Memory sentence example

memory
  • The memory brought goose bumps to her arms.
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  • The memory gave her resolution.
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  • The memory of it is a joy forever.
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  • It will be the collective memory and experience of the planet.
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  • But as we do them yet again and capture them, we finally can begin to develop a planet-wide memory system.
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  • There's no chance some of the memory is still there?
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  • Her memory of people is remarkable.
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  • It was the second strongest memory in human-Deidre's mind, the day when both of their lives changed.
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  • A young man cowers and cries, perhaps in memory long after his sister is gone.
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  • She was staring at the cake, trying to find some fond memory to shove aside the pictures in her mind when Sarah walked into the room.
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  • I'm on the road once more with only my memory of sweet little Marcia for company.
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  • Yet he couldn't shake the memory of her body against his, the way she'd looked at him last night.
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  • When dealing with the affairs and papers of his dead wife, her memory aroused in him no feeling but pity that she had not known the bliss he now knew.
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  • An elderly dame, too, dwells in my neighborhood, invisible to most persons, in whose odorous herb garden I love to stroll sometimes, gathering simples and listening to her fables; for she has a genius of unequalled fertility, and her memory runs back farther than mythology, and she can tell me the original of every fable, and on what fact every one is founded, for the incidents occurred when she was young.
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  • This memory carried him sadly and sweetly back to those painful feelings of which he had not thought lately, but which still found place in his soul.
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  • Everything I found in books that pleased me I retained in my memory, consciously or unconsciously, and adapted it.
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  • A memorial was erected to his memory at Komarom in 1896.
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  • A monument was erected to his memory in 1825, Lafayette laying the corner-stone.
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  • At Alexandria the noble Hypatia taught, to whose memory her impassioned disciple Synesius, afterwards a bishop, reared a splendid monument.
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  • His mental qualities were - a quick analytic perception, strong logical powers, a tenacious memory, a liberal estimate and tolerance of the opinions of others, ready intuition of human nature; and perhaps his most valuable faculty was rare ability to divest himself of all feeling or passion in weighing motives of persons or problems of state.
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  • So I saw, in real dollars, the cost of computer memory fall to one one-millionth of what it was thirty years ago.
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  • I knew Mr. Henry Drummond, and the memory of his strong, warm hand-clasp is like a benediction.
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  • She cannot know in detail how she was taught, and her memory of her childhood is in some cases an idealized memory of what she has learned later from her teacher and others.
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  • Their language is the memory of the language they hear spoken in their homes.
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  • Those dreadful moments he had lived through at the executions had as it were forever washed away from his imagination and memory the agitating thoughts and feelings that had formerly seemed so important.
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  • If it did it was only as a pleasant memory of the distant past.
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  • The farther I go back in memory, or what is the same thing the farther I go forward in my judgment, the more doubtful becomes my belief in the freedom of my action.
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  • The ultra sound photo brought back a vivid memory of Alex watching the screen as the baby moved in her womb.
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  • For the first time the memory of how he reacted when she told him she was pregnant wasn't a painful one.
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  • That he was an unlucky jerk and his loss of memory was probably a good thing in the long pull?
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  • It's my last memory of the immortal world until I returned a day ago.
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  • Better he should think it was a sad memory than to think she was afraid of ghosts.
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  • She searched her memory for where she might've dumped the keys last night.
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  • Carlyle's memory recalled the Porteous Riots of 1736, and less remotely his friendship with Adam Smith, David Hume, and John Home, the dramatist, for witnessing the performance of whose tragedy Douglas He Was Censured In 1757.
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  • Events which greatly affected the physical condition of the human race, or were of a nature to make a deep impression on the minds of the rude inhabitants of the earth, might be vaguely transmitted through several ages by traditional narrative; but intervals of time, expressed by abstract numbers, and these constantly varying besides, would soon escape the memory.
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  • If Crawford "refreshed his memory by the letter," he exposed himself, and the entire case, by copying whole passages, often with few verbal changes.
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  • Experiments made by a person who possesses a good memory seem to show that the thing is very possible, especially if Darnley revised Crawford's notes.
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  • His memory is still cherished in the district, for he conferred on it the title of Gefiirstete Grafschaft, spent much time in it, and erected in the chief church of Innsbruck a sumptuous monument as his tomb.
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  • In many subjects, the written examinations test memory rather than capacity.
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  • But it is important to consider it by itself, as showing us what impress the Master had made on the memory of one disciple who had been almost constantly by His side.
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  • In a large public park there is a bronze monument in memory of the soldiers of Peru who died in the Civil War.
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  • My memory is a big part of who I am and I have no desire to trade any of it away.
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  • These are the fainter images produced by repeated sensations, the " ideas " resulting from previous " impressions "- sensations at second-hand as it were, which are stored up in memory, and which a general name serves to recall.
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  • None the less his writings were committed to memory and remained the textbooks of Epicureanism to the last.
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  • Sloane's memory survives more by his judicious investments than by anything that he contributed to the subject matter of natural science or even of his own profession.
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  • Next came the strange scene at Canossa which burned itself into the memory of Europe.
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  • It was the memory of the Empire which stirred his blood; from the beginning of his reign he looked forward to securing the Lombard and the imperial crowns.
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  • In his public speeches the emperor repeatedly expressed his reverence for am the memory of his grandfather, and his determination to continue his policy; but he also repudiated the attempt of the extreme Conservatives to identify him with their party.
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  • It is so called in memory of Idris Gawr, celebrated in the Triads as one of the three "Gwyn Serenyddion," or "Happy Astronomers," of Wales, who is traditionally supposed to have made his observations on this peak.
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  • Patmore is one of the few Victorian poets of whom it may confidently be predicted that the memory of his greater achievements will outlive all consideration of occasional lapses from taste and dignity.
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  • Layamon, who in his translation of Wace treats his original much as Wace treated Geoffrey, says that there was a tradition that she had drowned herself, and that her memory and that of Mordred were hateful in every land, so that none would offer prayer for their souls.
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  • The memory of Gandersheim will long be preserved by its literary memorials.
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  • He gave a code of municipal law to Vienna, and rights to other towns, welcomed the Minnesingers to his brilliant court, and left to his subjects an enduring memory of valour and wisdom.
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  • In the first volume a chapter "De plantis in genere" contains an account of all the anatomical and physiological knowledge of the time regarding plants, with the recent speculations and discoveries of Caesalpinus, Grew, Malpighi and Jung; and Cuvier and Dupetit Thouars, declaring that it was this chapter which gave acceptance and authority to these authors' works, say that "the best monument that could be erected to the memory of Ray would be the republication of this part of his work separately."
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  • On some early occasions, however, he committed his speech to memory.
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  • Mr Aldis counselled him not to learn his speeches, but to write out and commit to memory certain passages and the peroration.
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  • You may almost hear the beating of his wings," he said, and concluded with an appeal to the prime minister that moved the House as it had never been moved within living memory.
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  • In some instances, indeed, he may have relied too much on his memory.
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  • All pupils were taught to recite portions of the Koran, and a proportion of the scholars learnt to read and write Arabic and a little simple arithmetic. Those pupils who succeeded in committing to memory the whole of the Koran were regarded as fiki (learned in Mahommedan law), and as such escaped liability to military conscription.
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  • They have a remarkable quickness of apprehension, a ready wit, a retentive memory, combined, however, with religious pride and hypocrisy, and a disregard for the truth.
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  • It may be questioned whether it was due to a wave of enthusiasm amongst the priests and people, leading them to rededicate the monuments in the name of their deliverer, or a somewhat insane desire of the king to perpetuate his own memory in a singularly unfortunate manner.
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  • But signs of associative memory are almost, if not entirely, wanting.
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  • The effect of thus reducing the excitant action of the environment is to give consciousness over more to mere revivals by memory, and gradually consciousness lapses.
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  • Actions of great complexity and delicacy of adjustment are daily executed by each of us without what is ordinarily understood as volition, and without more than a mere shred of memory attached thereto.
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  • Two theories of a physiological nature have been proposed to account for the separation of the complex reactions of these conditions of hypnotism from volition and from memory.
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  • In later times forest culture was added, and the Gerard Adriaan van Swieten schools of forestry, agriculture and horticulture were established by Major van Sweiten in memory of his son.
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  • Previously to 793 there lay between Jutland and England a sea which no keel had traversed within the memory of man.
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  • Originating in the common sentiment of humanity, which desires by some visible memorial to honour and perpetuate the memory of the dead, it was practised alike by peoples of high and of low development, and continued through all the stages of culture that preceded the introduction of Christianity.
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  • The monument erected to his memory in the parish church of Gunning Hill, Berks, bears a fine inscription by Canning.
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  • In Deuteronomy the command is based on the duty of humanity to servants and the memory of Egyptian bondage.
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  • Farther out is Riverview Park (219 acres), in which is the Allegheny Astronomical Observatory, and elsewhere are a soldiers' monument and a monument (erected by Andrew Carnegie) in memory of Colonel Johnes Anderson.
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  • The brilliant promise of his early years; the haunting memory of the crime by which he had obtained the power to realize his ideals; and, in the end, the terrible ' Apercu des idees de l'Empereur, Martens IV.
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  • To Malocello's enterprise, moreover, it is probable that Petrarch (born 1304) alludes when he tells how, within the memory of his parents, an armed fleet of Genoese penetrated to the "Fortunatae"; this passage some would refer, without sufficient authority, to the expedition of 1291.
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  • How the mental faculties are blunted by scholasticism and mere memory work must be seen to be believed; such an education is enough to spoil the best head.
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  • Hillel lived in the memory of posterity chiefly as the great teacher who enjoined and practised the virtues of charity, humility and true piety.
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  • Omissions of a few passages written from memory at a time of profound nervous depression would have altered the whole character of the book.
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  • The Scots had so handled their enemies that they could not or dared not pursue their advantage; on the other hand, it was long indeed before the memory of Flodden ceased to haunt the Scots and deter them from invading England in force.
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  • But its twin towers, known as the Sisters from the tradition that they were built by a Benedictine abbess of Faversham in memory of her sister, were preserved by Trinity House as a conspicuous landmark.
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  • The recumbent monument placed upon the spot, and the windows in the chapter-house of the abbey, one of them a gift from Queen Victoria, were a tribute to his memory from friends of every class in England and America.
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  • Cicero had already compared the sites consecrated by the memory of some illustrious name with those hallowed by recollections of a loved one.
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  • It is only pious memory that draws the Protestant to the sites consecrated by ecclesiastical history.
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  • It is probable that the tradition of battles between the Phrygians and the Amazons on the banks of the Sangarius preserves the memory of a struggle between the two races and the victory of the Phryges.
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  • The catastrophe seems to have deeply impressed the Greek mind, and the memory of it was preserved.
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  • In the Buddhist adaptation of this theory no soul, no consciousness, no memory, goes over from one body to the other.
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  • For a generation or two the books so put together were handed down by memory, though probably written memoranda were also used.
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  • It is at most a string of passages, drawn up in similar form to assist the memory, and intended, not to be read, but to be learnt by heart.
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  • The aid which they afford to memory is no longer required in an age in which books of reference abound.
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  • It was precisely as a help to memory that they were found so useful in the early Buddhist times, when the books were all learnt by heart, and had never as yet been written.
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  • Verses were helpful to the memory.
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  • It is quite possible that the memory of the early disciples, highly trained as it was, enabled them to preserve a substantially true record of some of these speeches, and of the circumstances in which they were uttered.
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  • Pasteur prosecuted his investigations into the silkworm disease at Alais, and the town has dedicated a bust to his memory.
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  • In it we see that Hubert in 708 succeeded Lambert in the see of Maestricht (Tongres), and that he erected a basilica to his memory.
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  • In his later years he expressed his views in a weekly journal, The Farmer's Sun, and published in 5904 My Memory of Gladstone, while occasional letters to the Spectator showed that he had lost neither his interest in English politics and social questions nor his remarkable gifts of style.
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  • At their worst, even with venal examiners (and additional fees were often offered as a bribe), Rashdall regards these examinations (at the end of the 13th century) as probably " less of a farce than the pass examinations of Oxford and Cambridge almost within the memory of persons now living."
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  • Owing to a prevailing confusion between tests of memory and tests of capacity, the allowance for chance fairly applied to the former is apt to be unduly extended to the latter.
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  • In applying tests of memory, it may be legitimate to allow a candidate to pass who answers correctly from 30 to 50% of the questions; such an allowance if applied to a test of capacity, such as the performance of a sum in addition, the solution of triangles by means of trigonometrical tables, or the translation of an easy passage from a foreign language, appears to be irrational.
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  • Examinations as tests of the knowledge of isolated facts are necessarily of relatively small value, because the memory of such facts is transient; and memorization of a large number of facts for examination purposes is generally admitted to be specially transient; the " knowledge-test," considered apart from a test of capacity, is in fact not a test of permanent knowledge, but of the power of retaining facts for a length of time which it is impossible to estimate and which with some candidates extends over a few weeks only.
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  • He was martyred on the eve of the triumph of Christianity, his shrine was reared near the scene of a great Greek legend (Perseus and Andromeda), and his relics when removed from Lydda, where many pilgrims had visited them, to Zorava in the Hauran served to impress his fame not only on the Syrian population, but on their Moslem conquerors, and again on the Crusaders, who in grateful memory of the saint's intervention on their behalf at Antioch built a new cathedral at Lydda to take the place of the church destroyed by the Saracens.
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  • Religion in this shape is the nearest step to the stage of absolute knowledge; and this absolute knowledge- " the spirit knowing itself as spirit " - is not something which leaves these other forms behind but the full comprehension of them as the organic constituents of its empire; " they are the memory and the sepulchre of its history, and at the same time the actuality, truth and certainty of its throne."
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  • If memory is lacking as a link between the different lives, this only shows that memory is not of the substance of the soul.
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  • A strand of wampum, consisting of purple and white shell-beads or a belt woven with figures formed by beads of different colours, operated on the principle of associating a particular fact with a particular string or figure, thus giving a serial arrangement to the facts as well as fidelity to the memory.
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  • The cultivation of tea in India began within the memory of men still living, and now has replaced indigo as the chief article for European capital, more particularly in Assam.
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  • But the invasion of Timur left no permanent impress upon the history of India, except in so far as its memory fired the imagination of Baber, the founder of the Mogul dynasty.
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  • Goree was first occupied by the Dutch, who took possession of it early in the 17th century and called it Goeree or Goedereede, in memory of the island on their own coast now united with Overflakkee.
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  • A monument to his memory was erected on Calton Hill.
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  • Caelius writes in a breezy, school-boy style; the Latinity of Plancus is Ciceronian in character; the letter of Sulpicius to Cicero on the death of Tullia is a masterpiece of style; Matius writes a most dignified letter justifying his affectionate regard for Caesar's memory.
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  • Its distinctive name la Real, " the Royal," was conferred in memory of its capture by Alphonso XI.
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  • But he thought that inferences other than syllogism are imperfect; that analogical inference is rhetorical induction; and that induction, through the necessary preliminary of syllogism and the sole process of ascent from sense, memory and experience to the principles of science, is itself neither reasoning nor science.
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  • The ministration to memory, aided by registering and arranging the data, of observation and experiment in tables of instances of agreement, difference and concomitant variations.
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  • From studying this succession of empirical logicians, we cannot doubt that sense, memory and experience are the real origin of inference, analogical, inductive and deductive.
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  • Again, since sense is the origin of memory and experience, memorial and experiential judgments are categorical and existential judgments, which so far as they report sensory judgments are always true.
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  • Finally, since sense, memory and experience are the origin of inference, primary inference is categorical and existential, starting from sensory, memorial and experiential judgments as premises, and proceeding to inferential judgments as conclusions, which are categorical and existential, and are true, so far as they depend on sense, memory and experience.
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  • Memory, however, is not that idea, but involves a judgment that there previously existed the hot now represented by the idea, which is about the sensible thing beyond the conceived idea; and the cause of this memorial judgment is past sense and present memory.
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  • So sense, memory and experience, the sum of sense and memory, though requiring conception, are the causes of the experiential judgment that there exist and have existed many similar, sensible things, and these sensory, memorial and experiential judgments about the existence of past and present sensible things beyond conceived ideas become the particular premises of primary inference.
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  • The real order is sensation and sensory judgment, conception, memory and memorial judgment, experience and experiential judgment, inference, inferential judgment, inferential conception.
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  • Conception begins as a condition of memory, and after a long continuous process of inference ends in mere ideation.
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  • What knowledge do we get by sense, memory and experience, the first mental causes of judgment?
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  • How does the whole process from sense to inference discover the real truth of judgments, which are true so far as they signify things known by sense, memory, experience and inference?
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  • It is not the second business of logic to direct us how out of conceptions to form judgments signified by propositions, because the real causes of judgments are sense, memory, experience and inference.
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  • Lastly, the science of inference is not indeed the science of sensation, memory and experience, but at the same time it is the science of using those mental operations as data of inference; and, if logic does not show how analogical and inductive inferences directly, and deductive inferences indirectly, arise from experience, it becomes a science of mere thinking without knowledge.
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  • It is clear then that a man's metaphysics and psychology must colour his logic. It is accordingly necessary to the logician to know beforehand the general distinctions and principles of things in metaphysics, and the mental operations of sense, conception, memory and experience in psychology, so as to discover the processes of inference from experience about things in logic.
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  • Logic has to consider the things we know, the minds by which we know them from sense, memory and experience to inference, and the sciences which systematize and extend our knowledge of things; and having considered these facts, the logician must make such a science of inference as will explain the power and the poverty of human knowledge.
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  • Yet memory is not mere conception, as Aristotle, and Mill after him, have perceived.
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  • Originally such judgments arise from sensory judgments followed by ideas, and are judgments of memory after sense that something sensible existed, e.g.
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  • These are conclusions which primarily are inferred from sensory and memorial judgments; and so far as inference starts from sense of something sensible in the present, and from memory after sense of something sensible in the past, and concludes similar things, inferential judgments are indirect beliefs in being and in existence beyond ideas.
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  • So far as it depends on memory, an inferential judgment presupposes memorial ideas in its data; and so far as it infers universal classes and laws, it produces general ideas.
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  • All these are beliefs in being and existence, and this existential belief is first in sense, and afterwards transferred to memory and inference.
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  • In short, a primary judgment is a belief in something existing apart from our idea of it; and not because we have an idea of it, or by comparing an idea with, or referring an idea to, reality; but because we have a sensation of it, or a memory of it or an inference of it.
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  • By " all " we mean every individual whatever of a kind; and when from the experience of sense and memory we start with particular judgments of existence, and infer universal judgments of existence and scientific laws, we further mean those existing individuals which we have experienced, and every individual whatever of the kind which exists.
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  • This makes them omit sensory judgments, and count only those which require ideas, and even general ideas expressed in general terms. Sigwart, for example, gives as instances of our most elementary judgments, " This is Socrates," " This is snow "- beliefs in things existing beyond ourselves which require considerable inferences from many previous judgments of sense and memory.
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  • A judgment is true whenever it is a belief that a thing is determined as it is known to be by sense, or by memory after sense, or by inference from sense, however indirect the inference may be, and even when in the form of inference of non-existence it extends consequently from primary to secondary judgments.
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  • Consequently, as knowledge is attainable by sense, memory and inference, truth is also attainable, because, though we cannot test what we know by something else, we can test what we judge and assert by what we know.
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  • It is difficult to connect this historical event with the legend of St John of Nepomuk, who was canonized by the church of Rome in 1729, mainly by the influence of the Jesuits, who hoped that this new cult would obliterate the memory of Hus.
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  • On the slope of Lookout Hill (185 ft.) within the park is a shaft erected in 1895 to the memory of the Maryland soldiers who valiantly defended the rear of the American army at the battle of Long Island.
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  • In Fort Greene Park is a monument to the memory of the soldiers who died in the British prison ships during the War of Independence, many of them having been buried in a vault below.
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  • It may be said to be a process of unification, whereby the centres of volition, consciousness and active memory are systematically shifted upwards from the lower to the higher "principles" until they have become firmly established in the "Buddhi," or "sixth principle."
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  • The relatives and friends then hand the priest a list of the contributions and charities which have been subscribed in memory of the deceased, which concludes the ceremony of "rising from mourning," or "the resurrection of the dead."
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  • On each successive anniversary of the death of a Parsee funeral ceremonies are performed in his memory.
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  • An iron framework is erected in the house, in which shrubs are planted and flowers cultivated to bloom in memory of the departed.
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  • The actual site of the battle, however, is about half a mile from the little town of Angri, and its memory is still vaguely preserved by the name Pozzo dei Goti (well of the Goths).
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  • Frederick is the seat of the Maryland school for the deaf and dumb and of the Woman's College of Frederick (1893; formerly the Frederick Female Seminary, opened in 1843), which in 1907-1908 had 212 students, 121 of whom were in the Conservatory of Music. Francis Scott Key and Roger Brooke Taney were buried here, and a beautiful monument erected to the memory of Key stands at the entrance to Mount Olivet cemetery.
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  • From his youth he stored up in his memory the sacred words of the Koran, the traditions of the Prophet, the verses of the old poets and the stories of the ancient wars of the Arabs.
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  • France had its traditions of the destruction of serpents by the early missionaries (Deane, 283 seq.), and the memory possibly survived at Luchon in the Pyrenees, where the clergy and people celebrated the eve of St John by burning live serpents.
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  • Her contemporaries almost unanimously record her excellence and womanly virtues; and by Dean Swift, no mild critic, she is invariably spoken of with respect, and named in his will as of "ever glorious, immortal and truly pious memory, the real nursing-mother of her kingdoms."
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  • These contractions, however, may prove too great a strain upon the eyesight or the memory, and thus become a hindrance instead of a help. This was apparently the case in Greek, for though the early printers cast types for all the contractions of the Greek MSS.
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  • The thatched house with crow-stepped gables in Church Street, in which Hugh Miller the geologist was born, still stands, and a statue has been erected to his memory.
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  • The eloquence of the Italian humanist has bestowed a not entirely merited aureole on the memory of Jerome of Prague.
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  • Foremost among the city's many monuments is that erected to the memory of George Washington.
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  • In Pennsylvania Avenue, at the foot of Capitol Hill, is a Monument of Peace (by Franklin Simmons) in memory of officers, seamen and marines of the U.S. Navy killed in the Civil War.
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  • Considering that the divergence of two alphabets (like the difference of two dialects) requires both time and familiar use, we may gather from these facts that writing was well known in Greece early in the 7th century B.e.2 The rise of prose composition in the 6th century B.C. has been thought to mark the time when memory was practically superseded by writing as a means of preserving literature - the earlier use of letters being confined to short documents, such as lists of names, treaties, laws, &c. This conclusion, however, is by no means necessary.
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  • It may be that down to comparatively late times poetry was not commonly read, but was recited from memory.
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  • Arguments have been founded upon the descriptions of the blind singers in the Odyssey, with their songs inspired directly by the Muse; upon the appeals of the poet to the Muses, especially in such a place as the opening of the Catalogue; upon the Catalogue itself, which is a kind of historical document put into verse to help the memory; upon the shipowner in the Odyssey, who has " a good memory for his cargo," &c. It may be answered, however, that much of this is traditional, handed down from the time when all poetry was unwritten.
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  • He assailed the memory of Athanasius with a virulence at least equal to that with which orthodox divines had treated Arius.
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  • He modestly declined the title of pater patriae; the memory of Claudius, and that of his own father Domitius were duly honoured.
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  • The Roman populace for a long time reverenced his memory as that of an open-handed patron, and in Greece the recollections of his magnificence, and his enthusiasm for art, were still fresh when the traveller Pausanias visited the country a century later.
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  • As a structure composed of diverF ill-connected parts it fell to pieces at its builder's death, leaving little but the incubus of a memory, the fascination of a mighty name, to dominate the mind of medieval Europe.
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  • How then are we to account for memory and the principles of necessity, similarity, universality?
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  • The legend was already very old and the festival "nobis omni tempore celeberrima"; but, as all written documents had disappeared since the burning of the early church erected over the sacred bones, the preacher could only appeal to the continuous and careful memory of the society to which he belonged (nostrates).
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  • There is a statue in the town in memory of Louis IX.
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  • Its endowment is attributed to Edward IV., in memory of his father Richard, duke of York, who fell at the battle of Wakefield (1460).
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  • The House of Commons voted a public monument to his memory, which was erected in Saint Paul's cathedral, London.
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  • His official knowledge was considerable; and it would be unjust to his memory to ignore the praises of his contemporaries or his knowledge of his country's commercial interests.
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  • Finland was on the whole prosperous and progressive, and his statue in the great square in front of the cathedral and the senate house in Helsingfors testifies to the regard in which his memory is cherished by his Finnish subjects.
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  • One of Alexander III.'s first acts was to confirm " the constitution which was granted to the grand-duchy of Finland by His Majesty the emperor Alexander Pavlovich of most glorious memory, and developed with the consent of the estates of Finland by our dearly beloved father of blessed memory the emperor Alexander Nicolaievich."
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  • All human knowledge, it is there laid down, may be referred to man's memory or imagination or reason.
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  • For long after Photius's death his memory was held in no special honour by his countrymen.
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  • Something of the imposing unity of his work was also, no doubt, due to an extraordinary power of memory, which enabled Millet to paint (like Horace Vernet) without a model; he could recall with precision the smallest details of attitudes or gestures which he proposed to represent.
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  • The view has little in its favour, although memory played a more important part then than now.
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  • The library of 1500 volumes which he bequeathed to the clergy of the diocese is housed in a building with an outside stair, standing near the cathedral, and the Bishop's Walk by the river also perpetuates his memory.
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  • Tregear's Maori-Polynesian Comparative Dictionary shows how the word and its derivatives are used to express thought, memory, emotion, desire, will - in short, psychic energy of all kinds.
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  • He died at Chislehurst on the 9th of November 1623, and was buried in Westminster Abbey, where a monument now stands to his memory.
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  • He was remarkable for his godliness, his enthusiasm for knowledge, and his prodigious memory.
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  • His other writings include A Poem Dedicated to the Memory of the Reverend and Excellent Mr Urian Oakes (1682); The Present State of New England (1690); The Life of the Renowned John Eliot (1691), later included in Book III.
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  • The memory of what is told in Neh.
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  • The chief incidents and episodes would be deeply graven in the popular memory; and it is the poet's function to make the past live again.
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  • But gradually this imperfect correspondence is improved, and the idea passes over again into the state of unconscious or organic memory.
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  • Will, according to Mr Spencer, is only another aspect of what is reason, memory or feeling - the difference lying in the fact that as will the nascent excitation (ideal motion) is conceived as passing into complete or full motion.
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  • The obloquy which thus gathered round Spinoza in the later years of his life remained settled upon his memory for a full hundred years after his death.
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  • In front of the stock exchange is a monument in memory of the 257 settlers killed in the Matabele rebellion of 1896, and at the junction of two of the principal streets is a colossal bronze statue of Cecil Rhodes.
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  • Of singularly alert faculties, with a remarkable knowledge of the men and history of his country, and an extraordinary memory, his masterful talent for politics and state-craft, together with his captivating manner and engaging personality, gave him, for nearly two decades, an unrivalled hold upon the fealty and affection of his party.
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  • On the motion of the Estate of Peasants, which had a long memory for aristocratic abuses, the question of the recovery of the alienated crown lands was brought before the Riksdag, and, despite the stubborn opposition of the magnates, a resolution of the Diet directed that all countships, baronies, domains, manors and other estates producing an annual rent of more than 70 per annum should revert to the Crown.
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  • Ex-President Pinto died three years later in Valparaiso, leaving a memory respected and admired by all political parties in his country.
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  • This tenacity of the Saga stands in the sharpest contrast with the fact that the historical memory of the Persian is extremely defective.
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  • Only in Persia itself, so far as we can judge from a few scanty traces, the national character of the religion seems to have survived among the people side by side with the memory of their old imperial position.
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  • It is, however, to be regretted that this monarchs memory is tarnished by more than one dark deed.
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  • Like the Greek drama and the mysteries of the European middle ages, it is the offspringof purely religious ceremony, which for centuries has been performed annually during the first ten days of the month Muharramthe recital of mournful lamentations in memory of the tragic fate of the house of the caliph All, the hero of the Shiitic Persians.
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  • On the green stand a monument erected by the state in 1799 to the memory of the minute-men who fell in that engagement, a drinking fountain surmounted by a bronze statue (1900, by Henry Hudson Kitson) of Captain John Parker, who was in command of the minute-men, and a large boulder, which marks the position of the minute-men when they were fired upon by the British.
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  • He thus had the opportunity of impressing the empress with his brilliant gifts, the most remarkable of which were exquisite manners, a marvellous memory and a clear and pregnant style.
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  • A monument to his memory stands on the banks of the Clyde, at Dunglass, near Bowling.
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  • His vast learning was the result of a powerful memory and unwearied industry, and he lacked the creative imagination necessary to mould this material into new forms. He was a powerful debater, but his victories were those of a dialectician rather than a convincing reasoner, and in him depth of insight and conviction were ill replaced by the controversial violence characteristic of the age.
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  • Halifax, however, concludes by desiring to moderate the roughness of his picture by emphasizing the excellence of his intellect and memory and his mechanical talent, by deprecating a too censorious judgment and by dwelling upon the disadvantages of his bringing up, the difficulties and temptations of his position, and on the fact that his vices were those common to human frailty.
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  • In his memory a Karl- Schwarz-stiftung was founded in connexion, with the theological faculty at Jena.
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  • Whatever the truth or fable of the first forty years of his life, he had certainly been a close and accurate observer, and had made himself acquainted with many curious and little-known phenomena, which he had stored up in a most tenacious memory.
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  • He trusted much to his memory, which was occasionally treacherous.
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  • In the second satire, the lines 29 seq., " Qualis erat nuper tragico pollutus adulter Concubitu," show that the memory of one of the foulest scandals of the reign of Domitian was still fresh in the minds of men.
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  • He was not remarkable at school for application to his studies, though his wonderful memory enabled him to make good progress in them; he frequently played truant and was whipped for it, robbed orchards, and indulged in other questionable schoolboy freaks; nor did he always come out of his scrapes with honour and a character for truthfulness.
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  • Like all materialists, the Stoics can only distinguish the sensible from the intelligible as Degrees of thinking when the external object is present (alrOfivEr6at) and thinking when it is absent The product of the latter kind includes memory (though this is, upon a strict analysis, something intermediate), and conceptions or general notions, under which were confusedly classed the products of the imaginative faculty.
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  • The Jews paid taxes on practically every business transaction, besides a special poll-tax of 30 dinheiros in memory of the 30 pieces of silver paid to Judas Iscariot; and for this reason they were protected by the Crown.
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  • The Emeline Fairbanks Memorial Library (1882) contained 30,000 volumes in 1910, housed in a building erected in 1903 by Mr Crawford Fairbanks in memory of his mother.
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  • On the promontory was an ancient temple of Apollo Actius, which was enlarged by Augustus, who also, in memory of the battle, instituted or renewed the quinquennial games called Actia or Ludi Actiaci.
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  • Perhaps the most interesting lines in the whole poem are those in which Rutilius assails the memory of "dire Stilicho," as he names him.
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  • According to Herodotus, they were independent in his time, and had never been conquered within the memory of man.
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  • Its present designation was bestowed upon it in memory of Bari in Italy (where she was born) by Bona Sforza, the consort of Sigismund I.
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  • The Langobards, German in their faults and in their strength, but coarser, at least at first, than the Germans whom the Italians had known, the Goths of Theodoric and Totila, found themselves continually in the presence of a subject population very different from anything which the other Teutonic conquerors met with among the provincials - like them, exhausted, dispirited, unwarlike, but with the remains and memory of a great civilization round them, intelligent, subtle, sensitive, feeling themselves infinitely superior in experience and knowledge to the rough barbarians whom they could not fight, and capable of hatred such as only cultivated races can nourish.
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  • But in two ways especially the energetic race which grew out of the fusion of Langobards and Italians between the 9th and the 12th centuries has left the memory of itself.
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  • Charles proved one of the King reatest rulers of Bohemia, where his memory is still greatest y revered.
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  • George of Podebrad, the only Hussite king of Bohemia, has always, with Charles IV., been the ruler of Bohemia whose memory has most endeared itself to his countrymen.
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  • Seven years afterwards he took the cross, thereby giving St Louis a valuable follower, and supplying himself with the occasion of an eternal memory.
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  • He was buried in the latter town, in the chancel of Holy Trinity church, where a monument was erected to his memory.
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  • By some modern authorities he is supposed to have been the founder of Thuggism, the Thugs having a special reverence for his memory.
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  • Here is an open plot of ground, Donkin Reserve, containing the lighthouse and a stone pyramid with an inscription in memory of Elizabeth, wife of Sir Rufane Donkin, described as "one of the most perfect of human beings, who has given her name to the town below."
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  • We see at once that the Goths hold altogether a different place in Spanish memory from that which they hold in Italian memory.
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  • In McDowell Park there is a monument to the memory of Dr Ephraim McDowell (1771-1830), who after 1795 lived in Danville, and is famous for having performed in 1809 the first entirely successful operation for the removal of an ovarian tumour.
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  • After his death his friends founded, in perpetuation of his memory, a Newmarch Lectureship in economic science and statistics at University College, London.
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  • A mausoleum was erected by national subscription, and in 1887 a statue, overlooking the Danube, was erected to his memory.
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  • Although it is certain that the four great geographical landmarks which to-day serve to keep Hudson's memory alive, namely the Hudson Bay, Strait, Territory and River, had repeatedly been visited and even drawn on maps and charts before he set out on his voyages, yet he deserves to take a very high rank among northern navigators for the mere extent of his discoveries and the success with which he pushed them beyond the limits of his predecessors.
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  • Among the best known is the patriotic Deutschland, Deutschland fiber Alles, composed in 1841 on the island of Heligoland, where a monument was erected in 1891 to his memory (subsequently destroyed).
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  • Pseudopremonitions, due to hallucinatory memory, are not unknown; there is also some ground for holding that crystal-gazers are able to perceive incidents which are happening at a distance from them.
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  • In his hours of recreation he climbed the hills or traced the Sorgues from its fountain under those tall limestone cliffs, while odes and sonnets to Madonna Laura were committed from his memory to paper.
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  • He built at Athens a great race-course of Pentelic marble, and a splendid musical theatre, called the Odeum in memory of his wife Regilla, which still exists.
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  • History itself, this double subject, the science and the art combined, begins with the dawn of memory and the invention of speech.
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  • Family chronicles preserved the memory of heroic ancestors whose deeds in the earliest age would have passed into the keeping of the bards.
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  • St Paul was a hard hitter, and Jewish Christians, who still clung to James and Peter as the only true pillars of the Church, are not likely to have cherished any love for his memory.
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  • About this time began a failure in his powers, especially in his memory.
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  • His affection for the memory of his mother and dissatisfaction with his own innovation on ancient customs thus blended together; and we can sympathize with his tears.
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  • He made an effort to destroy the memory of the sage from off the earth, consigning to the flames all the ancient books from which he drew his rules and examples, (save one), and burying alive hundreds of scholars who were ready to swear by his name.
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  • The phenomena of memory, as to both persons and places, is strong in animals, as is manifest by their recognition of their masters, and their returning at once to habits of which, though disused for many years, their brain has not lost the stored-up impressions.
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  • In the growth of systematic civilization, the art of writing has had an influence so intense, that of all tests to distinguish the barbaric from the civilized state, none is so generally effective as this, whether they have but the failing link with the past which mere memory furnishes, or can have recourse to written records of past history and written constitutions of present order.
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  • Strange shapes of hills and rocks, rare plants and animals, unusual faces and figures of men, questionable smiles and expressions, whether beautiful or grotesque, far-fetched objects and curiosities, were things he loved to pore upon and keep in memory.
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  • A bust to his memory was erected in the Poet's Corner in Westminster Abbey in 1884.
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  • The original reason for this was the reverence monies attaching to the memory of the Confessor, whose shrine and monu- stands in the central chapel behind the high altar.
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  • At the same time he made a careful study of the Bible, committing to memory the entire New Testament both in English and in Greek.
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  • A monument was erected to his memory on the shores of the lake, and the Russian government changed the name of the town of Karakol to Przhevalsk in his honour.
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  • In 1346 the town had to defend itself against the English, who again besieged it in 1433 The siege which it suffered in 1472 at the hands of the duke of Burgundy was rendered famous by the heroism of the women, under the leadership of Jeanne Hachette, whose memory is still celebrated by a procession on the 14th of October (the feast of Ste Angadreme), in which the women take precedence of the men.
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  • Elne, the ancient Illiberis, was named Helena by the emperor Constantine in memory of his mother.
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  • We have quoted the informal tribute of Racine; but it should not be forgotten that Racine, in discharge of his duty as respondent at the Academical reception of Thomas Corneille, pronounced upon the memory of Pierre perhaps the noblest and most just tribute of eulogy that ever issued from the lips of a rival.
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  • The inherent difficulties of this task were immensely enhanced by the fact that Euler was virtually blind, and had to carry all the elaborate computations it involved in his memory.
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  • He was much indebted to an uncommon memory, which seemed to retain every idea that was conveyed to it, either from reading or meditation.
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  • In all the countries through which he travelled his memory is cherished by the native tribes who, almost without exception, treated Livingstone as a superior being; his treatment of them was always tender, gentle and gentlemanly.
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  • His memory was remarkable, and if the whole of the Eddic poems had been lost, he could have written them down from memory.
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  • A Machiavellian tract on the fundamental maxims of Venetian policy (Opinione come debba governarsi la repubblica di Venezia), used by his adversaries to blacken his memory, is undoubtedly not his.
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  • On our action now depends the question whether our children shall curse or bless us; whether we shall live in their memory as promoters of civil strife, with all its miserable consequences, or as joint architects of a happy, prosperous and united state.
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  • Few sovereigns have left behind so odious a memory.
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  • This ceremony, which, as we shall presently see, is part of the omra, is generally said to be performed in memory of Hagar, who ran to and fro between the two eminences vainly seeking water for her son.
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  • The cottage in which Leyden was born is now the property of the Edinburgh Border Counties Association, and a monument to his memory has been erected in the centre of Denholm green.
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  • Lexington was the home of Henry Clay from 1797 until his death in 1852, and in his memory a monument has been erected, consisting of a magnesian-limestone column (about 120 ft.) in the Corinthian style and surmounted by a statue of Clay, the head of which was torn off in 1902 by a thunderbolt.
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  • In 1715 William Mackintosh of Borlum (1662-1743) and his force of Jacobite Highlanders captured the Citadel, of which only the name of Citadel Street and the archway in Couper Street have preserved the memory.
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  • In Monument Square near the post-office and the court-house is the white marble Battle Monument, erected in 1815 to the memory of those who had fallen in defence of the city in the previous year; it is 52 ft.
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  • A small monument erected to the memory of Edgar Allan Poe stands in the Westminster Presbyterian churchyard, where he is buried; there is another monument to his memory in Druid Hill Park.
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  • Father Souciet entered the field in defence of Freret; and in consequence of this controversy Sir Isaac was induced to prepare his larger work, which was published in 1728, after his death, and entitled The Chronology of Ancient Kingdoms amended, to which is prefixed a short Chronicle from the First Memory of Kings in Europe to the Conquest of Persia by Alexander the Great.
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  • The forms seem to result from a general tendency to visualization as an aid to memory; the letter-forms may in the first instance be quite as frequent as the numberforms, but they vanish in early childhood, being of no practical value, while the number-forms continue as an aid to arithmetical work.
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  • In the second preface to the Fragmens philosophiques, in which he candidly states the varied philosophical influences of his life, Cousin speaks of the grateful emotion excited by the memory of the day in 1811, when he heard Laromiguiere for the first time.
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  • In the eyes of most men his martyrdom had put the king so much in the wrong that the obstinacy and provocative conduct which had brought it about passed out of memory.
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  • A correct historical perspective could hardly be expected from men whose constitutional knowledge only ran back as far as the memory of themselves and their fathers.
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  • But the memory of the high-handed proceedings of Puritan rulers was still too recent to allow Englishmen to run the risk of a reimposition of their yoke, and this feeling, fanciful as it was, was sufficient to keep the Test Act in force for years to come.
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  • These figures are a simple and enduring monument to the ministers memory.
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  • At the age of thirty-eight he honoured the French Academy by taking his place among its members; the speech delivered on the occasion was characteristically generous in its tribute to an undeserving memory, and significantly enthusiastic in its glorification of Napoleon.
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  • The third and fourth volumes preserve the register of his deeds and words from 1870 to 1885; they contain, among other things memorable, the nobly reticent and pathetic tribute to the memory of the two sons, Charles (1826-1871) and Francois (1828-1873), he had lost since their common return from exile.
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  • His reminiscences of "Things Seen" in the course of a strangely varied experience, and his notes of travel among the Alps and Pyrenees, in the north of France and in Belgium, in the south of France and in Burgundy, are all recorded by such a pen and registered by such a memory as no other man ever had at the service of his impressions or his thoughts.
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  • Like others who have gone through the conventional course of instruction, he kept a place in his memory for the various charms of Virgil and Horace, of Tacitus and Ovid; but the master whose page by night and by day he turned with devout hand, was the copious, energetic, flexible, diversified and brilliant genius of the declamations for Archias the poet and for Milo, against Catiline and against Antony, the author of the disputations at Tusculum and the orations against Verres.
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  • The most prolonged mathematical reasoning, and the most intricate formulae, were given with almost infallible accuracy from the resources of his extraordinary memory.
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  • The severity of the treatise is relieved by characteristic touches of humour, and by quaint anecdotes and allusions furnished from his wide reading and perfect memory.
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  • An international committee was formed for the purpose of erecting a monument to his memory in Westminster Abbey; and there, in May 1895, a portrait medallion, by Albert Bruce Joy, was placed near the grave of Newton, and adjoining the memorials of Darwin and of Joule.
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  • In the same year, on the 26th of October, Pufendorf died at Berlin and was buried in the church of St Nicholas, where an inscription to his memory is still to be seen.
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  • Among its chief features are the Virgin Martyrs' Memorial, representing in white marble a guardian angel and the figures of Margaret M`Lauchlan and Margaret Wilson, who were drowned by the rising tide in Wigtown Bay for their fidelity to the Covenant (1685);(1685); the large pyramid to the memory of the Covenanters, and the Ladies' Rock, from which ladies viewed the jousts in the Valley.
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  • It perpetuates the memory of the beautiful gateway which formed the triumphal entrance into the city of Constantine, and which survived the original bounds of the new capital as late as 1508, when it was overthrown by an earthquake.
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  • The supporters of the Doctrinaires in the country were chiefly ex-officials of the empire, - who believed in the necessity for monarchical government but had a lively memory of Napoleon's tyranny and a no less lively hatred of the ancien regime, - merchants, manufacturers and members of the liberal professions, particularly the lawyers.
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  • Inquiry still takes this shape, and when any part of Disraeli's career is studied, the laces and essences, the rings over gloves, the jewelled satin shirt-fronts, the guitareries and chibouqueries of his early days are never remote from memory.
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  • Within the church is a marble tablet, placed there by his queen, with a generous inscription to his memory.
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  • His last years of power might have been followed by as long a period of more acceptable government than his own, to the effacement of his own from memory; but that did not happen.
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  • Anxious to blot out all memory of the bitter past, he forbade the use of the word "Borders," hoping that the designation "Middle Shires" might take its place.
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  • The legislative and statistical and especially the ritualistic parts belonging to P are so detailed and uninteresting that they make no impression on a reader's memory, and P's diffuseness, always undue, reaches a climax in chap. vii.
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  • All beyond each present transitory " impression " and the stores of memory is therefore reached blindly, through custom or habitual association.
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  • In the end, thanks to an unusually powerful memory and determined energy, he acquired a knowledge of seven or eight tongues besides his own, including ancient and modern Greek.
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  • This association under its charter (1856) bound itself to restore the estate as far as possible to the condition in which it was in the lifetime of Washington and to keep it sacred to his memory, and Virginia agreed to exempt it from taxation as long as these terms were fulfilled.
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  • The data relating to his whole history are scanty and obscure, and his memory has suffered materially from the fact that the chief chroniclers of his deeds and misdeeds were ecclesiastics.
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  • This yearning, he held, springs - like more sensual impulses - from a sense of want of something formerly possessed, of which there remains a latent memory in the soul, strong in proportion to its philosophic capacity; hence it is that in learning any abstract truth by scientific demonstration we merely make explicit what we already implicitly know; we bring into clear consciousness hidden memories of a state in which the soul looked upon Reality and Good face to face, before the lapse that imprisoned her in an alien body and mingled her true nature with fleshly feelings and impulses.
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  • When further he teaches that the attainment of happiness depends almost entirely upon insight and right calculation, fortune having very little to do with it; that the pleasures and pains of the mind are far more important than those of the body, owing to the accumulation of feeling caused by memory and anticipation; and that an indispensable condition of mental happiness lies in relieving the mind of all superstitions, which can be effected only by a thorough knowledge of the physical universe - he introduces an ample area for the exercise of the philosophic intellect.
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  • Telling of stories was a recognized form of entertainment at all feasts and gatherings, and it was the necessity of the reciter which gradually worked them into a regular form, by which the memory was relieved and the artistic features of the story allowed to be more carefully elaborated.
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  • He lived in quiet days a quiet life; but he shows himself in his works, as Snorri describes him, " a man wise, of good memory and a speaker of the truth."
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  • Among them are the sagas of Thorgils and Haflidi (I118-1121), the feud and peacemaking of two great chiefs, contemporaries of Ari; of Sturla (1150-1183), the founder of the great Sturlung family, down to the settlement of his great lawsuit by Jon Loptsson, who thereupon took his son Snorri the historian to fosterage, - a humorous story but with traces of the decadence about it, and glimpses of the evil days that were to come; of the Onundar-brennusaga (1185-1200), a tale of feud and fire-raising in the north of the island, the hero of which, Gudmund Dyri, goes at last into a cloister; of Hrafn Sveinbiornsson (1190-1213), the noblest Icelander of his day, warrior, leech, seaman, craftsman, poet and chief, whose life at home, travels and pilgrimages abroad (Hrafn was one of the first to visit Becket's shrine), and death at the hands of a foe whom he had twice spared, are recounted by a loving friend in pious memory of his virtues, c. 1220; of Aron Hiorleifsson (1200-1255), a man whose strength, courage and adventures befit rather a henchman of Olaf Tryggvason than one of King Haakon's thanes (the beginning of the feuds that rise round Bishop Gudmund are told here), of the Svinefell-men (1248-1252), a pitiful story of a family feud in the far east of Iceland.
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  • He had a most retentive memory and a very keen power of observation.
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  • In Westminster Abbey a statue was erected to his memory, and in Yorkshire a county asylum for the blind was founded in his honour.
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  • The body of Viscount Dundee, conveyed hither from the battlefield of Killiecrankie, was buried in the church of Old Blair, in which a monument was erected to his memory in 1889 by the 7th duke of Atholl.
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  • The one appropriated Mayo as the Lower (Oughter) M`William, and the earldom of Mayo perpetuates the memory of the event.
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  • At the general election of 1892, however, only 9 Parnellites - the section which under Mr John Redmond remained staunch to his memory - were returned to parliament.
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  • With reference to this last, he says we cannot know God from himself, but only after the analogy of his creatures; and the special analogy used is the self-consciousness of man, its peculiar double nature, with the necessary elements, memory and intelligence, representing the relation of the Father to the Son.
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  • Although a coarse, selfish and violent man, without any of the attributes of a statesman, Lancaster won a great reputation for patriotism; and his memory was long cherished, especially in the north of England, as that of a defender of popular liberties.
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  • It is named Edinburgh in memory of a visit in 1867 by the duke of Edinburgh.
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  • The chief objection to these processes is that they require, as a necessary condition, a singular amount of memory on the one hand and of forgetfulness on the other.
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  • Another work of Ricci's which attracted attention was the Hsi-kuo fa, or "Art of Memory as practised in the West."
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  • This well-established authority was also supported by the revered memory of Monseigneur Saint Louis; and it is this prestige, the strength of this ideal superior to all other, that explains how the royal prerogative came to survive the mistakes and misfortunes of the Hundred Years War.
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  • To conceal his plan he aroused French colonial aspirations against England, and also the memory of the spoliations of 1763, exasperating English jealousy of France, whose borders now exteiided to the Rhine, and laying hands on Hanover, Hamburg and Cuxhaven.
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  • In the Huetiana (1722) of the abbe d'Olivet will be found material for arriving at an idea of his prodigious labours, exact memory and wide scholarship. Another posthumous work was his Traite philosophique de la faiblesse de l'esprit humain (Amsterdam, 1723).
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  • There are two ancient burying-grounds; the oldest, on Park Street, dates from about 1642 and contains the graves of ancestors of four presidents - Cleveland, Benjamin Harrison, Franklin Pierce and Garfield - and a granite obelisk to the memory of Loammi Baldwin (1744-1807).
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  • On the south of the harbour is an obelisk in memory of Captain Skinner, of the steam packets, washed overboard in 1833.
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  • How Herodotus came to think that the bird was like an eagle is quite unexplained; perhaps this is merely a slip of memory.
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  • In his memory his friends purchased his library, and bought for it a house in Oxford, known as the Pusey House, which they endowed with sufficient funds to maintain three librarians, who were charged with the duty of endeavouring to perpetuate in the university the memory of the principles which he taught.
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  • In the majority of cases the conversion had occurred so long ago that the memory of the time when they were Mahommedans was lost, and multitudes of the children of Mudjares remained.
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  • Cowper's stepmother is buried in Bath, and a tablet on the walls of the cathedral commemorates her memory.
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  • A man of deep learning and prodigious memory, he seems to have developed Origen's Christology in the direction of Athanasius.
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  • From that work we learn that the higher education of the youth of Bagdad consisted principally in a minute and careful study of the rules and principles of grammar, and in their committing to memory the whole of the Koran, a treatise or two on philology and jurisprudence, and the choicest Arabian poetry.
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  • Allestree died on the 28th of January 1681, and was buried in the chapel at Eton College, where there is a Latin inscription to his memory.
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  • He was buried in the churchyard of Fressingfield, where there is a Latin epitaph to his memory.
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  • The memory of Kiligia (Cilicia) is enshrined in a popular song, and at Zeitun, in the recesses of Mount Taurus, a small Armenian community has hitherto maintained almost complete independence.
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  • Demidov, to whose memory a monument has been erected.
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  • His tomb, which is handsomely built of stone, is still to be seen in Brunei, and is constantly visited by Malays, who leave money and various articles on the tomb as offerings to his memory.
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  • But his nature was cold, unsympathetic and calculating, combined with a talent for intrigue, to which was added an excellent memory and a ready wit.
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  • Its northern and southern extremities have been named Cape Costigan and Cape Molyneux, in memory of two explorers who were among the first in modern times to navigate the sea and succumbed to the consequent fever and exhaustion.
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  • Dante mentions Dolcino's name (Inferno, c. xxviii.), and his memory is not yet completely effaced in the province of Novara.
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  • Nikolai Przhevalsky (Przevalsky q.v.), the Russian explorer in Central Asia, died here in 1889, and a monument has been erected to his memory.
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  • The harshness of the treatment meted out by Maurice to his father's old friend, the faithful counsellor and protector of his own early years, leaves a stain upon the stadholder's memory which can never be washed away.
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  • There is a monument in Quincy in memory of George Rogers Clark, and the homestead (built in 1835) of John Wood, founder of the city, is now owned by the Quincy Historical Society, organized in 1896.
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  • A bronze statue (dedicated in 1883) in his memory stands in Washington Park.
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  • They showed the blase modern reader that a world no less poetic, no less primitive than that of the Origins of Christianity exists, or still existed within living memory, on the north-western coast of France.
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  • His memory began to fail, and a large work at which he wrought night and day, on the connexion between physics and metaphysics, was found to be only a repetition of his already published doctrines.
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  • Though faithful in a high degree to the duties of friendship, he could not bear to visit his friends in sickness, and after their death he repressed all allusion to their memory.
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  • His memory has been preserved by his capture of the Treasure Galleons, which had never been taken so far, but he is also the traditional representative of the Dutch "sea dogs" of the 17th century.
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  • Interjected into that revelation came the memory of something Josh said before she married Alex.
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  • I suppose I'd remember you as an outspoken brat if I hadn't lost a few years of memory.
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  • That's not a memory; it's more wishful thinking!
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  • While we played the first few turns, Howie described how indiscriminate elements of his memory remained.
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  • I added, "More likely it developed from some long forgotten memory in Howie's subconscious; a book he read, a movie he saw."
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  • He's got a blank slate for a life time of memory.
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  • But then I see a benevolent individual has donated a not insignificant amount in memory of my late lamented house guest, Brenda Washington.
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  • He didn't think the memory was enough of a punishment for taking the life of an innocent human, but he was constrained again by the primary mission of the Guardians to protect humanity against evil, deserving or not.
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  • Unlike touching Czerno, whose dark memories had overwhelmed her just standing near him, Jonny had only one bad memory, that of his first kill that turned him from human to immortal.
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  • His kiss, though, had been spectacular, so full of passion and promise that the memory made her blood burn.
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  • Another memory emerged, one that reminded him that long ago, he'd been assigned to ease Damian's transition to the White God, which was how he met Cassandra, a human, in the mortal realm.
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  • Their bond was stronger than ever, and Jule's body bristled with magic that felt both foreign and familiar, like a memory long ago forgotten.
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