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methodism

methodism

methodism Sentence Examples

  • METHODISM, a term' denoting the religious organizations which trace their origin to the evangelistic teaching of John Wesley.

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  • Methodism began in a revival of personal religion, and it professed to have but one aim, viz.

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  • The extent to which the employment of the local preacher is characteristic of Methodism may be seen from the fact that in the United Kingdom while there are only about 5000 Methodist ministers, there are more than 18,000 congregations; some 13,000 congregations, chiefly in the villages, are dependent on local preachers.

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  • Methodism has always been aggressive, and her children on emigrating have taken with them their evangelistic methods.

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  • See A New History of Methodism, ed.

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  • The intention was to make American Methodism a facsimile of that in England, subject to Wesley and the British Conference-a society and not a Church.

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  • Methodism In The United States >>

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  • In 1790 he was converted to Methodism, and in 1796 determined to devote himself to preaching that faith among the Pennsylvania Germans.

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  • When he landed in Philadelphia in October 1771, the converts to Methodism, which had been introduced into the colonies only three years before, numbered scarcely 300.

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  • The greatest testimony to the work that earned for him the title of the "Father of American Methodism" was the growth of the denomination from a few scattered bands of about 300 converts and 4 preachers in 1771, to a thoroughly organized church of 214,000 members and more than 2000 ministers at his death, which occurred at Spottsylvania, Virginia, on the 31st of March 1816.

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  • Wakeley, Heroes of Methodism (New York, 1856); W.

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  • Du Bose, Francis Asbury (Nashville, Tenn., 1909); see also under Methodism.

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  • THE PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH, a community of nonconformists, which owes its origin to the fact that Methodism as founded by the Wesleys tended, after the first generation, to depart from the enthusiasm that had marked its inception and to settle down to the task of self-organization.

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  • One of the men to whom Primitive Methodism owes its existence was Hugh Bourne (1772-1852), a millwright of Stoke-upon-Trent.

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  • 1805) of the joint founder of Primitive Methodism, William Clowes (1780-1851), a native of Burslem, who had come to Tunstall.

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  • Lorenzo Dow (1777-1834), an eccentric American Methodist revivalist, visited North Staffordshire and spoke of the campmeetings held in America, with the result that on the 31st of May 1807 the first real English gathering of the kind was held on Mow Cop, since regarded as the Mecca of Primitive Methodism.

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  • Clowes, who, in spite of his revivalist sympathies, was more attached to Methodism than Bourne, was cut off from his church for taking part in camp-meetings at Ramsor in 1808 and 1810.

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  • The first distinct period in the history of Primitive Methodism proper is 1811-1843.

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  • The years1842-1853mark a transition period in the history of Primitive Methodism.

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  • Antliff, Thomas Bateman and Henry Hodge) finds Primitive Methodism as a connexion of federated districts, a unity which may be described as mechanical rather than organic. The districts between 1853 and 1873 were ten in number, Tunstall, Nottingham, Hull, Sunderland, Norwich, Manchester, Brinkworth, Leeds, Bristol and London.

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  • The period as a whole had some anxious moments; emigration to the gold-fields and the strife which afflicted Wesleyan Methodism brought loss and confusion between 1853 and 1860.

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  • Since 1885 Primitive Methodism has been developing from a "Connexion" into a "Church," the designation employed since 1902.

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  • He calls this the second rise of Methodism, the first being at Oxford in November 1729.

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  • The conviction which then flashed upon one of the most powerful and most active intellects in England is the true source of English Methodism" (History of England in Eighteenth Century, ii.

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  • Wesley describes this as the third beginning of Methodism.

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  • The centenary of Methodism was kept in 1839, a hundred years after the society first met at the Foundery.

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  • Methodism this year spread out from Birstal into the West Riding.

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  • This necessity grew more urgent every year as Methodism extended.

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  • n the early conversations doctrine took a prominent place, but as Methodism spread the oversight of its growing organization occupied more time and more attention.

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  • In 1771, Francis Asbury, the Wesley of America, crossed the Atlantic. Methodism grew rapidly, and it became essential to provide its people with the sacraments.

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  • His long life enabled him to perfect the organization of Methodism and to inspire his preachers and people with his own ideals, while he had conquered opposition by unwearying patience and by close adherence to the principles which he sought to teach.

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  • See also METHODISM, and the articles on the separate Methodist bodies; see also WESLEY FAMILY (J.

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  • is Trevecca, where Howel Harris, one of the founders of Welsh Methodism, was born in 1713, and where in 1752 he established a communistic religious "family" of about a hundred persons; their representatives in 1842 handed over the property to the Welsh Calvinistic Methodist connexion, who in that year opened there a theological college, and in 1874 added to it a Harris memorial chapel.

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  • In 18 To, owing to the growth of Methodism and the lack of ordained ministers, he led the Connexion in the movement for connexionally ordained ministers, and his influence was the chief factor in the success of that important step. From 1811 to 1814 his energy was mainly devoted to establishing auxiliary Bible Societies.

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  • As a preacher he early attained great popularity, and Was, albeit unjustly, accused of Methodism.

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  • This system was known as methodism, its adherents as the methodici or methodists.

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  • In their train came the great field preachers of Wales, like John Elias and Christmas Evans, and later the Primitive Methodists, who by their camp meetings and itinerancies kept religious enthusiasm alive when Wesleyan Methodism was in peril of hardening.

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  • The modern use of the term " chapel " seems to date only from Methodism (Mackennal, p. 165).

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  • Methodism >>

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  • A notable event in the history of Welsh Methodism was the publication in 1770, of a 4to annotated Welsh Bible by the Rev. Peter Williams, a forceful preacher, and an indefatigable worker, who had joined the Methodists in 1746, after being driven from several curacies.

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  • The ignorance of the people of the north made it very difficult for Methodism to benefit from these manifestations, until the advent of the Rev. Thomas Charles (1755-1814), who, having spent five years in Somersetshire as curate of several parishes, returned to his native land to marry Sarah Jones of Bala.

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  • Those of 1735, 1762, 1780 and 1791 have been mentioned; those of 1817, 1832, 1859 and 1904-1905 were no less powerful, and their history is interwoven with Calvinistic Methodism, the system of which is so admirably adapted for the passing on of the torch.

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  • NONCONFORMITY For the history of the gradual relief of nonconformists in England from their disabilities see English History, Baptists, Congregationalism, Methodism, Friends, Society Of, &C.; also Oath.

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  • See Methodism.

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  • WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH, one of the chief branches of Methodism.

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  • Their object was to prevent Methodism becoming independent.

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  • On the 4th of May eighteen laymen met at Hull and expressed their conviction that the useful ness of Methodism would be promoted by its continued connexion with the Church of England.

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  • As to the sacraments and the relations of Methodism to the Church of England the decision was: "We engage to follow strictly the plan which Mr Wesley left us."

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  • Some held that it forbade the administration of the sacraments except where they were already permitted; others maintained that it left Methodism free to follow the leadings of Providence as Wesley had always done.

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  • The constitution of Methodism thus practically took the shape which it retained till the admission of lay representatives to conference in 1878.

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  • No period in the history of Methodism was more critical than this, and in none was the prudence and good sense of its leaders more conspicuous.

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  • Meanwhile, Methodism was growing into a great missionary church.

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  • The burden of superintending these missions and providing funds for their support rested on Dr Coke, who took his place as the missionary bishop of Methodism.

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  • The Centenary of Methodism was celebrated in 1839 and £221,939 was raised as a thank-offering: £71,609 was devoted to the colleges at Didsbury and Richmond; £70,000 was given to the missionary society, which spent £30,000 on the site and building of a missionhouse in Bishopsgate Within; £38,000 was set apart for the removal of chapel debts, &c.

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  • Methodism was now recognized as one of the great moral and spiritual forces of the world.

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  • There was much jealousy of Dr Bunting, the master mind of Methodism, to whose foresight and wisdom large part of its success was due.

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  • Methodism began its work for popular education in a very modest way.

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  • Besides its dayschools, Methodism possesses the Leys School at Cambridge, Rydal Mount at Colwyn Bay and prosperous boarding-schools for boys and girls in many parts of the country.

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  • Methodism has from the beginning done much work in the army.

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  • The Forward Movement in Methodism dates from that period.

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  • Methodism realized its strength and its obligations.

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  • Village Methodism shared in the quickening which the Forward Movement brought to the large towns.

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  • "Sisters of the People" and deaconesses, for whom there is a training home at Ilkley, founded by Dr Stephenson in 1902, have also done much to help in these modern developments of Methodism.

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  • London Methodism owes more than can be told to the Metropolitan Chapel Building Fund which was founded in 1861.

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  • The Wesley Guild Movement, established in 1901, has its headquarters in Leeds and is doing a great work for the young people of Methodism.

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  • The Methodist Assembly which met in Wesley's Chapel, London, in 1909 brought the branches of British Methodism together with good results.

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  • Eayrs, A New History of Methodism (1909); Poetical Works of J.

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  • It was called Lebanon Seminary until 1830, when the present name was adopted in honour of William McKendree (1757-1835), known as the "Father of Western Methodism," a great preacher, and a bishop of the Methodist Church in 1808-1835, who had endowed the college with 480 acres of land.

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  • He published A Hundred Years of Methodism (1876) a Cyclopedia of Methodism (1878); Lectures on Preaching (1879), delivered before the Theological Department of Yale College; and a volume of his Sermons (1885) was edited by George R.

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  • In1865-1866he was chairman of the central committee for the celebration of the centenary of American Methodism.

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  • A great preacher, orator and teacher, and a remarkably versatile scholar, McClintock by his editorial and educational work probably did more than any other man to raise the intellectual tone of American Methodism, and, particularly, of the American Methodist clergy.

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  • He made in 1762 a vigorous attack on Methodism under the title of The Doctrine of Grace.

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  • What was new was that Wesley added an organization, Methodism (qi;), in which each of his followers unfolded to one another the secrets of their heart, and became accountable to his fellows.

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  • The theologian of English Methodism, apart from John Wesley himself, is Richard Watson.

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  • Fifth, there is the question of the means whereby British Methodism should receive the historic episcopate.

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  • founder of Methodism.

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  • But we still claim that Methodism was raised up by God to spread scriptural holiness throughout the land.

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  • primitive Methodism was by far the most popular form of all the dissenting religions.

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  • METHODISM, a term' denoting the religious organizations which trace their origin to the evangelistic teaching of John Wesley.

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  • Methodism began in a revival of personal religion, and it professed to have but one aim, viz.

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  • It was the zeal with which they were taught, the clear distinction which they drew between the profession of godliness and the enjoyment of its power - added to the emphasis they laid upon the immediate influence of the Holy Spirit on the consciousness 1 "Methodism" is derived from "method" (Gr.

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  • The extent to which the employment of the local preacher is characteristic of Methodism may be seen from the fact that in the United Kingdom while there are only about 5000 Methodist ministers, there are more than 18,000 congregations; some 13,000 congregations, chiefly in the villages, are dependent on local preachers.

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  • Methodism has always been aggressive, and her children on emigrating have taken with them their evangelistic methods.

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  • See A New History of Methodism, ed.

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  • The intention was to make American Methodism a facsimile of that in England, subject to Wesley and the British Conference-a society and not a Church.

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  • Methodism In The United States >>

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  • In 1790 he was converted to Methodism, and in 1796 determined to devote himself to preaching that faith among the Pennsylvania Germans.

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  • It seems probable that his parents were among the early converts of Wesley; at any rate, Francis became converted to Methodism in his thirteenth year, and at sixteen became a local preacher.

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  • When he landed in Philadelphia in October 1771, the converts to Methodism, which had been introduced into the colonies only three years before, numbered scarcely 300.

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  • The greatest testimony to the work that earned for him the title of the "Father of American Methodism" was the growth of the denomination from a few scattered bands of about 300 converts and 4 preachers in 1771, to a thoroughly organized church of 214,000 members and more than 2000 ministers at his death, which occurred at Spottsylvania, Virginia, on the 31st of March 1816.

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  • Wakeley, Heroes of Methodism (New York, 1856); W.

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  • Du Bose, Francis Asbury (Nashville, Tenn., 1909); see also under Methodism.

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  • THE PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH, a community of nonconformists, which owes its origin to the fact that Methodism as founded by the Wesleys tended, after the first generation, to depart from the enthusiasm that had marked its inception and to settle down to the task of self-organization.

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  • One of the men to whom Primitive Methodism owes its existence was Hugh Bourne (1772-1852), a millwright of Stoke-upon-Trent.

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  • 1805) of the joint founder of Primitive Methodism, William Clowes (1780-1851), a native of Burslem, who had come to Tunstall.

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  • Lorenzo Dow (1777-1834), an eccentric American Methodist revivalist, visited North Staffordshire and spoke of the campmeetings held in America, with the result that on the 31st of May 1807 the first real English gathering of the kind was held on Mow Cop, since regarded as the Mecca of Primitive Methodism.

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  • Clowes, who, in spite of his revivalist sympathies, was more attached to Methodism than Bourne, was cut off from his church for taking part in camp-meetings at Ramsor in 1808 and 1810.

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  • The first distinct period in the history of Primitive Methodism proper is 1811-1843.

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  • The years1842-1853mark a transition period in the history of Primitive Methodism.

    0
    0
  • Antliff, Thomas Bateman and Henry Hodge) finds Primitive Methodism as a connexion of federated districts, a unity which may be described as mechanical rather than organic. The districts between 1853 and 1873 were ten in number, Tunstall, Nottingham, Hull, Sunderland, Norwich, Manchester, Brinkworth, Leeds, Bristol and London.

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  • The period as a whole had some anxious moments; emigration to the gold-fields and the strife which afflicted Wesleyan Methodism brought loss and confusion between 1853 and 1860.

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  • Since 1885 Primitive Methodism has been developing from a "Connexion" into a "Church," the designation employed since 1902.

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  • He calls this the second rise of Methodism, the first being at Oxford in November 1729.

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  • The conviction which then flashed upon one of the most powerful and most active intellects in England is the true source of English Methodism" (History of England in Eighteenth Century, ii.

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  • Wesley describes this as the third beginning of Methodism.

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  • The centenary of Methodism was kept in 1839, a hundred years after the society first met at the Foundery.

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  • Methodism this year spread out from Birstal into the West Riding.

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  • This necessity grew more urgent every year as Methodism extended.

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    0
  • n the early conversations doctrine took a prominent place, but as Methodism spread the oversight of its growing organization occupied more time and more attention.

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  • In 1771, Francis Asbury, the Wesley of America, crossed the Atlantic. Methodism grew rapidly, and it became essential to provide its people with the sacraments.

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  • Wesley had reached the conclusion in 1746 that bishops and presbyters were essentially of one order (see Methodism, sect.

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  • His long life enabled him to perfect the organization of Methodism and to inspire his preachers and people with his own ideals, while he had conquered opposition by unwearying patience and by close adherence to the principles which he sought to teach.

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  • See also METHODISM, and the articles on the separate Methodist bodies; see also WESLEY FAMILY (J.

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  • is Trevecca, where Howel Harris, one of the founders of Welsh Methodism, was born in 1713, and where in 1752 he established a communistic religious "family" of about a hundred persons; their representatives in 1842 handed over the property to the Welsh Calvinistic Methodist connexion, who in that year opened there a theological college, and in 1874 added to it a Harris memorial chapel.

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  • In 18 To, owing to the growth of Methodism and the lack of ordained ministers, he led the Connexion in the movement for connexionally ordained ministers, and his influence was the chief factor in the success of that important step. From 1811 to 1814 his energy was mainly devoted to establishing auxiliary Bible Societies.

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  • As a preacher he early attained great popularity, and Was, albeit unjustly, accused of Methodism.

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  • Episcopacy in a stricter sense is the system of the Moravian Brethren and the Methodist Episcopal Church of America (see Methodism).

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  • This system was known as methodism, its adherents as the methodici or methodists.

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  • In their train came the great field preachers of Wales, like John Elias and Christmas Evans, and later the Primitive Methodists, who by their camp meetings and itinerancies kept religious enthusiasm alive when Wesleyan Methodism was in peril of hardening.

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  • For underneath obvious differences, like the Arminian theology of the Wesleys and the Presbyterian type of their organization, there was latent affinity between a " methodist society " and the original congregational idea of a church; and in practice Methodism, outside the actual control of the Wesleys, in various ways worked out into Congregationalism (see Mackennal, op. cit.

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  • The modern use of the term " chapel " seems to date only from Methodism (Mackennal, p. 165).

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  • A notable event in the history of Welsh Methodism was the publication in 1770, of a 4to annotated Welsh Bible by the Rev. Peter Williams, a forceful preacher, and an indefatigable worker, who had joined the Methodists in 1746, after being driven from several curacies.

    0
    0
  • The ignorance of the people of the north made it very difficult for Methodism to benefit from these manifestations, until the advent of the Rev. Thomas Charles (1755-1814), who, having spent five years in Somersetshire as curate of several parishes, returned to his native land to marry Sarah Jones of Bala.

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    0
  • Those of 1735, 1762, 1780 and 1791 have been mentioned; those of 1817, 1832, 1859 and 1904-1905 were no less powerful, and their history is interwoven with Calvinistic Methodism, the system of which is so admirably adapted for the passing on of the torch.

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    0
  • NONCONFORMITY For the history of the gradual relief of nonconformists in England from their disabilities see English History, Baptists, Congregationalism, Methodism, Friends, Society Of, &C.; also Oath.

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  • See Methodism.

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  • WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH, one of the chief branches of Methodism.

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  • Their object was to prevent Methodism becoming independent.

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  • On the 4th of May eighteen laymen met at Hull and expressed their conviction that the useful ness of Methodism would be promoted by its continued connexion with the Church of England.

    0
    0
  • As to the sacraments and the relations of Methodism to the Church of England the decision was: "We engage to follow strictly the plan which Mr Wesley left us."

    0
    0
  • Some held that it forbade the administration of the sacraments except where they were already permitted; others maintained that it left Methodism free to follow the leadings of Providence as Wesley had always done.

    0
    0
  • The constitution of Methodism thus practically took the shape which it retained till the admission of lay representatives to conference in 1878.

    0
    0
  • No period in the history of Methodism was more critical than this, and in none was the prudence and good sense of its leaders more conspicuous.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile, Methodism was growing into a great missionary church.

    0
    0
  • The burden of superintending these missions and providing funds for their support rested on Dr Coke, who took his place as the missionary bishop of Methodism.

    0
    0
  • The Centenary of Methodism was celebrated in 1839 and £221,939 was raised as a thank-offering: £71,609 was devoted to the colleges at Didsbury and Richmond; £70,000 was given to the missionary society, which spent £30,000 on the site and building of a missionhouse in Bishopsgate Within; £38,000 was set apart for the removal of chapel debts, &c.

    0
    0
  • Methodism was now recognized as one of the great moral and spiritual forces of the world.

    0
    0
  • There was much jealousy of Dr Bunting, the master mind of Methodism, to whose foresight and wisdom large part of its success was due.

    0
    0
  • James Everett, Samuel Dunn and William Griffith were expelled from the ministry, and an agitation began which robbed Wesleyan Methodism of ioo,000 members.

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  • Methodism began its work for popular education in a very modest way.

    0
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  • Besides its dayschools, Methodism possesses the Leys School at Cambridge, Rydal Mount at Colwyn Bay and prosperous boarding-schools for boys and girls in many parts of the country.

    0
    0
  • Methodism has from the beginning done much work in the army.

    0
    0
  • The Forward Movement in Methodism dates from that period.

    0
    0
  • Methodism realized its strength and its obligations.

    0
    0
  • Village Methodism shared in the quickening which the Forward Movement brought to the large towns.

    0
    0
  • "Sisters of the People" and deaconesses, for whom there is a training home at Ilkley, founded by Dr Stephenson in 1902, have also done much to help in these modern developments of Methodism.

    0
    0
  • London Methodism owes more than can be told to the Metropolitan Chapel Building Fund which was founded in 1861.

    0
    0
  • The Wesley Guild Movement, established in 1901, has its headquarters in Leeds and is doing a great work for the young people of Methodism.

    0
    0
  • The Methodist Assembly which met in Wesley's Chapel, London, in 1909 brought the branches of British Methodism together with good results.

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  • The Royal Aquarium at Westminster was purchased and a central hall and church house as the headquarters of Methodism erected.

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  • Eayrs, A New History of Methodism (1909); Poetical Works of J.

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  • It was called Lebanon Seminary until 1830, when the present name was adopted in honour of William McKendree (1757-1835), known as the "Father of Western Methodism," a great preacher, and a bishop of the Methodist Church in 1808-1835, who had endowed the college with 480 acres of land.

    0
    0
  • He published A Hundred Years of Methodism (1876) a Cyclopedia of Methodism (1878); Lectures on Preaching (1879), delivered before the Theological Department of Yale College; and a volume of his Sermons (1885) was edited by George R.

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  • During the lifetime of Griffith Jones the course of Welsh Methodism had run in orthodox channels and had been generally supported by the Welsh clergy and gentry; but after his death the tendency to exceed the bounds of conventional Church discipline grew so marked as to excite the alarm of the English bishops in Wales.

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  • In1865-1866he was chairman of the central committee for the celebration of the centenary of American Methodism.

    0
    0
  • A great preacher, orator and teacher, and a remarkably versatile scholar, McClintock by his editorial and educational work probably did more than any other man to raise the intellectual tone of American Methodism, and, particularly, of the American Methodist clergy.

    0
    0
  • He made in 1762 a vigorous attack on Methodism under the title of The Doctrine of Grace.

    0
    0
  • What was new was that Wesley added an organization, Methodism (qi;), in which each of his followers unfolded to one another the secrets of their heart, and became accountable to his fellows.

    0
    0
  • The theologian of English Methodism, apart from John Wesley himself, is Richard Watson.

    0
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  • The origin of Methodism in Flash is shrouded in obscurity, .

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  • It seems probable that his parents were among the early converts of Wesley; at any rate, Francis became converted to Methodism in his thirteenth year, and at sixteen became a local preacher.

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