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mercy

mercy

mercy Sentence Examples

  • I pray they will have mercy on you for your assistance.

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  • I pray they will have mercy on you for your assistance.

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  • Have mercy on me.

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  • I have no mercy for any creature that preys on humans.

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  • You are showing your daughter mercy, Wynn said carefully.

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  • Your father showed me mercy and you showed me kindness.

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  • Power without mercy is dangerous, son.

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  • "You've shown me mercy," she said, approaching him until they stood toe-to-toe.

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  • What mercy I have to give comes from her memory.

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  • He didn't have an ounce of mercy or humanity in him!

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  • She hesitated at the head of the stairs, tormented by the knowledge her father was incapable of mercy towards his daughter, let alone a stranger.

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  • "And if you come near my mate again, I will show no mercy," Jule added in a quiet tone that promised action.

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  • A wise man will not leave the right to the mercy of chance, nor wish it to prevail through the power of the majority.

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  • He is generosity, mercy, justice, order, genius--that's what the Emperor is!

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  • We will show the worlds the same mercy they showed me.

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  • You really think Sasha came here to throw himself on your mercy without some sort of back-up plan?

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  • Wynn didn't like being out of control, at the mercy of one he couldn't predict or manipulate.

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  • Wynn didn't like being out of control, at the mercy of one he couldn't predict or manipulate.

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  • Neither Kris nor Sasha was capable of mercy or empathy.

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  • Neither Kris nor Sasha was capable of mercy or empathy.

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  • He was putting himself at her mercy again, except that, this time, he had the power and chose not to use it.

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  • He was putting himself at her mercy again, except that, this time, he had the power and chose not to use it.

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  • I don't remember what made me take mercy on you and none of them.

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  • It gave her a little bit of peace, knowing she wasn't solely at the mercy of the outlaw.

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  • I've never known mercy, and I'll grant it to no one.

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  • "I don't do mercy," he reminded her.

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  • His tone was enough to tell her he'd show no mercy.

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  • Had his actions truly set her on this path to end up as the plaything of a creature with no capacity for mercy?

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  • I've never begged anyone for anything, let alone mercy.

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  • No part of him wanted to see her spared a demon's mercy.

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  • Can you not also show her mercy?

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  • She'd have to throw herself at Gabriel's mercy.

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  • Deidre knew that look, the one that said that Harmony was staring down an eternity of demon mercy.

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  • And if they are not prone to mercy?

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  • He held the ruler of the greatest kingdom at his mercy!

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  • He slaughters without mercy and control.

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  • You must learn mercy.

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  • Absolute power for learning mercy.

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  • The second spell will teach you mercy.

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  • The regent therefore represented to her brother that the disorders were entirely put down and that the time had come to show mercy.

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  • The names of some of these earliest captains of adventure, Fra Moriale, Count Lando and Duke Werner, who styled himself the Enemy of God and Mercy, have been preserved to us.

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  • A Bourbon at Versailles, a Habsburg at Vienna, or a thick-lipped Lorrainer, with a stroke of his pen, wrote off province against province, regarding not the populations who had bled for him or thrown themselves upon his mercy.

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  • Nice and Savoy also seemed at the mercy of the invaders.

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  • More than ever at the mercy of the Radicals and of their revolutionary allies, Rudini continued so to administer public affairs that subversive propaganda and associations obtained unprecedented extension.

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  • high, erected in 1831-1834 by the archbishop Ladislaus Pyrker (1772-1847); the church of the Brothers of Mercy, opposite which is a handsome minaret, 115 ft.

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  • Applying the thought of God's mercy to the obligations of believing men (xii.

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  • 8-13), to unite in thanksgiving for God's mercy to them in Christ.

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  • " House of Mercy," John v.

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  • The members of the Duma, moreover, were placed at the mercy of the government by a clause empowering the Directing Senate to suspend or deprive them.

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  • A dispute between Selinus and Segesta (probably the revival of a similar quarrel about 454, when an Athenian force appears to have taken part 2) was one of the causes of the Athenian expedition of 415 B.C. At its close the former seemed to have the latter at its mercy, but an appeal to Carthage was responded 1 The plant was formerly thought to be wild parsley.

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  • By closing Lubeck Valdemar had German trade and the German over-seas settlements entirely at his mercy.

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  • Failing in an attempt to arrange terms, and also in obtaining the help which he solicited from France, O'Neill was utterly routed by the O'Donnells at Letterkenny; and seeking safety in flight, he threw himself on the mercy of his enemies, the MacDonnells.

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  • The result of this double-dealing was that his army was destroyed by Ptolemy, who advanced into Egypt leaving Palestine at the mercy of Cleopatra.

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  • The legal reforms which they introduced tended for the most part to mercy, but the Talmud refers to one case which is an exception: false witnesses were condemned to suffer the penalty due to their victim, even if he escaped.

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  • The righteous could only flee or hide, and so wait dreaming of the mercy of God past and to come.

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  • Napoleon, therefore, had Prussia completely at his mercy; and his conditions to that power bore witness to the fact.

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  • Seeing that Godoy, the all-powerful minister at Madrid, had given mortal offence to Napoleon early in the Prussian campaign of 1806 by calling on Spain to arm on behalf of her independence, it passes belief how he could have placed his country at the mercy of Napoleon at the end of the year 1807.

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  • The French reinforcements which entered Spain managed to secure some of the strongholds of the northern provinces; and the disgraceful feuds in the royal family left the country practically at the emperor's mercy.

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  • The Genoese Admiral Luciano Doria sailed into the Adriatic, attacked and defeated Vettor Pisani at Pola in Istria, and again Venice and the lagoons lay at the mercy of the enemy.

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  • With the help of these troops the Phocian League at first carried the war into Boeotia and Thessaly, and though driven out of the latter country by Philip of Macedon, maintained itself for ten years, until the exhaustion of the temple treasures and the treachery of its leaders placed it at Philip's mercy.

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  • The principal institutions are the House of Mercy Hospital, with which is connected the Henry W.

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  • There may be cases which cannot be explained in this way; but " whatever may be thought about them, it is plain that even if these and their like are really to be traced to the intervention of the divine mercy which loves to reward a.

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  • Among the principal buildings are the U.S. Government Building, the City Hall and the County Court House; and the city's institutions include the Laredo Seminary (1882) for boys and girls, the Mercy Hospital, the National Railroad of Mexico Hospital and an Ursuline Convent.

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  • 2 and 3 emanated the masculine potency Love or Mercy (4) and the feminine potency Justice (5), and from the junction of the latter two emanated again the uniting potency Beauty (6).

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  • According to this theory of the archetypal man the three Sephiroth on the right-hand side are masculine and represent the principle of rigour, the three on the left are feminine and represent the principle of mercy, and the four central or uniting Sephiroth represent the principle of mildness.

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  • Hence the right is called " the Pillar of Judgment," the left " the Pillar of Mercy," and the centre " the Middle Pillar."

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  • In general, the small cotton farmer was at the mercy of the commission merchant, to whom he mortgaged his crops in advance; but this evil has lessened, and in some districts the system of advancing is either nonexistent or very slightly developed.

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  • Butler occupied that city The navigation of the river being secured by this success and by later operations in the north ending in July 1863 with the capture of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, the state was wholly at the mercy of the Union armies.

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  • Below the feudal nobility and their Moslem soldiers came the Christian serfs, tillers of the soil and taxpayers, whose lives and property were at the mercy of their lords.

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  • The atrophy of the Ottoman sea-power had left the archipelago at the mercy of the Greek war-brigs; piracy flourished; and it became essential in the interests of the commerce of all nations to make some power responsible for the policing of the narrow seas.

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  • Sigismund declared war on the duke of Austria, and the fathers, determined to have their will carried out, drew up in their 4th and 5th sessions (30th of March and 6th of April 1415) a set of decrees with the intention of justifying their attitude and putting the fugitive pope at their mercy.

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  • from Factory Island, and at the mercy of long range artillery planted thereon.

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  • In other words, the mercy already experienced in the removal of the plague is taken as a pledge of future grace not to stop short till all God's old promises are fulfilled.

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  • Fynn thus became leader of the whites at the port, who were much at the mercy of Dingaan.

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  • He knew no mercy.

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  • He had, however, returned to his allegiance to the house of Capet before the fall of Laon placed both Arnulf and Charles at the mercy of the French king (March 991).

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  • Count Claudius Mercy (1666-1734), who was appointed governor of Temesvar in 1720, took numerous measures for the regeneration of the Banat.

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  • Maria Theresa also took a great interest in the Banat, colonized the land belonging to the crown with German peasants, founded many villages, encouraged the exploitation of the mineral wealth of the country, and generally developed the measures introduced by Mercy.

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  • All hope for the city being now at an end, the Syracusans threw themselves on the mercy of Marcellus; but Achradina and the island still held out for a brief space under the Syracusan mercenaries, till one of their officers, a Spaniard, betrayed the latter position to the enemy, and at the same time Achradina was carried and taken.

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  • It was published with certain "remarks" on Pascal, mere offensive to orthodoxy than itself, and no mercy was shown to it.

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  • The League of Mercy, under royal charter, operates in conjunction with the Fund in the collection of small subscriptions.

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  • The Order of Mercy was instituted by the King as a reward for distinguished personal service.

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  • The Roman general Paulinus Suetonius, after marching rapidly from Wales to put down a serious insurrection, found Londinium unfitted for a base of military operations, and therefore left the place to the mercy of Boadicea, who entirely destroyed it, and killed the inhabitants.

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  • The chronicler piously adds that " the holy Mother of God on that day manifested her mercy to the townsmen, and delivered them from their foes."

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  • After his defeat and death on the hill on the Sussex Downs then called Senlac, the duke of Normandy had the country at his mercy, but he recognized the importance of London's position, and moved forward with the greatest caution and tact.

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  • On the 7th of June 1665 Samuel Pepys for the first time saw two or three houses marked with the red cross and the words " Lord, have mercy upon us," on the doors.

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  • Bestuzhev had previously rejected with scorn the proposals of the French government to mediate between Russia and Sweden on the basis of a territorial surrender on the part of the former; and he conducted the war so vigorously that by the end of 1742 Sweden lay at the mercy of the empress.

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  • Before the end of the year he was forced to admit that the cause of the French monarchy was hopeless so long as the king and queen of France were nothing but captives in their own capital, at the mercy of an irresponsible mob.

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  • Totila's conquest of Italy was marked not only by celerity but also by mercy, and Gibbon says "none were deceived, either friends or enemies, who depended on his faith or his clemency."

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  • c. 32) his majesty is enabled to remit wholly or in part any sum of money imposed upon conviction, and, if the offender has been imprisoned in default of payment, to extend to him the royal mercy.

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  • 15) proved the Chilean superiority, and put Lima at their mercy though desultory fighting was maintained by the remnants of the Peruvian army in the interior, under direction of General Caceres.

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  • In a sermon on the Apocalypse he shook men's souls by his terrible threats of the wrath to come, and drew tears from their eyes by the tender pathos of his assurances of divine mercy.

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  • First, "You must repent and feel true faith in God's mercy."

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  • He heard supernatural voices proclaiming mercy to the faithful, vengeance on the guilty, and mighty cries that the wrath of God was at hand.

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  • It is said that at least Bernardo del Nero would have been spared had Savonarola raised his voice, but, although refraining from any active part against the prisoners, the prior would not ask mercy for them.

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  • He was a bigoted Catholic, and showed to the Protestants even less mercy than his father.

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  • The famous temple of Kwannon, the goddess of mercy, is in the Asakusa Park, in which a permanent fair is held; it is a great holiday resort of the citizens.

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  • Defeated in 486 by Clovis, king of the Salian Franks, at the battle of Soissons, Syagrius fled, leaving his land at the mercy of the Franks.

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  • In the course of 1842 an attack of illness led to his making a journey in Italy, where he spent some time in a monastery belonging to one of the strictest of all the monastic orders, the Passionists, brethren addicted to wearing hair shirts and scourging themselves without mercy.

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  • 13, "I will have mercy and not sacrifice."

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  • When, after the battle of Kilsyth, Scotland was at the mercy of Montrose and his army, Leslie was recalled from England in 1645, and made lieutenant-general of horse.

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  • Owing, however, to the intrigues of the republican factions in Peru he was forced to withdraw to Truxillo, leaving the capital to the mercy of the Spaniards under Canterac, by whom it was immediately occupied.

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  • Potter had replied in 1633 to Knott's Charity Mistaken (1630), and Knott retaliated with Mercy and Truth.

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  • Marie Antoinette soon won the affection and confidence of the dauphin and endeared herself to the king, but her position was precarious, and both Mercy and Maria Theresa had continually to urge her to conquer her violent dislike for the favourite and try to conciliate her.

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  • Later, on the recommendation of Mercy and Vermond, she supported the nomination of Lomenie de Brienne in 1787, an appointment which, though widely approved at the time, was laid to the queen's blame when it ended in failure.

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  • Her difficulties were increased by the departure of Mercy for the Hague in September 1790, for Montmorin who now took his place in the negotiations had not her confidence to the same extent..

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  • Feeling herself helpless and almost isolated in Paris, she now relied chiefly on her friends outside France - Mercy, Count Axel Fersen, and the baron de Breteuil; and it was by their help and that of Bouille that after the death of Mirabeau, on the 8th of April 1791, the plan was arranged of escaping to Montmedy, which ended in the flight to Varennes (June 21, 1791).

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  • For about a year she continued to negotiate with them, forwarding to Mercy and the emperor Leopold II.

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  • Mercy was also in correspondence with the Constitutionals, and in letter after letter to him and the emperor, the queen, strongly supported by Fersen, insisted that the congress should be formed as soon as possible, her appeals increasing in urgency as she saw that Barnave's party would soon be powerless against the extremists.

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  • Marie Antoinette's actions were now directed entirely by Fersen, for she suspected Mercy and the emperor of sacrificing her to the interests of Austria (Fersen, i.

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  • The declaration of war which ' Letters of 31st July 1791 to Mercy.

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  • the king was forced to make (April 20) threw her definitely into opposition to the Revolution, and she betrayed to Mercy and Fersen the plans of the French generals (Arneth, p.2S9; Fersen, ii.

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  • He bases this statement entirely upon the queen's letters of July 3rd to Fersen, of July 4th to Mercy, the reception of which Fersen notes in his Journal on July 8th and 9th (Fersen ii.

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  • To these things used to y listen at the time, through the mercy of God vouchsafed to me, noting them down, not on paper but in my heart, and constantly by the grace of God brood over my accurate recollections."These are priceless words, for they establish a chain of tradition (John-Polycarp-Irenaeus) which is without a parallel in early church history.

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  • The city is the seat of the Bordentown Military Institute (with the Woodward memorial library), of the state manual training and industrial school for coloured youth, of the St Joseph's convent and mother-house of the Sisters of Mercy, and of St Joseph's academy for girls.

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  • MERCY (adapted from Fr.

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  • grant merci, great, many thanks, which Johnson took for "grant me mercy."

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  • In the medieval Church there were seven "corporal" and seven "spiritual works of mercy" (opera misericordiae); these were (a) the giving of food to the hungry and drink to the thirsty, the clothing of the naked, the visitation of the sick and of prisoners, the receiving of strangers, and the burial of the dead; (b) the conversion of sinners, teaching of the ignorant, giving of counsel to the doubtful, forgiveness of injuries, patience under wrong, prayer for the living and for the dead.

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  • The order of the Sisters of Mercy is a religious sisterhood of the Roman Church.

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  • The object was to perform the corporal and spiritual works of mercy.

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  • He had, however, already begun to look sourly upon Aristotle and the current scholastic theology, which he believed hid the simple truth of the gospel and the desperate state of mankind, who were taught a vain reliance upon outward works and ceremonies, when the only safety lay in throwing oneself on God's mercy.

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  • The clergy were bidden to exhort their hearers to the " works of charity, mercy and faith, specially prescribed and commanded in Scripture, and not to repose their trust or affiance in any other works devised by men's phantasies beside Scripture; as in wandering to pilgrimages, offering of money, candles or tapers to images or relics, or kissing or licking the same, saying over a number of beads, not understood or minded on, or in such-like superstition."

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  • In the second battle, fought eleven years later (3rd August 1645), Conde (then duke of Enghien) and Turenne were the leaders on the one side, and Mercy and Johann von Weert, the dashing cavalry commander whose onset had decided the battle of 1634, on the other.

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  • In rear of the village the plain was occupied by Mercy's army in the customary two lines, foot in the centre, horse in the wings.

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  • After a cannonade in which it suffered more severely than its entrenched enemy, the French centre furiously attacked the village of Allerheim; the fighting here was very heavy, and on the whole in favour of the Germans, although Mercy was killed.

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  • 0 Lord God, heavenly king, God the Father Almighty; 0 Lord, the only begotten Son, Jesus Christ; 0 Lord God, Lamb of God, Son of the Father, that takest away the sins of the world, have mercy upon us; Thou that takest away the sins of the world, receive our prayer; Thou that sittest at the right hand of the Father, have mercy upon us; For Thou alone art holy.

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  • But up till noon he took no serious step to capture the cross-roads, which then lay at his mercy.

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  • 260) left the eastern provinces largely at the mercy of the Persians; the prospect of Persian supremacy was not one which Palmyra or its prince had any reason to desire.

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  • In response, Mr Fraser, one of the Free State delegates, remarked that a harbour requires forts, soldiers, ships and sailors to man them, or else it would be at the mercy of the first gunboat that happened to assail it.

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  • The Feuillants copy is in existence, being the only manuscript, or partly manuscript, authority for the text; but access to it and reproduction of it are subjected to rather unfortunate restrictions by the authorities, and until it is completely edited students are rather at the mercy of those who have actually consulted it.

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  • Later writers spoke of a "tree of mercy," distilling the "oil of life," "i.e.

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  • Other institutions are Concordia College (1881, Lutheran), a state normal school (1880), the Wisconsin College of physicians and surgeons (1893), the national German-American teachers' seminary (normal), Milwaukee academy (1864), Milwaukee University school, Milwaukee school of engineering (1904), Milwaukee Turnverein school of physical culture, one of the largest schools of the sort in the United States, St John's Catholic institute, Our Lady of Mercy academy (Roman Catholic), Wisconsin academy of music, the Wisconsin school of art (art students' league), a Catholic normal school, St Rose's manual training school, the industrial chemical institute (the only technical school for brewers in the United States) and several business and commercial schools.

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  • The Brothers of Mercy have charge of some of the men's hospitals, and also carry on a remarkable system of district nursing.

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  • Meantime, Sulla having left Italy for the Mithradatic war, Cinna's sudden and violent revolution put the senate at the mercy of the popular leaders, and Marius greedily caught at the opportunity of a bloody vengeance, which became in fact a reign of terror in which senators and nobles were slaughtered wholesale.

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  • He is throughout more concerned for the wrong done to the faith at Ephesus than to himself, saying that if he held the views attributed to him by Cyril he would be the first to condemn himself without mercy.

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  • In the early days the Church was thought of as a community of saints, all of whose members were holy, and as a consequence discipline was strict, and offenders excluded from the Church were commonly not readmitted to membership but left to the mercy of God.

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  • The superior officers had to surrender "at mercy," and Lucas and Sir George Lisle were immediately tried by court martial and sentenced to death.

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  • The loss of revenue consequent upon the secession of Lithuania placed John Albert at the mercy of the Polish Sejmiki or local diets, where the szlachta, or country gentry, made their subsidies dependent upon the king's subservience.

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  • The principal hospitals are the Samaritan, the St Joseph's Mercy, and the German Lutheran.

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  • This ended, unlike the former one, in the utter defeat of the Carlist forces, and left the Provinces at the mercy of the government, without terms or agreement.

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  • There is a unity in the divine purpose, of which judgment and mercy are the two poles, but there is as yet no conception of an historical continuity in the execution of that purpose, and therefore no foundation laid for the maintenance of a continuous community of faith in the impending fall of the nation.

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  • According to Daub (Judas Ischariot, oder Betrachtungen Tiber das Bose im Verhaltniss zum Guten, 1816, 1818) Judas was "an incarnation of the devil," to whom "mercy and blessedness are alike impossible."

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  • He was not, however, destined to compass the downfall of the Sullan regime; the crisis of the Slave War placed the Senate at the mercy of Pompey and Crassus, who in 70 B.C. swept away the safeguards of senatorial ascendancy, restored the initiative in legislation to the tribunes, and replaced the Equestrian order, i.e.

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  • The novice is classified according as his destination is the priesthood or lay brotherhood, while a third class of "indifferents" receives such as are reserved for further inquiry before a decision of this kind a strict retreat, practically in solitary confinement, during which he receives from a director, yet relying on Thine infinite kindness and mercy and impelled by the desire of serving Thee, before the Most Holy Virgin Mary and all Thy heavenly host, I, N., vow to Thy divine Majesty Poverty, Chastity and Perpetual Obedience to the Society of Jesus, and promise that I will enter the same Society to live in it perpetually, understanding all things according to the Constitutions of the Society.

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  • Naturphilosophie has had scant mercy at the hands of modern science.

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  • Little mercy was shown on either side.

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  • Among hospitals those of special general interest are the Steevens, the oldest in the city, founded under the will of Dr Richard Steevens in 1720; the Mater Misericordiae (1861),which includes a laboratory and museum, and is managed by the Sisters of Mercy, but relieves sufferers independently of their creed; the Rotunda lying-in hospital (1756); the Royal hospital for incurables, Donnybrook, which was founded in 1744 by the Dublin Musical Society; and the Royal Victoria Eye and Ear hospital, Adelaide Road, which amalgamated (1904) two similar institutions.

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  • Hincmar of Reims and Haimo of Halberstadt, took the side of Paschasius, and affirmed that the substance of the bread and wine is changed, and that God leaves the colour, taste and other outward properties out of mercy to the worshippers, who would be overcome with dread if the underlying real flesh and blood were nakedly revealed to their gaze !

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  • The word "myrmidon" has passed into the English language to denote a subordinate who carries out the orders of his superior without mercy or consideration for others.

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  • On the landing of Pyrrhus in Italy (281 B.C.) they were among the first to declare in his favour, and found themselves exposed to the resentment of Rome when the departure of Pyrrhus left his allies at the mercy of the Romans.

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  • In 1402 Alexander, lord of the Isles, set fire to the town, but spared the cathedral for a consideration, in memory of which mercy the Little Cross (so named to distinguish it from the Muckle or Market Cross, restored in 1888) was erected.

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  • Ferdinand refused to despoil his brother's infant son, and even if he did not act on the moral ground he alleged, his sagacity must have shown him that he would be at the mercy of the men who had chosen him in such circumstances.

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  • After the battle of Jena she went with her husband to Konigsberg, and when the battles of Eylau and Friedland had placed Prussia absolutely at the mercy of France, she made a personal appeal to Napoleon at his headquarters in Tilsit, but without success.

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  • The mercy was needed.

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  • The Abbasids hunted their enemies down without mercy.

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  • as "urbs deserta," and Synesius, a native, describes it in the following century as a vast ruin at the mercy of the nomads.

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  • The reliefs consist of a series of groups representing the Seven Works of Mercy and other figures; these were executed by Giovanni Della Robbia between 1514 and 1525, and, though not equal to the best work of Luca and Andrea, are yet very fine in conception and modelling, and extremely rich in their general decorative effect.

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  • 481); two Anglo-Norman versions of Quatre sceurs (Justice, Truth, Peace, Mercy), 13th century (ed.

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  • It was captured by the Swedes in 1632, 1634 and 1638; and in 1644 it was seized by the Bavarians, who shortly after, under General Mercy, defeated in the neighbourhood the French forces under Enghien and Turenne.

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  • - During the Thirty Years' War the neighbourhood of Freiburg was the scene of a series of engagements between the French under Louis de Bourbon, duc d'Enghien (afterwards called the great Conde), and Henri de la Tour d'Auvergne, vicomte de Turenne, and the Bavarians and Austrians commanded by Franz, Freiherr von Mercy.

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  • At this point most commanders of the time would have decided not to fight, but to manoeuvre Mercy away from Freiburg; Enghien, however, was a fighting general, and Mercy's entrenched lines at Freiburg seemed to him a target rather than an obstacle.

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  • Enghien and Turenne had arranged that the Army of France was to move direct upon Freiburg by Wolfenweiter, while the Army of Weimar was to make its way by hillside tracks to Wittnau and thence to attack the rear of Mercy's lines while Enghien assaulted them in front.

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  • Thus the turning movement came to a standstill far short of Uffingen, the village on Mercy's line of retreat that Turenne was to have seized, nor was a flank attack possible against Mercy's main line, from which he was separated by the crest of the Schonberg.

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  • Meanwhile, Enghien's army had at the prearranged hour (4 P.M.) attacked Mercy's position on the Ebringen spur.

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  • The French bivouacked in the rain, Turenne making his way across the mountain to confer with the prince, and meanwhile Mercy quietly drew off his army in the dark to a new set of entrenchments on the ridge on which stood the Loretto Chapel.

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  • Enghien had designed his battle even more carefully than before, but as the result of a series of accidents the two French armies attacked prematurely and straight to their front, one brigade after another, and though at one moment Enghien, sword in hand, broke the line of defence with his last intact reserve, a brilliant counterstroke, led by Mercy's brother Kaspar (who was killed), drove out the assailants.

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  • It is said that Enghien lost half his men on this day and Mercy one-third of his, so severe was the battle.

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  • But Mercy had divined his Battle of adversary's plan, and leaving a garrison to hold Freiburg, the Bavarian army had made a night march on the 9/loth to the Abbey of St Peter, whence on the morning of the 10th Mercy fell back to Graben, his nearest magazine in the mountains.

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  • A sharp action began, but Mercy hearing the drums and fifes of the French infantry in the Glotter Tal broke it off and continued his retreat in good order.

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  • Only two guns and such of Mercy's wagons that were unable to keep up fell into the hands of the French.

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  • Enghien and Turenne did not continue the chase farther than Graben, and Mercy fell back unmolested to Rothenburg on the Tauber.

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  • Enghien's pertinacity had not achieved a decision with the sword, but Mercy had been so severely punished that he was unable to interfere with his opponent's new plan of campaign.

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  • This exaggeration of the real fact of the will to think ignores throughout the position of little man in the great world and at the mercy of things which drive him perforce to sense and from sense to thought.

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  • In only two things could they take the initiative, helpfulness and mercy; the deserving poor and the destitute were to receive instant relief; but no member could give anything to his relatives without consulting the heads of the society.

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  • This put the caliphs fatally at the mercy of their guards.

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  • 10, 1707) was broken alive on the wheel, Charles rejecting an appeal for mercy from his sister, the princess Ulrica, on the ground that Patkul, as a traitor, could not be pardoned for example's sake.

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  • The middle and eastern portions of the south side were places at which architectural changes, large or small, were numerous down to the latest times, and where the older buildings met with scant mercy.

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  • At Burlington are also the Mt St Mary's academy (1889, Roman Catholic), conducted by the Sisters of Mercy; and two business colleges.

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  • They are especially valuable in Mahommedan countries, where open preaching is difficult and sometimes impossible, and also in works of mercy among barbarous tribes; while in China, which comes under neither of these two categories, they have been largely developed.

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  • From the violence of a multitude in which women of the worst class were more furious than the men she was sheltered in the house of the provost, where she repeatedly showed herself at the window, appealing aloud with dishevelled hair and dress to the mercy which no man could look upon her and refuse.

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  • To him belong the ultimate direction of foreign affairs, the power to declare war and peace, to make treaties and alliances, and to dissolve one or both chambers of parliament, the supreme command of the army and navy, the supreme administration of the state finances and of the colonies and other possessions of the kingdom, and the prerogative of mercy.

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  • The United Provinces, as in 1672, seemed to lie at the mercy of their enemies, and as in that eventful year, popular feeling broke down the opposition of the burgher oligarchies, and turned to William IV., prince of Orange, as the saviour of the state.

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  • When war broke out Dutch commerce was destroyed, and the Dutch colonies were at the mercy of the English fleet without the possibility of a blow being struck in their defence.

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  • Yea, verily, they shall be saved from God's ire (de ira) and called to the mercy of Christ.

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  • After several meetings with the king, a treaty was drawn up, which acknowledged the sovereignty of Ashanti over the territory of the Fanti, and left the natives of Cape Coast to the mercy of their enemies.

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  • On the 19th he wrote to Elizabeth praying for mercy, and the same day offered £1000 for procuring his pardon; and on the loth, having disclosed the cipher used in the correspondence between himself and Mary, he was executed 1 Cata.

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  • text); "The mercy of the Lord is upon all flesh" (xviii.

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  • 3); "Mercy is seasonable.

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  • The narrative has no affinity with the point of view which looks on the history of Israel as a series of examples of divine justice and mercy in the successive rebellions and repentances of the people of God.'

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  • In the city are St Ann's Academy, the St James Mercy Hospital, the Steuben Sanitarium, a public library, and a county court-house - terms of the county court being held here as well as in Bath (pop. in 1905, 3 6 95), the county-seat, and in Corning.

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  • exercised his prerogative of mercy, and in May 1901 Arabi was permitted to return to Egypt.

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  • The leader of a third troop took a humbler tone, sued for mercy, and obtained it.

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  • Its contents, as was to be expected, are of a very chaotic character - of a character so chaotic indeed that the reader is almost at the mercy of the arrangement, perforce an arbitrary arrangement, of the editors.

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  • He knew little or nothing of any Teutonic language except English, which indeed, as he wrote it, was scarcely a Teutonic language; and thus he was absolutely at the mercy of Junius and Skinner.

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  • for mercy to the Sicilians.

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  • Both Austria and Prussia were much occupied with the Polish question, and to have plunged into a crusade against France would have been to have left Poland, where the new constitution had been proclaimed on the 3rd of May, to the mercy of Russia.

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  • The estimates could not be sanctioned, and though Kossuth granted the Szell cabinet a vote on account for the first four months of 1903, the Government found itself at the mercy of the Opposition.

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  • Alternately victorious and defeated, spared by the Syracusans on whose mercy he cast himself as a suppliant (451), sent to be safe at Corinth, he came back to Sicily only to form greater plans than before.

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  • There was no assertion of political rights by the white men, who were largely at the mercy of the natives, and who rarely ventured far from their ships or the " factories " established on the various rivers and estuaries.

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  • The peshwa's dominions were annexed, and those of Sindhia, Holkar, and the raja of Berar lay at the mercy of the governor-general, and were saved only by his moderation.

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  • theless almost entirely at the mercy of the living for his welfare in the other world: he was as dependent on a continued cult on the part of the surviving members of his family as the gods were dependent on the constant attendance of their priests.

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  • For one day and a half he enjoyed the title; the friends of the late Thir Pasha then accomplished his second degradation,i and Cairo was again the scene of terrible enormities, the Albanians revelling in the houses of the Mameluk chiefs, whose hareems met with no mercy at their hands.

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  • Had the khedive and Riaz been allowed a free hand, Arabi and his colleagues would have found little mercy.

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  • Our sources fail us, and we are at the mercy of doubtful rumours and more or less unreliable anecdotes.

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  • No mercy was shown him, nor did he in the least deserve mercy; he had wantonly attacked the peace of the country, and had cruelly libelled James.

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  • for the 12th of March 1881, "in order to obtain from the mercy of Almighty God help and succour in the weighty necessities of the Church, and comfort and strength in the battle against her numerous and mighty foes."

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  • Rome thus lay at his mercy, but he wasted time, and the Romans were able to occupy and provision the Capitol (though they had not sufficient forces to defend their walls) and to send their women and children to Veii.

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  • Elijah is the messenger of vengeance - sudden, fierce and overwhelming; Elisha is the messenger of mercy and restoration.

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  • The principal charitable institutions are the municipal Tuberculosis Sanatorium; the city hospital; the Union Benevolent Association, which maintains a home and hospital for the indigent, together with a training school for nurses; Saint John's orphan asylum (under the superintendence of the Dominican Sisters); Saint Mary's hospital (in charge of the Sisters of Mercy); Butterworth hospital (with a training school for nurses); the Woman's Home and Hospital, maintained largely by the Woman's Christian Temperance Union; the Aldrich Memorial Deaconess' Home; the D.

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  • The death of Mar (28th of October 1572) left power in the stronger hands of Morton, and the death of Knox (24th of November) put the kirk for a while at the mercy of the new regent.

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  • In the Spanish campaign of 1808 his advice was often of the highest value to the marshal, but Jomini quarrelled with his chief, and was left almost at the mercy of his numerous enemies, especially Berthier, the emperor's chief of staff.

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  • The whole of these vast countries, Northern Francia, with part of Burgundy, and the Rhineland, seem to lie as much at their mercy as England had done before Aethandune, or Ireland before the death of Turgesius.

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  • We trace a natural development in it: we seem to see why with such power and such sympathy He necessarily came into conflict with the religious leaders of the people, who were jealous of the influence which He gained and were scandalized by His refusal to be hindered in His mission of mercy by rules and conventions to which they attached the highest importance.

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  • But the powers were bent upon the destruction of the Jesuits, and they had the pope at their mercy.

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  • In 575 Sigebert was assassinated by Fredegond at the very moment when he had Chilperic at his mercy.

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  • 22, &c., meaning "Lord, have mercy"), the words of petition used at the beginning of the Mass and in other offices of the Eastern and Roman Churches.

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  • A few months after the fall of Zenobia, Palmyra revolted again; Aurelian unexpectedly returned, destroyed the city, and this time showed no mercy to the population (spring, 273).

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  • By two stringent regulations of 1799 and 1812 the tenant was practically put at the mercy of a rackrenting landlord.

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  • Karim threw himself upon the mercy of the conquerors.

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  • Shamash the sun-god was invested with justice as his chief trait, Marduk is portrayed as full of mercy and kindness, Ea is the protector of mankind who is grieved when, through a deception practised upon Adapa, humanity is deprived of immortality.

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  • This resolution of Motasim was destined to prove fatal to his dynasty; for it placed the caliphs at the mercy of their praetorians.

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  • Neither he nor the caliph had the slightest notion of the imminent danger they conjured up. When Nasir died, Ramadan 622 (October 1225), the eastern provinces of the empire had been trampled down by the wild hordes, the towns burned, and the inhabitants killed without mercy.

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  • Totally devoid of dignity and heroism, he ended by surrendering and imploring mercy from the barbarian victor.

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  • Aristotelians, the dialectical induction of the Topics, content with imperfect enumeration and with showing the burden of disproof upon the critic, is puerile, and at the mercy of a single instance to the contrary.

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  • the national and priestly elements controlled; doubtless many individuals still were faithful to the purer prophetic message, though also zealous for the system of ritual and sacrifice, but for the ruling majority ritualistic service was the chief thing, justice, purity and mercy being subordinate.

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  • God's continual presence, his fatherly love, his transcendent righteousness, his mercy, his goodness, were the facts of immediate experience.

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  • Thus religion is ethical through and through, as God's inner nature, expressed in forgiveness, mercy, righteousness and truth, is not something transcendental, but belongs to the realm of daily life.

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  • It is not God as abstract, infinite and eternal, as the far-away creator of the universe, or even as the ruler of the world, which Paul worships, but it is God revealed in Jesus Christ, the Father of Jesus Christ, the grace and mercy in Jesus Christ which deliver from evil.

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  • The wellknown custom of marking such houses with a red cross and the legend " God have mercy upon us!"

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  • A second nurse and a sister of mercy had feverish attacks, but no further case occurred.

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  • The defeat of Antiochus the Great at Magnesia, 190 B.C., placed Asia Minor at the mercy of Rome; but it was not until 133 that the first Roman province, Asia, was formed to include only western Anatolia, without Bithynia.

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  • 376): "Such souls as have departed with faith but without having had time to bring forth fruits meet for repentance may be aided towards the attainment of a blessed resurrection by prayers offered in their behalf, especially such as are offered in union with the oblation of the bloodless sacrifice of the Body and Blood of Christ, and by works of mercy done in faith for their memory."

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  • The discarded regent lived for some time in rebellion, endeavouring to establish an independent principality in Malwa, but at last he was forced to cast himself on Akbar's mercy.

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  • In it, of ter going over the several instances, he says, " I do again confess, that on the points charged upon me, although they should be taken as myself have declared them, there is a great deal of corruption and neglect; for which I am heartily and penitently sorry, and submit myself to the judgment, grace, and mercy of the court."

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  • and Guntram, but had no mercy for those who violated ecclesiastical privileges.

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  • They are at the mercy of " servants " (verse 8; cf.

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  • finds comfort in the thought of Yahweh's unfailing mercy; but ends with a louder cry for vengeance.

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  • Lima was now at the mercy of the Chileans, and on the 17th of January a division of 4000 men of all arms, under the command of General Cornelio Saavedra, was sent forward to occupy the Peruvian capital and restore order within the town limits.

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  • Always feeble in character, he was at that time old, and, from the first, was wholly at the mercy of the mutinous soldiery in Delhi, who were controlled by a council called the Barah Topi, or Twelve Heads.

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  • The field of Kadisiya lald Ctesiphon, with all its treasures, at the mercy of the victor.

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  • He then threw himself upon the mercy of the Arabs of the Garmsir or hot country, near the Persian Gulf, to whom the name of the Afghans was hateful, and who rose in a body to turn upon Azad.

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  • The estate itself, after passing through various hands, came in 1870 into the possession of the "Association of the Evangelical Lutheran Church for Works of Mercy," which established here an orphanage, known as the "Martin Luther Orphan Home."

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  • It possesses an old town hall dating from 1566, a hospital, a lunatic asylum, an orphanage, and a large parish church rebuilt in 1756; but the chief interest centres in the church of the Holy Sepulchre, built in 1337, which attracts thousands of pilgrims to its Porta Caeli or Gaadenpforte (Gate of Mercy) opened annually on Michaelmas eve and closed again on the 4th of October.

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  • These legends belong to an age when higher ideas of law and of social duty were being established;, the implacable blood-feud of primitive society gives place to a fair trial, and in Athens, when the votes of the judges are evenly divided, mercy prevails.

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  • England was the chief market for Portuguese wine and grain; and the long Portuguese littoral was at the mercy of the British navy.

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  • misereri, to have mercy or pity), the name of one of the penitential psalms (li.), from its opening words, Miserere mei, Deus.

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  • " Misericord and " miserere " are also used of a small dagger, the " dagger of mercy," capable of passing between the joints of armour, with which the coup de grace might be given to a wounded man.

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  • Mercy to the Gentiles and the punishment of "the sons of the kingdom" is foretold viii.

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  • Le Livre des tournois, a book of ceremonial, and the allegorical romance, Conqueste qu'un chevalier nomme le Cuer d'amour espris feist d'une dame appelee Doulce Mercy, with other works ascribed to him, were perhaps dictated to his secretaries, or at least compiled under his direction.

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  • The Greek consciousness of the sin of murder, only dimly awakened in the Homeric period, and only sensitive at first when a kinsman or a suppliant was slain, gradually expands till the sanctity of all human life becomes recognized by the higher morality of the people: and the names of ZEUs M€tXL tos, the dread deity of the ghost-world whom the sinner must make " placable," of ZEUs `I ho-tos and IIpoorpora70s, to whom the conscience-striken outcast may turn for mercy and pardon, play a guiding-part in this momentous evolution.9 Even this summary reveals the deep indebtedness of early Greek civilization to this cult, which engendered ideas of importance for the higher religious thought of the race, and which might have developed into a monotheistic religion, had a prophet-philosopher arisen powerful enough to combat the polytheistic proclivities of Hellas.

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