Mendelssohn sentence example

mendelssohn
  • His father's name was Mendel, and he was later on surnamed Mendelssohn (= son of Mendel).
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  • Mendelssohn soon won the confidence of Bernhard, who made the young student successively his book-keeper and his partner.
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  • Just as the latter afterwards makes Nathan the Wise and Saladin meet over the chess-board, so did Lessing and Mendelssohn actually come together as lovers of the game.
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  • This notion was being generally ridiculed as untrue, when Lessing found in Mendelssohn the realization of his dream.
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  • Mendelssohn owed his first introduction to the public to Lessing's admiration.
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  • Without consulting the author, Lessing published anonymously Mendelssohn's Philosophical Conversations (Philosophische Gespreiche) in 1755.
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  • It was the joint work of Lessing and Mendelssohn.
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  • From this time Mendelssohn's career was one of ever-increasing brilliance.
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  • In October 1763 the king granted Mendelssohn the privilege of Protected Jew (Schutz-Jude)- which assured his right to undisturbed residence in Berlin.
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  • Lavater was one of the most ardent admirers of Mendelssohn.
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  • Bonnet resented Lavater's action, but Mendelssohn was bound to reply, though opposed to religious controversy.
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  • Here we see the germs of Mendelssohn's Pragmatism, to use the now current term.
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  • Among them secular studies had been neglected, and Mendelssohn saw that he could best remedy the defect by attacking it on the religious side.
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  • Mendelssohn added a new section to this chapter by his German translation of the Pentateuch and other parts of the Bible.
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  • This work (1783) constituted Mendelssohn the Luther of the German Jews.
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  • Mendelssohn was the first great champion of Jewish emancipation in the 18th century.
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  • Mendelssohn himself published a German translation of the Vindiciae judaeorum by Menasseh ben Israel.
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  • This is the moral of Lessing's Nathan the Wise, the hero of which is undoubtedly Mendelssohn.
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  • Having been taught that there is no absolutely true religion, Mendelssohn's own descendants - a brilliant circle, of which the musician Felix was the most noted - left the Synagogue for the Church.
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  • But despite this, Mendelssohn's theory was found to be a strengthening bond in Judaism.
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  • Of Mendelssohn's remaining years it must suffice to say that he progressed in fame numbering among his friends more and more of the greatest men of the age.
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  • Mendelssohn had six children.
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  • Much interesting material on the Mendelssohn family is given in Hensel's Die Familie Mendelssohn (translated into English, 1881).
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  • Much general comment on Moses Mendelssohn appeared in the press of the world on occasion of the centenary of the birth of the composer Mendelssohn in 1909.
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  • In the same year in which this work appeared, he and his wife Dorothea (1763-1839), a daughter of Moses Mendelssohn, joined the Roman Catholic Church, and from this time he became more and more opposed to the principles of political and religious freedom.
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  • The beginning of Mendelssohn's F minor quartet is, again, a case usually, but perhaps wrongly, condemned for its orchestral appearance on paper.
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  • The Rational Psychology formulates immortality on the ground that the immaterial soul has no parts to suffer decay - the argument which Kant's Critique of Pure Reason " refutes" with special reference to the statement of it by Moses Mendelssohn.
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  • It was Moses Mendelssohn's German translation of the Pentateuch (1 7 80 - 1 793) which marked the new spirit, while the views of his opponents belong to a bygone age.
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  • One consequence of the Mendelssohn movement was that many writers used their vernacular language besides or instead of Hebrew, or translated from one to the other.
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  • The characteristic of the 18th and 19th centuries is the endeavour, connected with the name of Moses Mendelssohn, to bring Judaism more into relation with external learning, and in using the Hebrew language to purify tend- and develop it in accordance with the biblical standard.
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  • Mendelssohn became a warm friend of Lessing, the hero of whose drama Nathan the Wise was drawn from the Dessau Jew.
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  • Mendelssohn's Phaedo, on the immortality of the soul, brought the author into immediate fame, and the simple home of the " Jewish Plato " was sought by many of the leaders of Gentile society in Berlin.
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  • Mendelssohn's translation of the Pentateuch into German with a new commentary by himself and others introduced the Jews to more modern ways of thinking.
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  • Two results emanated from Mendelssohn's work.
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  • There are monuments to the philosopher Moses Mendelssohn (born here in 1729), to the poet Wilhelm Muller, father of Professor Max Muller, also a native of the place, to the emperor William I., and an obelisk commemorating the war of 1870-71.
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  • Interesting accounts of the impression produced by the performance at Rome may be found in the first volume of Mendelssohn's letters and in Miss Taylor's Letters from Italy.
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  • It has been musically treated by Handel and Mendelssohn.
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  • Hermann Hettner says that not only Leibnitz, Voltaire and Diderot, but Lessing, Mendelssohn, Wieland and Herder, drew the most stimulating nutriment from Shaftesbury.
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  • The beautiful Hebrew style created a new school of Hebrew poetry, and the Hebrew renaissance which resulted from the career of Moses Mendelssohn owed much to Luzzatto.
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  • There he met Nicolai and Moses Mendelssohn, with whom he formed a close friendship. In 1768 he became preacher or chaplain to the workhouse at Berlin and the neighbouring fishing village of Stralow.
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  • He was one of the pioneers in the revival of Jewish learning which followed on the age of Moses Mendelssohn.
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  • Among Lessing's chief friends during his second residence in Berlin were the philosopher Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786), in association with whom he wrote in 1755 an admirable treatise, Pope ein Metaphysiker 1 tracing sharply the lines which separate the poet from the philosopher.
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  • In youth he had musical ambitions, studied under Mendelssohn and Weinlig at Leipzig, under Loewe at Stettin, and afterwards at Vienna.
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  • In 1 770 he severed his connexion with his orthodox c04eligionists by his critical commentary on the ill oreh Nebuhim of Maimonides, and devoted himself to the study of philosophy on the lines of Wolff and Moses Mendelssohn.
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  • The Briefe fiber die Lehre Spinozas (1785; 2nd ed., much enlarged and with important Appendices, 1789) expressed sharply and clearly Jacobi's strenuous objection to a dogmatic system in philosophy, and drew upon him the vigorous enmity of the Berlin clique, led by Moses Mendelssohn.
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  • Behind that again is the academy of art, one wing of which accommodates the industrial art school; and close beside it are the school of technical arts and the conservatoire of music. Between the university library and the new Gewandhaus stands a monument of Mendelssohn (1892).
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  • As a musical centre Leipzig is known all over the world for its excellent conservatorium, founded in 1843 by Mendelssohn.
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  • Schiller and Gellert also resided for a time in Leipzig, and Sebastian Bach and Mendelssohn filled musical posts here.
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  • Among those who used in this way Menasseh's Vindiciae was Moses Mendelssohn.
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  • Mendelssohn wrote two concert pieces for clarinet, basset horn and pianoforte dedicated to father and son Baermann.
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  • A brilliant melodist, colourist and miniaturist, Bizet instinctively composed with the dramatic concision of his heroes Beethoven, Mozart and Mendelssohn.
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  • Nils Franke, piano tutor to the Music in Professional Practice Initiative, will lead his piano quintet in playing the Mendelssohn.
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  • Gumperz or Hess rendered a conspicuous service to Mendelssohn and to the cause of enlightenment in 1754 by introducing him to Lessing.
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  • As a result of his correspondence with Abbt, Mendelssohn resolved to write on the Immortality of the Soul.
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  • Modelled on Plato's dialogue of the samename, Mendelssohn's work possessed some of the charm of its Greek exemplar.
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  • What most impressed the German world was its beauty and lucidity of style - features to which Mendelssohn still owes his popularity as a writer.
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  • So far, Mendelssohn had devoted his talents to philosophy and criticism; now, however, an incident turned the current of his life in the direction of the cause of Judaism.
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  • He shared this with Lessing; in this case, at all events, it is probable that the latter was indebted to Mendelssohn.
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  • But before discussing this matter, we must follow out the consequences of Lavater's intrusion into Mendelssohn's affairs.
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  • The excitement caused by these proceedings led Mendelssohn to publish his most important contribution to the problems connected with the position of Judaism in relation to the general life.
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  • For Mendelssohn's biography the chief sources are Graetz, History of the Jews, vol.
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  • Against the first kind of argument, as formulated by Moses Mendelssohn, Kant advances the objection that, although we may deny the soul extensive quantity, division into parts, yet we cannot refuse to it intensive quantity, degrees of reality; and consequently its existence may be terminated not by decomposition, but by gradual diminution of its powers (or to use the term he coined for the purpose, by elanguescence).
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  • The reign of Louis the Pious (814-840) was, as Graetz puts it, " a golden era for the Jews of his kingdom, such as they had never enjoyed, and were destined never again to enjoy in Europe " - prior, that is, to the age of Mendelssohn.
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  • Moses Mendelssohn, both by his career and by his propaganda, for ever put an end to these conditions; he more than any other man.
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  • On the other hand Mendelssohn by his pragmatic conception of religion (specially in his Jerusalem) weakened the belief of certain minds in the absolute truth of Judaism, and thus his own grandchildren (including the famous musician Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy) as well as later Heine, Borne, Gans and Neander, embraced Christianity.
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  • They proclaim the acceptance of the spirit of Mendelssohn's reconciliation of the Jews to modern life.
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  • Beethoven's Nine Symphonies; Berlioz's " Symphonie fantastique," " Harold en Italie "; Benediction et Serment (Benvenuto Cellini); Danse des Sylphes (Damnation de Faust); Weber's overtures, Der Freischiitz, Euryanthe, Oberon, Jubilee; Beethoven's and Hummel's Septets; Schubert's Divertissement a la Hongroise; Beethoven's Concertos in C minor, G and E flat (orchestra for a second piano); Wagner's Tannhauser overture, march, romance, chorus of pilgrims; Lohengrin, Festzug and Brautlied, Elsa's Brautgang, Elsa's Traum, Lohengrin's Verweiss an Elsa; Fliegender Hollander, Spinnlied; Rienzi, Gebet; Rheingold, Walhall; Meistersinger, " Am stillen Herd "; Tristan, Isolde's Liebestod; Chopin's six Chants Polonais; Meyerbeer's Schillermarsch; Bach's six organ Preludes and Fugues; Prelude and Fugue in G minor; Beethoven, Adelaide; 6 miscellaneous and 6 Geistliche Lieder; Liederkreis; Rossini's Les Soirees musicales; Schubert, 59 songs; Schumann, 13 songs; Mendelssohn, 8 songs; Robert Franz, 13 songs.
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  • With closer contact to the un-oriental West and with the inevitable tendencies of modern western scholarship the Talmud has entered upon a new period, one which, though it may be said to date from the time of Moses Mendelssohn (see Jews, § 48), has reached a more distinctive stage at the present day.
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  • Lessing set about the translation and annotation of it, and Moses Mendelssohn borrowed from Burke's speculation at least one of the most fruitful and important ideas of his own influential theories on the sentiments.
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  • In 1840, Felix Mendelssohn wrote a contata celebrating, of all things, the printing press, and the second chorus is used as the melody for this carol.
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  • Cummings created the song in 1855 after Wesley and Mendelssohn had long passed on.
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  • Wesley had left specific instructions that his words be set to slow, reverent music; Mendelssohn was adamant that his music be for secular use only.
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