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meridians

meridians Sentence Examples

  • It is bounded on the north-west by Ohio, from which it is separated by the Ohio river, on the north by Pennsylvania and Maryland, the Potomac river dividing it from the latter state; on the east and south-east by Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, the boundary lines in the first two cases being meridians, in the last case a very irregular line following the crest of mountain ridges in places; and on the south-west by Virginia and Kentucky, the Big Sandy river separating it from the latter state.

  • is the interior of the Northern Territory north of the 10th parallel; and the whole of the country, excepting the seaboard, lying between the meridians of 120° and 140°, and north of the 25th parallel, has a mean temperature in excess of 90° Fahr.

  • From the Springs the expedition went north-west and made a useful examination of the country lying between 119° and 115° meridians and between 26° and 28° S.

  • From the eastern extremity of the Tibetan mountains, between the 95th azd tooth meridians, high ranges extend from about 35°N.

  • British India comprises approximately the area between the 95th and 10th meridians, and between the Tibetan table-land and the Indian Ocean.

  • The north - eastern portion of the Afghan tableland abuts on the Himalaya and Tibet, with which it forms a continuous mass of mountain between the 71st and 72nd meridians, and 34° and 36° N.

  • Treating the earth as a sphere, the meridians of longitude are all great circles.

  • In the case of topographical maps sheets bounded by meridians and parallels are to be commended.

  • The meridian of Greenwich has been universally accepted as the initial meridian, but in the case of most topographical maps of foreign countries local meridians are still adhered to - the more important among which are: The outline includes coast-line, rivers, roads, towns, and in fact all objects capable of being shown on a map, with the exception of the hills and of woods, swamps, deserts and the like, which the draughtsman generally describes as " ornament."

  • When dealing with maps not drawn on an equal area projection we substitute quadrilaterals bounded by meridians and parallels, the areas for which are given in the " Smithsonian Geographical Tables " (1894), in Professor H.

  • The sphere is then coated with plaster or whiting, and when it has been smoothed on a lathe and dried, the lines representing meridians and parallels are drawn upon it.

  • Across it were drawn seven parallels, running through Meroe, Syene, Alexandria, Rhodes, Lysimachia on the Hellespont, the mouth of the Borysthenes and Thule, and these were crossed at right angles by seven meridians, drawn at irregular intervals, and passing through the Pillars of Hercules, Carthage, Alexandria, Thapsacus on the Euphrates, the Caspian gates, the mouth of the Indus and that of the Ganges.

  • The parallels or climata 2 drawn through places, of which the longest day is of equal length and the decimation (distance) from the equator is the same, he maintained, ought to have been inserted at equal intervals, say of half an hour, and the meridians inserted on a like principle.

  • Parallels and meridians were represented by straight lines intersecting each other at right angles, the relative proportions between degrees of longitude and latitude being retained only along the parallel of Rhodes.

  • 3) both parallels and meridians are curved.

  • w The Earth beyond the Ocean where men dwelt before the Flood The Earth beyond the Ocean nearly every case the East occupies the top of the map. Neither parallels nor meridians are indicated, nor is there a scale.

  • Additional meridians sz R01, FIG.

  • None of these charts is graduated, and the horizontal and vertical lines which cross many of them represent neither parallels nor meridians.

  • Nicolaus Germanus, a monk of Reichenbach, in 1466 prepared a set of Ptolemy's maps on a new projection with converging meridians; and Paolo del Pozzo Toscanelli in 1474 compiled a new chart on a rectangular projection, which was to guide the explorer across the western ocean to Cathay and India.

  • circles, or, in a more advanced stage, meridians also.

  • Each sheet is bounded by parallels and meridians.

  • The greater part of it is desert, but a short stretch lying between the 48th and 50th meridians is well watered and exceptionally fertile.

  • In astigmatism, owing to differences in the refractive power of the various meridians of the eye, great defect of sight, frequently accompanied by severe headache, occurs.

  • If the globe is divided into hemispheres by the meridians of 20° W.

  • A committee of the Royal Geographical Society - the deliberations of which were interrupted by the departure on his last voyage of Sir John Franklin, one of the members - suggested these meridians as boundaries; the north and south boundaries of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans being the polar circles, leaving an Arctic and an Antarctic Ocean to complete the hydrosphere.

  • Possibly ridges of the sea-bed running southward from the southern continents may yet be discovered which would form more natural boundaries than the meridians.

  • If the whole globe were covered with a uniformly deep ocean, and if there were no difference of density between one part and another, the surface would form a perfect ellipsoid of revolution, that is to say, all the meridians would be exactly equal ellipses and all parallels perfect circles.

  • "Great" circles may also be defined as circles on a sphere which pass through the extremities of a diameter; they are familiar as the meridians or lines of longitude of geographers; lines of latitude are "small circles."

  • This included, roughly speaking, all of the land between the Missouri River and the Black Hills and between the White River and the Big Cheyenne and a strip extending north from the Black Hills to the North Dakota line between the 102nd and 103rd meridians.

  • When in Egypt he measured the pyramids, and, finding that the angles formed by the sides of the largest were in the direction of the four cardinal points, he concluded that this position must have been intended, and also that the poles of the earth and meridians had not deviated since the erection of those structures.

  • The southern boundary is generally regarded as the parallel of 40° S., but sometimes the part of the great Southern Ocean (40 0 to 662° S.) between the meridians passing through South Cape in Tasmania and Cape Horn is included.

  • KOXos, shortened, and ovpfi, tail), in astronomy, either of the two principal meridians of the celestial sphere, one of which passes through the poles and the two solstices, the other through the poles and the two equinoxes; hence designated as solstitial colure and equinoxial colure, respectively.

  • That the Arabs must have been acquainted with the compass, and with the construction and use of charts, at a period nearly two centuries previous to Chardin's first voyage to the East, may be gathered from the description given by Barros of a map of all the coast of India, shown to Vasco da Gama by a Moor of Guzerat (about the 15th of July 1498), in which the bearings were laid down "after the manner of the Moors," or "with meridians and parallels very small (or close together), without other bearings of the compass; because, as the squares of these meridians and parallels were very small, the coast was laid down by these two bearings of N.

  • It embraces most of the territory in the square formed by the meridians of 3° and 14° E.

  • The Inter-Andine or plateau region lies in and between the two great mountain chains which cross the greater part of the republic Mo between and almost parallel r with the 78th and 79th meridians.

  • WYOMING, one of the Central Western states of the United States of America, situated between the parallels of latitude 41° and 45° N., and the meridians of longitude 27° and 34° W.

  • The Mamore, the upper part of which is called the Chimore, rises on the north-east slopes of the Sierra' de Cochabamba a little south of the 17th parallel, and follows a northerly serpentine course to its confluence with the Beni, the greater part of which course is between the 65th and 66th meridians.

  • and between the meridians of 80° and 84° W., and is bounded W.

  • The state is bounded wholly by meridians and parallels, and is bordered on the N.

  • The actual difference between the meridians of Greenwich and Cape Town is one hour fourteen minutes.

  • As in the case of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, the southern boundary is taken at either 40° S., the line of separation from the great Southern Ocean, or, if the belt of this ocean between the two meridians named be included, at the Antarctic Circle.

  • m., between the meridians of 98° and 103° W.

  • acupuncture meridians with the vision centers to change our point of view about problems in our lives.

  • meridians of the body.

  • To the tone f ' ' correspond 6 nodal meridians.

  • The colored light is applied to the skin on specific points, similar to the points on the acupuncture meridians.

  • nodal meridians.

  • It is bounded on the north-west by Ohio, from which it is separated by the Ohio river, on the north by Pennsylvania and Maryland, the Potomac river dividing it from the latter state; on the east and south-east by Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, the boundary lines in the first two cases being meridians, in the last case a very irregular line following the crest of mountain ridges in places; and on the south-west by Virginia and Kentucky, the Big Sandy river separating it from the latter state.

  • is the interior of the Northern Territory north of the 10th parallel; and the whole of the country, excepting the seaboard, lying between the meridians of 120° and 140°, and north of the 25th parallel, has a mean temperature in excess of 90° Fahr.

  • From the Springs the expedition went north-west and made a useful examination of the country lying between 119° and 115° meridians and between 26° and 28° S.

  • Arbitrary lines, either traced from point to point and marked by posts on the ground, or defined as portions of meridians and parallels, are now the most common type of boundaries fixed by treaty.

  • From the eastern extremity of the Tibetan mountains, between the 95th azd tooth meridians, high ranges extend from about 35°N.

  • British India comprises approximately the area between the 95th and 10th meridians, and between the Tibetan table-land and the Indian Ocean.

  • The north - eastern portion of the Afghan tableland abuts on the Himalaya and Tibet, with which it forms a continuous mass of mountain between the 71st and 72nd meridians, and 34° and 36° N.

  • Treating the earth as a sphere, the meridians of longitude are all great circles.

  • In the case of topographical maps sheets bounded by meridians and parallels are to be commended.

  • The meridian of Greenwich has been universally accepted as the initial meridian, but in the case of most topographical maps of foreign countries local meridians are still adhered to - the more important among which are: The outline includes coast-line, rivers, roads, towns, and in fact all objects capable of being shown on a map, with the exception of the hills and of woods, swamps, deserts and the like, which the draughtsman generally describes as " ornament."

  • When dealing with maps not drawn on an equal area projection we substitute quadrilaterals bounded by meridians and parallels, the areas for which are given in the " Smithsonian Geographical Tables " (1894), in Professor H.

  • The sphere is then coated with plaster or whiting, and when it has been smoothed on a lathe and dried, the lines representing meridians and parallels are drawn upon it.

  • Across it were drawn seven parallels, running through Meroe, Syene, Alexandria, Rhodes, Lysimachia on the Hellespont, the mouth of the Borysthenes and Thule, and these were crossed at right angles by seven meridians, drawn at irregular intervals, and passing through the Pillars of Hercules, Carthage, Alexandria, Thapsacus on the Euphrates, the Caspian gates, the mouth of the Indus and that of the Ganges.

  • The parallels or climata 2 drawn through places, of which the longest day is of equal length and the decimation (distance) from the equator is the same, he maintained, ought to have been inserted at equal intervals, say of half an hour, and the meridians inserted on a like principle.

  • Parallels and meridians were represented by straight lines intersecting each other at right angles, the relative proportions between degrees of longitude and latitude being retained only along the parallel of Rhodes.

  • Of the two projections proposed by him one is a modified conical projection with curved parallels and straight meridians; in the second projection (see fig.

  • 3) both parallels and meridians are curved.

  • w The Earth beyond the Ocean where men dwelt before the Flood The Earth beyond the Ocean nearly every case the East occupies the top of the map. Neither parallels nor meridians are indicated, nor is there a scale.

  • Additional meridians sz R01, FIG.

  • None of these charts is graduated, and the horizontal and vertical lines which cross many of them represent neither parallels nor meridians.

  • Nicolaus Germanus, a monk of Reichenbach, in 1466 prepared a set of Ptolemy's maps on a new projection with converging meridians; and Paolo del Pozzo Toscanelli in 1474 compiled a new chart on a rectangular projection, which was to guide the explorer across the western ocean to Cathay and India.

  • circles, or, in a more advanced stage, meridians also.

  • Each sheet is bounded by parallels and meridians.

  • CUBA (the aboriginal name), a republic, the largest and most populous of the West India Islands, included between the meridians of 74° 7' and 84° 57' W.

  • The greater part of it is desert, but a short stretch lying between the 48th and 50th meridians is well watered and exceptionally fertile.

  • In astigmatism, owing to differences in the refractive power of the various meridians of the eye, great defect of sight, frequently accompanied by severe headache, occurs.

  • If the globe is divided into hemispheres by the meridians of 20° W.

  • A committee of the Royal Geographical Society - the deliberations of which were interrupted by the departure on his last voyage of Sir John Franklin, one of the members - suggested these meridians as boundaries; the north and south boundaries of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans being the polar circles, leaving an Arctic and an Antarctic Ocean to complete the hydrosphere.

  • Possibly ridges of the sea-bed running southward from the southern continents may yet be discovered which would form more natural boundaries than the meridians.

  • If the whole globe were covered with a uniformly deep ocean, and if there were no difference of density between one part and another, the surface would form a perfect ellipsoid of revolution, that is to say, all the meridians would be exactly equal ellipses and all parallels perfect circles.

  • "Great" circles may also be defined as circles on a sphere which pass through the extremities of a diameter; they are familiar as the meridians or lines of longitude of geographers; lines of latitude are "small circles."

  • This included, roughly speaking, all of the land between the Missouri River and the Black Hills and between the White River and the Big Cheyenne and a strip extending north from the Black Hills to the North Dakota line between the 102nd and 103rd meridians.

  • When in Egypt he measured the pyramids, and, finding that the angles formed by the sides of the largest were in the direction of the four cardinal points, he concluded that this position must have been intended, and also that the poles of the earth and meridians had not deviated since the erection of those structures.

  • The southern boundary is generally regarded as the parallel of 40° S., but sometimes the part of the great Southern Ocean (40 0 to 662° S.) between the meridians passing through South Cape in Tasmania and Cape Horn is included.

  • KOXos, shortened, and ovpfi, tail), in astronomy, either of the two principal meridians of the celestial sphere, one of which passes through the poles and the two solstices, the other through the poles and the two equinoxes; hence designated as solstitial colure and equinoxial colure, respectively.

  • That the Arabs must have been acquainted with the compass, and with the construction and use of charts, at a period nearly two centuries previous to Chardin's first voyage to the East, may be gathered from the description given by Barros of a map of all the coast of India, shown to Vasco da Gama by a Moor of Guzerat (about the 15th of July 1498), in which the bearings were laid down "after the manner of the Moors," or "with meridians and parallels very small (or close together), without other bearings of the compass; because, as the squares of these meridians and parallels were very small, the coast was laid down by these two bearings of N.

  • It embraces most of the territory in the square formed by the meridians of 3° and 14° E.

  • The Inter-Andine or plateau region lies in and between the two great mountain chains which cross the greater part of the republic Mo between and almost parallel r with the 78th and 79th meridians.

  • WYOMING, one of the Central Western states of the United States of America, situated between the parallels of latitude 41° and 45° N., and the meridians of longitude 27° and 34° W.

  • The Mamore, the upper part of which is called the Chimore, rises on the north-east slopes of the Sierra' de Cochabamba a little south of the 17th parallel, and follows a northerly serpentine course to its confluence with the Beni, the greater part of which course is between the 65th and 66th meridians.

  • and between the meridians of 80° and 84° W., and is bounded W.

  • The state is bounded wholly by meridians and parallels, and is bordered on the N.

  • Io shows the consequent distortion of a set of meridians after one revolution (at lat.

  • The actual difference between the meridians of Greenwich and Cape Town is one hour fourteen minutes.

  • As in the case of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, the southern boundary is taken at either 40° S., the line of separation from the great Southern Ocean, or, if the belt of this ocean between the two meridians named be included, at the Antarctic Circle.

  • m., between the meridians of 98° and 103° W.

  • A new technique called Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) involves tapping at various acupuncture meridians with the fingertips.

  • Acupuncture can help support the healing process by restoring the energy flow in the meridians that have been affected by the wound.

  • Traditional Chinese medicine seeks to reconnect the chi (energy flow) along the body's meridians and thus aid healing.

  • Acupressure-Often described as acupuncture without needles, acupressure is a traditional Chinese medical technique based on theory of qi (life energy) flowing in energy meridians or channels in the body.

  • Acupressure applies finger or thumb pressure to specific points located on the energy pathways or "meridians" in order to release blocked energy along these meridians that may be causing physical discomfort.

  • In acupressure, there are 14 primary meridians or channels used to treat various physical ailments.

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