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menelaus

menelaus

menelaus Sentence Examples

  • Menelaus supplanted Jason, obtaining his appointment from the king by the promise of a larger contribution.

  • This outrage, coupled with his appropriation of temple vessels, which he used as bribes, raised against Menelaus the senate and the people of Jerusalem.

  • His brother and deputy was killed in a serious riot, and an accusation was laid against Menelaus before Antiochus.

  • Menelaus held the citadel and Jason was unable to establish himself in the city.

  • Though Jason had fled, it was necessary to storm the city; the drastic measures which Menelaus advised seem to indicate that the poorer classes had been roused to defend the Temple from further sacrilege.

  • The Jewish refugees had turned the balance, and so Judas became strategus of Judaea, whilst Menelaus was put to death.

  • EUPHORBUS, son of Panthoiis, one of the bravest of the Trojan heroes, slain by Menelaus (Iliad, xvii.

  • Pythagoras, in support of his doctrine of the transmigration of souls, declared that he had once been this Euphorbus, whose shield, hung up in the temple of Argos by Menelaus, he claimed as his own (Horace, Odes, i.

  • AGAMEMNON, one of the most distinguished of the Greek heroes, was the son of Atreus (king of Mycenae) and Aerope, grandson of Pelops, great-grandson of Tantalus and brother of Menelaus.

  • During this period Agamemnon and Menelaus took refuge with Tyndareus, king of Sparta, whose daughters Clytaemnestra (more correctly Clytaemestra) and.

  • Menelaus succeededTyndareus, and Agamemnon,with his brother's assistance, drove out Aegisthus.

  • Menelaus >>

  • The fine arts department contains twenty-seven oil paintings by modern English and continental artists bequeathed by William Menelaus of Dowlais in 1883, the Pyke-Thompson collection of about roo water-colour paintings presented in 5899, and some 3000 prints and drawings relating to Wales.

  • MENELAUS, in Greek legend, son of Atreus (or Pleisthenes), king of Sparta, brother of Agamemnon and husband of Helen.

  • After a long and happy life in Lacedaemon, Menelaus, as the son-in-law of Zeus, did not die but was translated to Elysium (Homer, Odyssey, iii.

  • In the Homeric poems Laconia appears as the realm of an Achaean prince, Menelaus, whose capital was perhaps Therapne on the left bank of the Eurotas, S.E.

  • There Menelaus, the fomenter of war with the Asmoneans, was put to death by Lysias in 164 B.

  • At that period there was at Rome a demand for copies of, or variations on, noted works of Greek sculpture: the demand was met by the workshops of Pasiteles and his pupils Stephanus and Menelaus and others, several of whose statues are extant.

  • He breaks the truce between the Trojans and the Greeks by treacherously wounding Menelaus with an arrow, and finally he is slain by Diomedes (Homer, Iliad, ii.

  • `EMv), in Greek mythology, daughter of Zeus by Leda (wife of Tyndareus, king of Sparta), sister of Castor, Pollux and Clytaemnestra, and wife of Menelaus.

  • When she grew up, the most famous of the princes of Greece sought her hand in marriage, and her father's choice fell upon Menelaus.

  • Menelaus thereupon took her back, and they returned together to Sparta, where they lived happily till their death, and were buried at Therapnae in Laconia.

  • Menelaus on his way home was also driven by stress of winds to Egypt, where he found his wife and took her home (Herodotus 11.112-120; Euripides, Helena).

  • He appears only twice on the scene of action during the war - to make arrangements for the duel between Paris and Menelaus, and to beg the body of Hector for burial from Achilles, whom he visits in his tent by night.

  • Thyestes was found by Agamemnon and Menelaus, the sons of Atreus, and imprisoned at Mycenae.

  • Aegisthus being sent to murder Thyestes, mutual recognition took place, and Atreus was slain by the father and son, who seized the throne, and drove Agamemnon and Menelaus out of the country (Thucydides i.

  • Menelaus, the brother of Simon the Benjamite, had bought the high-priesthood over the head of Jason, who fled into the country of the Ammonites, in 172 B.C. (2 Macc. iv.

  • To secure his position (for he was not even of the priestly tribe) Menelaus persuaded the deputy of Antiochus, who was dealing with a revolt at Tarsus, to put Onias to death.

  • But Menelaus managed to retain his position, and his accusers were put to death.

  • Then, during the first or second invasion of Egypt, Jason, hearing that Antiochus was dead, returned suddenly and massacred all the followers of Menelaus who did not take refuge in the citadel.

  • He had some claim to the loyalty of such pious Jews as remained, because he was of the tribe of Levi - in spite of the means he, like Menelaus, had employed to get the high-priesthood.

  • His Jewish friends, first Jason and then Menelaus, had been enlightened enough to throw off their prejudices, and, so far as he could know, they represented the majority of the Jews.

  • His edition of the Spherics of Menelaus was published by his friend Dr Costard in 1758.

  • In the Homeric poems eastern Messenia is represented as under the rule of Menelaus of Sparta, while the western coast is under the Neleids of Pylos, but after Menelaus's death the Messenian frontier was pushed eastwards as far as Taygetus.

  • Meeting of the Armies - Paris challenges Menelaus - Truce made.

  • Battle for the body of Patroclus - Aristeia of Menelaus.

  • The chief incidents in that part of the poem - the panic rush to the ships, the duels of Paris and Menelaus, and of Hector and Ajax, the Aristeia of Diomede - stand in no relation to the mainspring of the poem, the promise made by Zeus to Thetis.

  • The joy of Menelaus on seeing Paris, Priam's ignorance of the Greek leaders, the speeches of Agamemnon in his review of the ranks (in book iv.), the building of the wall - all these are in place after the Greek landing, but hardly in the ninth year of the siege.

  • After three years' tenure of office Jason was supplanted by the Benjamite Menelaus, who disowned Judaism entirely.

  • In 3 06 a great fleet under Demetrius attacked Cyprus, and Ptolemy's brother, Menelaus, was defeated and captured in the decisive battle of Salamis.

  • But Amyclae and Therapne (Therapnae) seem to have been in early times of greater importance than Sparta, the former a Minyan foundation a few miles to the south of Sparta, the latter probably the Achaean capital of Laconia and the seat of Menelaus, Agamemnon's younger brother.

  • Though excavations were carried on near Sparta, on the site of the Amyclaeum in 1890 by Tsountas, and in 1904 by Furtwangler, and at the shrine of Menelaus in Therapne by Ross in 1833 and 1841, and by Kastriotis in 1889 and 1900, yet no organized work was tried in Sparta itself save the partial excavation of the "round building" undertaken in 1892 and 1893 by the American School at Athens; the structure has been since found to be a semicircular retainingwall of good Hellenic work, though partly restored in Roman times.

  • about 1304), translated Arabic scientific works, such as parts of Averroes and Ghazzali, Arabic versions from the Greek, as Euclid's Data, Autolycus, Menelaus (0 1 '$'n) and Theodosius on the Sphere, and Ptolemy's Almagest.

  • Menelaus supplanted Jason, obtaining his appointment from the king by the promise of a larger contribution.

  • This outrage, coupled with his appropriation of temple vessels, which he used as bribes, raised against Menelaus the senate and the people of Jerusalem.

  • His brother and deputy was killed in a serious riot, and an accusation was laid against Menelaus before Antiochus.

  • Menelaus held the citadel and Jason was unable to establish himself in the city.

  • Though Jason had fled, it was necessary to storm the city; the drastic measures which Menelaus advised seem to indicate that the poorer classes had been roused to defend the Temple from further sacrilege.

  • But it was Menelaus who was sent by the king " to encourage " (2 Macc. xi.

  • The Jewish refugees had turned the balance, and so Judas became strategus of Judaea, whilst Menelaus was put to death.

  • EUPHORBUS, son of Panthoiis, one of the bravest of the Trojan heroes, slain by Menelaus (Iliad, xvii.

  • Pythagoras, in support of his doctrine of the transmigration of souls, declared that he had once been this Euphorbus, whose shield, hung up in the temple of Argos by Menelaus, he claimed as his own (Horace, Odes, i.

  • AGAMEMNON, one of the most distinguished of the Greek heroes, was the son of Atreus (king of Mycenae) and Aerope, grandson of Pelops, great-grandson of Tantalus and brother of Menelaus.

  • During this period Agamemnon and Menelaus took refuge with Tyndareus, king of Sparta, whose daughters Clytaemnestra (more correctly Clytaemestra) and.

  • Menelaus succeededTyndareus, and Agamemnon,with his brother's assistance, drove out Aegisthus.

  • The fine arts department contains twenty-seven oil paintings by modern English and continental artists bequeathed by William Menelaus of Dowlais in 1883, the Pyke-Thompson collection of about roo water-colour paintings presented in 5899, and some 3000 prints and drawings relating to Wales.

  • MENELAUS, in Greek legend, son of Atreus (or Pleisthenes), king of Sparta, brother of Agamemnon and husband of Helen.

  • After a long and happy life in Lacedaemon, Menelaus, as the son-in-law of Zeus, did not die but was translated to Elysium (Homer, Odyssey, iii.

  • In the Homeric poems Laconia appears as the realm of an Achaean prince, Menelaus, whose capital was perhaps Therapne on the left bank of the Eurotas, S.E.

  • There Menelaus, the fomenter of war with the Asmoneans, was put to death by Lysias in 164 B.

  • At that period there was at Rome a demand for copies of, or variations on, noted works of Greek sculpture: the demand was met by the workshops of Pasiteles and his pupils Stephanus and Menelaus and others, several of whose statues are extant.

  • may be Menelaus; whilst the disinterested speaker may be Hyrcanus ben Tobias (cf.

  • He breaks the truce between the Trojans and the Greeks by treacherously wounding Menelaus with an arrow, and finally he is slain by Diomedes (Homer, Iliad, ii.

  • `EMv), in Greek mythology, daughter of Zeus by Leda (wife of Tyndareus, king of Sparta), sister of Castor, Pollux and Clytaemnestra, and wife of Menelaus.

  • When she grew up, the most famous of the princes of Greece sought her hand in marriage, and her father's choice fell upon Menelaus.

  • After the death of Paris she married his brother DeIphobus, whom she is said to have betrayed into the hands of Menelaus at the capture of the city (Aeneid, vi.

  • Menelaus thereupon took her back, and they returned together to Sparta, where they lived happily till their death, and were buried at Therapnae in Laconia.

  • Menelaus on his way home was also driven by stress of winds to Egypt, where he found his wife and took her home (Herodotus 11.112-120; Euripides, Helena).

  • He appears only twice on the scene of action during the war - to make arrangements for the duel between Paris and Menelaus, and to beg the body of Hector for burial from Achilles, whom he visits in his tent by night.

  • Thyestes was found by Agamemnon and Menelaus, the sons of Atreus, and imprisoned at Mycenae.

  • Aegisthus being sent to murder Thyestes, mutual recognition took place, and Atreus was slain by the father and son, who seized the throne, and drove Agamemnon and Menelaus out of the country (Thucydides i.

  • Menelaus, the brother of Simon the Benjamite, had bought the high-priesthood over the head of Jason, who fled into the country of the Ammonites, in 172 B.C. (2 Macc. iv.

  • To secure his position (for he was not even of the priestly tribe) Menelaus persuaded the deputy of Antiochus, who was dealing with a revolt at Tarsus, to put Onias to death.

  • But Menelaus managed to retain his position, and his accusers were put to death.

  • Then, during the first or second invasion of Egypt, Jason, hearing that Antiochus was dead, returned suddenly and massacred all the followers of Menelaus who did not take refuge in the citadel.

  • He had some claim to the loyalty of such pious Jews as remained, because he was of the tribe of Levi - in spite of the means he, like Menelaus, had employed to get the high-priesthood.

  • His Jewish friends, first Jason and then Menelaus, had been enlightened enough to throw off their prejudices, and, so far as he could know, they represented the majority of the Jews.

  • His edition of the Spherics of Menelaus was published by his friend Dr Costard in 1758.

  • In the Homeric poems eastern Messenia is represented as under the rule of Menelaus of Sparta, while the western coast is under the Neleids of Pylos, but after Menelaus's death the Messenian frontier was pushed eastwards as far as Taygetus.

  • Meeting of the Armies - Paris challenges Menelaus - Truce made.

  • Battle for the body of Patroclus - Aristeia of Menelaus.

  • The " quarrel of the chiefs," the " muster of the army," the " duel of Paris and Menelaus," &c., are excellent beginnings, but have no satisfying conclusion.

  • The chief incidents in that part of the poem - the panic rush to the ships, the duels of Paris and Menelaus, and of Hector and Ajax, the Aristeia of Diomede - stand in no relation to the mainspring of the poem, the promise made by Zeus to Thetis.

  • The joy of Menelaus on seeing Paris, Priam's ignorance of the Greek leaders, the speeches of Agamemnon in his review of the ranks (in book iv.), the building of the wall - all these are in place after the Greek landing, but hardly in the ninth year of the siege.

  • After three years' tenure of office Jason was supplanted by the Benjamite Menelaus, who disowned Judaism entirely.

  • In 3 06 a great fleet under Demetrius attacked Cyprus, and Ptolemy's brother, Menelaus, was defeated and captured in the decisive battle of Salamis.

  • But Amyclae and Therapne (Therapnae) seem to have been in early times of greater importance than Sparta, the former a Minyan foundation a few miles to the south of Sparta, the latter probably the Achaean capital of Laconia and the seat of Menelaus, Agamemnon's younger brother.

  • Though excavations were carried on near Sparta, on the site of the Amyclaeum in 1890 by Tsountas, and in 1904 by Furtwangler, and at the shrine of Menelaus in Therapne by Ross in 1833 and 1841, and by Kastriotis in 1889 and 1900, yet no organized work was tried in Sparta itself save the partial excavation of the "round building" undertaken in 1892 and 1893 by the American School at Athens; the structure has been since found to be a semicircular retainingwall of good Hellenic work, though partly restored in Roman times.

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