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mendoza

mendoza

mendoza Sentence Examples

  • These saline basins extend down to the lower terraces of Cordoba, Mendoza and La Pampa.

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  • Evidence of this is to be found in the altitudes of the stations on the Buenos Aires and Pacific railway running a little north of west across the pampas to Mendoza.

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  • Some of the principal affluents are the Vinchina and Jachal, or Zanjon, which flow into the Vermejo, the Patos, which flows into the San Juan, and the Mendoza, Tunuyan and Diamante which flow into the Desaguadero, all of these being Andean snow-fed rivers.

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  • southward to Mendoza.

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  • The names, area and population of the provinces and territories are as follows: The principal towns, with estimated population for 1905, are as follows: Buenos Aires (1,025,653), Rosario (129,121), La Plata (85,000), Tucuman (55,000), Cordoba (43,000), Sante Fe (33, 200), Mendoza (32,000), Parana.

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  • The gauge is broken at Mendoza, the Buenos Aires and Pacific having a gauge of 5 ft.

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  • In the Andean provinces of Mendoza, San Juan, Catamarca and Rioja viticulture attracts much attention, and the area in vineyards in 1901 was 109,546 acres, only 18% of which was outside the four provinces named.

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  • To meet the needs of technical and industrial education there are a school of mines at San Juan, a school of viticulture at Mendoza, an agronomic and veterinary school at La Plata, several agricultural and pastoral schools, and commercial schools in Buenos Aires, Rosario, Bahia Blanca and Concordia.

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  • Among these was Pedro de Mendoza, a Basque nobleman.

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  • Mendoza undertook to conquer and settle the territory at his own charges, certain profits being reserved to the crown.

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  • Here, on the 2nd of February, Mendoza laid the foundations of a settlement which in honour of the day he named Santa Maria de Buenos Aires.

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  • From Corpus Christi, Mendoza sent out various bodies to explore the interior in the direction of Peru, but without much success, and at length, thoroughly discouraged and broken in health, he abandoned his enterprise, and returned to Spain in 1537.

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  • In 1620 Buenos Aires was separated from the authority of the government established at Asuncion, and was made the seat of a government extending over Mendoza, Santa Fe, Entre Rios and Corrientes, but at the same time remained like the government of Paraguay at Asuncion, and that of the province of Tucuman, which had Cordoba as its capital, subject to the authority of the viceroyalty of Peru.

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  • In 1803 he produced El BarOn in its present form; originally written (1791) as a zarzuela, it was shamelessly plagiarized by Andres de Mendoza, but the recast, a far more brilliant work, still keeps the stage.

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  • Morelia, first known as Valladolid, was founded in 1541 by Viceroy Mendoza.

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  • In 1473 Torquemada and Gonzalez de Mendoza, archbishop of Toledo, approached the sovereigns.

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  • Her name is first openly connected with the king's as a possible wife in the event of Catherine's divorce, in a letter of Mendoza, the imperial ambassador, to Charles V.

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  • NEUQUEN, an inland territory of Argentina on the Chilean frontier, between the Colorado and Limay rivers, with the province of Mendoza on the N.

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  • The library, situated above the principal portico, was at one time one of the richest in Europe, comprising the king's own collection, the extensive bequest of Diego de Mendoza, Philip's ambassador to Rome, the spoils of the emperor of Morocco, Muley Zidan (1603-1628) and various contributions from convents, churches and cities.

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  • The balia was reconstituted several times by the imperial agents - in 1530 by Don Lopez di Soria and Alphonso Piccolomini, duke of Amalfi, in 1540 by Granvella (or Granvelle) and in 1548 by Don Diego di Mendoza; but government was carried on as badly as before, and there was increased hatred of the Spanish rule.

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  • On the 23rd of September 1551 Don Antonio de Mendoza arrived as second viceroy, but he died at Lima in the following July.

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  • Don Andres Hurtado de Mendoza, marquis of Canete, entered Lima as third viceroy of Peru on the 6th of July 1555, and ruled with an iron hand for six years.

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  • by San Luis and Mendoza, and W.

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  • It is roughly mountainous, and belongs to the closed drainage basin of western Argentina, centring in the province of Mendoza.

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  • The Argentine Great Western railway connects Mendoza with the capital of the province, and with the principal cities of the republic.

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  • of Mendoza and 730 m.

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  • San Juan was founded in 1561 by Juan Yufre, a_ companion of Captain Castillo, the founder of Mendoza.

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  • From 1776 to 1820 it was governed from Mendoza, and then a popular uprising made the province independent and the town its capital.

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  • Irigo Lopez De Mendoza, Marquis Of Santillana >>

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  • Andres Hurtado de Mendoza, marquess of Canete, who became viceroy of Peru in 1655, bestowed on Fernandez the office of chronicler of Peru; and in this capacity he wrote a narrative of the insurrection of Francisco Hernandez Giron, of the rebellion of Gonzalo Pizarro, and of the administration of Pedro de la Gasca.

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  • Antonio Escobar y Mendoza >>

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  • There is more than one meaning of Mendoza discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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  • The first college in Mexico was founded', during the administration of Viceroy Mendoza (1535-1550), but it taught very little beyond Latin, rhetoric, grammar and theology.

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  • The university of Mexico, planned by Mendoza and founded on the 21st of September 1551, was formally opened on the 25th of January 1553, with faculties of law, philosophy and theology.

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  • The term of office of the first viceroy, Antonio de Mendoza, was marked by the Mixton War, by an attempt to suppress the encomienda system, and by Events: a violent epidemic among the natives.

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  • Some years later the bishop of Puebla, Juan de Palafox y Mendoza, transferred many native congregations from the friars to secular priests, and subsequently, in 1647, came into conflict with the Jesuits, whom he excommunicated, but who eventually triumphed with the aid of the Dominicans and the archbishop. The power of the church may be judged from the petition of the Ayuntamiento of Mexico to Philip IV.

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  • Undoubtedly he facilitated her self-incrimination, but of her active encouragement of the plot there can be little doubt after the publication of her letters to Mendoza, in which she excuses her complicity on the plea that no other means were left to secure her liberation.

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  • A little knowledge about its sources above these points was given by the savages to de la Fuente in 1759 and to Mendoza in 1764, and we are also indebted to Humboldt for some vague data.

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  • by Mendoza.

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  • Next in importance is the town of Mercedes or Villa Mercedes (pop. 1904, about 6000) on the Rio Quinto, an important railway junction where the railways from Buenos Aires, Rosario, Mendoza and San Jose unite.

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  • It is said that he discovered the love intrigue between Antonio Perez and the widowed princess of Eboli, Ana Mendoza de la Cerda.

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  • The conspiracy was regarded by Mendoza, the Spanish ambassador, one of its chief instigators, and also by Walsingham, as the most dangerous of recent years; it included, in its general purpose of destroying the government, a large number of Roman Catholics, and had ramifications all over the country.

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  • 606, Mendoza to Philip.

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  • O'Higgins with most of the patriots fled across the Andes to Mendoza, where Jose de San Martin was preparing a force for the liberation of Chile.

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  • ANTONIO ESCOBAR Y MENDOZA (1589-1669), Spanish churchman of illustrious descent, was born at Valladolid in 1589.

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  • In 1908 direct railway communication was opened with Mendoza and San Juan.

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  • This did not suit Philip, who, although he instituted a process in the supreme tribunal of Aragon, speedily abandoned it and caused Perez to be attacked from another side, the charge of heresy being now preferred, arising out of certain reckless and even blasphe On the other hand it is suggested that this story of his being the son of Gomez was only circulated by Ruy Gomez's wife, Ana de Mendoza, as a refutation of the possibility of a supposed amour between her and Perez.

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  • He had not seen the cities himself, nor had he, as is frequently asserted, gone as far north as the present New Mexico, but his reports tended to confirm previous rumours and led the viceroy, Don Antonio de Mendoza, to send Fray Marcos de Niza, a Franciscan friar, on a small and inexpensive expedition of discovery.

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  • The best-known of these is the Uspallata pass between Santiago and the Argentine city of Mendoza, 12,870 ft.

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  • A branch of the Valparaiso and Santiago line runs to Los Andes, and its extension across the Andes connects with the Argentine lines from Buenos Aires to Mendoza and the Chilean frontier-all sections together forming a transcontinental route about 850 m.

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  • For three years the Spaniards maintained their hold on Chile, ruling the country with tyrannical harshness, but in the spring of 1817 a patriot force which had been organized at Mendoza in the Argentine by Jose de San Martin, an Argentine officer, and by O'Higgins, crossed the Andes and overwhelmed the royalists at the battle of Chacabuco.

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  • PEDRO GONZALEZ DE MENDOZA (1 4 28 - 1 495), Spanish cardinal and statesman, was the fourth son of Inigo Lopez de Mendoza, marquess of Santillana, and duke of Infantado.

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  • The house of Mendoza claimed to descend from the lords of Llodio in Alava, and to have been settled in Old Castile, in the 11th century.

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  • The life of the cardinal, by Salazar de Mendoza, Cronica del gran cardinal Don Pedro Gonzalez de Mendoza (Toledo, 1625), is disoursive and garrulous but valuable.

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  • Mendoza, Argentina (Province) >>

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  • After the murder of William the Silent (1584) Elizabeth sided more openly with the Dutch; the Spanish ambassador Mendoza was expelled from England for his intrigues with Elizabeths enemies (1586); and Execution on the discovery of Babingtons plot Elizabeth yielded of Maiy, to the demand of her parliament and her ministers queen of for Marys execution (1587); her death removed the ~ only possible centre for a Catholic rebellion in case of a Spanish attack.

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  • Peter Martyr in a letter to Lope Hurtado de Mendoza in 1513 is the first to state that it is of native origin.

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  • The western part of the province is drained by the Bermejo, which flows southward into the closed lacustrine basin of Mendoza.

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  • JUAN DE PALAFOX DE MENDOZA (1600-1659), Spanish bishop, was born in Aragon.

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  • The Marquesas Islands were discovered on the 21st of July 1 595 by Alvaro Mendana, who, however, only knew of the southeastern group, to which he gave the name by which they are generally known (although they also bear his own), in honour of Don Garcia Hurtado de Mendoza, marquis of Canete, viceroy of Peru, and patron of the voyage.

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  • included transportation to and from the Mendoza airport.

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  • Jessica Mendoza, aged nine, was the youngest member of the English squad, which went on to clinch a team silver medal.

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  • prized commodities, as recorded in the tribute pages of the Codex Mendoza.

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  • prized commodities, as recorded in the tribute pages of the Codex Mendoza.

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  • Regional Analysis: MENDOZA The Mendoza harvest results were excellent in terms of both quality and quantity for both red and white varietals.

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  • winery visits to Mendoza for an overnight stay.

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  • These saline basins extend down to the lower terraces of Cordoba, Mendoza and La Pampa.

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    0
  • Evidence of this is to be found in the altitudes of the stations on the Buenos Aires and Pacific railway running a little north of west across the pampas to Mendoza.

    0
    0
  • Some of the principal affluents are the Vinchina and Jachal, or Zanjon, which flow into the Vermejo, the Patos, which flows into the San Juan, and the Mendoza, Tunuyan and Diamante which flow into the Desaguadero, all of these being Andean snow-fed rivers.

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  • southward to Mendoza.

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  • The names, area and population of the provinces and territories are as follows: The principal towns, with estimated population for 1905, are as follows: Buenos Aires (1,025,653), Rosario (129,121), La Plata (85,000), Tucuman (55,000), Cordoba (43,000), Sante Fe (33, 200), Mendoza (32,000), Parana.

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  • The gauge is broken at Mendoza, the Buenos Aires and Pacific having a gauge of 5 ft.

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  • In the Andean provinces of Mendoza, San Juan, Catamarca and Rioja viticulture attracts much attention, and the area in vineyards in 1901 was 109,546 acres, only 18% of which was outside the four provinces named.

    0
    0
  • To meet the needs of technical and industrial education there are a school of mines at San Juan, a school of viticulture at Mendoza, an agronomic and veterinary school at La Plata, several agricultural and pastoral schools, and commercial schools in Buenos Aires, Rosario, Bahia Blanca and Concordia.

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  • Among these was Pedro de Mendoza, a Basque nobleman.

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  • Mendoza undertook to conquer and settle the territory at his own charges, certain profits being reserved to the crown.

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    0
  • Here, on the 2nd of February, Mendoza laid the foundations of a settlement which in honour of the day he named Santa Maria de Buenos Aires.

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  • Mendoza, after some fierce encounters with the Indians, now proceeded up the Parana, and built a fort, which he called Corpus Christi, near the site of Cabot's former settlement of San Espiritu.

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  • From Corpus Christi, Mendoza sent out various bodies to explore the interior in the direction of Peru, but without much success, and at length, thoroughly discouraged and broken in health, he abandoned his enterprise, and returned to Spain in 1537.

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  • Another expedition from Chile, under Garcia Hurtado de Mendoza, crossed the Cordillera in 1559, and having defeated the Araucanian Indians, made a settlement which from the name of the leader was called Mendoza.

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  • In 1620 Buenos Aires was separated from the authority of the government established at Asuncion, and was made the seat of a government extending over Mendoza, Santa Fe, Entre Rios and Corrientes, but at the same time remained like the government of Paraguay at Asuncion, and that of the province of Tucuman, which had Cordoba as its capital, subject to the authority of the viceroyalty of Peru.

    0
    0
  • In 1803 he produced El BarOn in its present form; originally written (1791) as a zarzuela, it was shamelessly plagiarized by Andres de Mendoza, but the recast, a far more brilliant work, still keeps the stage.

    0
    0
  • Morelia, first known as Valladolid, was founded in 1541 by Viceroy Mendoza.

    0
    0
  • In 1473 Torquemada and Gonzalez de Mendoza, archbishop of Toledo, approached the sovereigns.

    0
    0
  • Her name is first openly connected with the king's as a possible wife in the event of Catherine's divorce, in a letter of Mendoza, the imperial ambassador, to Charles V.

    0
    0
  • NEUQUEN, an inland territory of Argentina on the Chilean frontier, between the Colorado and Limay rivers, with the province of Mendoza on the N.

    0
    0
  • The library, situated above the principal portico, was at one time one of the richest in Europe, comprising the king's own collection, the extensive bequest of Diego de Mendoza, Philip's ambassador to Rome, the spoils of the emperor of Morocco, Muley Zidan (1603-1628) and various contributions from convents, churches and cities.

    0
    0
  • The balia was reconstituted several times by the imperial agents - in 1530 by Don Lopez di Soria and Alphonso Piccolomini, duke of Amalfi, in 1540 by Granvella (or Granvelle) and in 1548 by Don Diego di Mendoza; but government was carried on as badly as before, and there was increased hatred of the Spanish rule.

    0
    0
  • On the 23rd of September 1551 Don Antonio de Mendoza arrived as second viceroy, but he died at Lima in the following July.

    0
    0
  • Don Andres Hurtado de Mendoza, marquis of Canete, entered Lima as third viceroy of Peru on the 6th of July 1555, and ruled with an iron hand for six years.

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    0
  • by San Luis and Mendoza, and W.

    0
    0
  • It is roughly mountainous, and belongs to the closed drainage basin of western Argentina, centring in the province of Mendoza.

    0
    0
  • The Argentine Great Western railway connects Mendoza with the capital of the province, and with the principal cities of the republic.

    0
    0
  • of Mendoza and 730 m.

    0
    0
  • San Juan was founded in 1561 by Juan Yufre, a_ companion of Captain Castillo, the founder of Mendoza.

    0
    0
  • From 1776 to 1820 it was governed from Mendoza, and then a popular uprising made the province independent and the town its capital.

    0
    0
  • Irigo Lopez De Mendoza, Marquis Of Santillana >>

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    0
  • Andres Hurtado de Mendoza, marquess of Canete, who became viceroy of Peru in 1655, bestowed on Fernandez the office of chronicler of Peru; and in this capacity he wrote a narrative of the insurrection of Francisco Hernandez Giron, of the rebellion of Gonzalo Pizarro, and of the administration of Pedro de la Gasca.

    0
    0
  • Antonio Escobar y Mendoza >>

    0
    0
  • There is more than one meaning of Mendoza discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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    0
  • The first college in Mexico was founded', during the administration of Viceroy Mendoza (1535-1550), but it taught very little beyond Latin, rhetoric, grammar and theology.

    0
    0
  • The university of Mexico, planned by Mendoza and founded on the 21st of September 1551, was formally opened on the 25th of January 1553, with faculties of law, philosophy and theology.

    0
    0
  • The term of office of the first viceroy, Antonio de Mendoza, was marked by the Mixton War, by an attempt to suppress the encomienda system, and by Events: a violent epidemic among the natives.

    0
    0
  • Some years later the bishop of Puebla, Juan de Palafox y Mendoza, transferred many native congregations from the friars to secular priests, and subsequently, in 1647, came into conflict with the Jesuits, whom he excommunicated, but who eventually triumphed with the aid of the Dominicans and the archbishop. The power of the church may be judged from the petition of the Ayuntamiento of Mexico to Philip IV.

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    0
  • Undoubtedly he facilitated her self-incrimination, but of her active encouragement of the plot there can be little doubt after the publication of her letters to Mendoza, in which she excuses her complicity on the plea that no other means were left to secure her liberation.

    0
    0
  • A little knowledge about its sources above these points was given by the savages to de la Fuente in 1759 and to Mendoza in 1764, and we are also indebted to Humboldt for some vague data.

    0
    0
  • by Mendoza.

    0
    0
  • Next in importance is the town of Mercedes or Villa Mercedes (pop. 1904, about 6000) on the Rio Quinto, an important railway junction where the railways from Buenos Aires, Rosario, Mendoza and San Jose unite.

    0
    0
  • It is said that he discovered the love intrigue between Antonio Perez and the widowed princess of Eboli, Ana Mendoza de la Cerda.

    0
    0
  • The conspiracy was regarded by Mendoza, the Spanish ambassador, one of its chief instigators, and also by Walsingham, as the most dangerous of recent years; it included, in its general purpose of destroying the government, a large number of Roman Catholics, and had ramifications all over the country.

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    0
  • 606, Mendoza to Philip.

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    0
  • O'Higgins with most of the patriots fled across the Andes to Mendoza, where Jose de San Martin was preparing a force for the liberation of Chile.

    0
    0
  • ANTONIO ESCOBAR Y MENDOZA (1589-1669), Spanish churchman of illustrious descent, was born at Valladolid in 1589.

    0
    0
  • In 1908 direct railway communication was opened with Mendoza and San Juan.

    0
    0
  • This did not suit Philip, who, although he instituted a process in the supreme tribunal of Aragon, speedily abandoned it and caused Perez to be attacked from another side, the charge of heresy being now preferred, arising out of certain reckless and even blasphe On the other hand it is suggested that this story of his being the son of Gomez was only circulated by Ruy Gomez's wife, Ana de Mendoza, as a refutation of the possibility of a supposed amour between her and Perez.

    0
    0
  • He had not seen the cities himself, nor had he, as is frequently asserted, gone as far north as the present New Mexico, but his reports tended to confirm previous rumours and led the viceroy, Don Antonio de Mendoza, to send Fray Marcos de Niza, a Franciscan friar, on a small and inexpensive expedition of discovery.

    0
    0
  • The best-known of these is the Uspallata pass between Santiago and the Argentine city of Mendoza, 12,870 ft.

    0
    0
  • A branch of the Valparaiso and Santiago line runs to Los Andes, and its extension across the Andes connects with the Argentine lines from Buenos Aires to Mendoza and the Chilean frontier-all sections together forming a transcontinental route about 850 m.

    0
    0
  • For three years the Spaniards maintained their hold on Chile, ruling the country with tyrannical harshness, but in the spring of 1817 a patriot force which had been organized at Mendoza in the Argentine by Jose de San Martin, an Argentine officer, and by O'Higgins, crossed the Andes and overwhelmed the royalists at the battle of Chacabuco.

    0
    0
  • PEDRO GONZALEZ DE MENDOZA (1 4 28 - 1 495), Spanish cardinal and statesman, was the fourth son of Inigo Lopez de Mendoza, marquess of Santillana, and duke of Infantado.

    0
    0
  • The house of Mendoza claimed to descend from the lords of Llodio in Alava, and to have been settled in Old Castile, in the 11th century.

    0
    0
  • The life of the cardinal, by Salazar de Mendoza, Cronica del gran cardinal Don Pedro Gonzalez de Mendoza (Toledo, 1625), is disoursive and garrulous but valuable.

    0
    0
  • Mendoza, Argentina (Province) >>

    0
    0
  • After the murder of William the Silent (1584) Elizabeth sided more openly with the Dutch; the Spanish ambassador Mendoza was expelled from England for his intrigues with Elizabeths enemies (1586); and Execution on the discovery of Babingtons plot Elizabeth yielded of Maiy, to the demand of her parliament and her ministers queen of for Marys execution (1587); her death removed the ~ only possible centre for a Catholic rebellion in case of a Spanish attack.

    0
    0
  • Peter Martyr in a letter to Lope Hurtado de Mendoza in 1513 is the first to state that it is of native origin.

    0
    0
  • The western part of the province is drained by the Bermejo, which flows southward into the closed lacustrine basin of Mendoza.

    0
    0
  • JUAN DE PALAFOX DE MENDOZA (1600-1659), Spanish bishop, was born in Aragon.

    0
    0
  • The Marquesas Islands were discovered on the 21st of July 1 595 by Alvaro Mendana, who, however, only knew of the southeastern group, to which he gave the name by which they are generally known (although they also bear his own), in honour of Don Garcia Hurtado de Mendoza, marquis of Canete, viceroy of Peru, and patron of the voyage.

    0
    0
  • Regional Analysis: MENDOZA The Mendoza harvest results were excellent in terms of both quality and quantity for both red and white varietals.

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    0
  • In the Mendoza bag there are the seeds or berries of what appears to be a small potato plant with a whitish flower.

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  • Day 8: Return via more winery visits to Mendoza for an overnight stay.

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  • The bodega is at the base of the Andes in Mendoza, Argentina and the label's image represents the moon either rising or setting over the South American mountain range.

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  • Bodega Catena Zapata is one of the high profile wineries in Argentina, and the Catena family has been making wine in Mendoza for over 100 years.

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  • When I think of Malbec, I usually think of something from Mendoza, Argentina, perhaps some luscious bottle of dark red from Bodegas Catena.

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  • Talented filmmakers who are making a name for themselves in the industry include Gil Portes, Mark Meily, Maryo J. de los Reyes, Adolfo Alix, Jr., Jeffrey Jeturian, Brillante Mendoza, and Lay Diaz, among others.

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  • The show also starred Jorge Enrique Abello as Armando Mendoza, Luis Mesa as Daniel Valencia, Natalia Ramírez as Marcela Valencia and Lorna Paz as Patricia Fenández de Brickman.

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