Methodist sentence examples

methodist
  • UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, or United Methodists, and English Nonconformist community formed in 1907 by the union of the Methodist New Connexion (1797), the Bible Christians (1815), and the United Methodist Free Churches (18J7).

    4
    0
  • Wesley and his helpers, finding the Anglican churches closed against them, took to preaching in the open air; and this method is still followed, more or less, in the aggressive evangelistic work of all the Methodist Churches.

    4
    3
  • In 1822 a Methodist missionary had arrived in the island, and others followed.

    4
    4
  • In October 1768, a Methodist chapel was opened in New York.

    3
    0
  • The settlement here, gathering about the Methodist mission and school, began to grow in the decade 1840-1850.

    3
    0
  • Georgetown is the seat of the Southwestern University (Methodist Episcopal, South, co-educational), formed in 1873 (chartered 1875) by the combination of Ruterville College (Methodist Episcopal, at Ruterville, Texas, chartered in 1840, and closed in 1850), McKenzie College (at Clarksville, Texas, founded in 1841 and closed in 1872), Wesleyan College at San Augustine (chartered in 1844, burned a few years later, and not rebuilt), and Soule University at Chapel Hill (chartered in 1856, but closed in 1870).

    3
    0
  • Kendall, The Origin and History of the Primitive Methodist Church (2 vols., 1906); and What hath God Wrought ?

    3
    1
  • It is the seat of Blinn Memorial College (German Methodist Episcopal), opened as "Mission Institute" in 1883, and renamed in 1889 in honour of the Rev. Christian Blinn, of New York, a liberal benefactor; of Brenham Evangelical Lutheran College, and of a German-American institute (1898).

    3
    1
  • west of the city is the North Alabama Conference College (Methodist Episcopal South), opened in 1897.

    3
    2
  • There were, however, some ardent spirits who continued to work along the old lines and whose watchword was revivalism, and out of their efforts came the Bible Christian, the Independent Methodist and the Primitive Methodist denominations.

    2
    0
  • He joined a Methodist class, threw his house open for love-feasts and prayer-meetings, and did a great deal of itinerant evangelization among the cottages of the countryside.

    2
    0
  • Lorenzo Dow (1777-1834), an eccentric American Methodist revivalist, visited North Staffordshire and spoke of the campmeetings held in America, with the result that on the 31st of May 1807 the first real English gathering of the kind was held on Mow Cop, since regarded as the Mecca of Primitive Methodism.

    2
    0
  • ALEXANDER KILHAM (1762-1798), English Methodist, was born at Epworth, Lincolnshire, on the Toth of July 1762.

    2
    0
  • For this he was arraigned before the Conference of 1796 and expelled, and he then founded the Methodist New Connexion (1798, merged since 1906 in the United Methodist Church).

    2
    0
  • The foundation of his future work as the father of Methodist hymnody was laid in Georgia.

    2
    0
  • The autobiographies of these early Methodist preachers are among the classics of the Evangelical Revival.

    2
    0
  • is Trevecca, where Howel Harris, one of the founders of Welsh Methodism, was born in 1713, and where in 1752 he established a communistic religious "family" of about a hundred persons; their representatives in 1842 handed over the property to the Welsh Calvinistic Methodist connexion, who in that year opened there a theological college, and in 1874 added to it a Harris memorial chapel.

    2
    0
  • Other higher educational institutions in Minnesota are Hamline University (Methodist Episcopal), with a college of liberal arts at St Paul, and a college of medicine at Minneapolis; Macalester College (Presbyterian) at St Paul; Augsburg Seminary (Lutheran) at Minneapolis; Carleton College (non-sectarian, founded in 1866) and St Olaf College (Lutheran, founded in 1874) at Northfield; Gustavus Adolphus College (Lutheran) at St Peter; Parker College (Free Baptist, 1888) at Winnebago City; St John's University (Roman Catholic) at Collegeville, Stearns county; and Albert Lea College for women (Presbyterian, founded 1884) at Albert Lea.

    2
    0
  • A "methodist" is one who follows a "method," the term being applied not only to the Wesleyan body, but earlier to the Amyraldists, and in the 17th century to certain Roman Catholic apologists.

    2
    1
  • The extent to which the employment of the local preacher is characteristic of Methodism may be seen from the fact that in the United Kingdom while there are only about 5000 Methodist ministers, there are more than 18,000 congregations; some 13,000 congregations, chiefly in the villages, are dependent on local preachers.

    2
    1
  • They are: Methodist New Connexion (founded 1797-1798); Bible Christians (1815); United Methodist Free Churches 2 (about 1836); Primitive Methodists (founded 1807-1810); Independent Methodist Churches (about 1 806); Wesleyan Reform Union (1850, reorganized 1859).

    2
    1
  • Stetson University at De Land (Baptist); Rollins College (1885) at Winter Park (non-sectarian), with a collegiate department, an academy, a school of music, a school of expression, a school of fine arts, a school of domestic and industrial arts, and a business school; Southern College (1901), at Sutherland (Methodist Episcopal, South); the Presbyterian College of Florida (1905), at Eustis; Jasper Normal Institute (1890), at Jasper, and the Florida Normal Institute at Madison.

    2
    1
  • The societies which Bourne formed were for a time allowed to go under (Wesleyan) Methodist protection, but the crisis came in 1810, when the Stanley class of ten members declined to wash their hands of the Camp-Meeting Methodists, and so were refused admission.

    2
    1
  • It has affiliated to it colleges of the Roman Catholic, Episcopalian, Presbyterian and Methodist denominations, with medical and pharmaceutical colleges.

    2
    2
  • The Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Church had a total membership of 1 3, 280.

    2
    2
  • The principal religious denominations are the Baptist (371,518 in 1906) and the Methodist (212,105 in 1906).

    2
    2
  • Presbyterians of different churches in the United States in 1906 numbered 1,830,555; of this total 322,542 were in Pennsylvania, where there were 248,335 members of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (the Northern Church), being more than one-fifth of its total membership; 56,587 members of the United Presbyterian Church of North America, being more than two-fifths of its total membership; 2709 members of the Synod of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of North America, three-tenths of its total membership; the entire membership of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in the United States and Canada (440), 3150 members of the Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Church, nearly one-fourth of its total membership; and 2065 members of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in North America, general synod, about five-ninths of its total membership. The strength of the Church in Pennsylvania is largely due to the Scotch-Irish settlements in that state.

    1
    0
  • In 1781 he writes," I cannot but observe that these were the first rudiments of the Methodist societies."In the presence of such facts we can understand the significance of the mission to Georgia.

    1
    0
  • See also METHODISM, and the articles on the separate Methodist bodies; see also WESLEY FAMILY (J.

    1
    0
  • His preaching, his catechizing of the children after evensong, and his connexion with the Bala Methodists - his wife's stepfather being a Methodist preacher - gave great offence.

    1
    0
  • The expenses were met by collections made in the Calvinistic Methodist Societies, and as the funds increased masters were multiplied, until in 1786 Charles had seven masters to whom he paid £io per annum; in 1787, twelve; in 1789, fifteen; in 1794, twenty.

    1
    0
  • Canada and Australasia led the way, for in these countries the Methodist Church was undivided, and the sentiment was greatly strengthened by the formation in the United Kingdom of the United Methodist Church in 1907.

    1
    1
  • Of 147,223 communicants of all churches in 1906, the largest number, 82,272, were Roman Catholics, 22,109 were Congregationalists, 17,471 Methodist Episcopalians, 8450 Baptists, 1501 Free Baptists and 5278 Protestant Episcopalians.

    1
    1
  • The Baptist and Methodist churches are the leading religious denominations in the state; but there are also Presbyterians, Lutherans, members of the Christian Connexion (O'Kellyites), Disciples of Christ (Campbellites) Episcopalians, Friends, Roman Catholics, Moravians and members of other denominations.

    1
    1
  • In 1782 he was reappointed to supervise the affairs of the Methodist congregations in America.

    1
    1
  • THE PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH, a community of nonconformists, which owes its origin to the fact that Methodism as founded by the Wesleys tended, after the first generation, to depart from the enthusiasm that had marked its inception and to settle down to the task of self-organization.

    1
    1
  • Opposition from a master potter of the district, who threatened to put the Conventicle Act in force, was overcome, but more serious difficulties were presented by the antagonism of the Wesleyan Methodist circuit authorities.

    1
    1
  • Clowes, like Crawfoot, was set apart as a preacher to "live by the gospel," and in February 1812 the name "Primitive Methodist" was formally adopted, although for nearly a generation the name "Clowesites" survived in local use.

    1
    1
  • At the same time there has been a steadily These first three were joined in 1907 under the name of the United Methodist Church.

    1
    2
  • The Presbyterian Church of Wales, commonly known as the "Calvinistic Methodist," had its origin in the great evangelical revival of the 18th century.

    1
    2
  • His efforts met with great success, and in 1800 he founded what was virtually a new and independent church organization on the Methodist system, of which he became the presiding elder, and eventually (1807) bishop. This church is officially the Evangelical Association, but its adherents have been variously known as "New Methodists."

    1
    2
  • Delaware is the seat of the Ohio Wesleyan University (co-educational), founded by the Ohio Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1841, and opened as a college in 1844; it includes a college of liberal arts (1844), an academic department (1841), a school of music (1877), a school of fine arts (1877), a school of oratory (1894), a business school (1895), and a college of medicine (the Cleveland College of Physicians and Surgeons, at Cleveland, Ohio; founded as the Charity Hospital Medical College in 1863, and the medical department of the university of Wooster until 1896, when, under its present name, it became a part of Ohio Wesleyan University).

    0
    0
  • Tuskegee is chiefly known for its educational institutions - the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute and the Alabama Conference Female College (Methodist Episcopal Church, South; opened 1856).

    0
    0
  • Here is situated the Randolph-Macon College (Methodist Episcopal, South), one of the oldest Methodist Episcopal colleges in the United States.

    0
    0
  • From this conference dates the actual beginning of the "Methodist Episcopal Church of the United States of America."

    0
    0
  • In 1785, at Abingdon, Maryland, he laid the corner-stone of Cokesbury College, the project of Dr Coke and the first Methodist Episcopal college in America; the college building was burned in 1795, and the college was then removed to Baltimore, where in 1796, after another fire, it closed, and in 1816 was succeeded by Asbury College, which lived for about fifteen years.

    0
    0
  • United Methodist Free Churches >>

    0
    0
  • The Central Hall atTollcross testifies to Methodist energy.

    0
    0
  • The bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church, on the other hand, derive their orders from Thomas Coke, a presbyter of the Church of England, who in 1784 was ordained by John Wesley, assisted by two other presbyters, "superintendent" of the Methodist Society in America.

    0
    0
  • Methodist episcopacy is therefore based on the denial of any special potestas ordinis in the degree of bishop, and is fundamentally distinct from that of the, Catholic Church - using this term in its narrow sense as applied to the ancient churches of the East and West.

    0
    0
  • I-Iere he came under the influence of the new Methodist preachers, and in 1757 took orders, being ordained by the bishop of Bangor.

    0
    0
  • The district was one of the chief centres of the Methodist revival of the 18th century, the first synod of the Calvinistic Methodists being held in 1743 at Watford farm close to the town, from which place George Whitefield was married at Eglwysilan church two years previously.

    0
    0
  • His advocacy of anti-slavery principles, then frowned upon by the Methodist authorities, aroused opposition, and eventually resulted in his trial for heresy and the revocation of his licence.

    0
    0
  • In the Presbyterian churches a synod is an assembly containing representatives of several presbyteries and intermediate between these and the General Assembly; similarly in the Wesleyan and other Methodist churches the synod is the meeting of the district which links the circuits with the conference.

    0
    0
  • Joining the Methodist New Connexion, he was ordained a minister, but, not being employed as he wished in active "travelling evangelization," left that body also in 1861.

    0
    0
  • The principal buildings are the parish church of St Thomas (restored 1874), the church of St David (r866), a Roman Catholic church, and Baptist, Calvinistic, Methodist, Congregational and Wesleyan chapels; the intermediate and technical schools (1895), Davies's endowed (elementary) school (1789), the Gwyn Hall (1888), the town hall, with corn exchange in the basement storey, and the market-house.

    0
    0
  • Adrian is the seat of Adrian College (1859; co-educational), controlled by the Wesleyan Methodist Church in 1859-1867 and since 1867 by the Methodist Protestant Church, and having departments of literature, theology, music, fine arts, commerce and pedagogy, and a preparatory school; and of St Joseph's Academy (Roman Catholic) for girls; and 1 m.

    0
    0
  • The following periodicals, all of which date from the 18th century, are still published: the Gospel Magazine (1766, with which is incorporated the British Protestant), the Wesleyan Methodist Magazine (1778), Curtis's Botanical Magazine (1786), Evangelical Magazine (1793; since 1905 the Evangelical British Missionary), the Philosophical Magazine (1798), now known as the London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine.

    0
    0
  • The Methodist Magazine dates from 1818 and the Christian Disciple from 1813.

    0
    0
  • CHRISTIAN CONNECTION, a denomination of Christians in North America formed by secession, under James O'Kelly (1735-1826), of members of the Methodist Episcopal Church in North Carolina in 1793.

    0
    0
  • Other educational establishments are Queen's University, replacing the old Queen's College (1849) under the Irish Universities Act 1908; the Presbyterian and the Methodist Colleges, occupying neighbouring sites close to the extensive botanical gardens, the Royal Academical Institution, and the Municipal Technical Institute.

    0
    0
  • Amongst these are St James, Antrim Road; St Peter's Roman Catholic chapel, with its Florentine spire; Presbyterian churches in Fitzroy Avenue, and Elmwood Avenue, and the Methodist chapel, Carlisle Circus.

    0
    0
  • The town is the seat of the Kentucky Wesleyan College (co-educational; Methodist Episcopal, South), opened in 1866, and of the Winchester Trades and Industrial School (1900).

    0
    0
  • The principal churches, in order of their membership were, in 1890, the Methodist Episcopal, Presbyterian, Protestant Episcopal, Baptist, Roman Catholic, Quaker and Lutheran.

    0
    0
  • Educational institutions not supported by the state include: Iowa Wesleyan University (Methodist, opened in 1842) at Mt.

    0
    0
  • Pleasant; Iowa College (Congregational, 1848) at Grinnell; Central University of Iowa (Baptist, 1853) at Pella; Cornell College (Methodist, 1857) at Mt.

    0
    0
  • Vernon; Western College (United Brethren, 1856) at Toledo; Upper Iowa University (Methodist Episcopal, 1857) at Fayette; Leander Clark College (United Brethren, 1857) at Toledo; Lenox College (Presbyterian, 1859) at Hopkinton; Luther College (Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran, 1861) at Decorah; Des Moines College (Baptist, 1865) at Des Moines; Tabor College (Congregational, 1866) at Tabor; Simpson College (Methodist, 1867) at Indianola; Wartburg Kollege (Lutheran, 1868) at Clinton; Amity College (Non-sectarian, 1872) at College Springs; German College (Methodist Episcopal, 1873) at Mt.

    0
    0
  • Pleasant; Penn College (Friends, 1873) at Oskaloosa; St Joseph's College (Roman Catholic, 1873) at Dubuque; Parsons College (Presbyterian, 1875) at Fairfield; Coe College (Presbyterian, 1881) at Cedar Rapids; Drake University (Disciples of Christ, 1881) at Des Moines; Palmer College (Disciples of Christ, 1889) at Legrand; Buena Vista College (Presbyterian, 1891) at Storm Lake; Charles City College (Methodist Episcopal, 1891) at Charles City; Morningside College (Methodist Episcopal, 1894) at Sioux City; Graceland College (Reorganized Church of Latter Day Saints, 1895) at Lamoni.

    0
    0
  • The principal educational institutions are the University of Southern California (Methodist Episcopal, 1880), the Maclay College of Theology and a preparatory school; Occidental College (Presbyterian, 1887), St Vincent's College (Roman Catholic, founded 1865; chartered 1869) and the Los Angeles State Normal School (1882).

    0
    0
  • San Jose is the seat of the University of the Pacific (Methodist Episcopal), which was founded at Santa Clara in 1851, removed to its present site just outside the city in 1871, and had 358 students in all departments in 1909-1910; of the College of Notre Dame (1851; Roman Catholic), and of a State Normal School.

    0
    0
  • Boston University (Methodist Episcopal, 1867); Tufts College (1852), a few miles from Boston in Medford, originally a Universalist school; Clark University (1889, devoted wholly to graduate instruction until 1902, when Clark College was added), at Worcester, are important institutions.

    0
    0
  • There are schools, of theology at Cambridge (Protestant Episcopal), Newton (Baptist) and Waltham (New Church), as well as in connexion with Boston University (Methodist), Tufts College (Universalist) and Harvard (non-sectarian, and the affiliated Congregational Andover Theological Seminary at Cambridge).

    0
    0
  • This doxology is also used in the Protestant Episcopal and Methodist Episcopal churches of America, as indeed in most Protestant churches at the eucharist.

    0
    0
  • The Methodist movement touched all existing types of English religion, but none more than Congregationalism.

    0
    0
  • So was it in the long run with the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion, springing from Whitefield's Calvinistic wing of the Revival, not to mention the congregational strain in some minor Methodist churches.

    0
    0
  • Of 3,591,974 members of all religious denominations in 1906, 2,285,768 were Roman Catholics, 313,689 Methodist Episcopalians, 199,923 Presbyterians, 193,890 Protestant Episcopalians, 176,981 Baptists, 124,644 Lutherans, 57,351 Congregationalists, 35,34 2 Jews (heads of families only), 26,183 members of the German Evangelical Synod, 19,302 members of Eastern Orthodox churches and 10,761 Universalists.

    0
    0
  • Columbia University and Cornell University (q.v.), are: Union University (1795, non-sectarian), at Schenectady; Hamilton College (1812, non-sectarian), at Clinton; Colgate University (1819, non-sectarian), at Hamilton; Hobart College (1822, non-sectarian), at Geneva: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1824, non-sectarian), at Troy; New York University (1832, non-sectarian), in New York City; Alfred University (1836, non-sectarian), at Alfred; Fordham University (1841, Roman Catholic), in New York City; College of St Francis Xavier (1847, Roman Catholic), in New York City; College of the City of New York (1849, city); University of Rochester (1850, Baptist), at Rochester; Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn (1854, non-sectarian), at Brooklyn; Niagara University (1856, Roman Catholic), at Niagara Falls; St Lawrence University (1858, non-sectarian), at Canton; St Bonaventure's College (1859, Roman Catholic), at St Bonaventure; St Stephen's College (1860, Protestant Episcopal), at Annandale; Manhattan College (1863, Roman Catholic), at New York City; St John's College (1870, Roman Catholic), at Brooklyn; Canisius College (1870, Roman Catholic), at Buffalo; Syracuse University (1871, Methodist Episcopal), at Syracuse; Adelphi College (1896, non-sectarian), at Brooklyn; and Clarkson School of Technology (1896, non-sectarian), at Potsdam.

    0
    0
  • Whitman College (Congregational, 1866) at Walla Walla, Gonzaga College (Roman Catholic, 1887) at Spokane, Whitworth College (Presbyterian, 1890) at Tacoma and the University of Puget Sound (Methodist Episcopal, 1903) at Tacoma are institutions of higher learning maintained and controlled by their respective denominations.

    0
    0
  • The African Methodist Episcopal (Ethiopian) Church had 4110 members, of whom only two were whites.

    0
    0
  • Denominational colleges are Yankton College (1882) and Redfield College (1887), both Congregational; Huron College (1883, Presbyterian), and Dakota Wesleyan University (1885; Methodist Episcopal) at Mitchell.

    0
    0
  • It is the seat of the Montana Wesleyan University (Methodist Episcopal), founded in 1890; St Aloysius College and St Vincent's Academy (Roman Catholic); and has a public library with about 35,000 volumes, the Montana state library with about 40,000 volumes, and the state law library with about 24,000 volumes.

    0
    0
  • Lexington is the seat of the Lexington College for Young Women (Baptist, established 1855), the Central College for Women (Methodist Episcopal, South; opened 1869), and the Wentworth Military Academy (1880).

    0
    0
  • The Methodist Episcopal Church maintains Wesley College near Grand Forks (formerly the Red River Valley University at Wahpeton), affiliated with the state university.

    0
    0
  • Albuquerque is also the seat of the Harwood Industrial School (Methodist) for Mexican girls, of the Menaul Mission School (Presbyterian) for Mexican boys, and of a government Indian training school (1881) for boys and girls.

    0
    0
  • This is known as the first Methodist Association - held eighteen months before John Wesley's first conference (June 25th, 1744).

    0
    0
  • high), Second Presbyterian (1872), Central Christian (1869), St Paul's Methodist Episcopal (1870), and St Paul's Protestant Episcopal procathedral (185r), are also worthy of mention, and in the residential suburbs there are many fine churches.

    0
    0
  • Cincinnati is the seat of a Roman Catholic archbishopric and a Protestant Episcopal and Methodist Episcopal bishopric. The Masonic temple (195 ft.

    0
    0
  • The city has large publishing interests, and various religious (Methodist Episcopal and Roman Catholic) and fraternal periodicals, and several technical journals and trade papers are published here.

    0
    0
  • Among the educational institutions are Morningside College (Methodist Episcopal, 18 94), 3 m.

    0
    0
  • the Wesleyan Methodist, has its catechism or catechisms,.

    0
    0
  • The Roman Catholic Church in 1906 had more members than any other religious denomination (119,86 3 out of 190,298 communicants of all denominations); in the same year there were 19,070 Congregationalists, 15,974 Baptists, 12,529 Methodist Episcopalians (North) and 4892 Protestant Episcopalians.

    0
    0
  • Tacoma is the seat of Whitworth College (1890, Presbyterian), the University of Puget Sound (1903, Methodist Episcopal), the Annie Wright Seminary (1884), a boarding and day school for girls, and the Pacific Lutheran Academy and Business College.

    0
    0
  • It is the seat of Cornell College (Methodist Episcopal; coeducational), which was opened as the Iowa Conference Seminary in 1853, and was chartered in 1857 under its present name, adopted in honour of William W.

    0
    0
  • Syracuse University, whose campus (of zoo acres) in the south-east part of the city commands a fine view of the lake, is a co-educational institution largely under Methodist Episcopal control, but not sectarian, which in1908-1909had 239 instructors and 3205 students (1336 in the college of liberal arts; 189 in the summer school; 62 in the library school; 933 in the college of fine arts; 147 in the college of medicine; 179 in the college of law; 401 in the college of applied science; and 78 in the teachers' college).

    0
    0
  • While the older universities have increased greatly in influence and efficiency, the following new foundations have been made since confederation: - University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, 1877; Presbyterian College, Winnipeg, 1870; Methodist College, Winnipeg, 1888; Wesleyan College, Montreal, 1873; Presbyterian College, Montreal, 1868; School of Practical Science, Toronto, 1877; Royal Military College, Kingston, 1875; M`Master University, Toronto, 1888.

    0
    0
  • The total membership of the churches in 1906 was about 1,029,037, of whom 596,319 were Baptists, 349,079 were Methodist Episcopalians, 24,040 were Presbyterians, 19,273 were Roman Catholics, 12,703 were Disciples of Christ, 9790 were Protestant Episcopalians, and 5581 were Congregationalists.

    0
    0
  • The Methodist, Baptist, Roman Catholic and Protestant Episcopal Churches, and the Hebrews of the state also support homes for orphans.

    0
    0
  • The district conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church granted her a local preacher's licence, and she held pastorates at Hingham and East Dennis, Mass., remaining in the latter place seven years, until 1885.

    0
    0
  • But the same year she was ordained in the Methodist Protestant Church.

    0
    0
  • Wiley University was founded in 1873 by the Freedman's Aid Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Bishop College, was founded in 1881 by the American Baptist Home Mission Society and incorporated in 1885.

    0
    0
  • Among the educational institutions in San Antonio are the San Antonio Female College (Methodist Episcopal, South; 1894), the West Texas Military Academy; Peacock Military School; St Mary's Hall (Roman Catholic); St Louis College; and the Academy of Our Lady of the Lake (under the Sisters of Divine Providence, who have a convent here).

    0
    0
  • The denomination arose in the agricultural districts and fishing villages of north Cornwall and Devon; a district only slightly influenced by John Wesley and the original Methodist movement.

    0
    0
  • The founder was William O'Bryan (afterwards Bryant), a Methodist lay preacher of Luxillian, Cornwall.

    0
    0
  • The old Methodist body even excommunicated persons for attending "Bryanite" meetings.

    0
    0
  • In the various colonial Methodist unions the Bible Christians have contributed a total of 159 ministers, 14,925 members and 660 chapels.

    0
    0
  • Both ministers and people entered with interest and sympathy into the scheme for union between themselves, the Methodist New Connexion and the United Methodist Free Church, which was successfully accomplished in 1906.

    0
    0
  • WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH, one of the chief branches of Methodism.

    0
    0
  • They would not consent to the administration of the sacraments by the preachers in Hull, nor to Methodist preaching at the time when services were held in church.

    0
    0
  • A trenchant reply to this circular was prepared by Alexander Kilham, one of the younger Methodist preachers.

    0
    0
  • The Centenary of the Missionary Society falls in 1913, but Methodist Missions really date from 1786 when Dr Coke landed at Antigua.

    0
    0
  • He was expelled from the conference and joined the Wesleyan Methodist Association in 1836, but shortly afterwards became a clergyman in Manchester.

    0
    0
  • Those who now left the Connexion joined the reformers of 1828 and 1836 and formed the Methodist Free Churches.

    0
    0
  • Allen had a large share in the struggle by which Methodist work both in the army and the navy was developed.

    0
    0
  • The service done by Methodist chaplains in war time, and especially in the Boer War, won the warmest recognition from the authorities.

    0
    0
  • Dr Rigg, the president of that year, put all his strength into the movement, and every department of Methodist work at home and abroad shared in the benefits of the fund.

    0
    0
  • The number of Methodist chapels in 1818 was 2000; in 1839, 3500; in 1910, 8606.

    0
    0
  • The first rules for the management of Methodist Sunday schools were issued by the Conference in 1827.

    0
    0
  • In 1837 there were 3339 Methodist Sunday schools with 59,297 teachers and 341,443 scholars.

    0
    0
  • The Methodist Sunday School Union, founded in 1873, was formed into a department in 1907 and is doing much to guide and develop the work.

    0
    0
  • In 1898 the rooms in Wesley's house, where he studied and where he died, were set apart as a Methodist Museum.

    0
    0
  • The first Methodist Oecumenical Conference was held in London in 1881, the second in Washington in 1891, the third in London in 1901, the fourth being fixed for Toronto in 1911.

    0
    0
  • The Methodist Assembly which met in Wesley's Chapel, London, in 1909 brought the branches of British Methodism together with good results.

    0
    0
  • The great event of recent Methodist history was the Twentieth Century Fund inaugurated by Sir Robert W.

    0
    0
  • and C. Wesley; Wesley's Veterans; Lives of Early Methodist Preachers (Finsbury Library).

    0
    0
  • Other institutions for higher education are the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia (1749), an endowed institution which receives very little support from the state; the University of Pittsburgh (1819), at Pittsburg (q.v.); Dickinson College (Methodist Episcopal, 1783), at Carlisle; Haveriord College (Society of Friends, 1833), at Haverford; Franklin and Marshall {German Reformed, 1853), at Lancaster; Washington and Jefferson {Presbyterian, 1802), at Washington; Lafayette (Presbyterian, 1832), at Easton; Bucknell University (Baptist, 1846), at Lewisburg; Waynesburg (Cumberland Presbyterian, 1851), at Waynesburg; Ursinus (German Reformed, 1870), at Collegeville; Allegheny College (Methodist Episcopal, 1815), at Meadville; Swarthmore (Society of Friends (Hicksites), 1866), at Swarthmore; Muhlenberg (Lutheran, 1867), at Allentown; Lehigh University (non-sectarian) 1867), at Bethlehem; and for women Bryn Mawr College (Society of Friends, 1885), at Bryn Mawr; the Allentown College (German Reformed, 1867), at Allentown; Wilson College (Presbyterian, 1870), and the Pennsylvania College for women (1869), at Pittsburg.

    0
    0
  • It is the seat of Fort Worth University (coeducational), a Methodist Episcopal institution, which was established as the Texas Wesleyan College in 1881, received its present name in 1889, comprises an academy, a college of liberal arts and sciences, a conservatory of music, a law school, a medical school, a school of commerce, and a department of oratory and elocution, and in 1907 had 802 students; the Polytechnic College (coeducational; Methodist Episcopal, South), which was established in 1890, has preparatory, collegiate, normal, commercial, and fine arts departments and a summer school, and in 1906 had 12 instructors and (altogether) 696 students; the Texas masonic manual training school; a kindergarten training school; St Andrews school (Protestant Episcopal), and St Ignatius Academy (Roman Catholic).

    0
    0
  • In 1868 he went to Chicago as the representative of the Wesleyan Methodist conference, and settling in Canada did much to advance the cause of his denomination.

    0
    0
  • He was ordained to the Calvinistic Methodist ministry at Bala in 1847, and gave his time and talents ungrudgingly to Sunday school and temperance work.

    0
    0
  • It was called Lebanon Seminary until 1830, when the present name was adopted in honour of William McKendree (1757-1835), known as the "Father of Western Methodism," a great preacher, and a bishop of the Methodist Church in 1808-1835, who had endowed the college with 480 acres of land.

    0
    0
  • The city is the seat of Lawrence college (changed from university in 1908), an interdenominational (originally a Methodist Episcopal) co-educational institution, founded in 1847 as the Lawrence Institute of Wisconsin and named in honour of Amos Adams Lawrence (1814-1886) of Boston, son of Amos Lawrence, and giver of $io,000 for the founding of the Institute.

    0
    0
  • In 1814 the Wesleyan Missionary Society was formed, Methodist effort of this kind having previously been left to the individual enterprise of Dr Thomas Coke.

    0
    0
  • Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Missionary Society.

    0
    0
  • Primitive Methodist African and Colonial Missions.

    0
    0
  • Methodist New Connexion in England Foreign Missions.

    0
    0
  • Methodist Episcopal Church Missionary Society.

    0
    0
  • Methodist Episcopal Church (South).

    0
    0
  • The Anglican societies and the regular and older Nonconformist societies (Methodist, Baptist, Presbyterian and the London Missionary Society, which is virtually Congregationalist) have shared in these humbler recruits; but a large proportion of them have joined several younger " non-denominational " or " interdenominational " missions.

    0
    0
  • In Canada and Australia, the Anglican, Presbyterian, Methodist, Baptist and other communities have regular organizations for foreign missions.

    0
    0
  • The older American societies, especially the American Board (Congregational), the Presbyterian Boards, the Methodist Episcopal Church Society, the Baptist Missionary Union, and the Missionary Society of the Protestant Episcopal Church, have much extended their work.

    0
    0
  • The Methodist Episcopal Church and the Presbyterian Board, both of America, entered the country in 1885, and were soon joined by similar agencies from Canada and Australia.

    0
    0
  • The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel and the Methodist Episcopal Church work in and around Rangoon.

    0
    0
  • In the Straits Settlement the foundations of modern missionary effort were laid by the London Missionary Society pioneers who were waiting to get into China; they were succeeded by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (1856), English Presbyterians (1875), Methodist Episcopalians (1884), who have a fine Anglo-Chinese College at Singapore, and the Church of England Zenana Society (1900).

    0
    0
  • In Dutch Borneo the Rhenish Society is slowly making headway among the Dyaks; in British Borneo the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (1848) and the Methodist Episcopalians occupy the field.

    0
    0
  • Congregations were formed in Geneva, at Lausanne, where most of the Methodist and other dissenters joined the Brethren, at Vevey and elsewhere in Vaud.

    0
    0
  • Printing and publishing are of some importance: Charlotte is the publication headquarters of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church; and several textile trade journals and two medical periodicals are published here.

    0
    0
  • It is the seat of Livingstone College (African Methodist Episcopal, removed from Concord to Salisbury in 1882, chartered 1885).

    0
    0
  • From 1847 to 1867 Concord was the seat of the Biblical Institute (Methodist Episcopal), founded in Newbury, Vermont, in 1841, removed to Boston as the Boston Theological Seminary in 1867, and after 1871 a part of Boston University.

    0
    0
  • In his youth he came under the influence of the Calvinistic Methodist revival and became a preacher at nineteen.

    0
    0
  • On Charles's death in 1814 he became the recognized leader of the Calvinistic Methodist Church, and the story of his life is simply a record of marvellously successful preaching tours.

    0
    0
  • In 1846 he was elected a member of the National House of Representatives by a majority of 1511 over his Democratic opponent, Peter Cartwright, the Methodist preacher.

    0
    0
  • part of the city is Albion College (Methodist Episcopal; co-educational), embracing a College of Liberal Arts, a preparatory department, a conservatory of music, a school of art, a school of oratory, a normal course, and a commercial department.

    0
    0
  • Of these Victoria (Methodist) and Trinity (Anglican) are in Toronto, and have become federated with the provincial university, in which they have merged their degree-conferring powers.

    0
    0
  • Albert College, under the control of the Methodist church, was formerly a university, but now confines itself to secondary education.

    0
    0
  • The Congregational, the Calvary Baptist, the Second Presbyterian, the Independence Avenue Christian, the Independence Avenue Methodist, and the Second Christian Science churches are the finest church buildings.

    0
    0
  • A Methodist Episcopal institutional church, admirably equipped, was opened in 1906.

    0
    0
  • At Trevecca, near the same town, was a theological college for ministerial students attached to the Calvinistic Methodist body, but in October 1906 the institution was removed to Aberystwyth, and the buildings have since been utilized for a preparatory school belonging to the same body.

    0
    0
  • There is more than one meaning of United Methodist discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

    0
    0
  • In 1906 it was estimated that the total number of communicants of all denominations was 2,077,197, and that of this total 932,084 were Roman Catholics, 263,344 were Methodist (235,092 of the Northern Church, 7198 of the Southern Church, 9833 of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, 5512 of the Methodist Protestant Church, and 3597 of the Free Methodist Church of North America), 202,566 were Lutherans (113,527 of the Evangelical Lutheran Synodical 2 See the so-called McLean County Case (67 Ill.

    0
    0
  • The Illinois Woman's College (Methodist Episcopal; chartered in 1847 as the Illinois Conference Female Academy) received its present name in 1899.

    0
    0
  • In 1884 and 1885, toleration being established, Protestant missionaries of the American Presbyterian and Methodist Episcopal Churches entered Korea, and were followed by a large number of agents of other denominations.

    0
    0
  • In Seoul there were established an imperial English school with two foreign teachers, a reorganized Confucian college, a normal college under a very efficient foreign principal, Japanese, Chinese, Russian and French schools, chiefly linguistic, several Korean primary schools, mission boarding-schools, and the Pai Chai College connected with the American Methodist Episcopal Church, under imperial patronage, and subsidized by government, in which a liberal education of a high class was given and En-mun receives much attention.

    0
    0
  • Among the large denominational colleges are Philander Smith College, Little Rock (Methodist Episcopal, 1877); Ouachita College, Arkadelphia (Baptist, 1886); Hendrix College, Conway (Methodist Episcopal, South, 1884); and Arkansas College, Batesville (Presbyterian, 1872).

    0
    0
  • He was from his early manhood a prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

    0
    0
  • Its streets are shaded by elms. The city is the seat of Trinity College (Methodist Episcopal, South), opened in 1851 as a normal college, growing out of an academy called Union Institute, which was established in the northwestern part of Randolph county in 1838 and was incorporated in 1841.

    0
    0
  • In 1852 the college was empowered to grant degrees; in 1856 it became the property of the North Carolina Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; in 1859 it received its present name; and in 1892 it was removed to a park near Durham, included in 1901 in the corporate limits of the city.

    0
    0
  • The American University (chartered 1893), under Methodist Episcopal control, designed to bear a relation to the Protestant churches similar to that of the Catholic University to the Catholic Church, with a campus of 94 acres at the north-west end of the city, in 1910 had not been opened to students.

    0
    0
  • MATTHEW SIMPSON (1811-1884), American bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, was born in Cadiz, Ohio, on the 21st of June 1811.

    0
    0
  • He studied medicine in1830-1833and began to practise, and in 1833 was licensed as a preacher of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

    0
    0
  • Other institutions of higher learning which are not under state control are: Washington and Lee University (nonsectarian, 1749), at Lexington; Hampden-Sidney College (Presbyterian, 1776), at Hampden-Sidney; Richmond College (Baptist, 1832), at Richmond; Randolph-Macon College (Methodist Episcopal, 1832), at Ashland; Emory and Henry College (Methodist Episcopal, 1838), at Emory; Roanoke College (Lutheran, 1853), at Salem; Bridgewater College (German Baptist, 1879), at Bridgewater; Fredericksburg College (Presbyterian, 1893), at Fredericksburg; Virginia Union University (Baptist, 1899), at Richmond; and Virginia Christian College (Christian, 1903), at Lynchburg.

    0
    0
  • The city is the seat of Mount Union College (Methodist Episcopal), opened in 1846 as a preparatory school and having in 1907 a library of about 10,000 volumes, a collegiate department (opened in 1858), a normal department (1858), a school of music (1855), a commercial school (1868), a faculty of 29 teachers, and an enrolment of 524 students, of whom 274 were women.

    0
    0
  • Under Methodist influence he decided to enter the ministry, but, developing Congregational ideas, was trained at Cheshunt College.

    0
    0
  • Colorado College (1874) at Colorado Springs, Christian but not denominational, and the University of Denver, Methodist, are on independent to;: 4 c terling i r ` j `ia Perad°x Cany02 ' ity sse o [y H..

    0
    0
  • It has a city hall, a general hospital, a Masonic temple, and a number of educational institutions, including the Roanoke College (1860; Baptist), for young women; the RandolphMacon Institute (1897; Methodist Episcopal, South), for girls; and a commercial college.

    0
    0
  • Two other clergymen, who figure prominently in the Methodist movement, and whose influence has proved lasting, were Peter Williams of Carmarthen (1722-1796), the Welsh Bible commentator, and William Williams of I j antycelyn (1717-1791), the celebrated Welsh hymn-writer.

    0
    0
  • Incidentally, it will be noticed that this important Methodist revival had its origin and found its chief supporters and exponents in a restricted corner of South Wales, of which Carmarthen was the centre, in curious contrast with the literary movement in Elizabeth's reign, which was largely confined to the district round St Asaph.

    0
    0
  • Towards the close of the, 8th century the Methodist revival spread to North Wales under the influence of the celebrated Thomas Charles, commonly called Charles of Bala (1755-1814), formerly curate of Llanymowddwy and the founder of Welsh Sunday schools.

    0
    0
  • Thus between the year 1811 (the date of the Methodist secession) and 1832 (the year of the great Reform Bill), the number of dissenting chapels had risen from 945 to 1428: a truly marvellous increase even allowing for the speedy growth of population, since every chapel so built had of necessity to be well attended in order to render it self-supporting.

    0
    0
  • The enthusiastic course of the Methodist movement under Howell Harris, Daniel Rowland and William Williams; the establishment of Welsh Sunday Schools; the founding of the Bible Society under Thomas Charles of Bala; and the revival early in the 19th century of the Eisteddfodau (the ancient bardic contests of music, poetry and learning), have all contributed to extend the use of the Welsh language and to strengthen its hold as a popular medium of education throughout the Principality.

    0
    0
  • UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCHES, an English Nonconformist community merged since 1907 in the United Methodist Church (q.v.).

    0
    0
  • The organization was itself formed in 1857 by the amalgamation of the "Wesleyan Association" (which had in 1836 largely absorbed the Protestant Methodists of 1828) and the "Wesleyan Reformers" (dating from 1849, when a number of Wesleyan Methodist ministers were expelled on a charge of insubordination).

    0
    0
  • This arrangement, soon abandoned, was no doubt suggested by Methodist superintendency.

    0
    0
  • In 1775 Methodist influence appeared in the contention of two of the apostles and Jeremiah Walker for universal redemption.

    0
    0
  • He began to preach when he was fourteen, and in 1865 entered Richmond College to study for the Wesleyan Methodist ministry under the Rev. Alfred Barrett, one of whose daughters he married in 1873.

    0
    0
  • He had started in 1885 the Methodist Times, and rapidly made it a leading organ of Nonconformist opinion.

    0
    0
  • United Methodist Church >>

    0
    0
  • Bloomington is the seat of the Illinois Wesleyan University (Methodist Episcopal, coeducational, founded in 1850), which comprises a college of liberal arts, an academy, a college of law, a college of music and a school of oratory, and in 1907 had 1350 students.

    0
    0
  • JOHN MCCLINTOCK (1814-1870), American Methodist Episcopal theologian and educationalist, was born in Philadelphia on the 27th of October 1814.

    0
    0
  • In1848-1856he edited The Methodist Quarterly Review (after 1885 The Methodist Review); from 1857 to 1860 he was pastor of St Paul's (Methodist Episcopal) Church, New York City; and in1860-1864he had charge of the American chapel in Paris, and there and in London did much to turn public opinion in favour of the Northern States.

    0
    0
  • A great preacher, orator and teacher, and a remarkably versatile scholar, McClintock by his editorial and educational work probably did more than any other man to raise the intellectual tone of American Methodism, and, particularly, of the American Methodist clergy.

    0
    0
  • Among McClintock's other publications are: Sketches of Eminent Methodist Ministers (1863); an edition of Richard Watson's Theological Institutes (1851); and The Life and Letters of Rev. Stephen Olin (1854).

    0
    0
  • the Moravians, the Methodist Episcopal Church and the Mormons, the office and title of bishop have survived, or been created.

    0
    0
  • In 1906 it was estimated that the total membership of all religious denominations was 74,578, and that there were 32,425 Latter-Day Saints or Mormons (266 of the Reorganized Church), 18,057 Roman Catholics, 5884 Methodist Episcopalians (53 1 3 of the Northern Church), 3770 Presbyterians (3698 of the Northern Church), 3206 Disciples of Christ, and 2374 Baptists (2331 of the Northern Convention).

    0
    0
  • Other important institutions of learning within the state but not maintained by it are: Albion College (Methodist Episcopal; opened in 1843), at Albion; Hillsdale College (Free Baptist, 1855), at Hillsdale; Kalamazoo College (Baptist, 1855), at Kalamazoo; Adrian College (controlled by the Methodist Protestant Church since 1867), at Adrian; Olivet College (Congregational, 1859), at Olivet; Hope College (Reformed, 1866), at Holland; Detroit College (Roman Catholic, 1877), at Detroit; Alma College (Presbyterian; incorporated 1886), at Alma; and some professional schools at Detroit (q.v.).

    0
    0
  • The Calvinistic Methodist Church of Wales bestowed on him every honour in their possession, and he received the degree of D.D.

    0
    0
  • Among the denominational institutions are the Theological Seminary (Presbyterian) at Princeton; the Drew Theological Seminary (Methodist Episcopal) at Madison; Seton Hall College (Roman Catholic), at South Orange; St Peter's College (Roman Catholic) at Jersey City; St Benedict's College (Roman Catholic) at Newark; the German Theological School of Newark 1 The state's title to its riparian lands was established, after a long controversy, in 1870 in the case of Stevens v.

    0
    0
  • Spartanburg is the seat of Wofford College (Methodist Episcopal, South; founded in 1850 with a bequest of Benjamin Wofford, a local Methodist minister, and opened in 1854), which had, in 1908, 12 instructors and 286 students; also of Converse College (nonsectarian; for women), which was founded by D.

    0
    0
  • But near at hand and in full affiliation with the university are Victoria College (Methodist), Wycliffe College (Anglican), Knox College (Presbyterian) and St Michael's College (Roman Catholic), wherein courses in divinity are given and degrees conferred.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at the Methodist College, St.

    0
    0
  • 4 On September 17, 1907, the United Methodist Free Churches, the Methodist New Connexion, and the Bible Christians were united under the name of the United Methodist Church.

    0
    0
  • Of these Iliuliuk (also called Unalaska), the oldest, settled in 17601 775, has a custom house, a Russian-Greek Church, and a Methodist Mission and orphanage, and is the headquarters for a considerable fleet of United States revenue cutters which patrol the sealing grounds of the Pribilofs; adjacent is Dutch Harbor (so named, it is said, because a Dutch vessel was the first to enter it), which is an important port for Bering Sea commerce.

    0
    0
  • In Pittsburg is the publishing house of the United Presbyterian Church, and The Christian Advocate (weekly, Methodist Episcopal, 1834) is published here under the auspices of the general conference.

    0
    0
  • In the same year there were 8356 Roman Catholics, 1 9 02 members of the Northern Presbyterian Church, 1537 members of the Northern Methodist Episcopal Church, 1174 Congregationalists, and 987 Baptists (of the Northern Conference).

    0
    0
  • There is a large training college for the Wesleyan Methodist ministry in the suburb of Headingley.

    0
    0
  • The local councils consist of representatives of the Congregational and Baptist Churches, the Methodist Churches, the Presbyterian Church of England, the Free Episcopal Churches, the Society of Friends, and such other Evangelical Churches as the National Council may at any time admit.

    0
    0
  • The city is the seat of Epworth University (founded in 1901 by the joint action of the Methodist Episcopal Church and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South).

    0
    0
  • Philomath College (United Brethren, 1866), at Philomath; and Willamette University (Methodist Episcopal, 1844), at Salem.

    0
    0
  • 1845) and his nephew, Daniel Lee, went to Oregon as Methodist missionaries, and with McLoughlin's assistance they established missions in the Willamette valley.

    0
    0
  • high; the Grace Episcopal church - Baltimore being the seat of a Protestant Episcopal bishopric; the First Methodist Episcopal church; and the synagogues of the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation and the Oheb Shalom Congregation.

    0
    0
  • The Woman's College (Methodist), opened in 1888, is one of the best institutions of the kind in southern United States.

    0
    0
  • Morgan College (Methodist), opened in 1876, offers the advantages of a college education to the coloured young people.

    0
    0
  • In the suburbs there are three denominational schools, the Nebraska Wesleyan University (Methodist Episcopal, 1888) at University Place; Union College (Seventh Day Adventists, 1891) at College View; and Cotner University (Disciples of Christ, 1889, incorporated as the Nebraska Christian University) at Bethany.

    0
    0
  • From 1881 to 1900 he was vice-chancellor of the university of Toronto, and was largely responsible for the success of the movement leading to the federation between that body and the Victoria University (Methodist).

    0
    0
  • Other educational institutions of college rank include Vincennes University (non-sectarian), at Vincennes; Hanover College (1833, Presbyterian), at Hanover; Wabash College (1832, non-sectarian), at Crawfordsville; Franklin College (1837, Baptist), at Franklin; De Pauw University (1837, Methodist Episcopal), at Greencastle; Butler University (1855, Christian), at Indianapolis; Earlham College (1847, Friends), at Richmond; Notre Dame University (1842, Roman Catholic), at Notre Dame; Moore's Hill College (r856, Methodist Episcopal), at Moore's Hill; the University of Indianapolis (nonsectarian), a loosely affiliated series of schools at Indianapolis, centring around Butler University; and Rose Polytechnic Institute (1883, non-sectarian), at Terre Haute.

    0
    0
  • As regards the distribution of religious sects, in 1906 there were 458,190 communicants of all denominations, and of this number 121,208 were Methodists (108,097 being Methodist Episcopalians of the Northern Church), 93,195 were Roman Catholics, 46,299 were Baptists (34,975 being members of the Northern Baptist Convention and 10,011 of the National (Colored) Baptist Convention), 40,765 were Presbyterians (33,465 being members of the Northern Church) and 40,356 were Disciples of Christ.

    0
    0
  • The largest of these are the Kansas Wesleyan University (Methodist Episcopal, 1886) at Salina and Baker University (Methodist Episcopal, 1858) at Baldwin.

    0
    0
  • Among the many smaller colleges are Washburn College (Congregational, 1869) at Topeka, the Southwest Kansas College (Methodist Episcopal, opened 1886) at Winfield, the College of Emporia (Presbyterian, 1883) at Emporia, Bethany College (Lutheran, 1881) at Lindsborg, Fairmount College (non-sectarian, 1895) at Wichita, St Mary's College (Roman Catholic,1869)at St Mary's, and Ottawa University (Baptist, 1865) at Ottawa.

    0
    0
  • There were Methodist (1829), Baptist, Quaker, Catholic and Presbyterian missions active by 1837.

    0
    0
  • There were 57,473 Methodists (chiefly of the Methodist Episcopal Church), 26,163 Congregationalists and 21,716 Baptists.

    0
    0
  • Educational institutions of collegiate rank are Beloit College (1846; originally Congregational, now undenominational) at Beloit; Carroll College (1846, Presbyterian), at Waukesha; Lawrence College (1847; Methodist Episcopal), at Appleton; Concordia College (1881; Lutheran), Marquette University (1864, Roman Catholic), and Milwaukee-Downer College (1895; non-sectarian, for women; an outgrowth of Downer College, Congregational and Presbyterian, founded at Fox Lake in 1853), all at Milwaukee; Milton College (1867; Seventh Day Adventist), at Milton; North-western University 0865; Lutheran) at Watertown; Ripon College (1851; originally under Presbyterian and Congregational control, now non-sectarian), at Ripon; Wayland University (1855; co-educational; Baptist), at Beaver Dam; and the following Roman Catholic schools: St Clara Academy (1847; Dominican) at Sinsiniwa, St Francis Seminary (1853) at St Francis, and St Lawrence College (1861, Capuchin) at Mt Calvary.

    0
    0
  • There is a grammar school founded in 1652, and in the neighbourhood is the Methodist foundation of Bourne College (1883).

    0
    0
  • Arminianism is less fully worked out by Arminius than by later Dutch divines, of whom the " conciliatory " Litnborch is sometimes used as a Methodist text-book.

    0
    0
  • In 1906 there were 257,100 communicants of various churches in Oklahoma and Indian Territory, the Methodist Episcopalians being the most numerous, and next to them the Baptists.

    0
    0
  • Among the institutions of learning, neither maintained nor controlled by the state, are Epworth University (Methodist Episcopal, 1901) at Oklahoma City, and Kingfisher College at Kingfisher.

    0
    0
  • The city is the seat of Wesley College (Methodist Episcopal, South), until 1909 the North Texas University School, and of the North Texas Hospital for the Insane (1885), and has a Carnegie library.

    0
    0
  • The Methodist Church in Ireland was formed in 1878 by the Union of the Wesleyan with the Primitive Wesleyan Methodists.

    0
    0
  • In 1906 there were in the state 655,933 members of different religious denominations, of whom the Baptist bodies were the strongest with 341,456 communicants; the Methodist bodies had 249,169 members; 35,533 were Presbyterians; 12,652 were Lutherans; 10,317 were Roman Catholics; and 8557 were Protestant Episcopalians.

    0
    0
  • In Minneapolis are the Minneapolis College of Physicians and Surgeons (1883), the medical school of Hamline University; Augsburg Seminary (Norwegian Lutheran, 1869), the United Church Seminary (1890), the Minnesota College (Swedish, 1905), the Minneapolis Normal School for Kindergartners, the Froebellian Kindergarten Normal School, Graham Hall and Stanley Hall, the Minneapolis School of Music, Oratory and Dramatic Art, and the Northwestern Conservatory of Music. Between Minneapolis and St Paul are the main buildings of Hamline University (Methodist Episcopal, co-educational, 1854).

    0
    0
  • Among the hospitals and charitable institutions are the Minneapolis city hospital, the state hospital for crippled and deformed children, and Asbury Methodist, the Northwestern, the Deaconess', the Swedish, the St Mary's, the Maternity and the St Barnabas hospitals, Bethany Home, the Catholic orphan asylum, the Washburn orphans' home, the Pillsbury House (1906) where settlement work is carried on by the Plymouth Congregational Church, and several free dispensaries.

    0
    0
  • Among Chattanooga's educational institutions are two commercial colleges, the Chattanooga College for Young Ladies (nonsectarian), the Chattanooga Normal University, and the University of Chattanooga, until June 1907, United States Grant University (whose preparatory department, "The Athens School," is at Athens, Tenn.), a co-educational institution under Methodist Episcopal control, established in 1867; it has a school of law (1899), a medical school (1889), and a school of theology (1888).

    0
    0
  • Webster published in 1748 his Calculations, setting forth the principles on which his scheme for widows' pensions was based; he also wrote a defence of the Methodist movement in 1742, and Zeal for the Civil and Religious Interests of Mankind Commended (1754).

    0
    0
  • JOHN FLETCHER HURST (1834-1903), American Methodist Episcopal bishop, was born in Salem, Dorchester county, Maryland, on the 17th of August 1834.

    0
    0
  • From 1858 to 1867 he was engaged in pastoral work in America, and from 1867 to 1871 he taught in Methodist mission institutes in Germany.

    0
    0
  • Among the private educational institutions of the state are: Nebraska Wesleyan University (1888, Methodist Episcopal), at University Place, a suburb of Lincoln; Union College (1891, Adventist), at College View, suburb of Lincoln; Creighton University (1879, Roman Catholic), at Omaha; York College (1890, United Baptist), at York; Cotner University (1889; legally " The Nebraska Christian University "), at Bethany, a suburb of Lincoln; Grand Island College (1892, Baptist), at Grand Island; Doane College (1872, Congregational), at Crete; Hastings College (1882, Presbyterian), at Hastings; and Bellevue College (1883, Presbyterian), at Bellevue.

    0
    0
  • This institution, opened in 1875, is under the patronage of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and was named in honour of Cornelius Vanderbilt, who contributed $1,000,000 to its funds, and whose son, W.

    0
    0
  • The Baptist, the Methodist Episcopal (South), the Cumberland Presbyterian, and the African Baptist and the African Methodist Episcopal churches have publishing houses in Nashville.

    0
    0
  • METHODIST NEW CONNEXION, a Protestant Nonconformist Church, formed in 1797 by secession from the Wesleyan Methodists, and merged in 1907 into the United Methodist Church (q.v.).

    0
    0
  • Otherwise the doctrines and order of the Connexion were the same as those of the Wesleyans._ At the time of the union with the Bible Christians and the United Methodist Free Church in 1907 the Methodist New Connexion had some 250 ministers and 45,000 members.

    0
    0
  • Among the prominent buildings of the city are a public library, the high school, a theatre (owned by the Knights of Columbus), a Masonic Temple, the City Bank and several churches, of which the most notable, perhaps, are the Baptist, Methodist, and St Gabriel's (Roman Catholic), which is the gift of members of the Iselin family, to whose interest in yachting is due in part the prominence of the New Rochelle and Larchmont Yacht Clubs.

    0
    0
  • Supplementing the educative influence of the schools are the public libraries (161 in number in 1907); the state appropriates $200 to establish, and $100 per annum to maintain, a public library (provided the town in which the library is to be established contributes an equal amount), and the Public Library Committee has for its duty the study of library problems. Higher education is provided by Yale University; by Trinity College, at Hartford (nonsectarian), founded in 1823; by Wesleyan University, at Middletown, the oldest college of the Methodist Church in the United States, founded in 1831; by the Hartford Theological Seminary (1834); by the Connecticut Agricultural College, at Storrs (founded 1881), which has a two years' course of preparation for rural teachers and has an experiment station; by the Connecticut Experiment Station at New Haven, which was established in 1875 at Middletown and was the first in the United States; and by normal schools at New Britain (established 1881), Willimantic (1890), New Haven (1894) and Danbury (1903).

    0
    0
  • He was a Methodist circuit rider and pastor in Indiana and Minnesota (18J7-1866); associate editor (1866-1867) of The Little Corporal, Chicago; editor of The National Sunday School Teacher, Chicago (1867-1870); literary editor and later editor-in-chief of The Independent, New York (1870-1871); and editor of Hearth and Home in 1871-1872.

    0
    0
  • Quincy is the seat of St Francis Solanus College (1860) and St Mary's Institute (Roman Catholic); The Chaddock Boys' School (Methodist Episcopal), until 1900 known as Chaddock College; two schools of music; and the Gem City Business College.

    0
    0
  • Other institutions of higher learning, not under the control of the state, are: the University of Nashville (non-sect., 1785); Washington and Tusculum College (non-sect., 1794), at Greenville; Maryville College (Presbyterian, 1819), at Maryville; Cumberland University (Presbyterian, 1842), at Lebanon; Burritt College (non-sect., 1848), at Spencer; Hiwassee College (non-sect., 1849), at Sweetwater; Bethel College (Presbyterian 1850), at McKenzie; Carson and Newman College (Baptist, 1851), at Jefferson City; Walden University (Methodist, 1866), at Nashville; Fisk University (Congregational, 1866), at Nashville; University of Chattanooga (Methodist, 1867), at Chattanooga; University of the South (Protestant Episcopal, 1868), at Sewanee; King College (Presbyterian, 1869), at Bristol; Christian Brothers College (Roman Catholic, 1871), at Memphis; Knoxville College (United Presbyterian, 1875), at Knoxville; Milligan College (Christian, 1882), at Milligan; South-western Presbyterian College (1885), at Clarkville; and Lincoln Memorial University (non-sect., 1895), at Cumberland Gap.

    0
    0
  • To celebrate the bicentenary a water pump was erected in the small market place in Westgate where he preached the Methodist doctrine.

    0
    0
  • A possible point of confusion I: the former St Peter's Street Methodist chapel, a survivor.

    0
    0
  • Those who heard him lead morning devotions at the Methodist Conference never forgot him.

    0
    0
  • dwindlead comes at Bodmin Methodist Church, where the aging and dwindling congregation faced a similar problem with a huge historic building.

    0
    0
  • farmhouse cider, despite having embraced the Methodist Chapel in 1984.

    0
    0
  • Over the next few years the Methodist campaign became more intense.

    0
    0
  • noted Chinese scholar whose best-known work was his translation of the Methodist Book of Offices for use by the Chinese Church.

    0
    0
  • Pemberton's conference obituary refers to his staunch fidelity to Methodist discipline in the face of opposition.

    0
    0
  • His family, tho members of the Church of England, were in sympathy with the Methodist movement, and suffered obloquy in consequence.

    0
    0
  • former army padre Rev Peter Howson who is now minister of the Inverness Methodist Church.

    0
    0
  • Facing the pub is a private house that was once the village Methodist chapel and nearby the village post office.

    0
    0
  • Even tho agenda were also promulgated by the other Methodist denominations, these do not appear to have survived.

    0
    0
  • The United Reformed Church and the Methodist Church are partners in the Committee that is defining the regions.

    0
    0
  • The British Methodist Church shares the widespread revulsion at the March 11 th bombings in Madrid, and unequivocally condemns them.

    0
    0
  • Francis Macaulay ' s father, the Rev s Macaulay ' s father, the Rev Samuel Macaulay, was a Minister in the Methodist Church.

    0
    0
  • He saw the secession of the Methodist Episcopal Church South in 1844.

    0
    0
  • self-educated man who became a Wesleyan Methodist preacher himself.

    0
    0
  • The Marple Methodist Ladies Association ran a cake stall, the proceeds of which were donated to the ` Friends of NH ` .

    0
    0
  • tercentenary year, his Methodist following numbers 33 million throughout.

    0
    0
  • thanksgiving for the 75 years of worship and witness at Starbeck Methodist Church.

    0
    0
  • To find out, Alan Brown (Southern Methodist University, USA) and colleagues surveyed 218 first-year psychology undergraduates.

    0
    0
  • Mrs. xxxxxxxx did in fact tell the vicar of her local Methodist church of which she is a member.

    0
    0
  • The Methodist bodies with 115,825 communicants (38.4% of the total communicants or members) were the strongest.

    0
    0
  • The principal institutions of higher learning not under state control are Bethany College (Christian, 1841), at Bethany; Morris Harvey College (Methodist Episcopal, Southern, 1888), at Barboursville; West Virginia Wesleyan College (Methodist Episcopal, 1890), at Buckhannon; and Davis and Elkins College (Presbyterian, 1904), at Elkins.

    0
    0
  • The name "Methodist" was given in derision to those Oxford students who in company with the Wesleys used to meet together for spiritual fellowship; and later on when John Wesley had organized his followers into "societies" the name was applied to them in the same spirit.

    0
    0
  • The fact that standards of Methodist doctrine are laid down as consisting of "Mr Wesley's Notes on the New Testament and the 1st Series of his Sermons" (fiftythree in number), might seem to indicate a departure from existing systems, but it was not so.

    0
    0
  • (For the American branches see below.) The statistics given in the following table (not including Junior Society Classes) are from the Minutes of the Confierence of the Wesleyan Methodist Church for 1909.

    0
    0
  • Denver is the seat of the Jesuit college of the Sacred Heart (1888; in the suburbs); and the university of Denver (Methodist, 1889), a co-educational institution, succeeding the Colorado Seminary (founded in 1864 by John Evans), and consisting of a college of liberal arts, a graduate school, Chamberlin astronomical observatory and a preparatory school - these have buildings in University Park - and (near the centre of the city) the Denver and Gross College of Medicine, the Denver law school, a college of music in the building of the old Colorado Seminary, and a Saturday college (with classes specially for professional men).

    0
    0
  • He joined a Methodist society at Burslem, but business taking him at the close of 1800 to the colliery district of Harrisehead and Kidsgrove, he was so impressed by the prevailing ignorance and debasement that he began a religious revival of the district.

    0
    0
  • The Christian Endeavour movement in Great Britain derives, perhaps, its greatest force from its Primitive Methodist members; and the appointment of central missions, connexional evangelists and mission-vans, which tour the more sparsely populated rural districts, witness to a continuance of the original spirit of the denomination, while the more cultured side is fostered by the Hartley lecture.

    0
    0
  • Higher schools include: the State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College (1860) at Baton Rouge; Tulane University of Louisiana (1864) in New Orleans; Jefferson College (1864; Roman Catholic) at Convent; the College of the Immaculate Conception (1847; Roman Catholic) in New Orleans; St Charles College (1835; Roman Catholic) at Grand Couteau; St Joseph's College (1849; Roman Catholic) at Baton Rouge; the following colleges for women - Silliman Collegiate Institute (1852; Presbyterian) at Clinton, Mansfield Female College (1854; Methodist Episcopal, South) at Mansfield, the H.

    0
    0
  • They are A Demonstration of the Gross and Fundamental Errors of a late Book called "A Plain Account, &c., of the Lord's Supper" (1737); The Grounds and Reasons of the Christian Regeneration (1739); An Appeal to all that Doubt and Disbelieve the Truths of Revelation (1740); An Earnest and Serious Answer to Dr Trapp's Sermon on being Righteous Overmuch (1740); The Spirit of Prayer (1749, 1752); The Way to Divine Knowledge (1752); The Spirit of Love (1752, 1754); A Short but Sufficient Confutation of Dr Warburton's Projected Defence (as he calls it) of Christianity in his "Divine Legation of Moses" (1757); A Series of Letters (1760); a Dialogue between a Methodist and a Churchman (1760); and An Humble, Earnest and Affectionate Address to the Clergy (1761).

    0
    0
  • Episcopacy in a stricter sense is the system of the Moravian Brethren and the Methodist Episcopal Church of America (see Methodism).

    0
    0
  • Having educated himself by unremitting exertions, and acquired fluency of speech as a Methodist local preacher, he founded in 1872 the National Agricultural Labourers' Union, of which he was president.

    0
    0
  • In 1849 he became a local Methodist minister, and in the following year emigrated to the United States, where he obtained employment as a hammer maker at Shoemakersville, Pennsylvania.

    0
    0
  • In the Presbyterian churches (see Presbyterianism) a synod is an assembly containing representatives of several presbyteries and intermediate between these and the General Assembly; similarly in the Wesleyan and other Methodist churches the synod is the meeting of the district which links the circuits with the conference.

    0
    0
  • For underneath obvious differences, like the Arminian theology of the Wesleys and the Presbyterian type of their organization, there was latent affinity between a " methodist society " and the original congregational idea of a church; and in practice Methodism, outside the actual control of the Wesleys, in various ways worked out into Congregationalism (see Mackennal, op. cit.

    0
    0
  • Among the most noteworthy churches of Syracuse are the Roman Catholic cathedral of the Immaculate Conception - Syracuse became the see of a Roman Catholic bishop in 1887 - and St Paul's Protestant Episcopal, the first Presbyterian, first Methodist Episcopal, Dutch Reformed and May Memorial (Unitarian) churches, the last erected in memory of Samuel Joseph May (1797-1871), a famous anti-slavery leader, pastor of the church in 1845-1868, and author of Some Recollections of Our Anti-Slavery Conflict (1873).

    0
    0
  • BIBLE CHRISTIANS, one of the denominations now merged in the United Methodist Church (see United Methodists), so called because its early preachers appealed solely to the Bible in confirmation of their doctrines.

    0
    0
  • In 1796, Alexander Kilham, who refused to abstain from agitation for further reform, and accused his brethren of priestcraft, was expelled from their ranks and the New Connexion was formed with 5000 members (see Methodist New Connexion).

    0
    0
  • There are several Spanish hospitals in Manila, in two of which the city's indigent sick are cared for at its expense; in connexion with another a reform school is maintained; and there are a general hospital, built by the government, a government hospital for contagious diseases, a government hospital for government employees, a government hospital for lepers, an army hospital, a free dispensary and hospital supported by American philanthropists, St Paul's hospital (Roman Catholic), University hospital (Protestant Episcopal), and the Mary Johnson hospital (Methodist Episcopal).

    0
    0
  • Colorado College (1874) at Colorado Springs, Christian but not denominational, and the University of Denver, Methodist, are on independent to;: 4 c terling i r ` j `ia Perad°x Cany02 ' ity sse o [y H..

    0
    0
  • Bishop Hurst, by his splendid devotion in 1876-1879, recovered the endowment of Drew Theological Seminary, lost by the failure in 1876 of Daniel Drew, its founder; and with McClintock and Crooks he improved the quality of Methodist scholarship. The American University (Methodist Episcopal) at Washington, D.C., for postgraduate work was the outcome of his projects, and he was its chancellor from 1891 to his death.

    0
    0
  • Francis Macaulay ' s father, the Rev Samuel Macaulay, was a Minister in the Methodist Church.

    0
    0
  • He was a self-educated man who became a Wesleyan Methodist preacher himself.

    0
    0
  • Today, in Wesley 's tercentenary year, his Methodist following numbers 33 million throughout.

    0
    0
  • Part of the thanksgiving for the 75 years of worship and witness at Starbeck Methodist Church.

    0
    0
  • William Arthur, an Irish Methodist loaned to the Wesleyan Missionary Society, was one of the influential theologians of the nineteenth century.

    0
    0
  • In other denominations, such as the Methodist Church, baptism is seen as a commitment to Christ.

    0
    0
  • Cate Blanchett began acting while she was attending the Methodist Ladies College in Melbourne, Australia, appearing in many productions including The Odyssey of Runyon Jones.

    0
    0
  • Cate Blanchett ended up dropping out of the Methodist Ladies College in favor of travelling the world to get an education through life experiences in hopes that her travels would help her decide on a career.

    0
    0
  • The private university is affiliated with the United Methodist Church.

    0
    0
  • Dependents of United Methodist Church ministers can apply for the Ministerial Discount.

    0
    0
  • The highly acclaimed Texas Medical Center, home of M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, The Methodist Hospital, and Memorial Hermann Hospital, is located in the heart of Houston.

    0
    0
  • The Methodist Senior Community network has a reputation for excellent service provided by caring staff members.

    0
    0
  • United Methodist senior communities are located in a variety of states.

    0
    0
  • This not-for-profit senior community is sponsored by the Chelsea Area Wellness Foundation in conjunction with the United Methodist Retirement Communities.

    0
    0
  • Aside from the original location in Michigan, Methodist senior communities can be found throughout the United States.

    0
    0
  • With such varied locations, seniors are sure to find a region that provides the type of climate they hope to enjoy in retirement as well as the benefits of different levels of support services offered by the senior Methodist communities.

    0
    0
  • Methodist Health has a Sleep Center which is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

    0
    0
  • Located in Dallas, TX, Southern Methodist offers an 18-month master's level certificate program in video-game design.

    0
    0
  • About a century prior to that, Charles Wesley, brother of the founder of the Methodist Church, John Wesley, wrote about the glory of heaven under Christ.

    0
    0
  • Any couple may have different religious backgrounds, whether drastically different, such as a Christian dating a Buddhist, or it can be more subtle, like a Presbyterian dating a Methodist.

    0
    0
  • Since he was a cheerleader at Southern Methodist University during a time when their football team was experiencing extreme popularity, a lot of people saw him perform this new stunt, and it was soon named after him.

    0
    0
  • She was also rather active in the local church, St. John's United Methodist Church.

    0
    0
  • After graduating from Marymount High School in Los Angeles, Kourtney Kardashian attended Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, for two years.

    0
    0
  • Work begun in Australia and New Zealand prospered, and the former country finally contributed over 1 i,000 members to the formation of the United Methodist Church of Australia, New Zealand with its 2600 members preferring to remain connected with the home country.

    0
    1
  • The Canadian churches had a good record, consummated in 1884 when they contributed 8000 members and ioo ministers to the United Methodist Church of the Dominion.

    0
    1
  • The city has, besides, numerous fine office buildings, including that of the Society for Savings (an institution in which each depositor is virtually a stockholder), the Citizens', Rose, Williamson, Rockefeller, New England and Garfield buildings; and several beautiful churches, notably the Roman Catholic and Trinity cathedrals, the First Presbyterian ("Old Stone"), the Second Presbyterian, the First Methodist and Plymouth (Congregational) churches.

    0
    1
  • Salem is the seat of Willamette University (Methodist Episcopal, 1844), an outgrowth of the mission work of the Methodist Episcopal church begun in 1834 about 10 m.

    0
    1
Browse other sentences examples →