Merovingian sentence example

merovingian
  • Under the Merovingian kings the abbey of St Germain, named after the 6th bishop, was founded, and in the 9th century its schools had made the town a seat of learning.
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  • Under the empire Arvernia formed part of Prima Aquitania, and the district shared in the fortunes of Aquitaine during the Merovingian and Carolingian periods.
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  • His graduation thesis, published in 1819, on the history of the Merovingian mayors of the palace, attracted the attention of Baron Stein, by whom he was engaged in 1820 to edit the Carolingian chroniclers for the newly-founded Historical Society of Germany.
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  • In the Merovingian period it formed a duchy attached to the kingdom of Austrasia, and was governed by the descendants of duke Eticho, one of whom was St Odilia.
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  • In 743, however, the mayors decided to appoint a king in the person of Childeric III., who was apparently connected with the Merovingian family.
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  • Early Hesse was the district around the Fulda, the Werra, the Eder and the Lahn, and was part of the Frankish kingdom both during Merovingian and during Carolingian times.
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  • Of the Merovingian period there are still extant several papyrus deeds, the earliest of the year 625, the latest of 692.
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  • Under the kings of the third dynasty, the division of the kingdom among the sons of the dead monarch which had characterized the Merovingian and Carolingian dynasties, ceased.
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  • The Frankish kings of the Merovingian dynasty retained the Roman system of administration, and under them the word comes preserved its original meaning; the comes was a companion of the king, a royal servant of high rank.
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  • It is possible that chapter i., De mannire, was taken from a Merovingian capitulary and afterwards placed at the beginning of the Salic Law.
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  • The scale of judicial fines is given in the denarius (" which makes so many solidi"), and it is known that the monetary system of the solidus did not appear until the Merovingian period.
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  • These changes characterize the Merovingian age of Frankish history.
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  • Grants of land of the Merovingian kings had carried with them ownership and not a limited right, and the king's patrocinium had not widened in extent in the direction of the later vassal relation.
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  • Suggested probably by Roman practices, possibly developed directly from them, it received a great extension in the Merovingian period, at first and especially in the interest of the Church, but soon of lay land-holders.
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  • We have traced a definite line of descent for feudal institutions from Roman days through the Merovingian and Carolingian ages to the 10th century.
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  • The romances of this cycle, of Germanic (Frankish) origin and developed probably in the north of France by the French (probably in the north of France) contain reminiscences of the heroes of the Merovingian period, and in their later development were influenced by the Arthurian cycle.
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  • Having in general shared the fortunes of Aquitaine during the Merovingian and Carolingian periods, Agenais next became an hereditary countship in the part of the country now called Gascony (Vasconia).
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  • Boppard (Baudobriga) was founded by the Romans; under the Merovingian dynasty it became a royal residence.
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  • We cannot say whose son he was, or what bonds bound him to the Merovingian family.
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  • Under him the Merovingian monarchy attained its culminating point.
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  • From the death of Clovis to that of Dagobert (639), the Merovingian kings displayed considerable energy, both in their foreign wars and in the numerous wars against one another in which they found an outlet for their barbarian instincts.
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  • The Merovingian race thus came to an end in the cloister.
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  • Pippin and his son Charles Martel, who was mayor of the palace from 717 to 741, renewed the struggle with the Germans and were soon successful in re-establishing the central power which the Merovingian kings had allowed to slip from their grasp. The ducal office was abolished in Thuringia, a series of wars reduced the Alamanni to strict dependence, and both countries were governed by Frankish officials.
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  • All historians of Merovingian institutions and law have treated of the antrustions, and each one has his different system.
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  • He devoted, however, to this period three folio volumes (Gesta Francorum seu rerum francicarum tomi tres, 1646-1658), which form a critical commentary of much value, and in many points new, on the chroniclers of the Merovingian age.
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  • His study on the palaces constructed by the Merovingian kings (De basilicas quas primi Francorum reges condiderunt, 1658-1660) is noteworthy in this connexion.
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  • Each looked for support to a different Merovingian king, Ebroin even proclaiming a false Merovingian as sovereign.
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  • Chilperic may be regarded as the type of Merovingian sovereigns.
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  • Extensive burial-grounds, ranging in date from neolithic to Merovingian times, have recently been discovered near the city.
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  • Worms was known in Roman times as Borbetomagus, which in the Merovingian age became Wormatia, afterwards by popular etymology connected with Wurm, a dragon.
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  • Both titles were borrowed by the Merovingian kings for the administrative machinery of the Frank empire, and under them the functions of the duke remained substantially unaltered.
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  • After his death his published and unpublished writings were collected and published (with the exception of Les Cours royales des Iles Normandes and Lettres de Gerbert) in two volumes called Questions merovingiennes and Opuscules inedits (1896), containing, besides important papers on diplomatic and on Carolingian and Merovingian history, a large number of short monographs ranging over a great variety of subjects.
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  • He was one of the most dissolute of the Merovingian kings, his early death in 567 being brought on by his excesses.
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  • The bishopric of Strassburg existed in the days of the Merovingian kings, being probably founded in the 4th century, and embraced a large territory on both banks of the Rhine, which was afterwards diminished by the creation of the bishoprics of Spires and Basel.
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  • The Merovingian monarchy thus attained the utmost limits of its territorial expansion, bounded as it was by the Pyrenees, the Alps and the Rhine; it exercised influence over the whole of Germany, which it threw open to the Christian missionaries, and its conquests formed the first beginnings of German history.
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  • In the 7th century the Merovingian kings adopted the custom of summoning them all, and not merely the officials of their Palatium, to discuss political affairs; they began, moreover, to choose their counts or administrators from among the great landholders.
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  • In that year the Merovingian dynasty gave place to the rule of Pippin II.
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  • The Merovingian kings, mere war-chiefs before the advent of Clovis, had after the conquest of Gaul become absolute hereditary causes of nionarchs, thanks to the disappearance of the popular the failof assemblies and to the perpetual state of warfare.
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  • His dynasty was destined to supplant that of the Merovingian house.
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  • Still, certain disturbances made him see that aristocratic approval of his kingship might be strengthened if it could claim a divine sanction which no Merovingian had ever received.
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  • Their descendants became the Merovingian dynasty which ruled what is now France from the 5th to the 8th century.
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  • His attention having been drawn to questions of authenticity by the forgeries of Vrain Lucas, he devoted himself to tracing the spurious documents that encumbered and perverted Merovingian and Carolingian history.
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  • The connecting link between the general use of the signet, which was required by the Roman law for legal purposes, but which had died out by the 7th century, and the revival of seals in the middle ages is to be found in the chanceries Early of the Merovingian and Carolingian sovereigns, where s m $d seval the practice of affixing the royal seal to diplomas appears to have been generally maintained (see Diplomatic).
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