Mendicants sentence example

mendicants
  • They are declared to be mendicants and enjoy all the privileges of the other mendicant orders.
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  • Chunda prepared for the mendicants a mid-day meal, and after the meal the Buddha started for Kusinara.
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  • Do you imagine that I am not able to supply the wants of so many mendicants?"
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  • The mendicants, Dominican and Franciscan, took rapid root in England; the number of friaries erected in the reign of Henry III.
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  • (5) Aghora Panthis, a vile and disreputable class of mendicants, now rarely met with.
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  • Ladies gorgeously clad, and knights, showing by their dress and bearing their anxiety to revive the glories and the follies of the age of chivalry, jostled mountebanks, mendicants and vendors of all kinds.
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  • Of other sedentary orders the Cistercians were the most important, and the mendicants were very numerous.
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  • The confused and legendary notices of the journeyings of 1 These were at first simple huts, built for the mendicants in some grove of palm-trees as a retreat during the rainy season; but they gradually increased in splendour and magnificence till the decay of Buddhism set in.
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  • The most important of these, the Dadu Panthi sect, founded by Dadu about the year 1600, has a numerous following in Ajmir and Marwar, one section of whom, the Nagas, engage largely in military service, whilst the others are either householders or mendicants.
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  • They gave up their possessions, put on a saffron robe, shaved their head, and became mendicants or wandering monks.
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  • Concomitant with their function as places of worship, mosques served as social centers and as rest houses for travelers and itinerant mendicants.
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  • The great majority of these modern congregations of women follow the Augustinian rule, supplemented by special constitutions or by-laws; such are the Brigittines, the Ursulines and the Visitation nuns: others follow the rule of the third order of the Franciscans or other Mendicants (see Tertiaries).
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  • In former times Mexico was overrun with mendicants (pordioseros), vagrants and criminals (rateros), and the " Portales de las Flores " on the east of the Plaza Mayor was a favourite " hunting-ground " for them because of its proximity to the cathedral; but modern conditions have largely reduced this evil.
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  • More serious still, from the point of view of the Church, was the association of these wandering mendicants with the mystic heresies of the Fraticelli, the Apostolici and the pantheistic Brethren of the Free Spirit.
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  • Special constitutions were drawn up for its government, on the same lines as the Dominicans and other mendicants - a general elected by chapter, provincials to rule in the different countries, with assistants, definitors and visitors.
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  • In northern India, the professed followers of Sankara are mainly limited to certain classes of mendicants and ascetics, although the tenets of this great Vedanta teacher may be said virtually to constitute the creed of intelligent Brahmans generally.
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  • His doctrine, which may be said to constitute a kind of reaction against the severe sacerdotalism of Sankara, has spread over all classes of the southern community, most of the priests of Saiva temples there being adherents of it; whilst in northern India its votaries are only occasionally met with, and then mostly as mendicants, leading about a neatly caparisoned bull as representing Siva's sacred bull Nandi.
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  • There is no need to labour the point that the Mendicants responded to all these needs and interpreted them within the pale of Catholic Christianity, for the fact lies upon the surface of history.
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  • But a few words are necessary on the central idea from which the Mendicants received their name - the idea of poverty.
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  • There he taught for some time, attracting large numbers of hearers, among whom two, Sariputta and Moggallana, who afterwards became conspicuous leaders in the new crusade, then joined the Sangha or Society, as the Buddha's order of mendicants was called.
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  • The industries all centre in the pilgrimage; the chief object of every Meccan - from the notables and sheikhs, who use their influence to gain custom for the Jidda speculators in the pilgrim traffic, down to the cicerones, pilgrim brokers, lodging-house keepers, and mendicants at the holy places - being to pillage the visitor in every possible way.
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  • religious mendicants) and given them the jibba as their characteristic garment or uniform.
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  • After this incident many dervishes (religious mendicants) gathered round the young sheikh, whose reputation for sanctity speedily grew.
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  • Hindu religious mendicants, with every conceivable bodily deformity, line the principal streets on both sides.
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  • These devotees lavish large sums in indiscriminate charity, and it is the hope of sharing in such pious distributions that brings together the concourse of religious mendicants from all quarters of the country.
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  • And yet he, who was generally the haughtiest and most irritable of mankind, who was but too prompt to resent anything which looked like a slight on the part of a purse-proud bookseller, or of a noble and powerful patron, bore patiently from mendicants, who, but for his bounty, must have gone to the workhouse, insults more provoking than those for which he had knocked down Osborne and bidden defiance to Chesterfield.
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  • The mendicants of this creed, however, never actually solicit alms; and, indeed, "the quakerlike spirit of the sect, their abhorrence of all violence, their regard for truth and the inobtrusiveness of their opinions render them very inoffensive members of the state" (H.
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  • Moreover, besides the various orders of friars, there were the lay Tertiaries that arose and spread far and wide in connexion with the Franciscans and other mendicants, and the similar institute of the Humiliati (see Tertiaries).
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  • their living by weaving and the like, and appear to have been in intimate connexion with the craft-gilds; but under the influence of the mendicant movement of the 13th century these tended to break up, and, though certain of the male beguinages survived or were incorporated as tertiaries in the orders of friars, the name of Beghard became associated with groups of wandering mendicants who made religion a cloak for living on charity; beguigner becoming in the French language of the time synonymous with "to beg," and beghard with "beggar," a word which, according to the latest authorities, was probably imported into England in the 13th century from this source (see Beggar).
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