Member-of-parliament sentence example

member-of-parliament
  • He was a member of parliament in 1774 and 1775; in 1776 he became a peer as Baron Osborne, and in 1777 lord chamberlain of the queen's household.
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  • Two years before the publication of this first volume Gibbon was elected member of parliament for Liskeard (1774).
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  • After a period of work in Holland he betook himself to England, where his treatise on lettres de cachet had been much admired, being translated into English in 1787, and where he was soon admitted into the best Whig literary and political society of London, through his old schoolfellow Gilbert Elliot, who had now inherited his father's baronetcy and estates, and become a leading Whig member of parliament.
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  • Another, Thomas Grenville (1755-1846), who was, with one interval, a member of parliament from 1780 to 1818, and for a few months during 1806 and 1807 president of the board of control and first lord of the admiralty, is perhaps more famous as a book-collector than as a statesman; he bequeathed his large and valuable library to the British Museum.
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  • As Lord Stanley the latter had been member of parliament for the West Houghton division of Lancashire from 1892 to 1906; he was financial secretary to the War Office from 1900 to 1903, and postmaster-general from 1903 to 1905.
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  • He was elected in September 1553 member of parliament for Looe in Cornwall in Queen Mary's first parliament, but in October 1553 a committee of the house reported that, having as prebendary of Westminster a seat in convocation, he could not sit in the House of.
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  • In 1796, however, he became member of parliament for Grampound, retaining his seat until his death at Southampton on the 15th or 16th of July 1800.
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  • Beginning his commercial career as a clerk in his patron's house, John Gladstone lived to become one of the merchant-princes of Liverpool, a baronet and a member of parliament.
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  • In the political troubles which preceded the outbreak of the Civil War, Hopton, as member of parliament successively for Bath, Somerset and Wells, at first opposed the royal policy, but after Strafford's attainder (for which he voted) he gradually became an ardent supporter of Charles, and at the beginning of the Great Rebellion he was made lieutenant-general under the marquess of Hertford in the west.
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  • He was admitted at Gray's Inn in 1667, and in 1670 he was elected member of parliament for Derbyshire.
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  • Elected member of parliament for Faenza, he was again appointed secretary to the ministry of the interior in the Mamiani cabinet, and later director-general of the public health department.
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  • The correspondence was shown to Franklin by a mysterious " member of parliament " to back up the contention that the quartering of troops in Boston was suggested, not by the British ministry, but by Americans and Bostonians.
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  • In 1847, and again in 1853, Palmer was returned as member of Parliament for Plymouth, as a Peelite, and in the House of Commons he took an active and independent part.
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  • He was also member of parliament for Bridgnorth.
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  • His eldest daughter, Margaret (1505-1544), married to William Roper (1496-1578), an official of the court of king's bench and a member of parliament under Henry VIII., Edward VI.
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  • His son by his first marriage became earl of Hardwicke; his eldest son by his second marriage, Charles Philip Yorke (1764-1834), member of parliament for Cambridgeshire and afterwards for Liskeard, was secretary of state for war in Addington's ministry in 1801, and was a strong opponent of concession to the Roman Catholics.
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  • He became member of parliament for the family borough of Tewkesbury in 1747, retaining this seat until 1754, and from 1761 until his death he was one of the representatives of Worcestershire.
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  • He had already been appointed receiver of the court of wards, and in 1646 became member of parliament for Marlborough.
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  • In 1593 he was returned as member of parliament for his native county, and also chosen speaker of the House of Commons.
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  • He was elected member of parliament for Liskeard; and henceforth he was one of the most prominent of the constitutional party.
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  • Finding little prospect of a career in Scotland, in 1802 he went to London in company with Sir John Stuart, then member of parliament for Kincardineshire, and devoted himself to literary work.
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  • He appears to have disavowed his Roman Catholic opinions just after the accession of Edward VI., but having been chosen a member of parliament in 1547 he gained notoriety by his opposition to the act of uniformity in 1548.
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  • The Liberalism which he displayed as a member of Parliament and developed greatly in a crowded after-life was unlike the conventional Radicalism of the period.
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  • He had taken a prominent part in politics as a Liberal since his university days, especially in work for the Eighty Club, and in 1886 was elected member of parliament for East Fife, a seat which he retained in subsequent elections.
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  • In 1828 he was elected member of parliament for York, but was expelled on the technical ground that he had published in his newspaper the proceedings of the house without authorization.
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  • In October 1834 he was elected member of parliament for York, and took his seat in January 1835, the Reformers being now in the majority.
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  • In October 1869 he became minister of the interior in the Menabrea cabinet, but he fell with that cabinet a few months later, and although elected member of parliament for Canicatti held no important position until, upon the death of Minghetti in 1886, he became leader of the Right.
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  • As member of parliament for Tregony in 1 7681 774 and for Minehead in 1774-1780, he at first sided with the Whigs in opposing all plans to tax the American colonists, but he supported North's administration after the outbreak of the War of Independence.
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  • Called to the bar in 1807, he was elected member of parliament for the Inverness burghs in 1807, and having gained some reputation as a speaker in the House of Commons, he was made a lord of the treasury in December 1813, an office which he held until August 1819, when he became secretary to the lord-lieutenant of Ireland and a privy councillor.
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  • In 1808 he became member of parliament for Horsham; in 1810 he was appointed undersecretary for home affairs and two and a half years later he was made under-secretary for war and the colonies.
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  • He was born in 1721 and educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, and was returned as member of parliament for Grantham in 1741.
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  • In 1695 he was elected member of parliament for Ripon.
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  • Until the fall of Lord North's ministry he acted as an opposition member of parliament.
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  • All voters, European and non-European, are eligible for seats on the council, but any councillor who becomes a member of parliament thereupon ceases to be a member of the provincial council.
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  • Owing to his friendship with William Pitt he turned his attention to politics, and after his election as member of parliament for Devizes in 1784 gave a silent but steady support to the ministry of his friend.
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  • Richard was a member of parliament in 1467; afterwards he joined Henry, earl of Richmond, in Brittany, returned with the earl to England, and fought at Bosworth, where he was knighted.
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  • Sir Richard's eldest son, Piers or Peter Edgecumbe (1536-1607), was a member of parliament under Elizabeth for about thirty years.
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  • Educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, he was successively member of parliament for St Germans, Plympton and Lostwithiel from 1701 to 1742; on two occasions he served as a lord of the treasury; and from 1724 to 1742 he was paymaster-general for Ireland, becoming chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster in 1743.
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  • Pusey's elder brother, PHILIP PUSEY (1799-1855), was a member of parliament and a friend and follower of Sir Robert Peel.
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  • After his final return from India in 1710 he added to his properties and again became member of parliament for Old Sarum.
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