This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

mendel

mendel

mendel Sentence Examples

  • I mentioned Gregor Mendel, known as the father of genetics.

    9
    4
  • The researches of Gregor Johann Mendel (1822-1884), abbot of the Augustinian monastery at Briinn, in connexion with peas and other plants, apparently indicate that there is a definite natural law at work in the production of hybrids.

    6
    4
  • Mendel Pass (Botzen to Cles), railway on the E.

    5
    3
  • Mendel for the Constantinople Museum, and the site was ultimately conceded to an American syndicate, for whom H.

    4
    4
  • Mendel, Bulletin de correspondence hellinique, xxv.

    4
    4
  • On the other hand, from the experiments of Mendel and others, we now know that crossbred animals and plants may present all the characters of one of their pure-bred parents, and we also know that the offspring of what are regarded as pure-bred parents sometimes revert to remote, it may be quite different, ancestors.

    3
    6
  • His father's name was Mendel, and he was later on surnamed Mendelssohn (= son of Mendel).

    2
    3
  • Almost every side of zoology has contributed to the theory of evolution, but of special importance are the facts and theories associated with the names of Gregor Mendel, A.

    2
    3
  • His father, Emmanuel Mendel, is said to have been a Jewish pedlar, but August adopted the name of Neander on his baptism as a Christian.

    2
    3
  • Mendel made his chief experiments with cultivated varieties of the self-fertilizing edible pea.

    2
    3
  • It has been maintained that this tendency to a severance of the hybrid stock into its components must favour the persistence of a new character of large volume suddenly appearing in a stock, and the observations of Mendel have been held to favour in this way the views of those who hold that the variations upon which natural selection has acted in the production of new species are not small variations but large and " discontinuous."

    2
    3
  • And finally, there are a series of variations, amongst which no doubt are the mutations of de Vries and the disintegrations and recombinations of the unit factors with which Mendel and his followers have worked, in which the external or environmental factor is most remote from the actual result.

    2
    3
  • Those who have followed up the work of Mendel believe that the qualities of the new individual are a precise selection from and reconstruction of the parental qualities, and that were complete analysis possible, the characters of the new individual could be predicted with chemical accuracy.

    2
    3
  • The conceptions of the disciples of Mendel, amongst whom W.

    2
    3
  • Mendel made his chief experiments with cultivated varieties of the self-fertilizing edible pea.

    2
    3
  • The conceptions of the disciples of Mendel, amongst whom W.

    2
    3
  • All he could do was cross strains of wheat, much in the same fashion as Gregor Mendel did in the 1800s.

    2
    3
  • A fascinating character and an extremely patient experimenter, Mendel was a German friar and scientist who figured out that plants (and presumably animals) had inheritable characteristics.

    2
    3
  • Mendel's observations constitute an ingenious attempt to throw light on the matter, and in the opinion of some biologists have led to the discovery of an important principle.

    0
    0
  • Whatever value is to be attached to Mendel's observation of the breaking up of self-fertilized hybrids of cultivated varieties into the two original parent forms according to the formula " 'PP, 2PN, INN," it cannot be considered as more than a contribution to the extensive investigation of heredity which still remains to be carried out.

    0
    0
  • The attempt to connect Mendel's observation with the structure of the spermcells and egg-cells of plants and animals has already been made.

    0
    0
  • Now we know, from the numerous experiments in heredity which have resulted since the rediscovery of Mendel's principles, that an individual may carry a character in one of two conditions.

    0
    0
  • Bateson, Mendel's Principles of Heredity, a Defence (Cambridge, 1902); W.

    0
    0
  • (New York); "Mendel's Law of Heredity," Science, N.S.

    0
    0
  • Allen, "Mendel's Law and the Heredity of Albinism," Proc. Amer.

    0
    0
  • Bateson, Mendel's Principles of Heredity (Cambridge, 1909); E.

    0
    0
  • embark upon a stroll through the major landmarks in genetics, from Mendel to Monsanto, which have now entered scientific folklore.

    0
    0
  • His father's name was Mendel, and he was later on surnamed Mendelssohn (= son of Mendel).

    0
    0
  • Mendel Dessau was a poor scribe - a writer of scrolls - and his son Moses in his boyhood developed curvature of the spine.

    0
    0
  • Almost every side of zoology has contributed to the theory of evolution, but of special importance are the facts and theories associated with the names of Gregor Mendel, A.

    0
    0
  • His father, Emmanuel Mendel, is said to have been a Jewish pedlar, but August adopted the name of Neander on his baptism as a Christian.

    0
    0
  • Great attention has been given lately to the important experiments upon the results of hybridizing certain cultivated varieties of plants which were published so long ago as 1865, by the Abbe Mendel, but failed to attract notice until thirty-five years later, sixteen years after his death (see Mendelism).

    0
    0
  • Mendel's object was to gain further knowledge as to lsm the result of mixing by cross-fertilization or interbreeding two strains exhibiting diverse characters or structural features.

    0
    0
  • Mendel's observations constitute an ingenious attempt to throw light on the matter, and in the opinion of some biologists have led to the discovery of an important principle.

    0
    0
  • The fact that in the formation of the reproductive cells of the hybrid generation the material which carries the positive quality is not subdivided so as to give a half-quantity to each reproductive cell, but on the contrary is apparently distributed as an undivided whole to half only of the reproductive cells and not at all to the remainder, is the important inference from Mendel's experiments.

    0
    0
  • Whether this inference is applicable to other classes of cases than those studied by Mendel and his followers is a question which is still under investigation.

    0
    0
  • It has been maintained that this tendency to a severance of the hybrid stock into its components must favour the persistence of a new character of large volume suddenly appearing in a stock, and the observations of Mendel have been held to favour in this way the views of those who hold that the variations upon which natural selection has acted in the production of new species are not small variations but large and " discontinuous."

    0
    0
  • Whatever value is to be attached to Mendel's observation of the breaking up of self-fertilized hybrids of cultivated varieties into the two original parent forms according to the formula " 'PP, 2PN, INN," it cannot be considered as more than a contribution to the extensive investigation of heredity which still remains to be carried out.

    0
    0
  • The attempt to connect Mendel's observation with the structure of the spermcells and egg-cells of plants and animals has already been made.

    0
    0
  • The suggestion is obvious that the halving of the number of nuclear threads in the reproductive cells as compared with the number of those present in the ordinary cells of the tissues - a phenomenon which has now been demonstrated as universal - may be directly connected with the facts of segregation of hybrid characters observed by Mendel.

    0
    0
  • Mendel for the Constantinople Museum, and the site was ultimately conceded to an American syndicate, for whom H.

    0
    0
  • Mendel, Bulletin de correspondence hellinique, xxv.

    0
    0
  • Now we know, from the numerous experiments in heredity which have resulted since the rediscovery of Mendel's principles, that an individual may carry a character in one of two conditions.

    0
    0
  • Bateson, Mendel's Principles of Heredity, a Defence (Cambridge, 1902); W.

    0
    0
  • (New York); "Mendel's Law of Heredity," Science, N.S.

    0
    0
  • Allen, "Mendel's Law and the Heredity of Albinism," Proc. Amer.

    0
    0
  • Mendel Pass (Botzen to Cles), railway on the E.

    0
    0
  • The researches of Gregor Johann Mendel (1822-1884), abbot of the Augustinian monastery at Briinn, in connexion with peas and other plants, apparently indicate that there is a definite natural law at work in the production of hybrids.

    0
    0
  • Such mutations are not the product of the environment, but are an outcrop of the constitution of the germinal material of the varying organism, the result either of causes as yet undetected, or of the premutations and eliminations suggested by the work of Mendel (see Mendelism).

    0
    0
  • And finally, there are a series of variations, amongst which no doubt are the mutations of de Vries and the disintegrations and recombinations of the unit factors with which Mendel and his followers have worked, in which the external or environmental factor is most remote from the actual result.

    0
    0
  • Those who have followed up the work of Mendel believe that the qualities of the new individual are a precise selection from and reconstruction of the parental qualities, and that were complete analysis possible, the characters of the new individual could be predicted with chemical accuracy.

    0
    0
  • Bateson, Mendel's Principles of Heredity (Cambridge, 1909); E.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, from the experiments of Mendel and others, we now know that crossbred animals and plants may present all the characters of one of their pure-bred parents, and we also know that the offspring of what are regarded as pure-bred parents sometimes revert to remote, it may be quite different, ancestors.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →