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merit

merit

merit Sentence Examples

  • The merit of Bruce is that he did not despise the lesson.

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  • Kutuzov's merit lay, not in any strategic maneuver of genius, as it is called, but in the fact that he alone understood the significance of what had happened.

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  • The relative merit of the two systems depends upon the question how we can secure the best efficiency and equity in the application of the principles thus far laid down.

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  • Rank is nominally determined by merit, as tested by competitive examinations.

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  • The First Consul, on the other hand, sought to recognize and reward merit in all walks of life.

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  • The judges at Lyons placed it fifteenth in order of merit among the sixteen essays sent in.

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  • Frederick's great merit was that during his reign the Aragonese dynasty became thoroughly national and helped to weld the Sicilians into a united people.

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  • This narrow and pedantic theory had at least the merit of insisting on propriety of expression.

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  • As a classical scholar, his scorn of littlenesses sometimes led him into the neglect of minutiae, but he had the higher merit of interpreting ideas.

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  • A few years afterwards, a Fleming named Rubruquis was sent on a similar mission, and had the merit of being the first traveller of this era who gave a correct account of the Caspian Sea.

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  • The "man of great merit," who was still a novice in court circles, wishing to flatter Anna Pavlovna by defending her former position on this question, observed:

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  • But the investigation by which he reaches them has the merit of first prominently publishing and establishing the law of the refraction of light.

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  • In regard to the attitude of the Roman government towards the Christian religion, there are questions still sub judice; but Gibbon had the merit of reducing the number of martyrs within probable limits.

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  • But Muller has the merit of clearly outstriding his predecessors, and with his accustomed perspicuity made the way even plainer for his successors to see than he himself was able to see it.

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  • Gibbon justly describes it as " a golden volume, not unworthy of the leisure of Plato or Tully, but which claims incomparable merit from the barbarism of the times and the situation of the author."

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  • Gibbon justly describes it as " a golden volume, not unworthy of the leisure of Plato or Tully, but which claims incomparable merit from the barbarism of the times and the situation of the author."

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  • It has been the custom to speak of Thomas Corneille as of one who, but for the name he bore, would merit no notice.

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  • He narrated that episode so persistently and with so important an air that everyone believed in the merit and usefulness of his deed, and he had obtained two decorations for Austerlitz.

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  • But she was not even grateful to him for it; nothing good on Pierre's part seemed to her to be an effort, it seemed so natural for him to be kind to everyone that there was no merit in his kindness.

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  • Soon afterwards he died, on the 16th of September 1498, "full of years and merit" says his biographer.

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  • The lakes of Argentina are exceptionally numerous, although comparatively few are large enough to merit a name on the ordinary general map.

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  • To Brewster is due the merit of suggesting the use of lenses for the purpose of uniting the dissimilar pictures; and accordingly the lenticular stereoscope may fairly be said to be his invention.

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  • The "man of great merit," despite his desire to obtain the post of director, could not refrain from reminding Prince Vasili of his former opinion.

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  • This day the horrible appearance of the battlefield overcame that strength of mind which he thought constituted his merit and his greatness.

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  • It must be conceded as no small merit in Lydgate that, in an age of experiment he should have succeeded so often in hitting the right word.

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  • Charles is said to have told him when he made him treasurer that he had only two friends in the world, himself and his own merit.

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  • In so doing they slur over the real position and the real merit of the Saracens with regard to science and art.

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  • In the case of a crime we most urgently demand the punishment for such an act; in the case of a virtuous act we rate its merit most highly.

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  • It contains no building of high architectural merit, except, perhaps, the collegiate church of Santa Maria, with its lofty blue-tiled dome and fine west doorway.

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  • It contains no building of high architectural merit, except, perhaps, the collegiate church of Santa Maria, with its lofty blue-tiled dome and fine west doorway.

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  • Heads of departments and divisions are appointed by the mayor; all other officials are appointed according to the merit system.

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  • The idea has merit.

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  • The merit and glory of that singular affair belong to Elizabeth alone.

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  • Brennan felt Merrill Cooms idea had merit.

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  • This convinced Fred the man was Byrne but Dean gave the item little merit.

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  • Not that the place was without merit.

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  • Horace Walpole, who gives an unfavourable picture of his private character, acknowledges that Stone possessed "abilities seldom to be matched"; and he had the distinction of being mentioned by David Hume as one of the only two men of mark who had perceived merit in that author's History of England on its first appearance.

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  • Francis Ronalds in England merit recognition.

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  • King Hart is another example of the later allegory, and, as such, of higher literary merit.

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  • Yet, in the words of Macaulay, who gives an admirable account of the discussion in his essay on the comic dramatists of the Restoration, "when all deductions have been made, great merit must be allowed to the work."

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  • The Golden Temple is so called on account of its copper dome, covered with gold foil, which shines brilliantly in the rays of the Indian sun, and is reflected back from the waters of the lake; but the building as a whole is too squat to have much architectural merit apart from its ornamentation.

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  • Besides the more mechanical sort of work, such as mosaic patterns and architectural decoration, they also produced mosaic pictures and sculpture of very high merit, especially the recumbent effigies, with angels standing at the head and foot,, in the tombs of Ara Coeli, S.

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  • He was one of the original members of the Order of Merit, instituted in connexion with the coronation of King Edward VII.

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  • There are several old pictures of merit, and the shrine of St Eleuthere, the first bishop of Tournai in the 6th century, is a remarkable product of the silversmith's art.

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  • Again speaking in the Chamber, Mancini claimed for Italy the principal merit in the conclusion of the triple alliance, but declared that the alliance left Italy full liberty of action.

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  • This new statement has at least of Judg= the merit of bringing God into touch with man's goodness as well as with his happiness.

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  • Much American work of merit on the character of Christ is headed by W.

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  • He wrote (1) Antapodoseos, seu rerum per Europem gestarum, Libri VI, an historical narrative, relating to the events from 887 to 949, compiled with the object of avenging himself upon Berengar and Willa his queen; (2) Historia Ottonis, a work of greater impartiality and merit, unfortunately covering only the years from 960 to 964; and (3) the Relatio de Legatione Constantinopolitana (968-969).

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  • In 1823 he was appointed conservator of the physical cabinet at Munich, and in the following year he received from the king of Bavaria the civil order of merit.

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  • At the request of Mir `Alishirr, himself a distinguished statesman and writer, Mirkhond began about 1474, in the quiet convent of Khilasiyah, which his patron had founded in Herat as a house of retreat for literary men of merit, his great work on universal history, Rauzat-ussafa fi sirat-ulanbia walmuluk walkhulafa or Garden of Purity on the Biography of Prophets, Kings and Caliphs.

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  • The latter event is proved by a Latin address (of no particular merit) to the Doge and Senate entitled Oratio J.

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  • about 1040, containing among other relics of the cathedral an old altar supposed to be that of the idol Krodo which formerly stood on the Burgberg near Neustadt-Harzburg; the church of the former Benedictine monastery of St Mary, or Neuwerk, of the 12th century, in the Romanesque style, with wall-paintings of considerable merit; and the house of the bakers' gild now an hotel, the birthplace of Marshal Saxe.

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  • To him belongs the merit of carrying out some of the earliest determinations of the quantities by weight in which acids saturate bases and bases acids, and of arriving at the conception that those amounts of different bases which can saturate the same quantity of a particular acid are equivalent to each other.

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  • The "Essay on Quantity, occasioned by reading a Treatise in which Simple and Compound Ratios are applied to Virtue and Merit," denies the possibility of a mathematical treatment of moral subjects.

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  • The architecture of the city is not without merit.

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  • Richmond has many fine monuments and statues of historic interest and artistic merit, the most noteworthy of the former being the Washington Monument, in Capitol Square.

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  • Weston was ambassador from England to the elector palatine in 1619, and had the merit of being the first who introduced the great clover, as it was then called, into English agriculture, about 1652, and probably turnips also.

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  • The next writer of note is John Mortimer, whose Whole Art of Husbandry, a regular, systematic work of considerable merit, was published in 1707.

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  • This society early began td hold a great show of live stock, implements, &c. In 1842 certain Midlothian tenant-farmers had the merit of originating an Agricultural Chemistry Association (the first of its kind), by which funds were raised for the purpose of conducting such investigations as the title of the society implies.

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  • The awards here summarized are quite distinct from those of silver medals which are given by the society in the case of articles possessing sufficient merit, which are entered as " new implements for agricultural or estate purposes."

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  • General du Teil, the younger, who took part in the siege, thus commented on Bonaparte's services: "I have no words in which to describe the merit of Bonaparte: much science, as much intelligence and too much bravery..

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  • The chief merit of the latter work lies in its forty plates, whereon the heads and feet of many birds are indifferently figured .2 But, while the successive editions of Linnaeus's great work were revolutionizing natural history, and his example of precision in language producing excellent effect on scientific writers, several other authors were advancing the study of ornithology in a very different way - a way that pleased the eye even more than his labours were pleasing the mind.

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  • Far better both as draughtsman and as authority was George Edwards, who in 1 743 began, under the same title as Albin, a series of plates with letterpress, which was continued by the name of Gleanings in Natural History, and finished in 1760, when it had reached seven parts, forming four quarto volumes, the figures of which are nearly always quoted with approval.4 The year which saw the works of Edwards completed was still further distinguished by the appearance in France, where little had been done since Belon's days,' in six quarto volumes, of the Ornithologie of MathurinJacques Brisson - a work of very great merit so far as it goes, for as a descriptive ornithologist the author stands even now unsurpassed; but it must be said that his knowledge, according to internal evidence, was confined to books and to the external parts of birds' skins.

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  • Latham entered, so far as the limits of his work would allow, into the 1 They were drawn and engraved by Martinet, who himself began in 1787 a Histoire des oiseaux with small coloured plates which have some merit, but the text is worthless.

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  • Moreover, it veiled the honest attempts that were making both in France and Germany to find real grounds for establishing an improved state of things, and consequently the labours of De Blainville, Etienne, Geoffroy St-Hilaire and L'Herminier, of Merrem, Johannes Muller and Nitzsch-to say nothing of others-were almost wholly unknown on this side of the Channel, and even the value of the investigations of British ornithotomists of high merit, such as Macartney and Pvlacgillivray, was almost completely overlooked.

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  • For Scandinavia generally Herr Collin's Skandinaviens Fugle (8vo, 1873) is a greatly bettered edition of the very moderate Danmarks Fugle of Kjaerbolling; but the ornithological portion of Nilsson's Skandinavisk Fauna, Foglarna (3rd ed., 2 vols., 8vo, 1858) is of great merit; while the text of Sundevall's Svenska Foglarna (obl.

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  • Its great merit is that it proved the necessity of combining another and hitherto much-neglected factor in any natural arrangement, though vitiated as so many other schemes have been by being based wholly on one class of characters.

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  • That Dr Cornay was on the brink of making a discovery of considerable merit will by and by appear; but, with every disposition to regard his investigations favourably, it cannot be said that he accomplished it.

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  • The bridge of chief artistic merit is the Cambridge Bridge (1908), which replaced the old West Boston Bridge, and is one feature of improvements long projected for the beautifying of the Charles river basin.

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  • Within a week Ranke received the promise of a post at Berlin, and in less than three months was appointed supernumerary professor in the university of that city, a striking instance of the promptitude with which the Prussian government recognized scientific merit when, as in Ranke's case, it was free from dangerous political opinions.

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  • 700, was twice blessed; not only was it an act of atonement in itself, like fasting and flagellation; it also gained for the pilgrim the merit of having stood on holy ground.

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  • It is indeed true that to thousands the hope of acquiring spiritual merit must have been a great motive; it is also true, as the records of crusading sermons show, that there was a strong element of "revivalism" in the Crusades, and that thousands were hurried into taking the cross by a gust of that uncontrollable enthusiasm which is excited by revivalist meetings to-day.

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  • We have already seen that among the princes who joined the First Crusade there were some who were rather politiques than devots, and who aimed at the acquisition of temporal profit as well as of spiritual merit.

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  • The ballads relating to the Cid, of which nearly two hundred are extant, are greatly inferior in merit, though some of them are not unworthy to be ranked with the best in this kind.

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  • There are numerous rhymed fairy tales, which are much liked by the people, but they are of no literary merit.

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  • He passed his time in thoroughly congenial society, seeing everybody of note or merit in Europe.

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  • All these vessels are beautifully worked, the crystal bowl especially, with its fish-shaped cover handle, being as a work of art of high merit.

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  • The cathedral, a large, modern structure, is devoid of architectural merit, but some of the smaller, ancient, Byzantine churches are singularly interesting and beautiful.

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  • This has the merit of bringing the real Wagner to ears which may have no other means of hearing him, and it fosters no delusion as to what is missing in such a presentation.

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  • Ptolemy's great merit consists in having accepted the views of Hipparchus with respect to a projection suited for a map of the world.

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  • Her blunt manners, her unconcealed scorn of the male favourites that disgraced the court, and perhaps also her sense of unrequited merit, produced an estrangement between her and the empress, which ended in her asking permission to travel abroad.

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  • A few poems by Emmet of little merit are appended to Madden's biography.

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  • No religion has so clearly grasped the ideas of guilt and of merit.

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  • In a few cases, such as the Begova Dzamia at Serajevo, the Foea mosques and the Mostar bridge, the buildings raised by the Turks are of high architectural merit.

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  • Of course only a few of the most prominent, either through the intrinsic merit of their work or through the influence they have had on that of their contemporaries, can be mentioned in a brief review like the present.

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  • The writers mentioned above are the most important previous to the capture of Constantinople; but there is little literature of real merit prior to that event.

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  • The poems of this statesman, though possessing little merit of their own, being for the most part translations from Nevayi, form one of the landmarks in the history of Ottoman literature.

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  • The most distinguished prose writers of this period are perhaps Rashid, the imperial historio grapher, 'Asim, who translated into Turkish two great lexicons, the Arabic Itamus and the Persian Burhan-i and Kani, the only humorous writer of merit belonging to the old school.

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  • The other mosques do not merit any particular attention, and in general it may be said that Bagdad architecture is neither distinctive nor imposing.

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  • The abundant documents in the hands of her descendants, the families of Broglie and Haussonville, have indeed furnished material for books and papers, but these are almost wholly on the social aspect of Mme de Stael, not on her literary merit.

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  • In addition to remains of architecture and sculpture, some of them of high merit, there have been found many inscriptions, throwing light on the cures attributed to the god.

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  • Apart from its importance in other respects, Bury's treatment of the subject has at any rate the merit of defending the traditional view of St Patrick's career.

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  • Aleandro compiled a Lexicon Graeco-Latinum (Paris, 1512), and wrote Latin verse of considerable merit inserted in M.

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  • The standard force H =20 was selected as being sufficiently low to distinguish between good and bad specimens, and at the same time sufficiently high to make the order of merit the same Ss it would be under stronger forces.

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  • Yet it possesses the great and characteristic merit of generalizing the solutions of his predecessors, exhibiting them all as modifications of one principle.

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  • But it was in the application to mechanical questions of the instrument which he thus helped to form that his singular merit lay.

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  • The picture gallery is equally important in its way, affording a survey both of the earlier Bolognese paintings and of the works of the Bolognese eclectics of the 16th and 17th centuries, the Caracci, Guido Reni, Domenichino, Guercino, &c. The primitive masters are not of great excellence, but the works of the masters of the 15th century, especially those of Francesco Francia (1450-1517) and Lorenzo Costa of Ferrara (1460-1535), are of considerable merit.

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  • Another Brazilian historian of recognized merit is Joao Manoel Pereira da Silva, whose historical writings cover the first years of the empire, from its foundation to 1840.

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  • Among the later writers Joao Capistrano de Abren has produced some short historical studies of great merit.

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  • 1661), a poet of some merit.

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  • It was followed by the Lives of the Chief Justices of England, from the Norman Conquest till the death of Lord Mansfield, 8vo, 2 vols., a book of similar construction but inferior merit.

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  • of the Chigi Library in Rome), though devoid of literary merit, contains much valuable material.

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  • 250) decree that a confessor who has suffered torment for his adherence to the Christian faith should merit and obtain the rank of presbyter forthwith - " Immo confessio est ordinatio ejus."

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  • He failed in both respects, and when Michael Faraday, who overheard a portion of his conversation with Davy on the subject, was subsequently more successful, he was inclined to assert the merit of priority, to which Faraday did not admit his claim.

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  • It marks the dawn of a public spirit as represented by the gentry, who, alarmed at the national peril and justly suspicious of the ruling magnates, unhesitatingly placed their destinies in the hands of Hunyadi, the one honest man who by sheer merit had risen within the last ten years from the humble position of a country squire to a leading position in the state.

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  • Merit was with him the sole qualification for advancement.

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  • The songs and proverbs of Peter Beniczky, who lived in the early part of the 17th century, are not without merit, and have been several times reprinted.

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  • Of considerable merit are also the sacred lyrical melodies of Paul Radai in his Lelki hodolds (Spiritual Homage), published at Debreczen in 1715.

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  • Joseph Kiss in 1876 brought out a few lyric and epic poems of considerable merit.

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  • The principal merit of this author's drama Milton (1876) consists in its brilliance of language.

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  • As popular plays the Sdrga csiko (Bay Foal) and A giros bugyelldris (The Red Purse), by Francis Csepreghy, have their own special merit, and were often represented in 1878 and 1879 at Budapest and elsewhere.

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  • In the delicate task of apportioning his own large share of merit, he certainly does not err on the side of modesty; but it would perhaps be as difficult to produce an instance of injustice, as of generosity in his estimate of others.

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  • An astronomical work, called the Surya-siddhanta (" knowledge of the Sun "), of uncertain authorship and probably belonging to the 4th or 5th century, was considered of great merit by the Hindus, who ranked it only second to the work of Brahmagupta, who flourished about a century later.

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  • Its great merit consists in the complete notation and symbolism, which avoided the cumbersome expressions of the earlier algebraists, and reduced the art to a form closely resembling that of to-day.

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  • It was Wotton's merit that he rejected the legendary and fantastic accretions, and returned to Aristotle and the observation of nature.

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  • A chief merit of Ray is to have limited the term " species " and to have assigned to Ray it the significance which it bore till the Darwinian era, whereas previously it was loosely and vaguely applied.

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  • Apart from his special discoveries in the anatomy of plants and animals, and his descriptions of new species, the great merit of Linnaeus was his introduction of a method of enumeration and classification which may be said to have created systematic zoology and botany in their present form, and establishes his name for ever as the great organizer, the man who recognized a great practical want in the use of language and supplied it.

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  • The distinctive merit of G.

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  • It is Dohrn's merit to have pointed out 1 that this assumption is not warranted, and that degeneration or progressive simplification of structure may have, and in many lines certainly has, taken place, as well as progressive elaboration and in other cases continuous maintenance of the status quo.

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  • Darwin's great merit was that he excluded from his theory of development any necessary assumption of the transmission of acquired characters.

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  • He was again minister of the treasury from November 1903 to March 1905 in Giolitti's second administration, and for the third time from February to May 1906, under Sonnino's premiership. During the latter term of office he achieved the conversion of the Italian 5% debt (reduced to 4% by the tax) to 31% to be eventually lowered to 32%, an operation which other ministers had attempted without success; although the actual conversion was not completed until after the fall of the cabinet of which he formed part the merit is entirely his.

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  • His works bear the title "operas" because, though written mainly in prose, they contain songs which Silva introduced in imitation of the true operas which then held the fancy of the public. He was also a lyric poet of real merit, combining correctness of form with a pretty inspiration and real feeling.

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  • When called upon to go to the aid of this settlement, which in1865-1866was sore pressed by one of the mountain Bantu tribes known as the Baramapulana, the burghers of the southern Transvaal objected that the white inhabitants of that region were too lawless and reckless a body to merit their assistance.

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  • A magnificent Gothic parish church was destroyed by fire and gunpowder in 1790 to make way for a building of little merit in Italian style.

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  • Charpentier in his Excellence de la langue francaise (1683) had anticipated Perrault in the famous academical dispute concerning the relative merit of the ancients and moderns.

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  • Displaying no original critical power, their chief merit lies in the fact that they bring in a popular (but not always accurate) form the results of the criticism of others within the reach of general readers.

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  • His chief merit consists in having preserved extracts.

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  • They contain nothing but meditative lyrical pieces, almost any one of which is typical of the whole, though there is considerable variation of merit.

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  • The work of the last has some independent merit; but all are interesting as showing a fusion of Greek and Arabian medicine, the latter having begun to exercise even in the 11th century a reflex influence on the schools of Byzantium.

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  • The extent to which his practice was influenced by this and other a priori conceptions prevents us from classing Sydenham as a pure empiric; but he had the rare merit of never permitting himself to be enslaved even by his own theories.

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  • Louis, by his researches on pulmonary consumption and typhoid fever, had the chief merit of refuting the doctrines of Broussais.

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  • His systematic doctrines founded the so-called "natural history school"; but his real merit was that of the founder or introducer of a method.

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  • Haser: "Schdnlein has the incontestable merit of having been the first to establish in Germany the exact method of the French and the English, and to impregnate this method with the vivifying spirit of German research."

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  • The first of these divisions in order, not the least in bulk, and, though not the first in merit, inferior to none in the amount of congenial labour spent on it, is the theatre.

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  • His tragedies, on the other hand, are works of extraordinary merit in their own way.

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  • Zaire, among those where love is admitted as a principal motive, and Merope, among those where this motive is excluded and kept in subordination, yield to no plays of their classe in such interest as is possible on the model, in stage effect and in uniform literary merit.

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  • In Parliament Square and elsewhere are numerous statues, some of high merit, but it cannot be said that statuary occupies an important place in the adornment of streets and open places in London.

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  • This plan possessed the merit of novelty.

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  • 147,525 The chief religious principle of the Burmese is to acquire merit for their next incarnation by good works done in this life.

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  • The bestowal of alms, offerings of rice to priests, the founding of a monastery, erection of pagodas, with which the country is crowded, the building of a bridge or rest-house for the convenience of travellers are all works of religious merit, prompted, not by love of one's fellowcreatures, but simply and solely for one's own future advantage.

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  • Arms should dignify their person; they should ever practise their use; and great would be the merit of those who fought in the van, who slew the enemies of their faith, and who despaired not although overpowered by superior numbers.

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  • The number of varieties of grapes possessing some merit is considerable, but a very few of them will be found sufficient to supply all the wants of the cultivator.

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  • For general purposes nothing approaches the Black Hamburgh (including Frankenthal) in merit.

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  • According to Aristophanes, he was blinded by Zeus because he distributed his gifts without regard to merit.

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  • In 1855 he refused from Lord Palmerston an office not connected with foreign affairs, was elected lord rector of Aberdeen university, and on 15th June moved a resolution in the House of Commons (defeated by a large majority) declaring that in public appointments merit had been sacrificed to private influence and an adherence to routine.

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  • As laborious historical students, Don Jose Toribio Polo, the author of an ecclesiastical history of Peruvian dioceses, and Don Enrique Torres Saldamando, the historian of the Jesuits in Peru, have great merit.

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  • Peruvian literature since the independence has also attained high merit in the walks of poetry and romance.

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  • Trinidad Fernandez and Constantino Carrasco were two poets of merit who died young, the principal work of the latter being his metrical version of the Quichua drama, 011antay.

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  • Here lies a great merit of Hermas's book, his insight into experimental religion and the secret of failure in Christians about him, to many of whom Christianity had come by birth rather than personal conviction.

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  • The apparatus possesses the great merit of simplicity and compactness, in consequence of which it is comparatively cheap and not liable to derangement.

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  • In1882-1886he was mayor of the city of Brooklyn, being twice elected on an independent ticket; and by his administration of his office he demonstrated that a rigid "merit" civil-service system was practicable - in September 1884 the first municipal civil-service rules in the United Service were adopted in Brooklyn.

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  • In spite of strong prejudice, he shows remarkable breadth of view and appreciation of merit in systems the most hostile to his own.

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  • There is no proof that any book or painting of real merit was sacrificed, and Savonarola was neither foe to art nor to learning.

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  • It possesses few buildings of architectural merit.

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  • This object is to show the sciences as branches remodel the whole science, yet not the less will they recognize the merit of the first work which has facilitated their labours."- Congreve.

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  • The value and interest of the Perceval romances stand very high, not alone for their intrinsic merit, though that is considerable - Chretien's Perceval, though not his best poem, is a favourable specimen of his work, and von Eschenbach's Parzival, though less elegant in style, is by far the most humanly interesting, and at the same time, most deeply spiritual, of the Grail romances - but also for the interest of the subject matter.

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  • Nevertheless the annals show that during the three centuries before 1897 there were 108 earthquakes sufficiently disastrous to merit historical mention.

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  • In his country retreat at Shizuoka he formed one of the richest libraries ever brought together in Japan, and by will he bequeathed the Japanese section of it to his eighth son, the feudal chief of Owari, and the Chinese section to his ninth son, the prince of Kishu, with the result that under the former feudatorys auspices two works of considerable merit were produced treating of ancient ceremonials and supplementing the Nikongi.

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  • Japan was thus enriched with two works of very high merit, the Genji Mono galari (c. IO04~ and the Makura no Zoshi (about the same date).

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  • Neither work can be said to possess signal literary merit, but both had memorable consequences.

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  • Even Shakespeare has been played by these amateurs, and the abundant wit of the Japanese is on the way to enrich the stage with modern farces of unquestionable merit.

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  • Throughout the whole of this period, embracing about a hundred years, there still continued to work, altogether apart from the men who were making the success of popular art, a large number of able painters of the Kano, Tosa and Chinese schools, who multiplied pictures that had every merit except that of originality.

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  • In their adaptation of modern processes of illustration the Japanese are entirely abreast of Western nations, the chrornolithographs and other reproductions in the Kokka, a periodical record of Japanese works of art (begun in 1889), in the superb albums of the Shimbi S/join, and in the publications of Ogawa being of quite a high order of merit.

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  • But it is impossible to admit within the circle of high-art productions these wooden figures of everyday men and women, unrelieved by any subjective element, and owing their merit entirely to the fidelity with which their contours are shaped, their muscles modelled, and their anatomical proportions preserved.

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  • Architects, turners, tilemakers, decorative artists and sculptors, coming from China and from Korea, erected grand temples for the worship of Buddha enshrining images of much beauty and adorned with paintings and carvings of considerable merit.

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  • The decoration was confined to blue under the glaze, and as an object of art the ware possessed no special merit.

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  • But at Owari the experts were content with an inferior color, and their blue-and-white porcelains never enjoyed a distinguished reputation, though occasionally we find a specimen of great merit.

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  • He took for model the rich and delicate liquid-dawn monochrome, and succeeded in producing some specimens of considerable merit.

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  • Its merit consists entirely in the ample collection of materials.

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  • The first periodical of merit and influence was the History of the Works of the Learned (1699-1712), largely consisting of descriptions of foreign books.

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  • counsellor of the parliament of Paris and a man of rare merit and learning, to actually carry the project into effect.

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  • After its suppression and the falling off in interest of the Biblioteca italiana the next of any merit to appear was the Antologia, a monthly periodical brought out at Florence in 1820 by Gino Capponi and Giampetro Vieusseux, but suppressed in 1833 on account of an epigram of Tommaseo, a principal writer.

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  • 375) it was held to be not penal for a clergyman to speak of merit by transfer as a "fiction,"or to express a hope of the ultimate pardon of the wicked, or to affirm that any part of the Old or New Testament, however unconnected with religious faith or moral duty, was not written under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit.

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  • As an astronomer, Rittenhouse's principal merit is that he introduced in 1786 the use of spider lines in the focus of a transit instrument.

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  • On the traces of dragon and serpent myths in the Old Testament and their significance, see Gunkel, Schopfung and Chaos (1895) - a pioneering work of the highest merit - and Ency.

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  • Another statue, "The Sluggard," of equal merit, was exhibited in 1886; and a charming statuette of a nude figure of a girl looking over her shoulder at a frog, called "Needless Alarms," was completed in the same year, and presented by the artist to Sir John Millais in acknowledgment of the gift by the latter of his picture, "Shelling Peas."

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  • He was not only the first in point of time, and according to ancient testimony one of the first in point of merit, among the comic poets of Rome, and in spirit, though not in form, the earliest of the line of Roman satirists, but he was also the oldest of the national poets.

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  • A generation later, in what might be called the expiring effort of Latin poetry, appeared two writers of much greater merit.

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  • His style is simple and direct, but has hardly any other merit.

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  • GEOFFROY DE VILLEHARDOUIN (c. 1160 - c. 1213), the first vernacular historian of France, and perhaps of modern Europe, who possesses literary merit, is rather supposed than known to have been born at the château from which he took his name, near Troyes, in Champagne, about the year 1160.

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  • Under (i.) they condemned the doctrine of the school authors on congruous merit (Art.

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  • These volumes contain in addition to the four treatises already mentioned, Miscellaneous Reflections, now first printed, and the Inquiry concerning Virtue or Merit, described, as "formerly printed from an imperfect copy, now corrected and published intire," and as "printed first in the year 1699."

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  • of it too long, is able to bring irrecoverable ruin and misery" (Inquiry concerning Virtue or Merit, Bk.

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  • This system had the merit of counteracting any abuse of power by the bureaucracy.

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  • The civil service was reorganized so as to reward merit and work by promotion.

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  • In a similar manner grants of land, or of the profits of land, appear to have been made by the bishops to their clergy for life, on the ground of some extraordinary merit on the part of the grantee.

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  • It had, however, the merit of stimulating abler workers in the same field.

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  • Vieta himself, of course, did not see so far as that; nevertheless the merit cannot be denied him of having indirectly suggested the thought.

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  • But to none of them or their fellows did he, so far as it appears, show that jealousy of real merit from which so many great actors have been unable to remain free.

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  • The earlier biographies of Garrick are by Arthur Murphy (2 vols., 1801) and by the bookseller Tom Davies (2 vols., 4th ed., 1805), the latter a work of some merit, but occasionally inaccurate and confused as to dates; and a searching if not altogether sympathetic survey of his verses is furnished by Joseph Knight's valuable Life (1894).

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  • Many of these buildings are of considerable architectural merit, the material chiefly used in their construction being granite from the Paarl and red brick.

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  • His researches on elliptic functions are of considerable elegance, but their great merit lies in the stimulating effect which they had on later mathematicians.

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  • The 'TiroOi icae, which are of considerable merit, contain exhortations to bravery and a warning against the disgrace of cowardice.

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  • He may justly claim the merit of having guided the awakened psychological interest of British thinkers of the second half of the 19th century into fruitful channels.

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  • through the merit and disposition of the user.

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  • Czarniecki is rightly regarded as one of the most famous of heroic Poland's great captains, and to him belongs the chief merit of extricating her from the difficulties which threatened to overwhelm her during the disastrous reign of John Casimir.

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  • His Memoires du peuple francaise (1865-1873) and La France et les Frangais a travers les siecles (1882) at least have the merit of being among the first books written on the social history of France.

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  • During his second term Cleveland added 44,004 places in the civil service to the classified list, bringing them within the rules of the merit system.

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  • Of Alcott's published works the most important is Tablets (1868); next in order of merit is Concord Days (1872).

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  • Plutarch mentions his paintings as possessing; the Homeric merit of ease and absence of effort.

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  • Yet his merit as an Arabist was sooner recognized than the value of his Greek work.

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  • This led to the further step of setting up personal merit rather than ecclesiastical ordination as the ground of the priestly office.

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  • It is, moreover, a work of some artistic merit, although not free from inaccuracies.

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  • in 1897, received the Order of Merit in 1902, and was awarded many honours, academic and other.

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  • Between these cyclonic storms come areas of high pressure, or anticyclones, with dry cool air in summer, and dry cold air in winter, sometimes with such decided changes in temperature as to merit the name cold wave.

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  • He had already made himself known by critical studies on the history of the middle ages, of which the most important was his Geschichte des ersten Kreuzzuges (Dusseldorf, 1841; new ed., Leipzig, 1881), a work which, besides its merit as a valuable piece of historical investigation, according to the critical methods which he had learnt from Ranke, was also of some significance as a protest against the vaguely enthusiastic attitude towards the middle ages encouraged by the Romantic school.

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  • The annual reports, of which he was the chief author, became controversial pamphlets; he published bold replies to criticisms upon the work of the Commission; he explained its purposes to newspaper correspondents; when Congress refused to appropriate the amount which he believed essential for the work, he made the necessary economies by abandoning examinations of candidates for the Civil Service in those districts whose representatives in Congress had voted to reduce the appropriation, thus very shrewdly bringing their adverse vote into disfavour among their own constituents; and during the six years of his commissionership more than twenty thousand positions for government employes were taken out of the realm of merely political appointment and added to the classified service to be obtained and retained for merit only.

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  • He reformed the administration of the state canals, making the Canal Commission non-partisan; he introduced the merit system into many of the subordinate offices of the state; and he vigorously urged the passage of and signed the Ford Franchise Act (1899), taxing corporation franchises.

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  • No American president has done so much to discredit and destroy the old Jacksonian theory of party government that "to the victors belong the spoils," and to create confidence in the practical success as well as the moral desirability of a system of appointments to office which rests upon efficiency and merit only.

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  • Some reference has already been made to the fact that in every office which Mr Roosevelt held he constantly dwelt upon the truism, often forgotten or ignored, that no government can accomplish any permanent good unless its administrative and legislative officers are chosen and maintained for merit only.

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  • When Federal Civil Service commissioner he did more than any other single public man in the United States has had either the ability or the opportunity to do; to promote the doctrine of service for merit only out of the realm of theory into the realm of governmental practice.

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  • While he was criticized by the friends of Civil Service Reform for not going far enough during his presidency to protect the encroachments of those who desire to have the offices distributed as political rewards or for partisan ends, such specific acts as his transference to the classified service of all fourth-class postmasters east of the Mississippi and north of the Ohio rivers, his insistence upon a thorough investigation of the scandals in the Post Office department, and his order forbidding federal employes to use their offices for political purposes in the campaign of 1908 are typical of his vigorous support of the merit system.

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  • Two richly and elaborately carved chimney-pieces in the hotel de ville merit special notice.

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  • The merit of the simple suspension bridge is its cheapness, and its defect is its flexibility: This last becomes less serious as the dead weight of the structure becomes large in proportion to the live or temporary load.

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  • There was little or no sense of the danger of the legal principle, as related to human egoism and the instinct to seek salvation as a reward for merit.

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  • The reality of this tendency, particularly at Rome, betrays itself in Hermas, who teaches the supererogatory merit of alms gained by the selfdenial of fasting (Sim.

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  • The distribution of medals to the soldiers and the institution of the Victoria Cross (February 1857) as a reward for individual instances of merit and valour must also be noted among the incidents which occupied the queen's time and thoughts.

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  • This silly libel so enraged the performers at the Opera that they hanged and burned with him, the Dijon academy, which had founded his fame, announced the subject of "The Origin of Inequality," on which he wrote a discourse which was unsuccessful, but at least equal to the former in merit.

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  • Some posthumous fragments of another opera, Daphnis et Chloe, were printed in 1780; and in 1781 appeared Les Consolations des miseres de ma vie, a collection of about one hundred songs and other fugitive pieces of very unequal merit.

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  • As with Froude's work generally, its literary merit is remarkable; it is a well-balanced and orderly narrative, coherent in design and symmetrical in execution.

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  • His papers, which were republished in a single volume with the title Die Mechanik der Wdrme (3rd ed., 1893), are of unequal merit.

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  • Stanislaus Grochowski (1554-1612) was a priest; but his poetry is of little merit, although he was celebrated in his time as a writer of panegyrics.

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  • Another writer of pastorals, but not of equal merit, was Jan Gawinski, a native of Cracow.

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  • The history is written in an easy style and is a work of great merit.

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  • His works were published under the title of Juvenalis redivivus, and, although boasting but little poetical merit, give us very curious pictures of the times.

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  • Perhaps, however, with the exception of the works of Fredro, the Poles have not produced anything of much merit in this line.

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  • Other poets of the romantic school of considerable merit were Gorecki, Witwicki, Odyniec, and Gaszynski; the last-named wrote many exquisite sonnets, which ought alone to embalm his name.

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  • A poet of considerable merit is Adam Asnyk (1838-1897).

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  • At Warsaw, since the last insurrection, the university has become entirly Russianized, and its Transactions are published in Russian; but Polish works of merit still issue from the press - among others the leading Polish literary journal, Biblioteka warszawska.

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  • Boyle's great merit as a scientific investigator is that he carried out the principles which Bacon preached in the Novum Organum.

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  • It was certainly a work of great merit and charm.

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  • BIBLIOGRAPHY.-All Laud's works are to be found in the Library of Anglo-Catholic Theology (7 vols.), including his sermons (of no great merit), letters, history of the chancellorship, history of his troubles and trial, and his remarkable diary, the MSS.

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  • Buildings, &c. - Brick, blue limestone, and a greyish buff freestone are the most common building materials, and the city has various buildings of much architectural merit.

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  • consists primarily and completely of the merit and satisfaction of Christ our Saviour.

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  • It includes also the superfluous merit and satisfaction of the Blessed Virgin and the Saints.

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  • In one way, as I need not say, a saint has no superfluous merit.

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  • 1635) had in vain pretended to teach Hebrew, Greek and Latin in the space of six months (1612), but he had the merit of maintaining that the study of a language should begin with the study of an author.

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  • The town possesses few buildings of note, and of the extensive ruins few merit attention.

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  • The sixteen volumes of the Campaigns of the Civil War (1881-1882) and the Navy in the Civil War (1883) (written by various authors) are of very unequal merit, but several of the volumes are indispensable to the study of the Civil War.

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  • Considered as a history of algebra, this work is strongly objected to by Jean Etienne Montucla on the ground of its unfairness as against the early Italian algebraists and also Franciscus Vieta and Rene Descartes and in favour of Harriot; but Augustus De Morgan, while admitting this, attributes to it considerable merit.

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  • To Sir Humphry Davy belongs the merit of isolating this element from potash, which itself had previously been considered an element.

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  • Our direct sympathy with the agent in the circumstances in which he is placed gives rise, according to this view, to our notion of the propriety of his action, whilst our indirect sympathy with those whom his actions have benefited or injured gives rise to our notions of merit and demerit in the agent himself.

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  • It has been thought necessary to give in detail the facts relating to the conversion of the logarithms, as unfortunately Charles Hutton in his history of logarithms, which was prefixed to the early editions of his Mathematical Tables, and was also published as one of his Mathematical Tracts, has charged Napier with want of candour in not telling the world of Briggs's share in the change of system, and he expresses the suspicion that " Napier was desirous that the world should ascribe to him alone the merit of this very useful improvement of the logarithms."

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  • Every act of every person has not only a moral value producing merit or demerit, but also an inherent power which works out its fitting reward or punishment.

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  • These two exist in many forms more or less grotesque, and after death the soul passes to one of them and there receives its due; but that existence too is marked by desire and action, and is therefore productive of merit or demerit, and as the soul is thus still entangled in the meshes of karma it must again assume an earthly garb and continue the strife.

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  • The last book of the Laws of Manu deals with karmaplialam, " the fruit of karma," and gives many curious details of the way in which sin is punished and merit rewarded.

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  • Many of the commercial buildings are of architectural merit, notably the banks, of which the bank of Australasia, a massive edifice of the Doric order, and the Gothic Australian bank are the finest examples.

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  • such as that remaining of Xochicalco, which is figured by Humboldt, as well as the ornamented woodwork, feather-mats, and vases, are not without artistic merit.

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  • The different parts of the Bible vary considerably in merit, the alterations in the New Testament, for instance, showing freshness and vigou-, whereas most of the changes introduced in the Old Testament have been condemned as " arbitrary and at variance with the exact sense of the Hebrew text " (Westcott, op cit.

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  • He was the author of two historical works - a brief defence of the literary merit and personal and political character of James I.

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  • Some of the great warehouses are of considerable architectural merit.

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  • The scholars on the foundation (or "of the House") are chosen from among the undergraduates, for merit in classics, mathematics or experimental science.

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  • This view, generally known as "Prout's hypothesis," at least had the merit of stimulating inquiry, and many of the most careful determinations of atomic weights undertaken since its promulgation have been provoked by the desire to test its validity.

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  • The stories, though of no special merit as far as the plots are concerned, are told with verve and interest.

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  • This merit he shares with his contemporaries N.

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  • The mothones or mothakes were usually the sons of Spartiates and helot mothers; they were free men sharing the Spartan training, but were not full citizens, though they might become such in recognition of special merit.

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  • This is where two alternative readings, neither of which, can have come from the other, have equal external support and equal intrinsic merit.

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  • It is their merit from a Mahommedan point of view to have re-established the power of orthodox Islam and delivered the Moslem world from the subversive influence of the ultra-Shiite tenets, which constituted a serious danger to the duration of Islam itself.

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  • The merit of Sikes's system lies not so much in the hydrometer as in the complete system of tables by which the readings of the instrument are at once converted into percentage of proof-spirit.

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  • 4 Thus it is to Thompson (1830), and not to Burmeister (1834), as erroneously stated by Keferstein, that the merit of this discovery belongs.

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  • The merit of this crowning achievement belongs to Sigismund alone; but for him it would have been impossible.

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  • The ministry of finance is in the Treasury building on Rua do Sacramento - an immense structure of no special architectural merit.

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  • There are a number of theatres, but the city had no large theatre of architectural merit previous to the construction of the Municipal Theatre at the intersection of the Avenida Central with Rua 13 de Maio, with an elegant marble facade in the French Renaissance style.

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  • His controversial writings are vigorous if prolix and his theological essays have little merit.

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  • Modern churches are numerous, but of no remarkable architectural merit.

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  • Pringsheim, who, by a series of experiments of undoubted merit, tried to establish that the emission of the line spectra of the alkali metals was invariably associated with a reduction of the metallic oxide.

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  • Among a large number of biographies published previously, that by Washington Wilks (1854) has some merit.

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  • Merit was the sole qualification for promotion, and Peter himself set the example to the other learners by gradually rising from the ranks.

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  • Most of the interior walls of the caves were covered with fresco paintings, of a considerable degree of merit, and somewhat in the style of the early Italian painters.

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  • The merit of this fresh noumenal idealism consists in its correction of the one-sidedness of Schopenhauer: intelligence is necessary to will.

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  • He has the merit of presenting natural or intuitive realism in its purity.

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  • description of him as "of most upright conversation, truly a confessor of Christ, a teacher of piety, and a preacher of truth - a man whom I am not competent to praise according to his merit, yet altogether keep silent I dare not."

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  • It suits those of the readers, 1 as analysed above; and it has the merit of suggesting to us as author the very person of all those described in the New Testament who seems most capable of the task, Apollos, the learned Alexandrian (Acts xviii.

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  • Whatever the merit of a Gregory X.

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  • The lines do not lack vigour; and there are passages of high merit, notably the oftquoted section beginning "A!

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  • His legends are not without wit and poetical merit.

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  • But it is in the larger questions to which he opened the way that the merit of Grotius consists.

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  • The main merit of his account of ancient art, the only classical work of its kind, is that it is a compilation ultimately founded on the lost textbooks of Xenocrates and on the biographies of Duris and Antigonus.

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  • As Beltz observes, the fame of Sir Reginald Cobham, Sir Walter Manny and the earls of Northampton, Hereford and Suffolk was already established by their warlike exploits, and they would certainly have been among the original companions had the order been then regarded as the reward of military merit only.

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  • Ashmole cites authorities for the contention that knighthood ennobles, insomuch that whosoever is a knight it necessarily follows that he is also a gentleman; " for, when a king gives the dignity to an ignoble person whose merit he would thereby recompense, he is understood to have conferred whatsoever is requisite for the completing of that which he bestows."

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  • (3) Orders Of Merit, whether military, civil or joint orders.

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  • There are also certain orders, such as the recently instituted Order of Merit (British), and the Pour le Merite (Prussia), which have but one class, all members being on an equality of rank within the order.

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  • To the class of orders without the titular appellation " knight " belongs the Order of Merit, founded by King Edward VII.

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  • The badge is a cross of red and blue enamel surmounted by an imperial crown; the central blue medallion bears the inscription " For Merit " in gold, and is surrounded by a wreath of laurel.

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  • The Distinguished Service Order, an order of military merit, was founded on the 6th of September 1886 by Queen Victoria, its object being to recognize the special services of officers in the army and navy.

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  • of Lombardy, was founded by Napoleon as king of Italy in 1809, and refounded as an Austrian order of civil and military merit in 1816 by the emperor Francis I.; the number of knights is limited to 100-20 grand cross, 30 commanders, 50 knights.

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  • The Order of Francis Joseph, for personal merit of every kind, was founded in 1849 by the emperor Francis Joseph I.

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  • The Order of Leopold, for civil and military merit, was founded in 1832 by Leopold I., with four classes, a fifth being added in 1838.

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  • in 1867 as an order of civil merit.

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  • Originally restricted to 50 knights and granted as a family or court decoration, it was reconstituted as an unlimited order of merit in 1808 by Frederick VI.; alterations have been made in 1811 and 1864.

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  • The Legion of Honour, the only order of France, and one which in its higher grades ranks in estimation with the highest European orders, was instituted by Napoleon Bonaparte on the 19th of May 1802 (29 Floreal of the year X.) as a general military and civil order of merit.

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  • in 1693 for military merit, and the Order of Military Merit by Louis XV.

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  • Besides the above Bavaria possesses the Military Order of Maximilian Joseph, 1806, and the Civil Orders of Merit of St Michael, 1693, and of the Bavarian Crown, 1808, and other minor orders and decorations, civil and military.

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  • The Order of Henry the Lion, for military and civil merit, was founded by Duke William in 1834.

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  • There are five classes, and a cross of merit of two classes.

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  • of Schwerin and Frederick William of Strelitz; there are four classes, with two divisions of the grand cross, and also an affiliated cross of merit; the grand cross can be granted to ladies.

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  • The Order of Duke Peter Frederick Louis, a family order and order of merit, was founded by the grand duke Paul Frederick Augustus in memory of his father in 1838.

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  • It is an order of civil and military merit.

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  • In 1810 the order was made one for military merit against the enemy in the field exclusively.

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  • The decoration of merit for ladies (Verdienst-kreuz), founded in 1870, was raised to an order in 1907.

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  • Other Saxon orders are the military Order of St Henry, for distinguished service in the field, founded in 1736 in one class; since 1829 it has had four classes; the ribbon is sky blue with two yellow stripes, the gold cross bears in the centre the effigy of the emperor Henry II.; the Order of Albert, for civil and military merit, founded in 1850 by Frederick Augustus II.

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  • in memory of Duke Albert the Bold, the founder of the Albertine line of Saxony, has six classes; the Order of Civil Merit, was founded in THE ST Andrew (Russia).

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  • Saxe Coburg Gotha and Saxe Meiningen have also separate crosses of merit in science and art.

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  • The Order of the Crown of Wurttemberg was founded in 1818, uniting the former Order of the Golden Eagle and an order of civil merit.

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  • Besides the military Order of Merit founded in 1759, and the silver cross of merit, 1900, Wurttemberg has also the Order of Frederick, 1830, and the Order of Olga, 1871, which is granted to ladies as well as men.

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  • The Order of William, for military merit, was founded in 1815 by William I.; there are four classes; the badge is a white cross resting on a green laurel Burgundian cross, in the centre the Burgundian flint-steel, as in the order of the Golden Fleece.

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  • The Order of the Netherlands Lion, for civil merit, was founded in 1818; there are four classes.

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  • The Order of Adolphus of Nassau, for civil and military merit, in four classes, was founded in 1858, and the Order of the Oak Crown as a general order of merit, in five classes, in 1841, modified 1858.

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  • It is a general order of merit.

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  • in honour of St Olaf, the founder of Christianity in Norway, as a general order of merit, military and civil.

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  • It was reorganized as an order of merit by Gregory XVI.

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  • It was remodelled in 1832 under its present name and constitution as a general order of military and civil merit.

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  • The Order of St Benedict of Aviz (earlier of Evora), founded in 1162 as a religious military order, was secularized in 1789 as an order of military merit, in four classes.

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  • It also was secularized in 1789, and in 1862 was constituted an order of merit for science, literature and art, in five classes.

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  • The Order of the Star of Rumania was founded in 1877, and the Order of the Crown of Rumania in 1881, both in five classes, for civil and military merit; the ribbon of the first is red with blue borders, of the second light blue with two silver stripes.

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  • in 1882, statutes 1883, in five classes; the ribbon is blue and red; the Order of St Sava, founded 1883, also in five classes, is an order of merit for science and art; the Order of the Star of Karageorgevitch, four classes, was founded by Peter I.

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  • The three most ancient orders of Spain - of St James of Compostella, or St James of the Sword, of Alcantara and of Calatrava - still exist as orders of merit, the first in three classes, the last two as orders of military merit in one class.

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  • The order became a military order of merit in 1808 and was reorganized in 1874.

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  • The Order of Isabella the Catholic was founded in 1815 under the patronage of St Isabella, wife of Diniz of Portugal; originally instituted to reward loyalty in defence of the Spanish possessions in America, it is now a general order of merit, in three classes.

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  • Other Spanish orders are the Maria Louisa, 1792, for noble ladies; the military and naval orders of merit of St Ferdinand, founded by the Cortes in 1811.

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  • five classes; of St Ermenegild (Hermenegildo), 1814, three classes, of Military Merit and Naval Merit, 1866, and of Maria Christina, 1890; the Order of Beneficencia for civil merit, 1856; that of (i.) THE Redeemer (Greece).

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  • for merit in science, literature and art, 1902, and the Civil Order of Alfonso XII., 1902.

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  • The Order of the Pole Star (Polar Star, North Star, the " Black Ribbon "), founded in 1748 for civil merit, has since 1844 three classes.

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  • in 1772 as an order of merit for services rendered to the national industries and manufactures, has three classes, with subdivisions.

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  • in 1879 as a general order of merit in one class; the Nischan-el-Iftikhar, or Order of Glory, also one class, founded 1831 by Mahmoud II.; the Nischan-i-Mejidi, the Mejidieh, was founded as a civil and military order of merit in 1851 by Abdul Medjid.

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  • The Nischan-i-Osmanie, the Osmanieh, for civil and military merit, was founded by Abdul Aziz in 1862; it has four classes.

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  • There are no orders for natives, and such distinctions as are conferred by the different coloured buttons of the mandarins, the grades indicated by the number of peacocks' feathers, the gift of the yellow jacket and the like, are rather insignia of rank or personal marks of honour than orders, whether of knighthood or merit, in the European sense.

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  • Philopoemen's great merit lies in his having restored to his compatriots that military efficiency without which the Achaean League for all its skilful diplomacy could never stand.

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  • (2) Taoism promises immortality as the reward of merit.

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  • The collections which we possess under the name of Aesop's Fables are late renderings of Babrius's version or Hpo-yv &o sari, rhetorical exercises of varying age and merit.

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  • He was also known as a patron of art and literature and an amateur painter of no little merit.

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  • Finally, the improvement in the quality of the iron which resulted from thus completely freeing it from the gangue turned out to be a great and unexpected merit of the indirect process, probably the merit which enabled it, in spite of its complexity, to drive out the direct process.

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  • The general order of merit of a given variety or specimen of iron or steel may be measured by the degree to which it combines strength and hardness with ductility.

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  • Here the merit of nickel steel is not so much that it resists perforation, as that it does not crack even when deeply penetrated by a projectile.

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  • The combination of ductility, which lessens the tendency to break when overstrained or distorted, with a very high limit of elasticity, gives it great value for shafting, the merit of which is measured by its endurance of the repeated stresses to which its rotation exposes it whenever its alignment is not mathematically straight.

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  • Manganese by itself rather lessens than increases the malleableness and, indeed, the general merit of the metal, but it is added intentionally, in quantities even as large as 1 5 to palliate the effects of sulphur and oxygen.

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  • Besides a great saving of labour, only partly offset by the cost of repairs, these machines have the great merit of making the management independent of a very troublesome set of labourers, the hand pig-breakers, who were not only absolutely indispensable for every cast and every day, because the pig iron must be removed promptly to make way for the next succeeding cast of iron, but very difficult to replace because of the great physical endurance which their work requires.

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  • Besides minor advantages, this plan has the merit of avoiding an ineffective period which occurs in common open-hearth procedure just after the charge of cast iron has been melted down.

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  • - Phosphorus has, along with its great merit of giving fluidity, the grave defect of causing brittleness, especially under shock.

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  • There are some business edifices and residences of considerable architectural merit, but the greater part are small and inconspicuous, a majority of the residences being thatched, mudwalled cabins.

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  • The Aldine press continued through this period to issue books, but none of signal merit; and in 1585 Aldo determined to quit his native city for Bologna, where he occupied the chair of eloquence for a few months.

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  • His merit was that he carried through this idea in spite of dangers to himself and to the state.

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  • The events of 1830-1831 gave a great stimulus to Belgian letters, but the country possessed writers of considerable merit before that date.

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  • It is a large straggling encampment rather than a town, with few buildings of any architectural merit.

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  • A third, but of inferior merit, Sur le besoin de s'unir apres le depart des etrangers, was afterwards added.

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  • Malthus had undoubtedly the great merit of having called public attention in a striking and impressive way to a subject which had neither theoretically nor practically been sufficiently considered.

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  • Brisbane has a large number of buildings of architectural merit, though in some cases their effect is marred by the narrowness of the streets in which they stand.

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  • Wallis's Elenchus geometriae Hobbianae, published in 1655 about three months after the De corpore, contained also an elaborate criticism of Hobbes's whole attempt to relay the foundations of mathematical science in its place within the general body of reasoned knowledge - a criticism which, if it failed to allow for the merit of the conception, exposed only too effectually the utter inadequacy of the result.

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  • Deheque (1853) and Viscount Royston (1806; a work of great merit).

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  • the preceding generation a writer of eminent merit was sure to be munificently rewarded by the Government.

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  • Its importance for the history of religion and mythology is, in truth, very considerable, a fact which it is the great merit of Emin 7 and Dulaurier S to have first pointed out.

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  • His sermons, which have little literary merit, were published by J.

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  • But the salient merit of the Analysis is the constant endeavour after precise definition of terms and clear statement of doctrines.

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  • He formed an administration the merit of which, as of so many others was that it was Y, to belong to no party and to have no programme.

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  • The greatest merit of this book is the use of the number of cotyledons as a basis of classification; though it must be remembered that the difference between the monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous embryo was detected by Nehemiah Grew.

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  • As an historian Procopius is of quite unusual merit, when the generally low literary level of his age is considered.

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  • Its merit lies in the furious earnestness with which it is written, which gives it a force and reality sometimes wanting in the more elaborate books written for publication.

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  • In 1714, when he was appointed rector of the university, he succeeded Govert Bidloo (1649-1713) in the chair of practical medicine, and in this capacity he had the merit of introducing the modern system of clinical instruction.

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  • If all these are deficient in literary merit, they are deeply interesting as revelations of primitive mind and manners.

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  • In general it may be said of Egyptian literary compositions that apart from their interest as anthropological documents they possess no merit which would entitle them to survive.

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  • to use it, Amadeo Peyron (1785-1870) of Turin published a Coptic lexicon of great merit which is still standard, though far from satisfying the needs of scholars of the present day.

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  • (1448-1481) and Hans (1481-1513), whose chief merit it is to have founded the Danish fleet, were, during the greater part of their reigns, only nominally kings of Sweden.

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  • Denmark produced several Latin writers of merit.

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  • Christian Falster (1690-1752) wrote satires of some merit, but most of his work is in Latin.

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  • Knud Lyne Rahbek (1760-1830) was a pleasing novelist, a dramatist of some merit, a pathetic elegist, and a witty song-writer; he was also a man full of the literary instinct, and through a long life he never ceased to busy himself with editing the works of the older poets, and spreading among the people a knowledge of Danish literature through his magazine, Minerva, edited in conjunction with C. H.

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  • 1850), of Vejle, showed himself an occasional poet of merit.

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  • In 1675 appeared his Notitia Galliarum ordine litterarum digesta, a work of the highest merit, which laid the foundations of the scientific study of historical geography in France; but, like all the scholars of his age, he had no solid knowledge of philology.

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  • In a bureaucratic despotism the greatest merit of a sovereign is to choose capable and honest ministers.

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  • Lycian sculpture followed closely the development of Greek sculpture, and many of the sculptures with which the tombs are adorned are of a high order of merit.

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  • In this department Schurz put in force his theories in regard to merit in the Civil Service, permitting no removals except for cause, and requiring competitive examinations for candidates for clerkships; he reformed the Indian Bureau and successfully opposed a bill transferring it to theWar Department; and he prosecuted land thieves and attracted public attention to the necessity of forest preservation.

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  • The most valuable result of her labours was the Instituzioni analitiche ad use della gioventu italiana, a work of great merit, which was published at Milan in 1748.

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  • This edition, although it was a great undertaking and a work of considerable merit, was a very imperfect representation of the original code.

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  • The worth of his Frederick was acknowledged by the Prussian Order of Merit in 1874.

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  • His merit was so well known and acknowledged by the Royal Society that they judged him a fit person to decide the famous contest between Newton and G.

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  • It is of unequal merit, being best in places where the author was most imterested, especially in points of the development of law.

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  • And even here individual merit must yield to historical interest.

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  • To him also belongs the great merit of liberating Russian preaching from the fetters of Polish turgidity and affectation by introducing popular themes and a simple style into Orthodox pulpit eloquence.

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  • He received the British Order of Merit in 1906.

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  • His merit, his immortal glory, consists in this - that he infused into the body of the science a new spirit; but all the members of that body were already in existence, and rightly joined together."

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  • The first part was conducted in private by the chancellor and four examiners (temptatores in cameris), and included an inquiry into the candidate's residence, attendance at lectures, and performance of exercises, as well as examination in prescribed books; those candidates adjudged worthy were admitted to the more important examination before the faculty, and the names of successful candidates were sent to the chancellor in batches of eight or more at a time, arranged in order of merit.

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  • (The order of merit at the examination for the licentiateship existed in Paris till quite recently.) Each successful candidate was then required to maintain a thesis chosen by himself (quodlibetica) in St Julian's church, and was finally submitted to a purely formal public examination (collatio) at either the episcopal palace or the abbey of Ste Genevieve, before receiving from the chancellor, in the name of the Trinity, the licence to incept or begin to teach in the faculty of arts.

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  • In the medieval examinations described above we find most of the elements of our present examinations: certificates of previous study and good conduct, preparation of set-books, questioning on subjects not specially prepared, division of examinations into various parts, classification in order of merit, payment of fees, the presentation of a dissertation, and the defence and publication of a thesis (a term of which the meaning has now become extended).

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  • In the 17th century the first class comprised the names of twelve, and the second, of twenty-four, candidates, who were divided on the report of their teachers into classes before the examination, and finally arranged in order of merit by the examiners (Vernulaeus, quoted by Sir W.

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  • The " senior wrangler " was the first candidate in order of merit in the first part of the mathematical tripos.

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  • The abolition of order of merit at this examination was decided on in 1 9 06, and names of candidates appeared in this order for the last time in 1909.

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  • Until a few years ago the successful candidates at the licentiateship were arranged in order of merit.

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  • - The arrangement of students in order of merit led naturally to the use of examinations not only as a qualifying but also as a selective test, and to the offering of money prizes (including exhibitions, scholarships and fellowships) on the results.

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  • At Oxford the marks are not numerical, but the papers are judged as of this or that supposed " class," and various degrees of merit are indicated by the symbols a, (3, -y, S, to which the signs + or - may be prefixed, according as they are above or below a certain standard within each class.

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  • The advantage of numerical marks is that they are more easily manipulated than symbols; the disadvantage, that they produce the false impression that merit can be estimated with mathematical accuracy.

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  • Edgeworth's objection to such an argument is that the number of uncertainties is far less when candidates are classed than when they are placed in ostensible order of merit.

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  • The difficulties of comparison of marks are further complicated when students take different subjects and it is necessary to compare their merit by means of marks allotted by different examiners and added together.

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  • The order of merit in the two examinations is, as a rule, very different.

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  • Pytheas certainly had one merit which distinguished him from almost all his contemporaries - he was a good astronomer, and was one of the first who made observations for the determination of latitudes, among others that of his native place Massilia, which he fixed with remarkable accuracy; his result, which was within a few miles of the truth, was adopted by Ptolemy, and became the basis of the Ptolemaic map of the western Mediterranean.

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  • They are wholly devoid of literary merit.

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  • The merit of Hegel is to have indicated and to a large extent displayed the filiation and mutual limitation of our forms of thought; to have arranged them in the order of their comparative capacity to give a satisfactory expression to truth in the totality of its relations; and to have broken down the partition which in Kant separated the formal logic from the transcendental analytic, as well as the general disruption between logic and metaphysic. It must at the same time be admitted that much of the work of weaving the terms of thought, the categories, into a system has a hypothetical and tentative character, and that Hegel has rather pointed out the path which logic must follow, viz.

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  • There is much merit in his hymns and "canons" one of the latter is very familiar as the hymn "The Day of Resurrection, Earth tell it out abroad."

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  • He published a few songs of no great merit, and had at his death no more than the reputation among his friends of a kindly and accomplished man.

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  • So far from representing man's righteousness as involving merit over against God, our author represents the greatest hero of Israel as declaring " Not for any virtue or strength of mine, but in His compassion and long-suffering was He pleased to call me " (xii.

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  • It is the merit of Hugo Winckler especially to have lifted biblical study out of the somewhat narrow lines upon which it had usually proceeded, but, at the time of writing (1910), Old Testament criticism still awaits a sound reconciliation of the admitted internal intricacies and of the external evidence for Palestine and that larger area of which it forms part.

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  • - The term "art metal-work" is applied to those works in metal in which beauty of form or decorative effect is the first consideration, irrespective of whether the object is intended for use or is merely ornamental; and it embraces any article from a Birmingham brass bedstead to works of the highest artistic merit.

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  • The average ecclesiastical metal-work has rather receded than progressed in merit, except when designed by architects and executed under their supervision.

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  • He is the finest orator whom Canada has produced, and also wrote poetry, which shows in places high merit.

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  • In fact, it is not too much to say that it was the sophists who provided those great masters with their consummate instrument, and it detracts but little from the merit of the makers if they were themselves unable to draw from it its finer tones.

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  • If the Hindu village system may be praised for its justice, the Mogul farming system had at least the merit of efficiency.

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  • It was Warren Hastings's merit to organize the empire which Clive founded.

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  • The fifth act extended to the islands the benefits of a civil service based on merit.

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  • A speech delivered in this year, pro Quinctio, is still extant; it is concerned with a technical point of law and has little literary merit.

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  • The great merit of this system is the skill.

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  • It was led by what may be called the spiritual noblesse of Islam, which, as distinguished from the hereditary nobility of Mecca, might also be designated as the nobility of merit, consisting of the "Defenders" (Ansar), and especially of the Emigrants who had lent themselves to the elevation of the Koreish, but by no means with the intention of allowing themselves thereby to be effaced.

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  • Heeren's great merit as an historian was that he regarded the states of antiquity from an altogether fresh point of view.

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  • He revived the name Ch'ao-Hsien, changed the capital from Song-do to Seoul, organized an administrative system, which with some modifications continued till 1895, and exists partially still, carried out vigorous reforms, disestablished Buddhism, made merit in Chinese literary examinations the basis of appointment to office, made Confucianism the state religion, abolished human sacrifices and the burying of old men alive, and introduced that Confucian system of education, polity, and social order which has dominated Korea for five centuries.

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  • Mill's logic has the great merit of copiously exemplifying the principles of the variety of method according to subject-matter.

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  • The great merit of conceptual logic was the demand for a mental analysis of mental reasoning, and the direct analysis of reasoning into judgments which are the sole premises and conclusions of reasoning and of all mental inferences.

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  • The notices of the early prelates are of little value, but the portion of the book in which he speaks of Bishop Elphinstone is of enduring merit.

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  • Besides being a good soldier, he was a sculptor of some merit, who executed statues of his father and of Napoleon, and he wrote a life of his father and a history of the wars under Louis XV.

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  • This view has the merit of giving the book a practical religious aim - a sine qua non to any theory of an early Christian writing.

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  • 385, note.) In the case of a writer whose chief merit is the way in which he has worked up existing material, a general charge of plagiarism is almost irrelevant.

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  • Robert Willis (1800-1875) has the merit of having been the first to simplify considerably the theory of puie mechanism, by pointing out that that branch of mechanics relates wholly to comparative motions.

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  • In the epics considerable merit is attached to a life of seclusion and ascetic practices by means of which man is considered capable of acquiring supernatural powers equal or even superior to those of the gods - a notion perhaps not unnaturally springing from the pantheistic conception.

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  • The generally recognized principal Avatars do not, however, by any means constitute the only occasions of a direct intercession of the deity in worldly affairs, but - in the same way as to this day the eclipses of the sun and moon are ascribed by the ordinary Hindu to these luminaries being temporarily swallowed by the dragon Rahu (or Graha, " the seizer") - so any uncommon occurrence would be apt to be set down as a special manifestation of divine power; and any man credited with exceptional merit or achievement, or even remarkable for some strange incident connected with his life or death, might ultimately come to be looked upon as a veritable incarnation of the deity, capable of influencing the destinies of man, and might become an object of local adoration or superstitious awe and propitiatory rites to multitudes of people.

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  • But indeed the tirthayatra, or pilgrimage to holy bathing-places, is in itself considered an act of piety conferring religious merit in proportion to the time and trouble expended upon it.

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  • The quotient thus obtained decreases as the conditions are more favourable, and, on the whole, it seems to form a good index to the merit of the respective countries from the standpoint of vital forces.

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  • If it was a merit to believe without evidence, it was a shining virtue to believe in the teeth of evidence.

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  • Nor have they even had the dubious merit of success.

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  • There exist also several literary and academical magazines and reviews of a high order of merit.

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  • The theory, however unsatisfactory as an explanation, has one great merit, that it recognizes between the eye, for instance, and the object seen an intermediate something.

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  • It is the crowning merit of the author that he never ceases to be an impartial spectator - a cold and curious critic. We might compare him to an anatomist, with knife and scalpel dissecting the dead body of Italy, and pointing out the symptoms of her manifold diseases with the indifferent analysis of one who has no moral sensibility.

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  • The latter has the merit of assigning a specific name to a limited series of events and group of facts, which can be distinguished for the purpose of analysis from other events and facts with which they are intimately but not indissolubly connected.

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  • This general classification, which was made by a conference of brokers in 1855 as a result of many years of observation dating back to the 18th century, is still very fairly descriptive of the average merit of the wines classified.

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  • In 1843, after his removal to Gottingen, he began his great Handworterbuch der Physiologie, mit Riicksicht auf physiologische Pathologie, and brought out the fifth (supplementary) volume in 1852; the only contributions of his own in it were on the sympathetic nerve, nerve-ganglia and nerve-endings, and he modestly disclaimed all merit except as being the organizer.

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  • But they are eminently sincere, and they have the great merit of illustrating the local aspects of landscape and temperament and manners.

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  • " Personal merit," he says, " consists entirely in the usefulness or agreeableness of qualities to the person himself possessed of them, or to others, who have any intercourse with him."

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  • It had the merit of success in so far as it completely established itself in the church.

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  • The merit of this definition, on the other hand, lies in its bilateral form, which calls attention to the need of characterizing both the religious attitude and the religious object to which the former has reference.

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  • Babcock and urged by President Grant; introduced the merit system in his department, and resigned in October 1870 because of pressure put on him by politicians piqued at his prohibition of campaign levies on his clerks, and because of the interference of Grant in favour of William McGarrahan's attempt by legal proceedings to obtain from Cox a patent to certain California mining lands.

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  • But proportionate to his exultation in this first recognition of his merit was the depth of his mortification and the height of his indignation at the result of the second competition.

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  • He was the author of several volumes of poetry of considerable merit, and of a novel of convict life, Moondyne, which achieved a great success.

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  • In 1907 she received the Order of Merit from King Edward VII.

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  • Despite its size it contained few buildings of any architectural merit; the most important were the palace of the governor-general and the church of the Austrian mission.

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  • The third clause required him, in all cases of preferment, to be guided not " principally," as heretofore, but " solely " by merit,, thus striking at the very root of aristocratic privilege.

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  • They possess very slight poetic merit in their Swedish form.

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  • Charles XII., under whose special patronage Rydelius wrote, was himself a metaphysician and physiologist of merit.

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  • From 1810 to 1840 was the blossoming-time in Swedish poetry, and there were several writers of distinguished merit who could not be included in either of the groups enumerated above.

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  • Contracts were given by favour and not by merit, and the progress made in the construction of the new public works was far from satisfactory.

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  • To wield a peaceful authority over all the subjects of the empire, to reward merit, and to punish transgressionsuch is the highest task of king and officials.

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  • Jones calls it, which, if ever it should be generally understood in its original language, will contest the merit of invention with Homer itself.

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  • The one merit which "dogmatic" may claim as a term in Protestant theology is that it contrasts positive statements of belief with mere reports (e.g.

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  • Among the epistles of Gay, one rises to an eminence of merit, that called "Mr Pope's welcome from Greece," written in 1720.

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  • Falguiere was a painter as well as a sculptor, but somewhat inferior in merit.

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  • The ambitious Bible de l'humanite (1864), an historical sketch of religions, has but little merit.

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  • The writer's indignation at finding it treated with silent contempt by the great scholar, who thought it was the work of a personal enemyAleander - caused him to write a second oration, more violent, more abusive, with more self-glorification, but with less real merit than the first.

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  • Yet, while the scholars of his time admitted his pre-eminence, neither they nor those who immediately followed seem to have appreciated his real merit, but to have considered his emendatory criticism, and his skill in Greek, as constituting his claim to special greatness.

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  • For any large treatment of moral and political questions he seems to have been alike by nature and preparation unfitted; and there is no evidence of his having had any but the most ordinary and narrow views of the great social problems. He shows no trace of that hearty sympathy with the working classes which breaks out in several passages of the Wealth of Nations; we ought, perhaps, with Held, to regard it as a merit in Ricardo that he does not cover with fine phrases his deficiency in warmth of social sentiment.

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  • As, in Fenelon's own opinion, the great merit of Homer was his "amiable simplicity," so the great merit of Telemaque is the art that gives to each adventure its hidden moral, to each scene some sly reflection on Versailles.

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  • Other versions are Gifford's (1802), of some merit, and C. Badham's (1814).

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  • Even the men and women who till the soil are capable of improvizing verse of real merit, and sometimes excel in the ancient and difficult art of composing extempore amoebean rhymes.

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  • Comparatively few buildings were of striking merit.

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  • The university at Sucre, which dates from colonial times, and that at La Paz, are the only ones on the list sufficiently well equipped to merit the title.

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  • We find him at one time admitting that Catiline had almost persuaded him of his honesty and merit, and even seeking a political union with him; at another, when his alliance had been rejected and an election was at hand, declaiming against him as a murderer and a profligate.

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  • Of a later date, though of no great pretensions to architectural merit, are the Petri-kirche with a lofty spire, the Franzosische-kirche and the Neue-kirche with dome-capped towers, on the Gendarmen-markt, and the round, Roman Catholic St Hedwigs - kirche behind the Opera-house.

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  • Entering the city at the Potsdam Gate, traversing a few hundred yards of the Leipziger-strasse, turning into Wilhelm-strasse, and following it to Unter den Linden, then beginning at the Brandenburg Gate and proceeding down Unter den Linden to its end, one passes, among other buildings, the following, many of them of great architectural merit - the admiralty, the ministry of commerce, the ministry of war, the ministry of public works, the palace of Prince Frederick Leopold, the palace of the imperial chancellor, the foreign office, the ministry of justice, the residences of the ministers of the interior and of public worship, the French and the Russian embassies, the arcade, the palace of the emperor William I., the university, the royal library, the opera, the armoury, the palace of the emperor Frederick III., the Schloss-briicke, the royal palace, the old and new museums and the national gallery.

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  • This edifice, in the Italian baroque style, surmounted by a dome, possesses but little architectural merit, and its position is so confined that great ingenuity had to be employed in its internal arrangements to meet the demands of space, but its collection of pictures is one of the finest in Europe.

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  • Besides the writers of the community of the Bohemian Brethren, we meet at this period with three historians of merit.

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  • Mention should be made of Alois Jirdsek, also a distinguished dramatic author; Jacob Arbes, whose Romanetta have great merit; and Vaclav Hladik, whose Evzen Voldan is a very striking representation of the life of modern Prague.

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  • They are accompanied by ample annotations and appendices, with illustrations of great merit and value.

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  • In favour of the middle date, which has, as far as recent authorities are concerned, the weight of consent in its favour, the testimony of Guy Patin (1601-1672), a witness of some merit and not too far removed in point of time, is invoked.

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  • In 1526, however, Charles de Bordigne, in a satiric work of no great merit, entitled la Legende de Pierre Faifeu, has the name Gargantua with an allusion, and in 1532 (if not earlier) there appeared at Lyons les Grandes et inestimables chroniques du grand et enorme grant Gargantua.

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  • It is in the very absence of any cramping or limiting purpose that the great merit and value of the book consist.

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  • Several of these buildings are of considerable architec tural merit and fine elevation.

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  • Magius, a rhetorician of no great merit (Seneca, Controv.

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  • The only English translation of any merit is by Philemon Holland (1600).

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  • In Brahminic thought Karma, the consequences of action, necessitates rebirth in a lower or higher mode of existence, according to guilt or merit.

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  • The value of the work does not lie in its literary merit, but in the wealth of the materials which it furnishes for a knowledge of the early church.

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  • It is an episcopal see of great antiquity, but its cathedral, built in the 18th century on the site of a mosque, possesses little architectural merit.

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  • Besides the poems mentioned above, he wrote hymns to Dante, to the Apostles, "Dio e popolo," &c. The chief merit of his work lies in the spontaneity and enthusiasm for the Italian cause which rendered it famous, in spite of certain technical imperfections, and he well deserved the epithet of "The Tyrtaeus of the Italian revolution."

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  • The best of his poetical writings is his Gedichte (1827; 9th ed., Berlin, 1887); but there is great merit also in his Alemannische Lieder (1826; 5th ed., 1843), Soldatenlieder (1851), Soldatenleben (1852), Rheinleben (1865), and in his Fiinfzig Kinderlieder, Fiinfzig neue Kinderlieder, and Alte and neue Kinderlieder.

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  • Four years after his death, Michel Jean Jacques Dize (1764-1852), who had been preparateur to Darcet at the time he examined the process and who was subsequently associated with Le Blanc in its exploitation, published in the Journal de physique a paper claiming that it was he himself who had first suggested the addition of chalk; but a committee of the French Academy, which reported fully on the question in 1856, came to the conclusion that the merit was entirely Le Blanc's (Com.

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  • This disengagement from local circumstance without the sacrifice of emotional sincerity is a merit in Petrarch, but it became a fault in his imitators.

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  • Mezikre's Petrarque (1868) is a monograph of merit.

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  • But to him belongs the merit of having, most probably without knowing what had already been done, enunciated a complete account of its theory, and of thus having firmly established it as a means by which the chemical constituents of celestial bodies can be discovered through the comparison of their spectra with those of the various elements that exist on this earth.

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  • So remarkable was this work that the value of the prize was doubled as a recognition of unusual merit.

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  • Meanwhile he was writing apace, but nothing of particular merit.

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  • The genuineness of this speech, which is of little merit, has been disputed.

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  • But the merit of both lies in their journalistic qualities of contemporary narrative.

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  • He was articled as a law clerk in Edinburgh, and his Elegy on Craigmillar Castle (1776) was printed during his clerkship. In 1781 he removed to London to devote himself to literary work, publishing in the same year a volume of Rimes of no great merit, and Scottish Tragic Ballads.

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  • His chief merit was to confirm Mustafa Kuprili as grand vizier.

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  • The merit of achieving this belongs to the enthusiastic orientalist Anquetil Duperron, the fruit of whose prolonged stay in India (1755-1761) and his acquaintance with the Parsee priests was a translation (certainly very defective) of the Zend-Avesta.

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  • It cannot be said that Theocritus exhibits signal merit in his Epics.

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  • They do not possess any special merit, and their authenticity is often doubtful.

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  • Sainte-Aldegonde's literary merit, and some other books.

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  • Shortly after the Poems Slavery, there appeared in 1843 a more ambitious work, The Spanish Student, a Play in Three Acts, a kind of sentimental "Morality," without any special merit but good intention.

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  • In 1849 Longfellow published a novel of no great merit, Kavanagh, and also a volume of poems entitled The Seaside and the Fireside, a title which has reference to his two homes, the seaside one on the charming peninsula of Nahant, the fireside one in Cambridge.

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  • His greatest merit, however, was the guardianship he exercised over the king, whose sensual temperament and weak character exposed him to many temptations which might have been very injurious to the state.

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  • His merit lies in the fact that he was the first to deal systematically with the question of Church and State, and the position thus taken up by him, and the manner in which that position was assumed, gave rise to a lifelong conflict between Giannone and the Church; and in spite of his retractation in prison at Turin, he deserves the palm--as he certainly endured the sufferings - of a confessor and martyr in the cause of what he deemed historical truth.

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  • The great line of public offices along the esplanade and facing Back Bay, which are in the Gothic style mixed with Saracenic, are not individually distinguished for architectural merit, but they have a cumulative effect of great dignity.

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  • In later Rumanian history there arose a class who obtained their rank by merit or favour, and did not necessarily bequeath it to their heirs.

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  • He was the founder of the first political and literary review, and he had a genius for discovering talent, and the merit of assisting it.

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  • Alecsandri is less successful in his dramas, most of which are adaptations from French originals; the only merit of his novels is that amidst the phonetic and philological turmoil he kept to the purer language of the people.

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  • Cogalniceanu published various reviews, some of a political, others of a more literary character, such as the Dacia literar y (1840) and Archiva romdneasca (1845-46); he has also the great merit of having published for the first time a collection of the Moldavian chronicles.

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  • In general, when the educated minority and the common people differ about the merit of a book, the opinion of the educated minority finally prevails.

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