This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

mersey

mersey

mersey Sentence Examples

  • Those of the north-west belong to the Mersey, and those of the north-east to the Don, but all the others to the Trent, which, like the Don, falls into the Humber.

    0
    0
  • direction, divides Derbyshire from Cheshire, and falls into the Mersey.

    0
    0
  • The Trent & Mersey canal crosses the southern part of the county, and there is a branch canal (the Derby) connecting Derby with this and with the Erewash canal, which runs north from the Trent up the Erewash valley.

    0
    0
  • Bridges of this type have been erected at Portugalete, Bizerta, Rouen, Rochefort and more recently across the Mersey between the towns of Widnes and Runcorn.

    0
    0
  • The Runcorn bridge crosses the Manchester Ship Canal and the Mersey in one span of woo ft., and four approach spans of 552 ft.

    0
    0
  • north-west from London by the London & North-Western railway; and on the Grand Trunk (Trent and Mersey) Canal.

    0
    0
  • Septimius Severus made it two provinces, Superior and Inferior, with a boundary which probably ran from Humber to Mersey, but we do not know how long this arrangement lasted.

    0
    0
  • It occupies a hilly site at the junction of the rivers Tame and Mersey; the larger part of the town lying on the south (left) bank, while the suburb of Heaton Norris is on the Lancashire bank.

    0
    0
  • Mersey >>

    0
    0
  • WARRINGTON, a market town and municipal, county and parliamentary borough of Lancashire, England, on the river Mersey, midway between Manchester and Liverpool, and 182 m.

    0
    0
  • During the Civil War the inhabitants embraced the royalist cause and the earl of Derby occupied the town and made it for some time his headquarters in order to secure the passage of the Mersey.

    0
    0
  • of the estuary of the Mersey 16 m.

    0
    0
  • The modern prosperity of the town dates from the completion in 1773 of the Bridgewater Canal, which here descends into the Mersey by a flight of locks.

    0
    0
  • Owing to the Mersey being here fordable at low water,.

    0
    0
  • On a rock which formerly jutted into the Mersey ZEthelfleda.

    0
    0
  • BRIGANTES (Celtic for "mountaineers" or "free, privileged"), a people of northern Britain, who inhabited the country from the mouth of the Abus (Humber) on the east and the Belisama (Mersey; according to others, Ribble) on the west as far northwards as the Wall of Antoninus.

    0
    0
  • BIRKENHEAD, a municipal, county and parliamentary borough, and seaport of Cheshire, England, on the river Mersey, 1 9 5 m.

    0
    0
  • It drew its main revenues from tolls levied at the Mersey ferry; and its prior sat in the parliament of the earls of Chester, enjoying all the dignities and privileges of a Palatinate baron.

    0
    0
  • The rise of Birkenhead, from a hamlet of some 50 inhabitants in 1818 to its present importance, was due in the first place to the foresight and enterprise of William Laird, who purchased in 1824 a few acres of land on the banks of a marshy stream, known as Wallasey Pool, which flowed into the Mersey about 2 m.

    0
    0
  • The docks, which covered an area of 7 acres, were opened in 1847, and after thrice changing hands were made over in 1858 to the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board, a body created by act of 1857, to control the harbourage on both sides of the river.

    0
    0
  • Birkenhead Park was opened in 1847, Mersey Park in 1885; while a tract of moorland 6 m.

    0
    0
  • In 1886 the Mersey tunnel, connecting Birkenhead with Liverpool, was opened by the prince of Wales.

    0
    0
  • Despite competition from the Mersey tunnel, these ferries continue to transport millions of passengers annually, and have a considerable share in the heavy goods traffic.

    0
    0
  • This entire property is now under the authority of the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board.

    0
    0
  • In Lancashire a flat coastal strip occurs between the western front of the Pennine Chain and the Irish Sea, and, widening southward, extends into Cheshire and comprises the lower valleys of the Mersey and the Dee.

    0
    0
  • On the west there are Solway Firth, Morecambe Bay, the estuaries of the Mersey and Dee, Cardigan Bay of the Welsh coast, and the Bristol Channel and Severn estuary.

    0
    0
  • from the Mersey, Severn and Wash.

    0
    0
  • Region, which stretches from the Scottish border to the division centre of England, running south; (3) Wales, occupying the peninsula between the Mersey and the Bristol Channel, and extending beyond the political boundaries of the principality to include Shropshire and Hereford; and (4) the peninsula of Cornwall and Devon.

    0
    0
  • The plain sweeps round south of the Lancashire coal-field, forms the valley of the Mersey from Stockport to the sea, and farther south in Cheshire the salt-bearing beds of the Keuper marls give rise to a characteristic industry.

    0
    0
  • It is more usual to tunnel under such channels, and the numerous Thames tunnels, the Mersey tunnel between Liverpool and Birkenhead, and the Severn tunnel, the longest in the British Islands (42 m.), on the routes from London to South Wales, and from Bristol to the north of England, are all important.

    0
    0
  • The mean annual temperature diminishes very regularly from south-west to northeast, the west coast being warmer than the east, so that the mean temperature at the mouth of the Mersey is as high as that at the mouth of the Thames.

    0
    0
  • The Mersey estuary, being partly sheltered by Ireland and North Wales, does not serve as an inlet for modifying influences to the same extent as the Bristol Channel: and as the wind entering by it blows squarely against the slope of the Pennine Chain, it does not much affect the climate of the midland plain.

    0
    0
  • Maintains docks at Garston on the Mersey, a steamship traffic with Dublin and Greenore from Holyhead, and, jointly with the Lancashire & Yorkshire Company, a service to Belfast, &c., from Fleetwood.

    0
    0
  • The lower or estuarine courses of some of the English rivers as the Thames, Tyne, Humber, Mersey and Bristol Avon, are among the most important waterways in the world, as giving access for seaborne traffic to great ports.

    0
    0
  • From the Mersey the Manchester Ship Canal runs to Manchester.

    0
    0
  • The main line of the Aire and Calder navigation runs from Goole by Castleford to Leeds, whence the Leeds and Liverpool canal, running by Burnley and Blackburn, completes the connexion between the Humber and the Mersey.

    0
    0
  • The Trent itself affords an extensive navigation, from which, at Derwent mouth, the Trent and Mersey Canal runs near Burton and Stafford, and through the Potteries, to the Bridgewater Canal and so to the Mersey.

    0
    0
  • The river Weaver, a tributary of the Mersey, affords a waterway of importance to the salt-producing towns of Cheshire.

    0
    0
  • It lies in open country near the river Dane, having water communications by the Trent and Mersey canal, and a branch giving access to the Shropshire Union canal.

    0
    0
  • BOOTLE, a municipal and county borough in the Bootle parliamentary division of Lancashire, England; at the mouth of the Mersey, forming a northern suburb of Liverpool.

    0
    0
  • The great docks on this, the east bank of the Mersey, extend into the borough, but are considered as a whole under Liverpool.

    0
    0
  • Perhaps the first important cases occurred in the earlier part of the 19th century on the Lancashire shore of the Mersey estuary, where, one after another, deep wells in the New Red Sandstone had to be abandoned for most purposes.

    0
    0
  • 613), and occupying the land about the mouths of the Mersey and the Dee.

    0
    0
  • from the town, with the Trent and Mersey Canal on a higher level.

    0
    0
  • ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE, a market-town and municipal and parliamentary borough of Lancashire, England, on the river Tame, a tributary of the Mersey, 185 m.

    0
    0
  • Among the rivers flowing northward to Bass Strait are the Tamar, Inglis, Cam, Emu, Blyth, Forth, Don, Mersey, Piper and Ringarooma.

    0
    0
  • The Carboniferous rocks occupy the whole of the south-eastern corner of Tasmania; and one outlier occurs on the northern coast in the Mersey Valley.

    0
    0
  • Its mineral wealth was not suspected, although as far back as 1850 coal of fair quality had been found between the Dee and the Mersey rivers, and gold had been discovered in two or three localities during 1852.

    0
    0
  • On a stretch of land, near the shoreline of the Mersey, is located a duck decoy dating from the 17th century.

    0
    0
  • Mersey River Rescue has caught the lost sailing dingy.

    0
    0
  • Mersey players were also involved in some minor fracas.

    0
    0
  • The angling fraternity has a choice of fishing on the village pond, the Trent & Mersey canal or the River Trent.

    0
    0
  • She was also capable of withstanding gales, which regularly sweep the Mersey Estuary, especially during the winter months.

    0
    0
  • keelboat sailing on the Mersey straight from the city center all year round.

    0
    0
  • South Park in Bootle was given a nautical navy makeover by the crew of HMS Mersey.

    0
    0
  • On the estuary side from the rather moribund Weston Point Docks was the now derelict Weston Mersey side lock down to the Mersey.

    0
    0
  • Heart of Mersey has attracted plaudits from the health sector for its excellent work in raising awareness of coronary disease prevention.

    0
    0
  • keelboat sailing on the Mersey straight from the city center all year round.

    0
    0
  • August 1806 Mersey & Irwell Navigation He was ordered to have steamboats built for the company's Manchester to Runcorn passenger services.

    0
    0
  • Located on the city's breathtaking waterfront, the hotel boasts fantastic views over the River Mersey.

    0
    0
  • WIDNES, a municipal borough in the Widnes parliamentary division of Lancashire, England, on the Mersey, 12 m.

    0
    0
  • Those of the north-west belong to the Mersey, and those of the north-east to the Don, but all the others to the Trent, which, like the Don, falls into the Humber.

    0
    0
  • direction, divides Derbyshire from Cheshire, and falls into the Mersey.

    0
    0
  • The Trent & Mersey canal crosses the southern part of the county, and there is a branch canal (the Derby) connecting Derby with this and with the Erewash canal, which runs north from the Trent up the Erewash valley.

    0
    0
  • Bridges of this type have been erected at Portugalete, Bizerta, Rouen, Rochefort and more recently across the Mersey between the towns of Widnes and Runcorn.

    0
    0
  • The Runcorn bridge crosses the Manchester Ship Canal and the Mersey in one span of woo ft., and four approach spans of 552 ft.

    0
    0
  • north-west from London by the London & North-Western railway; and on the Grand Trunk (Trent and Mersey) Canal.

    0
    0
  • Septimius Severus made it two provinces, Superior and Inferior, with a boundary which probably ran from Humber to Mersey, but we do not know how long this arrangement lasted.

    0
    0
  • It occupies a hilly site at the junction of the rivers Tame and Mersey; the larger part of the town lying on the south (left) bank, while the suburb of Heaton Norris is on the Lancashire bank.

    0
    0
  • p. 60, " Mersey Railway Lifts "; vol.

    0
    0
  • He was most active and energetic in his efforts, not only for the improvement of Stafford - shire pottery, but almost equally so for the improvement of turnpike roads, the construction of a canal (the Trent & Mersey) and the founding of schools and chapels.

    0
    0
  • WARRINGTON, a market town and municipal, county and parliamentary borough of Lancashire, England, on the river Mersey, midway between Manchester and Liverpool, and 182 m.

    0
    0
  • During the Civil War the inhabitants embraced the royalist cause and the earl of Derby occupied the town and made it for some time his headquarters in order to secure the passage of the Mersey.

    0
    0
  • of the estuary of the Mersey 16 m.

    0
    0
  • The modern prosperity of the town dates from the completion in 1773 of the Bridgewater Canal, which here descends into the Mersey by a flight of locks.

    0
    0
  • Owing to the Mersey being here fordable at low water,.

    0
    0
  • On a rock which formerly jutted into the Mersey ZEthelfleda.

    0
    0
  • BRIGANTES (Celtic for "mountaineers" or "free, privileged"), a people of northern Britain, who inhabited the country from the mouth of the Abus (Humber) on the east and the Belisama (Mersey; according to others, Ribble) on the west as far northwards as the Wall of Antoninus.

    0
    0
  • BIRKENHEAD, a municipal, county and parliamentary borough, and seaport of Cheshire, England, on the river Mersey, 1 9 5 m.

    0
    0
  • It drew its main revenues from tolls levied at the Mersey ferry; and its prior sat in the parliament of the earls of Chester, enjoying all the dignities and privileges of a Palatinate baron.

    0
    0
  • The rise of Birkenhead, from a hamlet of some 50 inhabitants in 1818 to its present importance, was due in the first place to the foresight and enterprise of William Laird, who purchased in 1824 a few acres of land on the banks of a marshy stream, known as Wallasey Pool, which flowed into the Mersey about 2 m.

    0
    0
  • The docks, which covered an area of 7 acres, were opened in 1847, and after thrice changing hands were made over in 1858 to the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board, a body created by act of 1857, to control the harbourage on both sides of the river.

    0
    0
  • Birkenhead Park was opened in 1847, Mersey Park in 1885; while a tract of moorland 6 m.

    0
    0
  • In 1886 the Mersey tunnel, connecting Birkenhead with Liverpool, was opened by the prince of Wales.

    0
    0
  • Despite competition from the Mersey tunnel, these ferries continue to transport millions of passengers annually, and have a considerable share in the heavy goods traffic.

    0
    0
  • This entire property is now under the authority of the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board.

    0
    0
  • In Lancashire a flat coastal strip occurs between the western front of the Pennine Chain and the Irish Sea, and, widening southward, extends into Cheshire and comprises the lower valleys of the Mersey and the Dee.

    0
    0
  • On the west there are Solway Firth, Morecambe Bay, the estuaries of the Mersey and Dee, Cardigan Bay of the Welsh coast, and the Bristol Channel and Severn estuary.

    0
    0
  • from the Mersey, Severn and Wash.

    0
    0
  • Region, which stretches from the Scottish border to the division centre of England, running south; (3) Wales, occupying the peninsula between the Mersey and the Bristol Channel, and extending beyond the political boundaries of the principality to include Shropshire and Hereford; and (4) the peninsula of Cornwall and Devon.

    0
    0
  • The plain sweeps round south of the Lancashire coal-field, forms the valley of the Mersey from Stockport to the sea, and farther south in Cheshire the salt-bearing beds of the Keuper marls give rise to a characteristic industry.

    0
    0
  • It is more usual to tunnel under such channels, and the numerous Thames tunnels, the Mersey tunnel between Liverpool and Birkenhead, and the Severn tunnel, the longest in the British Islands (42 m.), on the routes from London to South Wales, and from Bristol to the north of England, are all important.

    0
    0
  • The mean annual temperature diminishes very regularly from south-west to northeast, the west coast being warmer than the east, so that the mean temperature at the mouth of the Mersey is as high as that at the mouth of the Thames.

    0
    0
  • The Mersey estuary, being partly sheltered by Ireland and North Wales, does not serve as an inlet for modifying influences to the same extent as the Bristol Channel: and as the wind entering by it blows squarely against the slope of the Pennine Chain, it does not much affect the climate of the midland plain.

    0
    0
  • Maintains docks at Garston on the Mersey, a steamship traffic with Dublin and Greenore from Holyhead, and, jointly with the Lancashire & Yorkshire Company, a service to Belfast, &c., from Fleetwood.

    0
    0
  • The lower or estuarine courses of some of the English rivers as the Thames, Tyne, Humber, Mersey and Bristol Avon, are among the most important waterways in the world, as giving access for seaborne traffic to great ports.

    0
    0
  • From the Mersey the Manchester Ship Canal runs to Manchester.

    0
    0
  • The main line of the Aire and Calder navigation runs from Goole by Castleford to Leeds, whence the Leeds and Liverpool canal, running by Burnley and Blackburn, completes the connexion between the Humber and the Mersey.

    0
    0
  • The Trent itself affords an extensive navigation, from which, at Derwent mouth, the Trent and Mersey Canal runs near Burton and Stafford, and through the Potteries, to the Bridgewater Canal and so to the Mersey.

    0
    0
  • The river Weaver, a tributary of the Mersey, affords a waterway of importance to the salt-producing towns of Cheshire.

    0
    0
  • It lies in open country near the river Dane, having water communications by the Trent and Mersey canal, and a branch giving access to the Shropshire Union canal.

    0
    0
  • BOOTLE, a municipal and county borough in the Bootle parliamentary division of Lancashire, England; at the mouth of the Mersey, forming a northern suburb of Liverpool.

    0
    0
  • The great docks on this, the east bank of the Mersey, extend into the borough, but are considered as a whole under Liverpool.

    0
    0
  • Perhaps the first important cases occurred in the earlier part of the 19th century on the Lancashire shore of the Mersey estuary, where, one after another, deep wells in the New Red Sandstone had to be abandoned for most purposes.

    0
    0
  • 613), and occupying the land about the mouths of the Mersey and the Dee.

    0
    0
  • from the town, with the Trent and Mersey Canal on a higher level.

    0
    0
  • ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE, a market-town and municipal and parliamentary borough of Lancashire, England, on the river Tame, a tributary of the Mersey, 185 m.

    0
    0
  • Among the rivers flowing northward to Bass Strait are the Tamar, Inglis, Cam, Emu, Blyth, Forth, Don, Mersey, Piper and Ringarooma.

    0
    0
  • The Carboniferous rocks occupy the whole of the south-eastern corner of Tasmania; and one outlier occurs on the northern coast in the Mersey Valley.

    0
    0
  • Its mineral wealth was not suspected, although as far back as 1850 coal of fair quality had been found between the Dee and the Mersey rivers, and gold had been discovered in two or three localities during 1852.

    0
    0
  • August 1806 Mersey & Irwell Navigation He was ordered to have steamboats built for the company 's Manchester to Runcorn passenger services.

    0
    0
  • The bow of the Mersey Harbor and Docks Board suction dredger and assorted light floats in for refurbishment.

    0
    0
  • Located on the city 's breathtaking waterfront, the hotel boasts fantastic views over the River Mersey.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →