Merits sentence example

merits
  • Two of his merits seem to have impressed the ancients themselves.
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  • The work has merits, but has never been officially approved.
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  • Though some skeptics smiled when told of Berg's merits, it could not be denied that he was a painstaking and brave officer, on excellent terms with his superiors, and a moral young man with a brilliant career before him and an assured position in society.
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  • Most of the native Sapiums have been destroyed by reckless tapping, and the merits of this genus have been somewhat overlooked and deserve reinvestigation.
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  • But the net result of the development of the doctrine of rent is that all problems in which this factor appears, and they embrace the whole range of economic theory, must apparently be treated on their merits.
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  • Doppet, the next commander, was little better fitted for the task; but his successor, Dugommier, was a brave and experienced soldier who appreciated the merits of Bonaparte.
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  • Apart from its intrinsic merits as a learned and valuable addition to classification, this work is interesting in the history of ornithology because of the wholesale changes of nomenclature it introduced as the result of much diligence and zeal in the application of the strict rule of priority to the names of birds.
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  • Those who take up such an extreme position regarding his merits have known too little of the state of contemporary science, and have limited their comparison to the works of the scholastic theologians.
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  • Spohr, however, promptly discovered its merits, and produced it at Cassel some months later, with very favourable results.
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  • The map of Marinus and the descriptive accounts which accompanied it have perished, but we learn sufficient concerning them from Ptolemy to be able to appreciate their merits and demerits.
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  • Unfortunately politics were inextricably interwoven with the religious controversies of the time, and resistance to English influence involved resistance to the activities of the reformers in the church, whose ultimate victory has obscured the cardinal's genuine merits as a statesman.
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  • It has high merits of style, being lucid and pointed to a degree.
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  • The government adopted this proposal, and laid down as a principle that it would guarantee the gross receipts per kilometre of guaranteed railways, such gross receipts to be settled for each railway on its own merits.
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  • They decided each problem on its merits, looking more to the spirit than to the letter, and often showing a practical sagacity worthy of Johnson himself.
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  • By direction of Talleyrand, then minister for foreign affairs, the French commissary repaired in state to the old man's residence in Turin, to congratulate him on the merits of his son, whom they declared "to have done honour to mankind by his genius, and whom Piedmont was proud to have produced, and France to possess."
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  • It is indeed by no means easy to distinguish and apportion the respective merits of the competitors.
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  • This criticism is not applicable to his works on antiquarian subjects, and his edition of Benedetto Accolti's De bello a Christianis contra barbaros (1623) has great merits.
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  • In Greyfriars' churchyard the Solemn League and Covenant was signed, and among its many monuments are the Martyrs' monument, recording the merits of the murdered covenanters, and the tomb of " Bluidy " Mackenzie.
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  • All these measures were important and were carefully drawn; but their merits cannot be explained in a biographical notice.
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  • Its poetic merits are few, and its historical accuracy is easily impugned.
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  • Murimuth has no merits of style, and gives a bald narrative of events.
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  • Of a more general character, and combining the merits of the above schools, are the works of the authors who constituted the socalled "Debreczen Class," which boasts the names of the naturalist and philologist John Foldi, compiler of a considerable part of the Debreczeni magyar grammatica; Michael Fazekas, author of Ludas Matyi (Vienna, 1817), an epic poem, in 4 cantos; and Joseph Kovacs.
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  • It is one of Darwin's great merits to have made use of these observations and to have formulated their results to a large extent as the laws of variation and heredity.
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  • The last-named work, though lacking in original power and clearness of judgment, is extremely convenient and useful, and has had an influence perhaps disproportionate to its real exegetical merits.
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  • His merits as an author are often judged solely by his Constitutional History.
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  • Concerning the date of his birth and his parentage nothing definite is known, but as he ascribes his position at court to the merits of his parents they were probably people of some importance.
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  • It is enough to say that on this fantastic basis Helmont constructed a medical system which had some practical merits, that his therapeutical methods were mild and in many respects happy, and that he did service by applying newer chemical methods to the preparation of drugs.
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  • Its merits were recognized by Descartes, among the first, nine years after its publication.
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  • His character and career have been made the subject of eulogies much beyond their merits.
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  • The peculiar merits of the Venetian manufacture are the elegance of form and the surprising lightness and thinness of the substance of the vessels produced.
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  • It is written for two choirs, the one of five and the other of four voices, and has obtained a celebrity which, if not entirely factitious, is certainly not due to its intrinsic merits alone.
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  • Corona, and the cathedral, and several pictures also in the picture gallery; while his son Benedetto had greater merits as an engraver than a painter.
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  • Apart from this his chief merits lie in his studies on the subject of the traditional authorities, the results of which are given by Ibn Sa`d, and in his chronology, which is often excellent.
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  • Though Porta's merits were undoubtedly great, he did not invent or improve the camera obscura.
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  • As a traveller and observer his merits are conspicuous.
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  • In architectural merits its monuments, though not so extensive, are worthy of comparison with those of Granada.
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  • Instead of discoursing on the corporate conscience of the state and the endowments of the Church, the importance of Christian education, and the theological unfitness of the Jews to sit in parliament, he is solving business-like problems about foreign tariffs and the exportation of machinery; waxing eloquent over the regulation of railways, and a graduated tax on corn; subtle on the monetary merits of half-farthings, and great in the mysterious lore of quassia and cocculus indicus.
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  • There is a radical difference between the points of view of the Japanese and the Western connoisseur in estimating tbe Japanese merits of sculpture in metal.
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  • Directing his efforts at first to reproducing the deep green and straw-yellow glazes of China, he had exhausted almost his entire resources before success came, and even then the public was slow to recognize the merits of his ware.
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  • But for this he would hardly have established so absolute an antithesis between industrial and military competition, and have shown himself readier to recognize that the law of the struggle for existence, just because it is universal and equally (though differently) operative in every form of society, cannot be appealed to for guidance in deciding between the respective merits of an industrial or military and of an individualist or socialist organization of society.
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  • One of the many merits of the antiquary Lami was his connexion with the Novelle letterarie (1740-1770), founded by him, and after the first two years almost entirely written by him.
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  • From Sir Walter Scott downwards the tendency to judge literary work on its own merits to a great extent restored Defoe to his proper place, or, to speak more correctly, set him there for the first time.
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  • One of his great merits is that he was the first to dissociate medicine from priestcraft, and to direct exclusive attention to the natural history of disease.
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  • For most of the period in question Thucydides is the only source; and despite the inherent merits of a great writer, it can hardly be doubted that the tribute of almost unqualified praise that successive generations of scholars have paid to Thucydides must have been in some measure qualified if, for example, a Spartan account of the Peloponnesian War had been preserved to us.
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  • He published an edition of it and called attention to its merits in a special preface.
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  • Here the recension in 1 Esdras especially merits attention for its text, literary structure and for its variant traditions.
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  • In Oxford he was allowed to hold a disputation with some learned doctors on the rival merits of the Copernican and so-called Aristotelian systems of the universe, and, according to his own report, had an easy victory.
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  • He was at last persuaded to accept the military command in Aragon, which he thought below his merits.
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  • In the first example, which was erected on the quay at Newcastle in 1846, the necessary pressure was obtained from the ordinary water mains of the town; but the merits and advantages of the device soon became widely appreciated, and a demand arose for the erection of cranes in positions where the pressure afforded by the mains was insufficient.
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  • But whatever merits they had as clarifiers of turbid water, the advent of bacteriology, and the recognition of the fact that the bacteria of certain diseases may be water-borne, introduced a new criterion of effectiveness, and it was perceived that the removal of solid particles, or even of organic impurities (which were realized to be important not so much because they are dangerous to health per se as because their presence affords grounds for suspecting that the water in which they occur has been exposed to circumstances permitting contamination with infective disease), was not sufficient; the filter must also prevent the passage of pathogenic organisms, and so render the water sterile bacteriologically.
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  • In 1871 she obtained a civil-list pension of £roo in recognition of her merits.
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  • But it is as a writer that the merits of Herodotus are most conspicuous.
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  • For these reasons its popularity was not so immediate as that of Grote's work, but within recent years its substantial merits have been more adequately recognized.
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  • In 1110 an apostate monk in Zeeland, Tanchelm, carried their views still farther, and asserted that the sacraments were only valid through the merits and sanctity of the ministers.
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  • The Waldenses withdrew altogether from the ministrations of the church, and chose ministers for themselves whose merits were recognized by the body of the faithful.
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  • The statutory definition of the grounds of reduction was intended, however, merely to put an end to the practice which had previously obtained of reviewing awards on their merits, and it does not prevent the courts from setting aside an award where the arbitrator has exceeded his jurisdiction, or disregarded any one of the expressed conditions of the submission, or been guilty of misconduct.
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  • The men of the Revolution regarded him with something like idolatry, and his literary merits conciliated many who were far from idolizing him as a revolutionist.
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  • The merits of his work met with full recognition.
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  • Bayle also paraded the opposition between reason and revelation; but the argument in his hands is a double-edged weapon, and when he extols the merits of submissive faith his sincerity is at least questionable.
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  • He lived to the age of eighty; but, however great were the merits of his Chronicle, it was long considered a suspicious book on account of the leanings of the author to Calvinism.
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  • Whatever he has, he wants it all for himself, because, the more 'he merits on earth (by Christ's grace) the greater is his glory in heaven.
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  • Often the biblical text cannot be said to supply more than a hint or a suggestion, and the particular application in Halaka or Haggada must be taken on its merits, and the teaching does not necessarily fall because the exegesis is illegitimate.
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  • Although now entirely superseded, it has considerable merits as regards style and arrangement.
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  • The changes introduced by the Genevan translators were, as a rule, a great improvement, and the version received a ready welcome and immediate popularity, not only on account of its intrinsic merits, but because of its handy size, usually that of a small quarto, and of its being printed, like Whittingham's New Testament, in a readable Roman type instead of black letter.
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  • The well-known sentence of Carlyle, that it is "as far as possible from meriting its high reputation," is in strictness justified, for all Thiers's historical work is marked by extreme inaccuracy, by prejudice which passes the limits of accidental unfairness, and by an almost complete indifference to the merits as compared with the successes of his heroes.
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  • Probably no statesman has ever had a more disgusting task; and the fact that he discharged it to the satisfaction of a vast majority is the strongest testimony to Thiers's merits.
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  • Galater (1897); Perrot, De Galatia 1 In the unsettled state of this controversy, weight naturally attaches to the opinion of experts on either side; and the above statement, while opposed to the view taken in the following article on the epistle, must be taken on its merits.
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  • But as early as 558 in Gaul the bread was arranged on the altar in the form of a man, so that one believer ate his eye, another his ear, a third his hand, and so on, according to their respective merits!
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  • On the other hand, the characteristic merits of the system may be summed up as consisting in the safeguards it provides against the undue predominance of any one power or person in the government, and therewith against any risk there may be that the president should become a despot, and in the full opportunities it secures for the due consideration of all important measures.
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  • This declaration of principles and plans is sometimes of importance, not only as an appeal to the people in respect of the past services and merits of the party, but as pledging them to the measures they are to introduce and push forward if they win the election.
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  • This system, which has been employed for the lowest weir on the Moldau, and for a weir at the upper end of the Danube canal near Vienna to shut out floods and floating ice, as well as on the Seine, possesses the merits of raising all the movable parts of the weir out of water in flood-time, and rendering the working of the weir very safe and easy.
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  • The merits of this weir in being easily raised against a strong current and in allowing of the perfect regulation of the discharge, are unfortunately, under ordinary conditions, more than counterbalanced by the necessity of carrying the drum and its foundations to a greater depth below the sill of the weir than the height of the weir above it.
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  • The high flavour, the crisp, juicy flesh and the long-keeping qualities of the Canadian apples are their chief merits.
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  • Experiments are also conducted to test the merits of new or untried varieties of cereals and other field crops, of grasses, forage plants, fruits, vegetables, plants and trees; and samples, particularly of the most promising cereals, are distributed freely among farmers for trial, so that those which promise to be most profitable may be rapidly brought into general cultivation.
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  • English Canadian Literature Is Marked By The Weaknesses As Well As The Merits Of Colonial Life.
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  • Each and every case he will decide on its own merits and without reference to decisions upon the other cases not now before him.
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  • Each case must be considered on its merits; and the critic's procedure must of necessity be "eclectic" - an epithet often used with a tinge of reproach, the ground for which it is not easy to discover.
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  • Taking up a piece, he would request his visitor not to breathe upon it, nor handle it; he would dilate upon the many merits of the drug and the cures it had effected.
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  • It was due to Lightfoot's support almost as much as to his own great merits that Westcott was elected to the chair on the 1st of November 1870.
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  • In 1871 a new Lectionary was substituted for the previously existing one, into the merits and demerits of which it is not possible to enter here; and in 1872, by the Act of Uniformity Amendment Act, a shortened form of service was provided instead of the present form of Morning and Evening Prayer for optional use in other than cathedral churches on all days exeept Sunday, Christmas Day, Ash Wednesday, Good Friday and Ascension Day; provision was also statutably made for the separation of services, and for additional services, to be taken, however, except so far as anthems and hymns are concerned, entirely out of the Bible and the Book of Common Prayer.
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  • In spite of the disadvantage that it is impossible to separate advantageously the history and critical examination of any doctrine in the arbitrary manner which de Gerando chose, the work has great merits.
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  • The reputation of a greater Maecenas - ascribed to him by his eulogists - dwindles before a sober, critical contemplation, and his undeniable merits are by no means equal to those which fame has assigned to him.
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  • These personal merits and this political necessity were the only pleas advanced in a letter to her ambassador in England.
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  • A furrier or skin merchant must possess a good eye for colour to be successful, the difference in value on this subtle matter solely (in the rarer precious sorts, especially sables, natural black, silver and blue fox, sea otters, chinchillas, fine mink, &c.) being so considerable that not only a practised but an intuitive sense of colour is necessary to accurately determine the exact merits of every skin.
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  • With regard to the merits of European dressing, it may be fairly taken that English, German and French dressers have specialities of excellence.
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  • But if sold upon its own merits, pointed fox is a durable fur.
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  • The latter piece-obtained a longer lease of life than its intrinsic literary merits warranted, on account of the popularity of the political opinions freely expressed in it - so freely expressed, indeed, that the displeasure of the king was incurred, and Delavigne lost his post.
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  • Each measure had, therefore, to be considered not only on its own merits, but in relation to the general balance of advantage, and an amendment in one might bring about the rejection of all.
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  • Although a warmly patriotic Roman, he does full justice to the merits of the barbarian enemies of the empire, particularly the Ostrogoths; although the subject of a despotic prince, he criticizes the civil and military administration of Justinian and his dealings with foreign peoples with a freedom which gives a favourable impression of the tolerance of the emperor.
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  • Its merits are its recognition of the helplessness of the old heathenism to satisfy human aspiration after the divine, and the impressive simplicity with which it presents the unfailing argument of the lives of Christians.
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  • It is the Latin volume which we now call the Digest (Digesta) or Pandects (IICAEKrat) and which is by far the most precious monument of the legal genius of the Romans, and indeed, whether one regards the intrinsic merits of its substance or the prodigious influence it has exerted and still exerts, the most remarkable law-book that the world has seen.
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  • Such merits as it possesses - simplicity of arrangement, clearness and conciseness of expression - belong less to Tribonian than to Gaius, who was closely followed wherever the alterations in the law had not made him obsolete.
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  • They are very bulky, and with the exception of a few, particularly the 116th and 118th, which introduce the most sweeping and laudable reforms into the law of intestate succession, are much more interesting, as supplying materials for the history of the time, social, economical and ecclesiastical, than in respect of any purely legal merits.
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  • To the merits of the work as actually performed some reference has already been made.
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  • The merits and demerits of this system will appear during the description of the characters of the members of the several subdivisions.
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  • The high temperature necessary to fuse cement clinker makes this process difficult to accomplish commercially, but it has many inherent merits and may be the process of the future, displacing the rotatory method.
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  • The book is in some respects his masterpiece, and its merits are beyond question.
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  • His merits as a theologian it is unnecessary to discuss; it is as a statesman and a lawyer that he stands conspicuous.
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  • In astronomy he depreciates the merits of Newton and elevates Kepler, accusing Newton particularly, a propos of the distinction of centrifugal and centripetal forces, of leading to a confusion between what is mathematically to be distinguished and what is physically separate.
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  • The new thought of a treasury of merits (thesaurus meritorum) introduced further changes.
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  • It was held that the good deeds over and above what were needed for their own salvation by the living or by the saints in heaven, together with the inexhaustible merits of Christ, were all deposited in a treasury out of which they could be taken by the pope and given by him to the faithful.
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  • Thus Satisfactions became not merely signs of sorrow but actual merits, which freed men from the need to undergo the temporal pains here and in purgatory which their sins had rendered them liable to.
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  • By an Indulgence merits could be transferred from the storehouse to those who required them.
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  • The Treasury of Merits has never been properly defined; it is hard to say what it is, and it is not properly understood by the people; it cannot be the merits of Christ and of His saints, because these act of themselves and quite apart from the intervention of the pope; it can mean nothing more than that the pope, having the power of the keys, can remit ecclesiastical penalties imposed by the church; the true Treasure-house of merits is the Holy Ghost of the grace and glory of God.
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  • The work was not without merits, and it was re-issued in 1733 and 1750.
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  • On the continent of Europe, France was the first to recognize the merits of its bygone designers and craftsmen, and even antecedent to the Exhibition of 1851, when art in Great Britain was dormant, it was possible to obtain in Paris faithful reproductions of the finest ormolu work of the 18th century.
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  • Six months later, the indefatigable astronomer started for Danzig to set at rest a dispute of long standing between Hooke and Hevelius as to the respective merits of plain or telescopic sights; and towards the end of 1680 he proceeded on a continental tour.
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  • The education provided by the sophists of culture had positive merits.
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  • With these considerable merits, normal sophistry had one defect, its indifference to truth.
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  • Amongst the many merits of that admirable scholar, it is one of the greatest that he has laid " the fiend called die Sophistik," that is to say, the theory that sophistry was an organized conspiracy against law and morals.
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  • The only merits, therefore, which can be claimed for Cicero are that he invented a philosophical terminology for the Romans, and that he produced a series of manuals which from their beauty of style have had enduring influence upon mankind.
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  • It is granted only according to act, and merits as the law in enlightening, warning or promising reward.
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  • None the less his merits as an original thinker are far outshone by his splendid services to the history of philosophy.
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  • Reviewing the merits and demerits of each system, Mr Crawford gave his adhesion to that of unvarying solitude as pursued in the Eastern penitentiary in Pennsylvania.
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  • It may be added here that judged by later experience the Irish system had no transcendent merits, and it is now extinct.
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  • The convict is not eligible for release or licence, but when the time of conditional liberation would have formerly arrived the case is submitted to the authorities and dealt with on its merits.
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  • Unfortunately, however, these merits are usually connected with a less admirable characteristic - contempt for tradition.
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  • It exhibits, more clearly perhaps than any other of Morison's works, both his merits and his defects.
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  • Tried by current standards his poems lack form and structure, but they undoubtedly have in full measure the qualities and merits that the poet sought to give them.
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  • The scientific method, then, is to consider each " miracle " on its own merits, according as we find reason to suppose that it has reached our author more or less directly.
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  • The face of the world has changed so greatly since Paley's day that we are apt to do less than justice to his undoubted merits.
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  • For, just as the Roman Church as a whole preserves in the spiritual sphere the spirit and much of the organization of the Roman Empire, so the administration of the Curia carries on the tradition of Roman government, with its reverence for precedent and its practice of deciding questions, not on their supposed abstract merits, but in accordance with the rules of law as defined in the codes or by previous decisions.
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  • On the whole, both their merits and their defects are such as we should expect to find in the work of the poet celebrated by Bmda, and it seems possible, though hardly more than possible, that we have in these pieces a comparatively little altered specimen of Cmdmon's compositions.
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  • He was an arranger of measures and leader of political forces, not an originator of ideas and systems. His public life covered nearly half a century, and his name and fame rest entirely upon his own merits.
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  • Phil., in which the merits of Roger Bacon are brought prominently forward.
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  • Viewed as a whole they have the characteristics of other Palestinian literature, the merits and defects of other oriental works.
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  • For this reason anonymous writings were attributed to famous names, and traditions were judged (as in Islam), not so much upon their merits, as by the chain of authorities which traced them back to their sources.
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  • Among the marine productions on the southern coast, a species of kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera, merits special mention because of its extraordinary length, its habit of clinging to the rocks in strong currents and turbulent seas, and its being a shelter for innumerable species of marine animals.
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  • As in the case of the woman with the precious box of ointment, it is not the gift that merits reward, but the faith that inspires it.
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  • And if such Hottentots should escape, the owner shall be entitled to follow them up and to punish them, according to their merits in his discretion.
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  • The merits of the Cape system - to minimize the differences between the white and native races.
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  • The poets and the philosophers paid him enthusiastic homage, and all the distinguished women of the day testified to his superlative merits.
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  • Muretus soon recognized Scaliger's merits, and introduced him to all the men that were worth knowing.
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  • As to the merits of the controversy opinion will always be divided.
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  • Whatever his merits as a writer or as a philanthropist, Gregoire's name lives in history mainly by reason of his wholehearted effort to prove that Catholic Christianity is not irreconcilable with modern conceptions of political liberty.
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  • If we are to form a correct judgment on the merits of Livy's history, we must, above all things, bear in mind what his aim was in writing it, and this he has told us himself in the celebrated preface.
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  • It is urged that Livy, who in the fourth and fifth decades shows himself so sensible of the great merits of Polybius, is not likely to have ignored him in the third, and that his more limited use of him in the latter case is fully accounted for by the closer connexion of the history with Rome and Roman affairs, and the comparative excellence of the available Roman authorities, and, lastly, that the points of agreement with Polybius, not only in matter but in expression, can only be explained on the theory that Livy is directly following the great Greek historian.
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  • But, if our estimate of the merits of his speeches is moderated by doubts as to his right to introduce them at all, no such scruples interfere with our admiration for the skill with which he has drawn the portraits of the great men who figure in his pages.
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  • These merits, not less than the high tone and easy grace of his narrative and the eloquence of his speeches, gave Livy a hold on Roman readers such as only Cicero and Virgil besides him ever obtained.
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  • Nearly all his works possess genuine and solid merits which raise them above the commonplace, and many of them still remain valuable.
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  • Thenceforward, however, his merits were recognized.
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  • The merits of Motley as an historian are undeniably great.
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  • The circumstances of Lull's death caused him to be regarded as a martyr, local patriotism helped to magnify his merits, and his fantastic doctrines found many enthusiastic partisans.
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  • But through all the periods of his life his view of the world was essentially religious and subjective, and, consequently, his manner of dealing with it hymnal or lyric. This fact, even more than his merits as an artist, serves to account for his immense popularity.
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  • Apart from the merits or demerits of particular taxes or groups of taxes, and the questions as to inequality, injury to trade, and the like already discussed, the aggregate of taxation, or rather revenue, of a state may be considered in the most general way, having regard to the proportion appropriated by the state of the total income of the community, and the return made by the state therefor.
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  • Rowland was one of the most brilliant men of science that America has produced, and it is Curious that at first his merits were not perceived in his own country, In America he was unable even to secure the publication of certain of his scientific papers; but Clerk Maxwell at once saw their excellence, and had them printed in the Philosophical Magazine.
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  • In 1883 the dispute in connexion with the boundary between Colombia and Venezuela was submitted by the two governments to the arbitration of Alphonso XII., king of Spain, and a commission of five members was appointed to investigate the merits of the respective claims. The decision in this dispute was finally given by the queen regent of Spain on the 16th of March 1891.
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  • It is reported that in his examination for a scholarship at Trinity, to which he was elected on the 28th of April 1664, he was examined in Euclid by Dr Isaac Barrow, who formed a poor opinion of his knowledge, and that in consequence Newton was led to read the Elements again with care, and thereby to form a more favourable estimate of Euclid's merits.
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  • It is a curious accident that we have no information about the respective merits of the candidates for a degree in this year, as the " ordo senioritatis " of the bachelors of arts for the year is omitted in the " Grace Book."
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  • It was natural that the queen should form a high opinion of one whose merits had made such a deep impression on her husband.
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  • This excess of the deductive spirit explains at once both the merits and the defects of his two great works, which will probably remain political classics, though they are less and less likely to be used as practical guides.
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  • A short experience of his work convinced the king that his merits had not been exaggerated.
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  • It is curious to find that Caxton, an honest man, and an enthusiast as to the future of the art of printing, which he had introduced into England, waxes enthusiastic as to the merits of the intelligent but unscrupulous peers who took an interest in his endeavours.
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  • The natural consequence was that men who paid court to him were promoted, and those who kept at a distance from him had no notice taken of their merits.
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  • When the new parliament met in the autumn of 1852, it was at once plain that the issue would be determined on the rival merits of the old and the new financial systems. Disraeli courted the decision by at once bringing forward the budget, which custom, and perhaps convenience, would have justified him in postponing till the following spring.
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  • The, great majority of the British people, who imperfectly understood the merits of the case, were unanimous in.
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  • On the other hand e was wholly free from that quality which he ascribed to Lord eorge Sackville, a man "apt to take a sort of undecided, equ vocal, narrow ground, that evades the substantial merits of the qu stion, and puts the whole upon some temporary, local, accide tal or personal consideration."
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  • Burke's conservatism was, as such a passage as this may illustrate, the result partly of strong imaginative associations clustering round the more imposing symbols of social continuity, partly of a sort of corresponding conviction in his reason that there are certain permanent elements of human nature out of which the European order had risen and which that order satisfied, and of whose immense merits, as of its mighty strength, the revolutionary party in France were most fatally ignorant.
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  • Airy then at length published an account of the circumstances, and Adams's memoir was printed as an appendix to the Nautical Almanac. A keen controversy arose in France and England as to the merits of the two astronomers.
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  • The moral elevation of the fragment of Cicero thus preserved to us gave the work a popularity in the middle ages to which its own merits have little claim.
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  • However biassed, this a priori study had its merits.
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  • Of course it can be explained; and when explained, we see that Disraeli's good fortune in this respect is not due entirely to his own merits.
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  • Mignet's Histoire de la Revolution Francaise (2 vols., Paris, 1861), short and devoid of literary charm, has the merits of learning and judgment and is still useful.
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  • The latter has many and obvious merits, not the least of which is the pathos shed about him in his last incarnation as the Indian John of The Pioneers.
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  • In recognition of his merits, the emperor of Austria made him a knight of the Iron Crown and a councillor of state at Milan, where he died on the 17th of January 1834.
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  • The poet Matthias Jochumsson has written several dramas, but their chief merits are lyrical.
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  • It is in the investigation of the moon's motion that the, merits of the ancient astronomy are seen to the best advantage.
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  • Already, in 336, Ctesiphon had proposed that Demosthenes should receive a golden crown from the state, and that his extraordinary merits should be proclaimed in the theatre at the Great Dionysia.
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  • As he was liberal to the bards, they did not forget his merits.
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  • His merits in this respect, however, can only be appraised by the study of his works at first hand.
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  • Its merits as a police have perhaps been exaggerated, and in the war with Granada its bands were employed as soldiers.
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  • Thus Mehring is justly claimed as the originator of comb-foundation, though the value of his invention was less eagerly taken advantage of even in Germany than its merits deserved.
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  • One of its chief merits was that it brought Italians of different classes and provinces together, and taught them to work in harmony for the overthrow of tyranny and foreign rule.
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  • A classical scholar of fair merits, he is best known as the author of a little book on logic (Compendium Artis Logicae), a work of little value in itself, but used at Oxford (in Mansel's revised edition) till long past the middle of the 19th century.
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  • Each case must be taken on its merits.
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  • With regard to the merits and demerits of the last two mentioned processes - expression and extraction - the adoption of either will largely depend on local conditions and the objects for which the products are intended.
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  • The silence respecting him maintained by Quintilian and by Lucian may reasonably be taken to imply their agreement with Dionysius as to his merits as a master of style.
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  • A letter of St Boniface is preserved, in which he rebukes this king for his immoralities and encroachments on church property, while recognizing his merits as a monarch.
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  • It also supplied a focus for those painters who, whatever their merits, had not been thought fit to invite to become academicians.
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  • Clearly her merits as a writer don't work for everyone - but how many writers could claim genuinely universal appeal?
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  • But it is not only on the merits of the argument that I personally accept the Lucan authorship of the Gospel and Acts.
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  • Its imposing front facade of red brickwork in Flemish bond with finely lined pointing even merits a mention in Pevsner.
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  • Ability to charter merits of cuban cigars base could not quot small doors.
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  • In this instance the merits of the work justify the warmest commendation.
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  • This group has a brief to design a practical model of pension compulsion for the UK rather than discuss its merits.
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  • Through our partnership with H2O homes overseas countrywide we hope to educate consumers on the merits and risks of fluctuating currencies.
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  • For some time the relative merits or otherwise of administrative or legislative devolution have been debated.
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  • Planning and Markets - electronic journal devoted to comparing the merits of planned interventions and market solutions.
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  • With the arrival of fascist dictators in Europe Fenner Brockway began to have doubts about the political merits of pacifism.
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  • Political leaders were therefore willing to attempt to persuade electorates of the merits of their cause.
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  • Accepting (or rejecting) a naturalistic theory requires only empirical observation and analysis -- evidence that can be accepted on its own merits.
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  • And a minute merits of cuban cigars orioles hummingbirds and.
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  • The RPTS is strictly impartial and every case it handles is decided on its merits.
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  • But there are some entrepreneurs that are still leery about the merits of creating a business plan.
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  • All sites are visited by the case officer in order to assess the merits of the proposals.
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  • Much time and print is dedicated to discussing the relative merits of each method, but are we running before we can walk?
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  • None of the projects seem to argue the merits of this approach.
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  • Or weighing the merits of the coffee whitener used at McDonald's vs. that used at Burger King?
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  • As the Nicaraguan conflict spread, Hondurans were left to ponder the merits of the deal the armed forces had brokered.
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  • But the most heated discussion among Members of Parliament was not the respective merits of Michael Martin or Gwyneth Dunwoody.
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  • In dim and mysterious groves of oak, wherefrom the sacred mistletoe was gathered, the Druids decided upon the merits of the competitors.
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  • Well, whatever his literary merits, he struck me as a fairly noxious specimen.
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  • Without trying to sound preachy, the merits of lying are obvious.
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  • John Cazale also merits attention as Sal, his slightly psychotic sidekick.
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  • Ok, I can't deny that I occasionally pondered their merits, relative to my own self-regard.
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  • One of the class sessions is spent considering the subject and merits of contrastive stylistics.
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  • At the beginning of the 19th century, however, some Neapolitan exiles at Milan called attention to the merits of their great countryman, and his reinstatement was completed by Michelet, who in 1827 translated the Scienza nuova and other works with a laudatory introduction.
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  • Among other subjects, he wrote on the School of Hierotheus, on Romish falsifications of the Greek Fathers, on Leo XIII., on Liberal Ultramontanism, on the Papal Teaching in regard to Morals, on Vincentius of Lerins and he carried on a controversy with Professor Willibald Beyschlag, of the German Evangelical Church, on the respective merits of Protestantism and Old Catholicism regarded as a basis for teaching the Christian faith.
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  • He made one attempt to reconcile the disputes between the army and the politicians by a conference, but ended the barren discussion on the relative merits of aristocracies, monarchies and democracies, interspersed with Bible texts, by throwing a cushion at the speaker's head and running downstairs.
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  • The two great merits of this anemometer are its simplicity and the absence of a wind vane; on the other hand it is not well adapted to leaving a record on paper of the actual velocity at any definite instant, and hence it leaves a short but violent gust unrecorded.
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  • We may infer that, whatever the merits of that modification, it does not affect the theistic problem.
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  • Two shepherds, Amintas and Faustus, discuss the familiar theme of the respective merits of town and country life, and relate a quaint fable of the origin of the different classes of society.
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  • David accomplished the conquests of Saul but on a grander scale; " Saul hath slain his thousands and David his tens of thousands " is the popular couplet comparing the relative merits of the rival dynasts.
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  • The third tractatus of this volume deals with birds - including among them bats, bees and other flying creatures; but as it is the first printed book in which figures of birds are introduced it merits notice, though most of the illustrations, which are rude woodcuts, fail, even in the coloured copies, to give any precise indication of the species intended to be represented.
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  • It has already been mentioned that Macgillivray contributed to Audubon's Ornithological Biography a series of descriptions of some parts of the anatomy of American birds, from Mac- gillivray subjects supplied to him by that enthusiastic naturalist, and whose zeal and prescience, it may be called, in this respect merits all praise.
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  • The Revue Zoologique for 1847 (pp. 360-369) contained the whole, and enabled naturalists to consider the merits of the author's project, which was to found a new classification of birds on the form of the anterior palatal bones, which he declared to be subjected more evidently than any other to certain fixed laws.
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  • The relative merits of the formulae of Kekule, Claus and Dewar were next investigated by means of the reduction products of benzene, it being Baeyer's intention to detect whether double linkages were or were not present in the benzene complex.
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  • Samuel Johnson, Gibbon, Lord Lyttelton and Bishop Horne all spoke enthusiastically of its merits; and it is still the only work by which its author is popularly known.
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  • Here he took a house and after a while entered upon his own characteristic style of art, that of battle-painting, in which he has been accounted to excel all other old masters; his merits were cordially recognized by the celebrated Cerquozzi, named Michelangelo delle Battaglie.
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  • Although, like most men of strong originative power, he assimilated with difficulty the ideas of others, his tardiness sprang rather from inability to depart from the track of his own methods than from reluctance to acknowledge the merits of his competitors.
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  • He organized the engineer companies which explored and reported on the several proposed routes for a railway connecting the Mississippi valley with the Pacific Ocean; he effected the enlargement of the army, and made material changes in its equipment of arms and ammunition, utilizing the latest improvements; he made his appointments of subordinates on their merits, regardless of party considerations; he revised the system of tactics, perfected the signal corps service, and enlarged the coast and frontier defences of the country.
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  • So highly were his merits appreciated by his professors - Schleiermacher was accustomed to say that he possessed a special charisma for the science of "Introduction" - that in 1818 after he had passed the examinations for entering the ministry he was recalled to Berlin as Repetent or tutorial fellow in theology, a temporary post which the theological faculty had obtained for him.
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  • Escoiquiz was far too firmly convinced of his ingenuity and merits to conceal the delusions and follies of himself and his associates.
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  • The king, Prince Charles and the governing circle appreciated the merits of their faithful lieutenant less than did his enemies Waller and Fairfax, the former of whom wrote, "hostility itself cannot violate my friendship to your person," while the latter spoke of him as "one whom we honour and esteem above any other of your party."
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  • Among the merits of Herodotus as an historian, the most prominent are the diligence with which he collected his materials, the candour and impartiality with which he has placed his facts before the reader, the absence of party bias and undue national vanity, and the breadth of his conception of the historian's office.
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  • And, though his merits as a Grecian lie mainly in his conjectures, his realism is felt in this sphere also; his German translations especially show more freedom and practical insight, more feeling for actual life, than is common with the scholars of that age.2 For a list of Reiske's writings see Meusel, xi.
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  • It is true that his French panegyrists (and he is not himself free from censure on this score) are unjust in their estimate of Smith as an expositor and extol too highly the merits of Say.
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  • In private character he was amiable and affectionate; his generosity in recognizing the merits of others secured him against the worst shafts of envy; and a life marked by numerous disquietudes was cheered and ennobled by sentiments of sincere piety.
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  • She despatched to France a special envoy, the bishop of Dumblane, with instructions setting forth at length the unparalleled and hitherto ill-requited services and merits of Bothwell, and the necessity of compliance at once with his passion and with the unanimous counsel of the nation - a people who would endure the rule of no foreign consort, and whom none of their own countrymen were so competent to control, alike by wisdom and by valour, as the incomparable subject of her choice.
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  • To his modesty Bossuet bears witness, when he told him to stand up sometimes, and not be always on his knees before a critic. Gibbon vouches for his learning, when (in the 47th chapter) he speaks of "this incomparable guide, whose bigotry is overbalanced by the merits of erudition, diligence, veracity and scrupulous minuteness."
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  • This is a bombastic and vainglorious epic in honour of Charles XI., whom Eurelius adored; it is not, however, without great merits, richness of language, flowing metre, and the breadth of a genuine poetic enthusiasm.
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  • Yet, while these are essential merits of the book, its endearing charm lies deeper, in the sweet and kindly personality of the author, who on his rambles gathers no spoil, but watches the birds and field-mice without disturbing them from their nests, and quietly plants an acorn where he thinks an oak is wanted, or sows beech-nuts in what is now a stately row.
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  • A more complete description of the relative merits of each option is beyond the scope of this module.
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  • Ok, I ca n't deny that I occasionally pondered their merits, relative to my own self-regard.
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  • For not shying away from controversy alone Griffith deserves his merits.
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  • Ours is not a slavish following, however - we consider it essential to treat each program or project on its merits.
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  • The use of stem cell transplantation to consolidate responses merits further study.
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  • Each therapeutic modality should be evaluated according to its own merits.
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  • Two tic students achieved distinctions whilst six others were rated with merits.
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  • We proudly proclaim the merits of the transatlantic alliance.
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  • Your financial institution will probably ask you to opt in to overdraft protection and will outline the merits and potential costs of accepting overdraft protection on your checking account.
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  • Any strong negative side effects, difficult breathing, rash or other serious medical condition merits a trip to the emergency room or the doctor's office.
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  • However, both methods have their merits.
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  • Along with the standard insignia tab, trefoil pin and American flag, there are now proficiency badges where girls complete projects, as opposed to the Brownie "try its" where merits are easier and more of an experience than accomplishment.
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  • The plant is distinct, and merits a place by shady wood walks, as it naturally inhabits woods.
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  • Its value for our islands is known, and a subject of such ornament and distinction merits the best positions among the choice trees and shrubs.
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  • Its merits are not remarkable, and the short season of bloom of spring-raised everlasting annuals leads to a poor result.
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  • Joy-Weed (Alternanthera) - Little Brazilian weeds of the Amaranthus order, which, owing to their color, have been used in our gardens to an extent far beyond their merits.
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  • If you do, you'll know how to coordinate the right outfit and look as elegant and classic as the occasion merits.
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  • Knotting experts agree that each knot has its own merits, but the basic knot, also known as the four-in-hand knot, is considered the most popular.
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  • Dr. Andrew Weil wrote a great article about the merits of adding hemp oil to your diet.
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  • While it's true that not everyone agrees on the merits of a certain product, customer reviews will provide an opportunity for you to take the general pulse of the favorability and benefits of a particular model.
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  • There are dozens of different Scribblenauts merits available to be earned.
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  • Still the game is not without its positive merits, as the first 3D (albeit isometric) Sonic game the visuals looked stunning at the time and were a breath of fresh air compared to the traditional side on 2D graphics of previous years.
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  • Still, winemakers around the world are beginning to realize the merits of this grape, and it is showing up increasingly in single varietal wines.
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  • Both devices certainly have their merits, but they also have their weak points.
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  • If there is a difference in response from the left to right knee, then there may be an underlying problem that merits further evaluation.
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  • This question merits many different responses, but for Cheryl Burke in particular, the answer is found in Atherton, a small city in Northern California.
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  • There are many advantages to selecting human hair extensions over the synthetic variety, but for all their merits, these extensions cost considerably more than their synthetic counterparts.
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  • Happily, there is quite a lengthy discussion pertaining exclusively to these particular swimsuits, so you should be able to garner plenty of different opinions about the suits' merits.
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  • While the merits of having these amazingly strong and accomplished women photographed in their bikinis can be debated, the talent some of these lovely 2010 Olympic hopefuls possess is beyond doubt.
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  • If only interracial dating was as easy as two people accepting and caring for each other based on their merits as human beings.
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  • Although such a policy has its merits, it is still important to understand that when you sign up for a dating site, you are often joining an online community.
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  • Regardless of the type of roller coaster, dedicated fans still seek out each ride to experience its particular merits and excitement.
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  • The business video must represent your product or service professionally, and that merits hiring a professional video production company.
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  • Each style has its own merits; select the style that you prefer.
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  • As scientists continue to debate the merits and health benefits of Atkins and other low carb diet plans many dieters also want to learn the truth about low carb foods.
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  • The jury is still out on the definite answer to this question, but one thing that's known for sure is the fact that each garment carries its own particular merits.
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  • While advice such as walking with a book balanced on your head may seem antiquated, it does have its merits.
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  • Depending on your needs and the type of clothing you are wearing, each of these bodysuits serves up its own merits.
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  • Although each web marketing business must be taken on its merits, generally any company offering complete packages that span a number of different elements is one that can achieve good results.
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  • We have already mentioned the final conception in which Lotze's speculation culminates, that of a personal Deity, Himself the essence of all that merits existence for its own sake, who in the creation and government of a world has voluntarily chosen certain laws and forms through which His ends are to be realized.
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  • Clive showed his appreciation of Hastings's merits by appointing him in 1758 to the important post of resident at the court of Murshidabad.
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  • When their merits are fully recognized, it will be found that his worth, as a teacher of his countrymen, extends far beyond his own generation.
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  • Ancient critics take a very high view of the merits of Pheidias.
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  • The tower of Notre Dame, dating from 1180, is a landmark across the dunes, and the church behind it, although a shell, merits inspection.
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  • It is certain that whatever merits the Cretan laws may have possessed for the internal regulation of the different cities, they had the one glaring defect, that they made no provision for any federal bond or union among them, or for the government of the island as a whole.
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  • The panegyrics of Aldus Manutius require to be received with some caution, since he was given to exaggerating the merits of his friend, and uses almost the same language about a young Pole named Stanilaus Niegosevski; see John Black's Life of Torquato Tasso, ii.
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  • The Japanese have produced few books of importance, and their compositions are chiefly remarkable as being lighter and more secular than is usual in Asia, but the older Chinese works take high rank both for their merits and the effect they have had.
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  • He saw also that much of the inefficiency of the Assembly arose from the inexperience of the members and their incurable verbosity; so, to establish some system of rules, he got his friend Romilly to draw up a detailed account of the rules and customs of the English House of Commons, which he translated into French, but which the Assembly, puffed up by a belief in its own merits, refused to use.
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  • Without pledging ourselves to the acceptance of all its details - some of which, as is only natural, cannot be sustained with our present knowledge - it is certainly not too much to say that Merrem's merits are almost incomparably superior to those of any of his predecessors.
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  • The extraordinary merits of this book, and the admirable fidelity to his principles which Professor Burmeister showed in the difficult task of editing it, were unfortunately overlooked for many years, and perhaps are not sufficiently recognised now.
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  • Every critic could recognize the structural merits of the earlier plays, for their operatic conventionalities and abruptness of motive are always intelligible as stage devices.
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  • As soon as Prince Andrew began to demonstrate the defects of the latter and the merits of his own plan, Prince Dolgorukov ceased to listen to him and gazed absent-mindedly not at the map, but at Prince Andrew's face.
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  • Anna Mikhaylovna also had of late visited them less frequently, seemed to hold herself with particular dignity, and always spoke rapturously and gratefully of the merits of her son and the brilliant career on which he had entered.
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  • A code of requirements in regard to the opening of new railways has been drawn up by the department for the guidance of railway companies, and as the special circumstances of each line are considered on their merits, it rarely happens that the department finds it necessary to prohibit the opening of a new railway.
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  • Bleek's merits as a rising scholar were recognized by the minister of public instruction, who continued his stipend as Repetent for a third year, and promised further advancement in due time.
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