attic foot of 1.08 English foot was used.

    0
    0
  • Small German periscopes were usually 1 metre or 2 a metre in length and had two eyepieces giving magnifications 10 and 15 diameters.

    0
    0
  • He wrote a number of short love-poems in epic metre, called Daphniaca.

    0
    0
  • In fact, one quarter of the whole kingdom, consisting of the provinces of North and South Holland, the western portion of Utrecht as far as the Vaart Rhine, Zeeland, except the southern part of ZeelandFlanders, and the north-west part of North Brabant, lies below the Amsterdam zero; and altogether 38% of the country, or all that part lying west of a line drawn through Groningen, Utrecht and Antwerp, lies within one metre above the Amsterdam zero and would be submerged if the sea broke down the barrier of dunes and dikes.

    0
    0
  • The power of the pumping-engines is taken on the basis of 12 h.p. per moo hectares for every metre that the water has to be raised, or stated in another form, the engines must be capable of raising nearly 9 lb of water through I yd.

    0
    0
  • The first of these consists of about 4000 lines, written in the so-called "political" metre, and was discovered in the latter part of the 19th century, in a 16th-century MS., at Trebizond; the other three MSS.

    0
    0
  • Metre had been already used by Dunash.

    0
    0
  • For the principal of these Angot (1) gives the following wave-lengths (unit i µµ or 1 X ro 9 metre) :-630, 578, 566, 535, 5 2 3, 500.

    0
    0
  • Accordingly the sacred book has not even the artistic form of poetry; which, among the Arabs, includes a stringent metre, as well as rhyme.

    0
    0
  • They are written in the Doric dialect, with epic licences; the metre is dactylico-trochaic. Brief as they are, they show us what Longinus meant by calling Stesichorus "most like Homer"; they are full of epic grandeur, and have a stately sublimity that reminds us of Pindar.

    0
    0
  • Ennius prided himself especially on being the first to form the strong speech of Latium into the mould of the Homeric hexameter in place of the old Saturnian metre.

    0
    0
  • Clarke, then inspector-general of fortifications, Itrongly urged this plan, and proposed to begin at once a metre gauge railway from Suakin, to be constructed by Indian labor ander officers skilled in laying desert lines.

    0
    0
  • They had been plundered and were destroyed to within a metre of the ground, but still contained some pottery and stone vases, bronze blades, seals, and ivory fragments.

    0
    0
  • And the collector has not thought it necessary to choose stanzas written in the same metre, or in the same number of lines.

    0
    0
  • It is of metre gauge, was begun in 1887 and is some 300 m.

    0
    0
  • The Flow Tube Was About 1 Metre Long And I Millim.

    0
    0
  • 173 sqq., he considers the element of rhythm or metre in prose, and in the Orator (174-226) he returns to the subject and discusses it at length.

    0
    0
  • The style of Diphilus was simple and natural, and his language on the whole good Attic; he paid great attention to versification, and was supposed to have invented a peculiar kind of metre.

    0
    0
  • Garnett (6th ed., 1900), a literal rendering in a metre imitating that of the original; J.

    0
    0
  • Morris (1895) in imitative metre, and almost unintelligibly archaistic in diction; and C. B.

    0
    0
  • In the vocabulary the most striking difference is that many words appear from the metre to have contained a sound which they afterwards lost, viz.

    0
    0
  • It is characteristic of early literature that the evolution of the thought - that is, the grammatical form of the sentence - is guided by the structure of the verse; and the correspondence which consequently obtains between the rhythm and the grammar - the thought being given out in lengths, as it were, and these again divided by tolerably uniform pauses - produces a swift flowing movement, such as is rarely found when the periods have been constructed without direct reference to the metre.

    0
    0
  • Even the metre - the hexameter verse - may be assigned to them.

    0
    0
  • and iv.; on metre, &c., Hartel's Homerische Studien (i.-iii., Vienna); Knos, De digammo Homerico quaestiones (Upsala, 1872-1873-1878); Thumb, Zur Geschichte des griech.

    0
    0
  • 235-851) on the fall of the angels and the temptation of our first parents, which differs markedly in style and metre from the rest.

    0
    0
  • With the exception of his commentaries on scripture, nearly all his extant Syriac works are composed in metre.

    0
    0
  • is of the simplest, consisting only in the arrangement of the discourse in lines of uniform length - usually heptasyllabic (Ephraim's favourite metre) or pentasyllabic. A more complicated arrangement is found in other poems, such as the Carmina Nisibena: these are made up of strophes, each consisting of lines of different lengths according to a settled scheme, with a recurring refrain.

    0
    0
  • External features and poetical structure.-These poems exhibit a peculiar metre, the so-called " limping verse," of which Am.

    0
    0
  • This metre came in time to be distinctive of elegy.

    0
    0
  • Some anomalies, both of metre and of sense, may be removed by judicious emendation; and many lines become smooth enough, if we assume a crasis of open vowels of the same class, or a diphthongal pronunciation of others, or contraction or silence of certain suffixes as in Syriac. The oldest elegiac utterances are not couched in this metre; e.g.

    0
    0
  • " this Hebrew metre may be recognized in the Babylonian epic of Gilgamesh, written at least a thousand years earlier:- Ea-bdini ibri kutdni I Nimru sha Geri, " Eabani, my friend, my little brother !

    0
    0
  • There is something arresting in that bold " I am the Man "; and the lyrical intensity, the religious depth and beauty of the whole, may well blind us to occasional ruggedness of metre and language, abrupt transitions from figure to figure and other alleged blemishes, some of which may not have seemed such to the poet's contemporaries (e.g.

    0
    0
  • This is a bombastic and vainglorious epic in honour of Charles XI., whom Eurelius adored; it is not, however, without great merits, richness of language, flowing metre, and the breadth of a genuine poetic enthusiasm.

    0
    0
  • metre and rhyme; others mention as author of the first Persian poem a certain Abulhaf~ of Soghd, near Samarl~and.

    0
    0
  • ghazal or ode (a love-ditty, wine-song or religious hymn), the rubai or quatrain (our epigram, for which the Persians invented a new metre in addition to those adopted from the Arabs), and the mathnawi or double-rhymed poem (the legitimate form for epic and didactic poetry).

    0
    0
  • Of this description are the Anbiyanama, or history of the pre-Mahommedan prophets, by IIasanI Shabistarl Ayani (before the 8th century of the Hegira); Ibn 1-Iusams Khawartzama (1427; 830 A.11.), of the deeds of All; Badhils ~Iamla-i-Jjaidari, which was completed by Najaf (1723; 1135 A.H.), or the life of Mahommed and the first four caliphs; Ka~ims Fara~~inama-i-Fa4ima, the book of joy of Fatima, Mahomets daughter (1737; 1150 A.H.)all four in the epic metre of the Shahnama; and the prose stories of ~Iatim Tai, the famous model of liberality and generosity in preIslamitic times; of Am-Zr ~Iamzah, the uncle of Mahomet; and of the Mu~jizat-i-Ms?sa~wi, or the miraculous deeds of Moses, by MuIn-almiskin (died about 1501; 907 A.I-L).

    0
    0
  • 3, at a level higher by about a metre, and the area of its cella alone contains the whole of the earlier shrines.

    0
    0
  • He does not possess the fiery pulse and humaneness of Burns, but the exquisite perfection of his metre and the subtle alliance of his thought and expression must always secure for him the warmest admiration of true lovers of poetic art.

    0
    0
  • At the same time he gave fresh life to the national redondilha metre (medida velha) by his Cartas or Satiras which with his Eclogues, some in Portuguese, others in Castilian, are his most successful compositions.

    0
    0
  • These dates are given in the following memorial distich with a frank indifference to quantity and metre "Vult Crux, Lucia, Cinis, Charismata dia Quod det vota pia quarta sequens feria."

    0
    0
  • He was the author of a Latin poem, De Reditu Suo, in elegiac metre, describing a coast voyage from Rome to Gaul in A.D.

    0
    0
  • His eclogues and epistles and the epic of Africa, on which he set such store, exhibit a comparatively limited command of Latin metre.

    0
    0
  • in.), that is to say, about an eleventh part of a square metre.

    0
    0
  • Language and Metre.

    0
    0
  • The metre used by Theocritus in the Bucolics and Mimes, as well as in the Epics, is the dactylic hexameter.

    0
    0
  • (v.) Metre.

    0
    0
  • According to Duhm there are many passages in which metre (see also Amos) may also be a factor in our critical conclusions.

    0
    0
  • Jeremiah, he thinks, always uses the same metre.

    0
    0
  • Giesebrecht, on the other hand, maintains that there are passages which are certainly Jeremiah's, but which are not in what Duhm calls Jeremiah's metre; Giesebrecht also, himself rather conservative, considers Duhm remarkably free with his emendations.

    0
    0
  • Though written in a metre deemed foreign to English ears, the poem immediately attained a wide popularity, which it has never lost, and secured to the dactylic hexameter a recognized place among English metres.

    0
    0
  • In 1854 hejresigned his professorship. In the following year he gave to the world the Indian Edda, The Song of Hiawatha, a conscious imitation, both in subject and metre, of the Finnish epic, the Kalevala, with which he had become acquainted during his second visit to Europe.

    0
    0
  • The metre is monotonous and easily ridiculed, but it suits the subject, and the poem is very popular.

    0
    0
  • The stout columnar stem may reach a height of 20 metres, and a diameter of half a metre; it remains either unbranched or divides near the summit into several short 4'`.C.

    0
    0
  • 1 the earth is therefore receiving energy at the rate of 1.47 kilowatts per square metre, or 1.70 horse-power per square yard.

    0
    0
  • The corresponding intensity at the sun's surface is 4.62 X Io 4 as great, or 6.79 X Io 4 kilowatts per square metre = 7.88 X Io 4 horse-power per square yard - enough to melt a thickness of 13.3 metres (=39.6 ft.) of ice, or to vaporize 1.81 metres (=5.92 ft.) of water per minute.

    0
    0
  • To the classical scholar the metre alone is of interest.

    0
    0
  • The Delphian poetess Boeo attributed to him the introducion of the cult of Apollo and the invention of the epic metre.

    0
    0
  • The metre and the kilometre, for instance, or the metre and the millimetre, are not directly comparable; but the metre can be conceived as containing too centimetres.

    0
    0
  • The principal units of length, weight and volume are the metre, gramme (or gram) and litre.

    0
    0
  • Thus kilogramme means 1000 grammes, and centimetre means 1 1, o of a metre.

    0
    0
  • The metre and the gramme are defined by standard measures preserved at Paris.

    0
    0
  • In the same year Les Chansons des rues et des bois gave evidence of new power and fresh variety in the exercise and display of an unequalled skill and a subtle simplicity of metre and of style employed on the everlasting theme of lyric and idyllic fancy, and touched now and then with a fire more sublime than that of youth and love.

    0
    0
  • The latter has an average calorific power of 1732 calories per cubic metre, or 161 B.T.U.

    0
    0
  • metre water-gas and 3.13 Siemens gas.

    0
    0
  • At Stockholm the rate of elevation is approximately 0.47 metre (=1.54 ft.) in a century.

    0
    0
  • METRE (/.L€Tpudl, sc. TEXvfl, from Gr.

    0
    0
  • For the restricted use of "metre" as a unit of measurement, see Metric System below.

    0
    0
  • In form all these poems belong to two or three classes: - kvioa, an epic " cantilena "; tal, a genealogical poem; drapa, songs of praise, &c., written in modifications of the old Teutonic metre which we know in Beowulf; galdr and lokkr, spell and charm songs in a more lyric measure; and mal, a dialogue poem, and liod, a lay, in elegiac measure suited to the subject.

    0
    0
  • Sigurd II., Fafnis's Lay, Sigrdrifa's Lay) and Hamdismal, all continental, and all entirely consonant to the remains of Old English poetry in metre, feeling and treatment, one can see that it is with this school that the Icelandic " makers " are in sympathy, and that from it their verse naturally descends.

    0
    0
  • The last part, Hattatal, a treatise on metre, was written for Earl Skuli about 1222, in imitation of Earl Rognvald and Hall's Hattalykill (Clavis metrica) of 1150.

    0
    0
  • 1 "Political" verse or metre is the name given to a kind of verse found as early as the 6th century in proverbs, and characteristic of Byzantine and modern Greek poetry.

    0
    0
  • that system of weights and measures of which the metre is the fundamental unit.

    0
    0
  • The theory of the system is that the metre is a 1000-1000Y Part of a quandrant of the earth through Paris; the litre or unit of volume is a cube ofmetre side; the gramme or unit of weight is (nominally) 10 water at 4° C. The idea of adopting scientific measurements had been suggested as early as the 17th century, particularly by the astronomer Jean Picard (1620-1682), who proposed to take as a unit the length of a pendulum beating one second at sealevel, at a latitude of 45°.

    0
    0
  • Another commission was also appointed to draw up a system of weights and measures based on the length of the metre and to fix the nomenclature, which on the report of the commission was established in 1795.

    0
    0
  • It was not until 1799 that the report on the length of the metre was made.

    0
    0
  • This was followed by the law of the 10th of December 1799 fixing definitely the value of the metre and of the kilogramme, or weight of a litre of water, and the new system became compulsory in 180r.

    0
    0
  • The object of the Bureau is to make and provide prototypes of the metre and kilogramme, for the various subscribing countries.

    0
    0
  • In northern Angola the railway (metre gauge) from Loanda was carried to Malanje (375 m.) and was bought in July 1918 by the Portuguese Government.

    0
    0
  • This remarkable poem, written in the metre of the old Servian ballads, gives a vivid description of life in Bosnia under Turkish rule, and of the hereditary border feuds between Christians and Moslems. In later life Mazuranic distinguished himself as a statesman, and became ban of Croatia from 1873 to 1880.

    0
    0
  • True coal has also been obtained in the same district, the deposits varying from a third to half a metre in thickness.

    0
    0
  • Saturnian Metre >>

    0
    0
  • It is written in pure Baiswari or Eastern Hindi, in stanzas called chaupais, broken by dohas or couplets, with an occasional soratha and chhand - the latter a hurrying metre of many rhymes and alliterations.

    0
    0
  • The leaves as a rule far exceeded in size those of any of the Coniferae, attaining in some species a length of a metre.

    0
    0
  • The poem was first written down by a wandering minstrel about 971 to 991, was remodelled about 1140 by Konrad,' who introduced interpolations in the spirit of chivalry and was perhaps responsible for the metre; during the wars and miseries of the next fifty years manners and taste became barbarized and the fine traditions of the old popular poetry were obscured, and it was under this influence that, about 1190, a jongleur (Spielmann) revised the poem, this recension being represented by group B.

    0
    0
  • and the Transandine of one metre.

    0
    1
  • 6 in., but there is a large mileage of other gauges, especially metre.

    0
    1
  • Mag., 1887) that the angular measurements present less difficulty than the comparison of the grating interval with the standard metre.

    0
    1
  • Owing principally to differences in the length of the inch in various countries this method had great inconveniences, and now the unit is the refractive power of a lens whose focal length is one metre.

    0
    1
  • Tennyson was already writing copiously - "an epic of 6000 lines" at twelve, a drama in blank verse at fourteen, and so on: these exercises have, very properly, not been printed, but the poet said of them at the close of his life, "It seems to me, I wrote them all in perfect metre."

    0
    1
  • In the next century we have Velius Longus's treatise De Orthographia, and then a much more important work, the Noctes Atticae of Aulus Gellius, and (c. 200) a treatise in verse by Terentianus, an African, upon Latin pronunciation, prosody and metre.

    0
    1
  • Reiske's linguistic knowledge was great, but he used it only to understand his authors; he had no feeling for form, for language as language, or for metre.

    0
    1
  • In 1856 he published a valuable essay on Calderon,with a translation of a portion of Life is a Dream in the original metre.

    0
    1
  • with a probable error estimated at o Io metre.

    0
    1
  • A battery of 11-inch howitzers was Metre fist established only one mile away.

    0
    1
  • The siege was now pressed with vigour by the construction of batteries at and around 203 Metre, by an infantry advance against the main western defences, and by renewed operations against the eastern forts.

    0
    1
  • There are several quite distinct forms of metre, of which those most commonly used are the Klong, the Kap and the Klon.

    0
    1
  • Of the little love songs in Klon metre, called Klon pet ton, there are many hundreds.

    0
    1
  • A fourth poetical metre is Chan, which, however, is not so much used as the others.

    0
    1
  • The metre is discussed first, each verse is scanned, and each word thoroughly and instructively examined.

    0
    1
  • He announced the existence of hydrogen, among other elements, in the sun's atmosphere in 1862, and in 1868 published his great map of the normal solar spectrum which long remained authoritative in questions of wave-length, although his measurements were inexact to the extent of one part in 7000 or 8000 owing to the metre which he used as his standard having been slightly too short.

    0
    1
  • The two standards, the cubic inch and the cubic decimetre, may not be strictly comparable owing to a difference in the normal temperature (Centigrade and Fahrenheit scales) of the two units of extension, the metre and the yard.

    0
    1
  • That is to say, the metre might be redetermined or restored as to its length within one ten-millionth part, by reference to, e.g., 1553163.5 wave-lengths of the red ray of the spectrum of cadmium, in air at 15° C. and 760 mm.

    0
    1
  • See: Valeur du Metre, A.

    0
    1
  • For the metre of the form shown in fig.

    0
    1
  • on the metre.

    0
    1
  • The length of the metre is independent of the thermometer so far that it has its length at a definite physical point, the temperature of melting ice (0° C.), but there is the practical difficulty that for ordinary purposes measurements cannot be always carried out at 0° C.

    0
    1
  • The International Geodetic Committee have adopted the metre as their unit of measurement.

    0
    1
  • foot, and repressed by statutes both against its yard and mile, we should need but a small change to place our measures in accord with the metre.

    0
    1
  • -- Decametre or 10 metres; double metre; metre or 1000 millimetres; decimetre or 0.1 metre; centimetre or 0.001 metre; millimetre.

    0
    1
  • His reputation does not seem justified; his works, as Plutarch says (De audiendis poetis, 16), have nothing poetical about them except the metre, and the style is bombastic and obscure; but they contain some interesting information as to ancient belief on the subjects treated.

    0
    1
  • He substitutes an order of words which, in respect of syntax, metre or rhythm is more familiar to him.

    0
    1
  • The most frequent motive is the removal of some difficulty in the sense, expression or metre of the text, and especially obvious gaps or corruptions which the interpolator endeavours to fill or to heal.

    0
    1
  • It is no answer to the objection that a reading in some Roman poet makes nonsense to say that its Latinity is perfect or its metre excellent.

    0
    1
  • Amongst the legitimate reasons for suspecting the correctness of a text are patent contradictions in a passage or its immediate neighbourhood, proved and inexplicable deviations from the standards for forms, constructions and usages (mere rarity or singularity is not enough), weak and purposeless repetitions of a word (if there is no reason for attributing these to the writer), violations of the laws of metre and rhythm as observed by the author, obvious breaks in the thought (incoherence) or disorderly sequence in the same (double or multiple incoherence).

    0
    1
  • The permanent committee of the Paris International Congress of 1900, which was held for the purpose of unification of the numerotage of counts, unanimously decided - (a) With reference to cotton, silk and other textiles spun from fibres, that they should be based on a fixed weight and variable length, the unit being one metre to one gramme.

    0
    1
  • Perot and C. Fabry, employing their interferometer methods, have compared the wave-length of the red cadmium line with the standard metre in Paris and found it to be equal to 6438.4696 A, the observations being taken in dry air at 18° C and at a pressure of 76 cms. (g = 980.665).

    0
    1
  • or 192.27 metres - an important result, as it determines the Olympian foot to be 0.3204 metre or a little more than an English foot (I.

    0
    1
  • In the Heraeum at Olympia, it may be remarked, the unit adopted was not this Olympian foot, but an older one of 0.297 metre, and in the temple of Zeus an Attic foot of 1.08 English foot was used.

    0
    1
  • Small German periscopes were usually 1 metre or 2 a metre in length and had two eyepieces giving magnifications 10 and 15 diameters.

    0
    1
  • He wrote a number of short love-poems in epic metre, called Daphniaca.

    0
    1
  • In fact, one quarter of the whole kingdom, consisting of the provinces of North and South Holland, the western portion of Utrecht as far as the Vaart Rhine, Zeeland, except the southern part of ZeelandFlanders, and the north-west part of North Brabant, lies below the Amsterdam zero; and altogether 38% of the country, or all that part lying west of a line drawn through Groningen, Utrecht and Antwerp, lies within one metre above the Amsterdam zero and would be submerged if the sea broke down the barrier of dunes and dikes.

    0
    1
  • The power of the pumping-engines is taken on the basis of 12 h.p. per moo hectares for every metre that the water has to be raised, or stated in another form, the engines must be capable of raising nearly 9 lb of water through I yd.

    0
    1
  • The first of these consists of about 4000 lines, written in the so-called "political" metre, and was discovered in the latter part of the 19th century, in a 16th-century MS., at Trebizond; the other three MSS.

    0
    1
  • Metre had been already used by Dunash.

    0
    1
  • For the principal of these Angot (1) gives the following wave-lengths (unit i µµ or 1 X ro 9 metre) :-630, 578, 566, 535, 5 2 3, 500.

    0
    1
  • Accordingly the sacred book has not even the artistic form of poetry; which, among the Arabs, includes a stringent metre, as well as rhyme.

    0
    1
  • They are written in the Doric dialect, with epic licences; the metre is dactylico-trochaic. Brief as they are, they show us what Longinus meant by calling Stesichorus "most like Homer"; they are full of epic grandeur, and have a stately sublimity that reminds us of Pindar.

    0
    1
  • Ennius prided himself especially on being the first to form the strong speech of Latium into the mould of the Homeric hexameter in place of the old Saturnian metre.

    0
    1
  • They had been plundered and were destroyed to within a metre of the ground, but still contained some pottery and stone vases, bronze blades, seals, and ivory fragments.

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  • And the collector has not thought it necessary to choose stanzas written in the same metre, or in the same number of lines.

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  • It is of metre gauge, was begun in 1887 and is some 300 m.

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  • The Flow Tube Was About 1 Metre Long And I Millim.

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  • 173 sqq., he considers the element of rhythm or metre in prose, and in the Orator (174-226) he returns to the subject and discusses it at length.

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  • The style of Diphilus was simple and natural, and his language on the whole good Attic; he paid great attention to versification, and was supposed to have invented a peculiar kind of metre.

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  • Garnett (6th ed., 1900), a literal rendering in a metre imitating that of the original; J.

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  • Morris (1895) in imitative metre, and almost unintelligibly archaistic in diction; and C. B.

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  • In the vocabulary the most striking difference is that many words appear from the metre to have contained a sound which they afterwards lost, viz.

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  • It is characteristic of early literature that the evolution of the thought - that is, the grammatical form of the sentence - is guided by the structure of the verse; and the correspondence which consequently obtains between the rhythm and the grammar - the thought being given out in lengths, as it were, and these again divided by tolerably uniform pauses - produces a swift flowing movement, such as is rarely found when the periods have been constructed without direct reference to the metre.

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  • Even the metre - the hexameter verse - may be assigned to them.

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  • 235-851) on the fall of the angels and the temptation of our first parents, which differs markedly in style and metre from the rest.

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  • With the exception of his commentaries on scripture, nearly all his extant Syriac works are composed in metre.

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  • is of the simplest, consisting only in the arrangement of the discourse in lines of uniform length - usually heptasyllabic (Ephraim's favourite metre) or pentasyllabic. A more complicated arrangement is found in other poems, such as the Carmina Nisibena: these are made up of strophes, each consisting of lines of different lengths according to a settled scheme, with a recurring refrain.

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  • External features and poetical structure.-These poems exhibit a peculiar metre, the so-called " limping verse," of which Am.

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  • This metre came in time to be distinctive of elegy.

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  • Some anomalies, both of metre and of sense, may be removed by judicious emendation; and many lines become smooth enough, if we assume a crasis of open vowels of the same class, or a diphthongal pronunciation of others, or contraction or silence of certain suffixes as in Syriac. The oldest elegiac utterances are not couched in this metre; e.g.

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  • " this Hebrew metre may be recognized in the Babylonian epic of Gilgamesh, written at least a thousand years earlier:- Ea-bdini ibri kutdni I Nimru sha Geri, " Eabani, my friend, my little brother !

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  • metre and rhyme; others mention as author of the first Persian poem a certain Abulhaf~ of Soghd, near Samarl~and.

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  • ghazal or ode (a love-ditty, wine-song or religious hymn), the rubai or quatrain (our epigram, for which the Persians invented a new metre in addition to those adopted from the Arabs), and the mathnawi or double-rhymed poem (the legitimate form for epic and didactic poetry).

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  • Of this description are the Anbiyanama, or history of the pre-Mahommedan prophets, by IIasanI Shabistarl Ayani (before the 8th century of the Hegira); Ibn 1-Iusams Khawartzama (1427; 830 A.11.), of the deeds of All; Badhils ~Iamla-i-Jjaidari, which was completed by Najaf (1723; 1135 A.H.), or the life of Mahommed and the first four caliphs; Ka~ims Fara~~inama-i-Fa4ima, the book of joy of Fatima, Mahomets daughter (1737; 1150 A.H.)all four in the epic metre of the Shahnama; and the prose stories of ~Iatim Tai, the famous model of liberality and generosity in preIslamitic times; of Am-Zr ~Iamzah, the uncle of Mahomet; and of the Mu~jizat-i-Ms?sa~wi, or the miraculous deeds of Moses, by MuIn-almiskin (died about 1501; 907 A.I-L).

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  • 3, at a level higher by about a metre, and the area of its cella alone contains the whole of the earlier shrines.

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  • He does not possess the fiery pulse and humaneness of Burns, but the exquisite perfection of his metre and the subtle alliance of his thought and expression must always secure for him the warmest admiration of true lovers of poetic art.

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  • At the same time he gave fresh life to the national redondilha metre (medida velha) by his Cartas or Satiras which with his Eclogues, some in Portuguese, others in Castilian, are his most successful compositions.

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  • These dates are given in the following memorial distich with a frank indifference to quantity and metre "Vult Crux, Lucia, Cinis, Charismata dia Quod det vota pia quarta sequens feria."

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  • He was the author of a Latin poem, De Reditu Suo, in elegiac metre, describing a coast voyage from Rome to Gaul in A.D.

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  • His eclogues and epistles and the epic of Africa, on which he set such store, exhibit a comparatively limited command of Latin metre.

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  • in.), that is to say, about an eleventh part of a square metre.

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  • Language and Metre.

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  • The metre used by Theocritus in the Bucolics and Mimes, as well as in the Epics, is the dactylic hexameter.

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  • (v.) Metre.

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  • According to Duhm there are many passages in which metre (see also Amos) may also be a factor in our critical conclusions.

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  • Jeremiah, he thinks, always uses the same metre.

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  • Giesebrecht, on the other hand, maintains that there are passages which are certainly Jeremiah's, but which are not in what Duhm calls Jeremiah's metre; Giesebrecht also, himself rather conservative, considers Duhm remarkably free with his emendations.

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  • Though written in a metre deemed foreign to English ears, the poem immediately attained a wide popularity, which it has never lost, and secured to the dactylic hexameter a recognized place among English metres.

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  • In 1854 hejresigned his professorship. In the following year he gave to the world the Indian Edda, The Song of Hiawatha, a conscious imitation, both in subject and metre, of the Finnish epic, the Kalevala, with which he had become acquainted during his second visit to Europe.

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  • The metre is monotonous and easily ridiculed, but it suits the subject, and the poem is very popular.

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  • Hebrew religious poetry was revived for synagogue hymnology, and, partly in imitation of Arabian models, a secular Hebrew poetry was developed in metre and rhyme.

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  • ft., and the total area of all the storeys would form a causeway 1 metre in breadth and 95 m.

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  • A state railway on the metre gauge from Wadhwan to the town of Dhrangadra, a distance of 21 m., was opened for traffic in 1898.

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  • Debray (1827-1888) he worked at the platinum metals, his object being on the one hand to prepare them pure, and on the other to find a suitable metal for the standard metre for the International Metric Commission then sitting at Paris.

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  • His favourite metre was the pentasyllabic. Cyrillona composed a poem on the invasion of the Huns in 395, 9 and is by some regarded as identical with Ephraim's nephew Abhsamya, who in 403-404 " composed hymns and discourses on the invasion of the Roman empire by the Huns."

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  • 8 It is in Ephraim's favourite metre, the heptasyllabic, and all the MSS.

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  • Hebrew religious poetry was revived for synagogue hymnology, and, partly in imitation of Arabian models, a secular Hebrew poetry was developed in metre and rhyme.

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    2
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