This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

melts

melts Sentence Examples

  • Pyrimidine, C4H4N2, itself is a water-soluble base which melts at 21° C. and possesses a narcotic smell.

    8
    0
  • It melts at 275° C. 4-Methyluracil, C5H602N2, has long been known, having first been synthesized by R.

    8
    0
  • It is a colourless solid which melts at 54° C. to a deep blue liquid.

    8
    0
  • The silver salt, obtained by shaking an ether solution of nitroform with freshly prepared, slightly moist silver oxide, reacts with methyl iodide to form trinitroethane, a crystalline solid which melts at 56° C. Concentrated caustic potash decomposes the latter compound, forming the potassium salt of dinitroethane, CH3 C(N02)2K.

    8
    5
  • It burns with a purple flame, forming carbon dioxide and nitrogen; and may be condensed (by cooling to - 25° C.) to a colourless liquid, and further to a solid, which melts at - 34.4° C. (M.

    7
    7
  • The one melts, the other but breaks in pieces.

    6
    6
  • The orthocompound melts at Io 5° C. and boils at 218° C., the para-compound melts at 54° C. and boils at 230° C. Meta-nitrotoluene (melting at 16° C.) is obtained by nitrating acetparatoluidide and then replacing the amino group by hydrogen.

    5
    0
  • Now melts the snow.

    5
    3
  • Tetranitromethane, C(N02)4, obtained by adding nitroform to a hot mixture of nitric and sulphuric acids, is a crystalline solid which melts at 13° C. Chlorpicrin, CC1 3 NO 2, is a liquid of suffocating odour obtained by the action of nitric acid and chloride of lime on many organic compounds.

    5
    4
  • It deliquesces in the air and melts readily on heating.

    4
    9
  • It is a liquid which boils at about 165° C. (with partial decomposition); it may be solidified, and when pure melts at 13.6° C. (L.

    0
    0
  • Acetamide,, CH 3 �Conh 2j is a white deliquescent crystalline solid, which melts at 82-83° C. and boils at 222° C. It is usually prepared.

    0
    0
  • Snow falls two years out of three, but soon melts.

    0
    0
  • Bunsen), it melts at 310-320° C. and boils between 763-772° C. (T.

    0
    0
  • r 265 at 15° C., possessing a somewhat sweet taste; below o° C. it solidifies to a white crystalline mass, which melts at 17° C. When heated alone it partially volatilizes, but the greater part decomposes; under a pressure of 12 mm.

    0
    0
  • The acid melts at 132° C., and at a higher temperature it rapidly decomposes into acetic acid and carbon dioxide.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 70° C.and at higher temperatures decomposes, with evolution of carbon dioxide and formation of aceto-nitrile, CH 3 CN.

    0
    0
  • It is a crystalline solid, which melts at 29 0 -30 0 C. and boils at 218°-219° C., and is readily soluble in alcohol and ether.

    0
    0
  • At 150° C. it melts, and on the continued application of heat boils, giving off its water of crystallization.

    0
    0
  • It forms a golden yellow crystalline mass, which sublimes slowly in vacuo, and melts at 25.5° C. It blackens on exposure to moisture, and decomposes when exposed to light.

    0
    0
  • Monoclinic sulphur, obtained by crystallizing fused sulphur, melts at I 19.5°, and admits of undercooling even to ordinary temperatures, but contact with a fragment of the rhombic modification spontaneously brings about the transformation.

    0
    0
  • Lehmann it melts at 168° (or at a slightly lower temperature in its water of crystallization) and on cooling forms optically isotropic crystals; at 125.6° the mass becomes doubly refracting, and from a solution rhombohedral (optically uniaxial) crystals are deposited; by further cooling acicular rhombic crystals are produced at 82.8°, and at 32.4° other rhombic forms are obtained, identical with the product obtained by crystallizing at ordinary temperatures.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in needles and melts at 132° C. (with decomposition).

    0
    0
  • Glyoxime, HON: CH CH: NOH, obtained from glyoxal and hydroxylamine, or by boiling amidothiazole with excess of hydroxylamine hydrochloride and water, melts at 178° C. and is readily soluble in hot water.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 173° C.; and on reduction with sodium in alcoholic solution yields tetramethylene diamine.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 35° C. and boils at 117° C. (14 mm.).

    0
    0
  • Acetoxime, (CH 3) 2 C:NOH, melts at 58-59° C. and is readily soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • Acetophenoneoxime, C 6 H 5 C(:NOH) CH3, melts at 59° C. In glacial acetic acid solution, on the addition of concentrated sulphuric acid, it is converted into acetanilide.

    0
    0
  • Benzophenone oxime, CeHSC (:NOH)C 6 H 5, exists only in one modification which melts at 140° C.; whereas the unsymmetrical benzophenones each yield two oximes.

    0
    0
  • At low temperatures it is a colourless crystalline solid which melts at -10.14° C. (W.

    0
    0
  • The liquid boils at -5° C. and the solid melts at -65° C. It forms double compounds with many metallic chlorides, and finds considerable application as a means of separating various members of the terpene group of compounds.

    0
    0
  • It is a gas at ordinary temperature; when liquefied it boils at -63.5° C. and on solidification melts at -139° C. Water decomposes it into nitric and hydrofluoric acids.

    0
    0
  • The snow-fall is slight, and, except on a few of the loftier peaks, the snow soon melts.

    0
    0
  • In the interior the surface of the inland ice is composed of dry snow which never melts, and is constantly packed and worked smooth by the winds.

    0
    0
  • This product melts at 86° C., and becomes anhydrous when heated to 110° C. The anhydrous compound can also be prepared, as hard crusts melting at 146°, by crystallizing concentrated aqueous solutions at 30 to 35°.

    0
    0
  • At about 150 0 -200° C. caoutchouc melts, forming a viscous liquid which does not solidify on cooling.

    0
    0
  • An alloy of 15 parts of bismuth, 8 of lead, 4 of tin and 3 of cadmium (Wood's alloy) melts below 70° C.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 485° and solidifies on cooling to a translucent, horn-like mass; an early name for it was plumbum corneum, horn lead.

    0
    0
  • With picric acid it forms a sparingly soluble picrate, which melts at 145 0 C. On the condition of phenanthrene in alcoholic solution see R.

    0
    0
  • Snow falls rarely, and when it does, it melts at once.

    0
    0
  • anhydrous it melts at 178°.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless crystalline solid which melts at 15° C. and has the properties of a strong acid.

    0
    0
  • Its specific gravity has the high value 18.7; its specific heat is 0.02765, which, according to Dulong and Petit's law, corresponds to U = 240: It melts at bright redness.

    0
    0
  • The product is a crystalline solid of specific gravity 2.34, and melts at about 1430° C. See also German Patent 108817 for the production of crystallized silicon from silica and carborundum.

    0
    0
  • Ruff and Curt Albert (Ber., 1905, 38, p. 53) by decomposing titanium fluoride with silicon chloroform in sealed vessels at 100 -120° C. It is a colourless gas which may be condensed to a liquid boiling at -80 2° C. On solidification it melts at about -110° C. The gas is very unstable, decomposing slowly, even at ordinary temperatures, into hydrogen,, silicon fluoride and silicon: 4SiHF 3 =2H 2 +3SiF 4 +Si.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless solid which melts at 92° C. For silicon derivatives of the amines see Michaelis, Ber., 1896, 29, p. 710; on asymmetric silicon and the resolution of dl-benzyl-ethyl-propyl-silicol see F.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 160°, and on cooling solidifies to a glassy mass, which on standing gradually becomes opaque and crystalline.

    0
    0
  • It is a crystalline solid, which melts at 30° C. and boils at 190 8° C. Fusion with alkalis converts it into salicylic acid.

    0
    0
  • It solidifies in a freezing mixture, on the addition of a crystal of phenol, and then melts at 3 0 -4° C. It boils at 202° 8 C. Its aqueous solution is coloured bluish-violet by ferric chloride.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 213° C. and boils at 351° C. It is insoluble in water, sparingly soluble in alcohol and ether, but readily soluble in hot benzene.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 27° C., and is easily soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • In boiling liquids its formation may be prevented by adding paraffin wax; the wax melts and forms a ring on the surface of the liquid, which boils tranquilly in the centre.

    0
    0
  • Instances of its application are found in the separation of orthoand para-nitrophenol, the o-compound distilling and the p- remaining behind; in the separation of aniline from the mixture obtained by reducing nitrobenzene; of the naphthols from the melts produced by fusing the naphthalene monosulphonic acids with potash; and of quinoline from the reaction between aniline, nitrobenzene, glycerin, and sulphuric acid (the product being first steam distilled to remove any aniline, nitrobenzene, or glycerin, then treated with alkali, and again steam distilled when quinoline comes over).

    0
    0
  • It is a silver-white ductile metal (of specific gravity 2.54) which melts at 8000.

    0
    0
  • He noticed that when ice melts it takes up a quantity of heat without undergoing any change of temperature, and he argued that this heat, which as was usual in his time he looked upon as a subtle fluid, must have combined with the particles of ice and thus become latent in its substance.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 417-419° C. (with decomposition) when heated in a sealed tube (A.

    0
    0
  • Spring has shown that by compressing a finely divided mixture of i 5 parts of bismuth, 8 parts of lead, 4 parts of tin and 3 parts of cadmium, an alloy is pro duced which melts at ioo C., that is, much below the meltingpoint of any of the four metals.

    0
    0
  • This compound melts at 350° C., a temperature far above the melting-point of either sodium or mercury.

    0
    0
  • The intermediate summits occurring in the freezing-point curves of alloys are usually rounded; this feature is believed to be due to the partial decomposition of the compound which takes place when it melts.

    0
    0
  • It forms a picrate which melts at 123-124° C.

    0
    0
  • von Riemsdijk) and 270.5° (C. C. Person); commercial bismuth melts at 260° (Ledebur), and electrolytic bismuth at 264° (Classen).

    0
    0
  • It melts to a reddish-brown liquid, which solidifies to a yellow crystalline mass on cooling.

    0
    0
  • The alloy used is composed of 15 parts of bismuth, 8 of lead, 4 of tin and 3 of cadmium; it melts at 70°, and can be experimented with as readily as mercury.

    0
    0
  • The salt melts in its water of crystallization at 75°, and the liquid thus obtained goes up to a density of 3.6.

    0
    0
  • Silver-thallium nitrate, TIAg(N03)2, introduced by Retgers, melts at 75° to form a clear liquid of density 4.8; it may be diluted with water.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 452° C. and boils at 478° C. (F.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 224° C. and is exceedingly hygroscopic. Water decomposes it with formation of tellurous acid and other products.

    0
    0
  • It melts between 2250° and 2300°, its specific heat is 0.0365, coefficient of expansion o 0000079, and specific gravity 16.64.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 26° to 27° C. and has a specific gravity of 1.88 (15°C.).

    0
    0
  • Caesium hydroxide, Cs(OH) 2, obtained by the decomposition of the sulphate with baryta water,is a greyish-white deliquescent solid,which melts at a red heat and absorbs carbon dioxide rapidly.

    0
    0
  • It melts at about 800°, but sublimes at a lower temperature.

    0
    0
  • The Chimen-tagh rises into imposing summits, some rounded, some pyramidal in outline, which are capped with snow, though the snow melts in summer.

    0
    0
  • 5 C., which melts at - 9 2° 3 C. (K.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 55° C. and boils at 115° C. It may also be obtained by elimination of carbon dioxide from the pyrazine dicarboxylic acid formed when quinoxaline is oxidized with alkaline potassium permanganate (S.

    0
    0
  • Again, pure sodium chloride melts at about 775° C., while sodium boils at 877° C., so that the margin of safety is but small if loss by vaporization is to be prevented.

    0
    0
  • On heating it melts at 95.6° (Bunsen) to a liquid resembling mercury, and boils at 877.5° (Ruff and Johannsen, Ber., 1905, 38, p. 3601), yielding a vapour, colourless in thin layers but a peculiar purple, with a greenish fluorescence, when viewed through thick layers.

    0
    0
  • It also combines with dry ammonia at 300-400° to form sodamide, NaNH 2, a white waxy mass when pure, which melts at 155°.

    0
    0
  • It forms a grey mass, which melts at a red heat and violently combines with water to give the hydroxide.

    0
    0
  • When anhydrous it is a colourless opaque solid which melts at 310 °, and decomposes at about 110o°.

    0
    0
  • It melts at io08°.

    0
    0
  • The highest members of the series as yet known are cerotene, C26H527 which is obtained by the distillation of Chinese wax and is a paraffinlike solid which melts at 57° C., and melene, CsoH60(?), which is obtained by the distillation of bees'-wax.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 62° C. (B.

    0
    0
  • Soc., 1856, p. 30) electrolysed an equimolecular mixture of potassium and calcium chlorides (which melts at a lower temperature than potassium chloride) also between carbon electrodes; whilst Castner's process, in which caustic potash is electrolysed, is employed commercially.

    0
    0
  • The salt crystallizes in cubes of specific gravity 1.995; it melts at about 800° and volatilizes at a bright red heat.

    0
    0
  • This salt is very deliquescent; it melts at 45°, and at 100° decomposes into iodine and potassium iodide.

    0
    0
  • It forms a yellowishwhite deliquescent mass, which melts on heating, and at a sufficiently high temperature it yields a dark red liquid.

    0
    0
  • It melts readily over the fire, and softens even with the heat of the mouth; it is insoluble in water, and nearly so in cold alcohol.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 114.2° C. and boils at 184.35° C. under atmospheric pressure (W.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless, crystalline, deliquescent solid which melts at 135° C., and at 140° C. is completely decomposed into iodine pentoxide, water and oxygen.

    0
    0
  • The free acid is a colourless liquid with a smell resembling bitter almonds; it boils at 26.1° C., and may be solidified, in which condition it melts at -14° C. It burns with a blue flame,.

    0
    0
  • Allyl cyanide boils at 119° C. Benzonitrile boils at 190.6° C. When solidified it melts att7° C. It is easily soluble in alcohol and ether.

    0
    0
  • Formic acid is a colourless, sharp-smelling liquid, which crystallizes at 0° C., melts at 8.6° C. and boils at 100.8° C. Its specific gravity is 1.22 (20°/4°).

    0
    0
  • Anhydroecgonine melts at 235° C., and has an acid and a basic character.

    0
    0
  • Flora.The Alpine flora, which is found in the United States only on the tops of those mountains which rise above the limit of trees, consists principally of a variety of plants which bloom as soon as the snow melts and for a short season make a brilliant display of colors.

    0
    0
  • The benzene layer on evaporation deposits the antipyrine as a colourless crystalline solid which melts at 113° C. and is soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in water, melts at 193° C., and is decomposed at a higher temperature into chromium sesquioxide and oxygen; it is a very powerful oxidizing agent, acting violently on alcohol, converting it into acetaldehyde, and in glacial acetic acid solution converting naphthalene and anthracene into the corresponding quinones.

    0
    0
  • Amino-azo-benzene, C6H5 N2 C 6 H 4 NH 2, crystallizes in yellow plates or needles and melts at 126° C. Its constitution is determined by the facts that it may be prepared by reducing nitro-azo-benzene by ammonium sulphide and that by reduction with stannous chloride it yields aniline and.

    0
    0
  • It is an orange-red crystalline compound which melts at 154° C. Ortho-oxyazobenzene, C 6 H 5 N: N (1) C6H4.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 112-114° C. and is easily reduced to the corresponding hydrazo compound.

    0
    0
  • The former (known as the a or benz-anti-aldoxime) melts at 34-35° C.; the latter (0 or benz-syn-aldoxime) melts at 130° C. and is slowly transformed into the a form.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 632.7° C. (C. T.

    0
    0
  • In a similar way the curve FGH, between 30° and 55°, shows the effect of the hydrate Fe2Cl6.5H20, and the curve HJK that of the hydrate Fe 2 C1 6.4H 2 O, which, when pure, melts at 73.5° - the point J on the diagram.

    0
    0
  • The corresponding double chloride is a far better material; first, because it melts at about 180° C., and does not volatilize below a red heat, and second, because the voltage of aluminium chloride is 2.3 and that of sodium chloride 4.3, so that there is a much wider margin of safety to cover irregularities in the electric pressure.

    0
    0
  • The specific gravity of cast metal is 2.583, and of rolled 2.688 at 4° C. It melts at 626° C. (freezingpoint 654.5 Heycock and Neville).

    0
    0
  • Chloroform solidifies in the cold and then melts at - 62° C.; it boils at 61.2° C., and has a specific gravity I.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless solid, which melts at 80° C., and boils at 218° C. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system; it is to be noted that aand 0-naphthol assume almost identical forms, so that these three compounds have been called isomorphous.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 170° C., and is readily soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • 7) the solid matter has become so hot that the now deoxidized iron melts, as does the slag as fast as it is formed by the union of its three constituents, the gangue, the lime resulting from the decomposition of the limestone and the ash of the fuel.

    0
    0
  • At this time the slag is temporarily rich in iron oxide and silica, resulting from the oxidation of the iron and of its silicon as the charge slowly melts and trickles down.

    0
    0
  • The blast of air forced in through the tuyeres near the bottom of the furnace burns the coke there, and the intense heat thus caused melts away the surrounding iron, so that this column of coke and iron gradually descends; but it is kept at its full height by feeding more coke and iron at its top, until all the iron needed for the day's work has thus been charged.

    0
    0
  • As the iron melts it runs out through a tap hole and spout at the bottom of the furnace, to be poured into the moulds by means of clay-lined ladles.

    0
    0
  • Phenyl nitramine, C 6 H S NH N02, is a colourless crystalline solid, which melts at 46° C. Sodium amalgam in alkaline solution reduces it to phenylhydrazine.

    0
    0
  • It is a yellowish oil which melts at - 24° C.; it boils at 143-144° C., but cannot be distilled safely as it decomposes violently, giving nitrogen and ethyl fumarate.

    0
    0
  • Borax is very frequently employed; it melts to a clear liquid and dissolves silica and many metallic oxides.

    0
    0
  • Its hydrochloride melts at 163° C., and crystallizes from alcohol in colourless deliquescent prisms. Acetic anhydride converts the base into an acetamino-dimethyl pyrimidine, acetic acid and acetamide being also formed.

    0
    0
  • Its specific gravity is 6.1545, and it melts at 810°.

    0
    0
  • The remaining isomer, pivalic or trimethylacetic acid, (CH3)3C C02H, melts at 35° and boils at 163°.

    0
    0
  • The greater the heat, the more rapidly melts the ice, and the larger the quantity of water available for irrigation.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in deliquescent prisms and melts with partial decomposition at 119-120° C. It behaves as a ketonic acid, being reduced in aqueous solution by sodium amalgam to tartronic acid, and also combining with phenylhydrazine and hydroxylamine.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 720° and decomposes rapidly above 800°, giving oxygen and thallous oxide.

    0
    0
  • The chloride when anhydrous is a crystalline mass which melts at 24°.

    0
    0
  • C0 The picrate melts at 182-183° C.

    0
    0
  • Gattermann, Ann., 1888, 244, p. 30), melts at 50° C. and boils at 61-62° C. In the presence of anhydrous aluminium chloride it reacts with aromatic hydrocarbons to form the amides of aromatic acids.

    0
    0
  • It is permanent in dry air, but tarnishes in moist air; it can be hammered and rolled; it melts at 623° C. It burns readily on heating, with a brilliant flame; and it also combines with chlorine,bromine, iodine, sulphur, phosphorus and cyanogen.

    0
    0
  • When this happens the plug being no longer covered with water is heated to such a temperature that it melts and allows the contents of the boiler to escape into the furnace.

    0
    0
  • In automatic fire-sprinklers the orifices of the pipes are closed with fusible metal, which melts and liberates the water when, owing to an outbreak of fire in the room, the temperature rises above a predetermined limit.

    0
    0
  • At Kandahar snow seldom falls on the plains or lower hills; when it does, it melts at once.

    0
    0
  • The winter is tolerably mild; snow melts as it falls, and even on the mountains does not lie long.

    0
    0
  • As the emperor Baber said of Kabul, at one day's journey from it you may find a place where snow never falls, and at two hours' journey a place where snow almost never melts!

    0
    0
  • By heating gallium in a regulated stream of chlorine the dichloride GaC1 2 is obtained as a crystalline mass, which melts at 164° C. and readily decomposes on exposure to moist air.

    0
    0
  • It boils at 209°C., and melts at 3.6° C. (C.E.

    0
    0
  • It melts between 1400-1600° C. Its specific heat increases with rise of temperature, the mean value from 15° to 100° C. being 0.1084 (A.

    0
    0
  • It is a silvery white metal which melts at 38.5° C. and has a specific gravity of I 52.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in water, the solution being very alkaline and caustic. It melts at 301°.

    0
    0
  • Rubidium carbonate, Rb2C03, formed by the addition of ammonium carbonate to rubidium hydroxide, is a crystalline mass which melts in its water of crystallization when heated.

    0
    0
  • The metal has a crystalline structure, and melts at about 2800°.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 248° and boils at 275.6°; the vapour density corresponds to the above formula.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 275° and boils at 34 6.7° (759.5 mm.).

    0
    0
  • It melts at 210.4° and boils at 227.5° forming a red vapour.

    0
    0
  • The crystalline hydrate melts at 50° C. The pure acid decomposes slowly on standing, but is stable in dilute aqueous solution.

    0
    0
  • Potassium perchlorate, Kcio 4, can be obtained by carefully heating the chlorate until it first melts and then nearly all solidifies again.

    0
    0
  • It is an amorphous solid which melts at 54-55° C. On reduction with sodium in alcoholic solution it yields tetraethylene diamine (putrescein) and pyrollidine.

    0
    0
  • It melts without decomposition, and begins to give off oxygen at about 370° C. According to F.

    0
    0
  • In the process of oxidation, a certain amount of cuprous oxide is always formed, which melts in with the copper and diminishes its softness and tenacity.

    0
    0
  • It melts at below red heat to a brown mass, and its vapour density at both red and white heat corresponds to the formula Cu 2 C1 2.

    0
    0
  • The trihydrate melts at 114.5°, and boils at 170 0, giving off nitric acid, and leaving the basic salt Cu(NO 3) 2.3Cu(OH) 2.

    0
    0
  • It forms a crystalline powder which melts at 213° C. It is insoluble in alcohol, and nearly insoluble in cold water.

    0
    0
  • In the anhydrous state it melts at 205-206° C. Mesotartaric acid is formed when cinchonine tartrate is heated for some time at 170° C. (L.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in prisms, and in the anhydrous state melts at 140° C. On prolonged boiling with aqueous hydrochloric acid it yields racemic acid.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in octahedra, having a specific gravity of 3.2, and melts at 597° C. (T.

    0
    0
  • Its specific gravity varies from 6.7 to 6.86; it melts at 432° C. (Dalton), and boils between 1090 -1600 C. (T.

    0
    0
  • The buds, conspicuous for their size, are protected by a coat of a glutinous substance, which is impervious to water; in spring this melts, and the bud-scales are then cast off.

    0
    0
  • When the lead melts and begins to oxidize, the lead oxide, or so-called litharge, combines with or dissolves the non-metallic and readily oxidizable constituents of the ore, while the gold and silver alloy with the lead.

    0
    0
  • Silver melts at about rooo C.; recent determinations give 960.7° (Heycock and Neville) and 962° (Becquerel); at higher temperatures it volatilizes with the formation of a pale blue vapour (Stas).

    0
    0
  • It melts at about 460° to a clear yellow liquid, which, on cooling, solidifies to a translucent resinous mass.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 427°, and darkens on exposure to air.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 435° and, on cooling, forms a yellow transparent mass.

    0
    0
  • It is a crystalline solid which melts at 56° C. and boils at 204° C. It can only be diazotized in the presence of concentrated sulphuric acid, and even then the free diazonium sulphate is not stable, readily passing in the presence of water to a-oxypyridine.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 64° C. and boils at 250-252° C. The aminopyridines are readily soluble in water, and resemble the aliphatic amines in their general chemical properties.

    0
    0
  • Nitric acid oxidizes it to all the fatty acids from acetic to capric. Nitrous acid gives the isomeric elaidic acid, C $ H 17 CH: CH (CH 2] 7 CO 2 H, which is crystalline and melts at 51°.

    0
    0
  • The acid crystallizes in hexagonal prisms and melts at 58° C. It dissolves in water and yields a hydrate of composition H 2 SeO 4 H 2 O.

    0
    0
  • Its specific gravity is 0.59, and it melts at r80° C. It burns on ignition in air, and when strongly heated in an atmosphere of nitrogen it forms lithium nitride, Li 3 N.

    0
    0
  • Lithium chloride LiC1, prepared by heating the metal in chlorine, or by dissolving the oxide or carbonate in hydrochloric acid, is exceedingly deliquescent, melts below a red heat, and is very soluble in alcohol.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 28° and boils at 250°.

    0
    0
  • It forms a colourless syrup, of specific gravity 1.2485 (1 5°/4°), and decomposes on distillation under ordinary atmospheric pressure; but at very low pressures (about i mm.) it distils at about 85° C., and then sets to a crystalline solid, which melts at about 18° C. It possesses the properties both of an acid and of an alcohol.

    0
    0
  • Stock (Ber., 1909, 42, 4510), who points out that ordinary red phosphorus melts at 605°-610°, whilst Hittorf's melts at 620°; moreover, the latter is less reactive than the former at high temperatures.

    0
    0
  • Deliquescent, rectangular tablets of H 4 P 2062H 2 O separate out on concentrating a solution in a vacuum, which on drying further give the acid, which melts at 55°, and decomposes suddenly when heated to 70° into phosphorous and metaphosphoric acids with a certain amount of hydrogen phosphide.

    0
    0
  • It sublimes when heated, but under pressure it melts at 148°, giving a normal vapour density, but on further heating it dissociates into the trichloride and chlorine; this dissociation may be retarded by vapourizing in an atmosphere of chlorine.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless liquid,boiling at 107.2°, and when solidified it melts at o 8°.

    0
    0
  • It boils at 139°, melts at - 54°, and has a specific gravity of o 8812.

    0
    0
  • It boils at 138°, melts at 15°, and has a specific gravity of o 8801 at 0°.

    0
    0
  • It melts at about 200° C., and at 210° to 255° it is resolved into carbon dioxide and pyrogallol, C 6 H 3 (OH) 3.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes from water in needles or prisms and in the anhydrous state melts at 253-254° C. Potassium permanganate oxidizes it to pyridine tricarboxylic acid (234).

    0
    0
  • It melts at 22-23° C. and boils at 240° C., and behaves in most respects similarly to quinoline.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 154-156° C., losing carbon dioxide and passing into cyclo-butane carboxylic acid, C 4 H 7 CO 2 H.

    0
    0
  • It forms white needles (from alcohol), melts at 95° and boils at 278°.

    0
    0
  • Snow is uncommon in the south-east of the state, and whenever there is a snow-storm the snow usually melts as it falls; but in the centre and north-west occasionally covers the ground to a depth of several inches.

    0
    0
  • In the amorphous condition it can be obtained by condensing the vapour of the oxide at as high a temperature as possible, when a vitreous mass is produced, which melts at 200° C., has a specific gravity of 3.68-3.798, and is more soluble in water than the crystalline variety.

    0
    0
  • It melts easily and volatilizes.

    0
    0
  • It melts above 300°, and dissolves in 7800 parts of cold water and in 460 of boiling.

    0
    0
  • I t is deliquescent, and melts at 23° C. (M.

    0
    0
  • It melts readily, and on cooling resolidifies to a brown mass, which at moderately high temperatures gives off oxygen and leaves a residue of a basic lead salt; for this reason fused lead chromate is sometimes made use of in the analysis of organic compounds.

    0
    0
  • birefringence pattern developed during the coextrusion flow of LDPE melts.

    0
    0
  • conductivity of polymer melts.

    0
    0
  • The systems that I examine vary from simple melts of diblock copolymer to block copolymers with elaborate architectures.

    0
    0
  • As the subducting oceanic crust melts as it goes deeper into the Earth, the newly-created magma rises to the surface and forms volcanoes.

    0
    0
  • crystallized at pressures 8 kbar from melts containing 1 -2 wt% water.

    0
    0
  • The fat melts and cooks the protein fibrils in the muscle bundles without causing excessive amino acid breakdown.

    0
    0
  • If it melts and bubbles then it is the inert filler which is used to make the weight of a real shell for tests.

    0
    0
  • fudge that literally melts in the mouth.

    0
    0
  • It half melts, half cuts as its going along, but the melting is extremely localized.

    0
    0
  • materializes under an ungimmicked cloth napkin, and then just mysteriously melts away.

    0
    0
  • First the solder on the pads melts and wets the pad and the ball surface; then the whole ball becomes molten.

    0
    0
  • The measurement of extrudate swell of polymer melts using capillary extrusion rheometers is specified by the standard ISO 11443 [6] .

    0
    0
  • The SR5 is a universal controlled stress rheometer suitable for use with complex fluids such as polymer melts, creams and lotions.

    0
    0
  • Photo: Polar bear © Heather Crawford As Arctic sea ice melts, polar bears and sea ice melts, polar bears and seals are finding that their habitats are disappearing.

    0
    0
  • undercooled metallic melts.

    0
    0
  • A phase field model for spontaneous grain refinement in deeply undercooled metallic melts.

    0
    0
  • When the ice melts your drink will not lose its flavor and become too watery.

    0
    0
  • It has a specific gravity of 8.8, and it melts at 1530° C. (H.

    0
    0
  • Pyrimidine, C4H4N2, itself is a water-soluble base which melts at 21° C. and possesses a narcotic smell.

    0
    0
  • 6), melts at 180-181°C. The simple oxypyrimidines are obtained by the action of nitrous acid on the amino derivatives, or by heating these latter with concentrated hydrochloric acid to 180° C. They show both basic and phenolic properties and are indifferent to the action of reducing agents.

    0
    0
  • Uracil and its homologues may be obtained in many cases from the hydrouracils by the action of bromine, and subsequent elimination of the elements of hydrobromic acid; or by the condensation of aceto-acetic ester and related substances with urea, thiourea, guanidine, &c. Uracil, C4H402N2, crystallizes in colourless needles, is soluble in hot water and melts with decomposition at 335° C. Hydrouracil, C4H602N2, is obtained by the action of bromine and caustic alkalis on succinamide (H.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 275° C. 4-Methyluracil, C5H602N2, has long been known, having first been synthesized by R.

    0
    0
  • It burns with a purple flame, forming carbon dioxide and nitrogen; and may be condensed (by cooling to - 25° C.) to a colourless liquid, and further to a solid, which melts at - 34.4° C. (M.

    0
    0
  • It is a liquid which boils at about 165° C. (with partial decomposition); it may be solidified, and when pure melts at 13.6° C. (L.

    0
    0
  • Acetamide,, CH 3 �Conh 2j is a white deliquescent crystalline solid, which melts at 82-83° C. and boils at 222° C. It is usually prepared.

    0
    0
  • Bunsen), it melts at 310-320° C. and boils between 763-772° C. (T.

    0
    0
  • It is a dark-coloured crystalline solid which melts at 194° C. and boils at 268° C. It fumes in moist air and deliquesces gradually.

    0
    0
  • Gradually coming to occupy definite beds, which are deepened and polished by the friction, they impress a characteristic appearance on the land, which guides them as they traverse it, and, although the ice melts at lower levels, vast quantities of clay and broken stones are brought down and deposited in terminal moraines where the glacier ends.

    0
    0
  • Para-aminophenol, C6H4.OH NH2(1.4) melts at 148° C., with decomposition.

    0
    0
  • The solid melts to a pale yellow liquid which on continued heating gradually darkens and becomes more viscous, the maximum viscosity occurring at 180°, the product being dark red in colour.

    0
    0
  • It may be condensed and yields a solid which melts at - 55° C. Sulphuretted hydrogen decomposes it with formation of hydrofluoric acid and liberation of sulphur.

    0
    0
  • This oxide exists in two forms. The aform is readily fusible and melts at 14.8° C. It corresponds to the simple molecular complex S03.

    0
    0
  • r 265 at 15° C., possessing a somewhat sweet taste; below o° C. it solidifies to a white crystalline mass, which melts at 17° C. When heated alone it partially volatilizes, but the greater part decomposes; under a pressure of 12 mm.

    0
    0
  • The acid melts at 132° C., and at a higher temperature it rapidly decomposes into acetic acid and carbon dioxide.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 70° C.and at higher temperatures decomposes, with evolution of carbon dioxide and formation of aceto-nitrile, CH 3 CN.

    0
    0
  • It is a crystalline solid, which melts at 29 0 -30 0 C. and boils at 218°-219° C., and is readily soluble in alcohol and ether.

    0
    0
  • At 150° C. it melts, and on the continued application of heat boils, giving off its water of crystallization.

    0
    0
  • It forms a golden yellow crystalline mass, which sublimes slowly in vacuo, and melts at 25.5° C. It blackens on exposure to moisture, and decomposes when exposed to light.

    0
    0
  • Monoclinic sulphur, obtained by crystallizing fused sulphur, melts at I 19.5°, and admits of undercooling even to ordinary temperatures, but contact with a fragment of the rhombic modification spontaneously brings about the transformation.

    0
    0
  • Lehmann it melts at 168° (or at a slightly lower temperature in its water of crystallization) and on cooling forms optically isotropic crystals; at 125.6° the mass becomes doubly refracting, and from a solution rhombohedral (optically uniaxial) crystals are deposited; by further cooling acicular rhombic crystals are produced at 82.8°, and at 32.4° other rhombic forms are obtained, identical with the product obtained by crystallizing at ordinary temperatures.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in needles and melts at 132° C. (with decomposition).

    0
    0
  • Glyoxime, HON: CH CH: NOH, obtained from glyoxal and hydroxylamine, or by boiling amidothiazole with excess of hydroxylamine hydrochloride and water, melts at 178° C. and is readily soluble in hot water.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 173° C.; and on reduction with sodium in alcoholic solution yields tetramethylene diamine.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 35° C. and boils at 117° C. (14 mm.).

    0
    0
  • Acids convert it into the O-oxime (benz-syn-aldoxime) which melts at 125° C. When distilled under diminished pressure the 0-form reverts to the a-modification (see Beckmann, Ber., 1887, 20, p. 2766; 1889, 22, pp. 4 2 9, 5 1 3, 1531, 1588).

    0
    0
  • Acetoxime, (CH 3) 2 C:NOH, melts at 58-59° C. and is readily soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • Acetophenoneoxime, C 6 H 5 C(:NOH) CH3, melts at 59° C. In glacial acetic acid solution, on the addition of concentrated sulphuric acid, it is converted into acetanilide.

    0
    0
  • Benzophenone oxime, CeHSC (:NOH)C 6 H 5, exists only in one modification which melts at 140° C.; whereas the unsymmetrical benzophenones each yield two oximes.

    0
    0
  • At low temperatures it is a colourless crystalline solid which melts at -10.14° C. (W.

    0
    0
  • The liquid boils at -5° C. and the solid melts at -65° C. It forms double compounds with many metallic chlorides, and finds considerable application as a means of separating various members of the terpene group of compounds.

    0
    0
  • It is a gas at ordinary temperature; when liquefied it boils at -63.5° C. and on solidification melts at -139° C. Water decomposes it into nitric and hydrofluoric acids.

    0
    0
  • This product melts at 86° C., and becomes anhydrous when heated to 110° C. The anhydrous compound can also be prepared, as hard crusts melting at 146°, by crystallizing concentrated aqueous solutions at 30 to 35°.

    0
    0
  • At about 150 0 -200° C. caoutchouc melts, forming a viscous liquid which does not solidify on cooling.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 327.7° C. (H.

    0
    0
  • An alloy of 15 parts of bismuth, 8 of lead, 4 of tin and 3 of cadmium (Wood's alloy) melts below 70° C.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 485° and solidifies on cooling to a translucent, horn-like mass; an early name for it was plumbum corneum, horn lead.

    0
    0
  • anhydrous it melts at 178°.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 194° C. (H.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless crystalline solid which melts at 15° C. and has the properties of a strong acid.

    0
    0
  • The silver salt, obtained by shaking an ether solution of nitroform with freshly prepared, slightly moist silver oxide, reacts with methyl iodide to form trinitroethane, a crystalline solid which melts at 56° C. Concentrated caustic potash decomposes the latter compound, forming the potassium salt of dinitroethane, CH3 C(N02)2K.

    0
    0
  • Tetranitromethane, C(N02)4, obtained by adding nitroform to a hot mixture of nitric and sulphuric acids, is a crystalline solid which melts at 13° C. Chlorpicrin, CC1 3 NO 2, is a liquid of suffocating odour obtained by the action of nitric acid and chloride of lime on many organic compounds.

    0
    0
  • The orthocompound melts at Io 5° C. and boils at 218° C., the para-compound melts at 54° C. and boils at 230° C. Meta-nitrotoluene (melting at 16° C.) is obtained by nitrating acetparatoluidide and then replacing the amino group by hydrogen.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless solid which melts at 54° C. to a deep blue liquid.

    0
    0
  • The product is a crystalline solid of specific gravity 2.34, and melts at about 1430° C. See also German Patent 108817 for the production of crystallized silicon from silica and carborundum.

    0
    0
  • Ruff and Curt Albert (Ber., 1905, 38, p. 53) by decomposing titanium fluoride with silicon chloroform in sealed vessels at 100 -120° C. It is a colourless gas which may be condensed to a liquid boiling at -80 2° C. On solidification it melts at about -110° C. The gas is very unstable, decomposing slowly, even at ordinary temperatures, into hydrogen,, silicon fluoride and silicon: 4SiHF 3 =2H 2 +3SiF 4 +Si.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless solid which melts at 92° C. For silicon derivatives of the amines see Michaelis, Ber., 1896, 29, p. 710; on asymmetric silicon and the resolution of dl-benzyl-ethyl-propyl-silicol see F.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 160°, and on cooling solidifies to a glassy mass, which on standing gradually becomes opaque and crystalline.

    0
    0
  • It is a crystalline solid, which melts at 30° C. and boils at 190 8° C. Fusion with alkalis converts it into salicylic acid.

    0
    0
  • It solidifies in a freezing mixture, on the addition of a crystal of phenol, and then melts at 3 0 -4° C. It boils at 202° 8 C. Its aqueous solution is coloured bluish-violet by ferric chloride.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 213° C. and boils at 351° C. It is insoluble in water, sparingly soluble in alcohol and ether, but readily soluble in hot benzene.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 27° C., and is easily soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • The anhydrous acid melts at 189.5° C. (E.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 417-419° C. (with decomposition) when heated in a sealed tube (A.

    0
    0
  • This compound melts at 350° C., a temperature far above the melting-point of either sodium or mercury.

    0
    0
  • It forms a picrate which melts at 123-124° C.

    0
    0
  • von Riemsdijk) and 270.5° (C. C. Person); commercial bismuth melts at 260° (Ledebur), and electrolytic bismuth at 264° (Classen).

    0
    0
  • The alloy used is composed of 15 parts of bismuth, 8 of lead, 4 of tin and 3 of cadmium; it melts at 70°, and can be experimented with as readily as mercury.

    0
    0
  • The salt melts in its water of crystallization at 75°, and the liquid thus obtained goes up to a density of 3.6.

    0
    0
  • Silver-thallium nitrate, TIAg(N03)2, introduced by Retgers, melts at 75° to form a clear liquid of density 4.8; it may be diluted with water.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 452° C. and boils at 478° C. (F.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 224° C. and is exceedingly hygroscopic. Water decomposes it with formation of tellurous acid and other products.

    0
    0
  • It melts between 2250° and 2300°, its specific heat is 0.0365, coefficient of expansion o 0000079, and specific gravity 16.64.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 26° to 27° C. and has a specific gravity of 1.88 (15°C.).

    0
    0
  • It melts at about 800°, but sublimes at a lower temperature.

    0
    0
  • 5 C., which melts at - 9 2° 3 C. (K.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 55° C. and boils at 115° C. It may also be obtained by elimination of carbon dioxide from the pyrazine dicarboxylic acid formed when quinoxaline is oxidized with alkaline potassium permanganate (S.

    0
    0
  • Again, pure sodium chloride melts at about 775° C., while sodium boils at 877° C., so that the margin of safety is but small if loss by vaporization is to be prevented.

    0
    0
  • On heating it melts at 95.6° (Bunsen) to a liquid resembling mercury, and boils at 877.5° (Ruff and Johannsen, Ber., 1905, 38, p. 3601), yielding a vapour, colourless in thin layers but a peculiar purple, with a greenish fluorescence, when viewed through thick layers.

    0
    0
  • It also combines with dry ammonia at 300-400° to form sodamide, NaNH 2, a white waxy mass when pure, which melts at 155°.

    0
    0
  • When anhydrous it is a colourless opaque solid which melts at 310 °, and decomposes at about 110o°.

    0
    0
  • It melts at io08°.

    0
    0
  • The highest members of the series as yet known are cerotene, C26H527 which is obtained by the distillation of Chinese wax and is a paraffinlike solid which melts at 57° C., and melene, CsoH60(?), which is obtained by the distillation of bees'-wax.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 62° C. (B.

    0
    0
  • The liquid boils at - 78.2° C. (1 atmo.), and by rapid evaporation can be made to solidify to a snow-white solid which melts at - 65° C. (see Liquid Gases).

    0
    0
  • The salt crystallizes in cubes of specific gravity 1.995; it melts at about 800° and volatilizes at a bright red heat.

    0
    0
  • This salt is very deliquescent; it melts at 45°, and at 100° decomposes into iodine and potassium iodide.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 114.2° C. and boils at 184.35° C. under atmospheric pressure (W.

    0
    0
  • It will only combine with hydrogen in the presence of a catalyst, but combines with many other elements directly; for example, phosphorus melts and then inflames, antimony burns in the vapour, and mercury when heated with iodine combines with it rapidly.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless, crystalline, deliquescent solid which melts at 135° C., and at 140° C. is completely decomposed into iodine pentoxide, water and oxygen.

    0
    0
  • The free acid is a colourless liquid with a smell resembling bitter almonds; it boils at 26.1° C., and may be solidified, in which condition it melts at -14° C. It burns with a blue flame,.

    0
    0
  • Allyl cyanide boils at 119° C. Benzonitrile boils at 190.6° C. When solidified it melts att7° C. It is easily soluble in alcohol and ether.

    0
    0
  • Formic acid is a colourless, sharp-smelling liquid, which crystallizes at 0° C., melts at 8.6° C. and boils at 100.8° C. Its specific gravity is 1.22 (20°/4°).

    0
    0
  • Anhydroecgonine melts at 235° C., and has an acid and a basic character.

    0
    0
  • The benzene layer on evaporation deposits the antipyrine as a colourless crystalline solid which melts at 113° C. and is soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in water, melts at 193° C., and is decomposed at a higher temperature into chromium sesquioxide and oxygen; it is a very powerful oxidizing agent, acting violently on alcohol, converting it into acetaldehyde, and in glacial acetic acid solution converting naphthalene and anthracene into the corresponding quinones.

    0
    0
  • Amino-azo-benzene, C6H5 N2 C 6 H 4 NH 2, crystallizes in yellow plates or needles and melts at 126° C. Its constitution is determined by the facts that it may be prepared by reducing nitro-azo-benzene by ammonium sulphide and that by reduction with stannous chloride it yields aniline and.

    0
    0
  • It is an orange-red crystalline compound which melts at 154° C. Ortho-oxyazobenzene, C 6 H 5 N: N (1) C6H4.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 112-114° C. and is easily reduced to the corresponding hydrazo compound.

    0
    0
  • The former (known as the a or benz-anti-aldoxime) melts at 34-35° C.; the latter (0 or benz-syn-aldoxime) melts at 130° C. and is slowly transformed into the a form.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 632.7° C. (C. T.

    0
    0
  • In a similar way the curve FGH, between 30° and 55°, shows the effect of the hydrate Fe2Cl6.5H20, and the curve HJK that of the hydrate Fe 2 C1 6.4H 2 O, which, when pure, melts at 73.5° - the point J on the diagram.

    0
    0
  • The corresponding double chloride is a far better material; first, because it melts at about 180° C., and does not volatilize below a red heat, and second, because the voltage of aluminium chloride is 2.3 and that of sodium chloride 4.3, so that there is a much wider margin of safety to cover irregularities in the electric pressure.

    0
    0
  • The specific gravity of cast metal is 2.583, and of rolled 2.688 at 4° C. It melts at 626° C. (freezingpoint 654.5 Heycock and Neville).

    0
    0
  • Chloroform solidifies in the cold and then melts at - 62° C.; it boils at 61.2° C., and has a specific gravity I.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless solid, which melts at 80° C., and boils at 218° C. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system; it is to be noted that aand 0-naphthol assume almost identical forms, so that these three compounds have been called isomorphous.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 170° C., and is readily soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • Phenyl nitramine, C 6 H S NH N02, is a colourless crystalline solid, which melts at 46° C. Sodium amalgam in alkaline solution reduces it to phenylhydrazine.

    0
    0
  • It is a yellowish oil which melts at - 24° C.; it boils at 143-144° C., but cannot be distilled safely as it decomposes violently, giving nitrogen and ethyl fumarate.

    0
    0
  • Its hydrochloride melts at 163° C., and crystallizes from alcohol in colourless deliquescent prisms. Acetic anhydride converts the base into an acetamino-dimethyl pyrimidine, acetic acid and acetamide being also formed.

    0
    0
  • Its specific gravity is 6.1545, and it melts at 810°.

    0
    0
  • The remaining isomer, pivalic or trimethylacetic acid, (CH3)3C C02H, melts at 35° and boils at 163°.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in deliquescent prisms and melts with partial decomposition at 119-120° C. It behaves as a ketonic acid, being reduced in aqueous solution by sodium amalgam to tartronic acid, and also combining with phenylhydrazine and hydroxylamine.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 720° and decomposes rapidly above 800°, giving oxygen and thallous oxide.

    0
    0
  • The chloride when anhydrous is a crystalline mass which melts at 24°.

    0
    0
  • C0 The picrate melts at 182-183° C.

    0
    0
  • Gattermann, Ann., 1888, 244, p. 30), melts at 50° C. and boils at 61-62° C. In the presence of anhydrous aluminium chloride it reacts with aromatic hydrocarbons to form the amides of aromatic acids.

    0
    0
  • It is permanent in dry air, but tarnishes in moist air; it can be hammered and rolled; it melts at 623° C. It burns readily on heating, with a brilliant flame; and it also combines with chlorine,bromine, iodine, sulphur, phosphorus and cyanogen.

    0
    0
  • By heating gallium in a regulated stream of chlorine the dichloride GaC1 2 is obtained as a crystalline mass, which melts at 164° C. and readily decomposes on exposure to moist air.

    0
    0
  • It boils at 209°C., and melts at 3.6° C. (C.E.

    0
    0
  • It melts between 1400-1600° C. Its specific heat increases with rise of temperature, the mean value from 15° to 100° C. being 0.1084 (A.

    0
    0
  • It is a silvery white metal which melts at 38.5° C. and has a specific gravity of I 52.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in water, the solution being very alkaline and caustic. It melts at 301°.

    0
    0
  • The metal has a crystalline structure, and melts at about 2800°.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 248° and boils at 275.6°; the vapour density corresponds to the above formula.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 275° and boils at 34 6.7° (759.5 mm.).

    0
    0
  • It melts at 210.4° and boils at 227.5° forming a red vapour.

    0
    0
  • The crystalline hydrate melts at 50° C. The pure acid decomposes slowly on standing, but is stable in dilute aqueous solution.

    0
    0
  • It is an amorphous solid which melts at 54-55° C. On reduction with sodium in alcoholic solution it yields tetraethylene diamine (putrescein) and pyrollidine.

    0
    0
  • It melts without decomposition, and begins to give off oxygen at about 370° C. According to F.

    0
    0
  • The trihydrate melts at 114.5°, and boils at 170 0, giving off nitric acid, and leaving the basic salt Cu(NO 3) 2.3Cu(OH) 2.

    0
    0
  • It forms a crystalline powder which melts at 213° C. It is insoluble in alcohol, and nearly insoluble in cold water.

    0
    0
  • In the anhydrous state it melts at 205-206° C. Mesotartaric acid is formed when cinchonine tartrate is heated for some time at 170° C. (L.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in prisms, and in the anhydrous state melts at 140° C. On prolonged boiling with aqueous hydrochloric acid it yields racemic acid.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in octahedra, having a specific gravity of 3.2, and melts at 597° C. (T.

    0
    0
  • Its specific gravity varies from 6.7 to 6.86; it melts at 432° C. (Dalton), and boils between 1090 -1600 C. (T.

    0
    0
  • When two blocks of ice are placed loosely together so that the superfluous water which melts from them may drain away, the remaining water draws the blocks together with a force sufficient to cause the blocks to adhere by the process called Regelation.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 27° C. and boils at 243° C. Resorcin disulphonic Acid (HO) 2 C 6 H 2 (HSO 3) 2, is a deliquescent mass obtained by the action of sulphuric acid on resorcin (H.

    0
    0
  • Silver melts at about rooo C.; recent determinations give 960.7° (Heycock and Neville) and 962° (Becquerel); at higher temperatures it volatilizes with the formation of a pale blue vapour (Stas).

    0
    0
  • It melts at about 460° to a clear yellow liquid, which, on cooling, solidifies to a translucent resinous mass.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 427°, and darkens on exposure to air.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 435° and, on cooling, forms a yellow transparent mass.

    0
    0
  • Generally, if a solid be heated to a certain temperature, it melts or fuses, assuming the liquid condition (see Fusion); if the heating be continued the liquid boils and becomes a vapour (see Vaporization).

    0
    0
  • It is a crystalline solid which melts at 56° C. and boils at 204° C. It can only be diazotized in the presence of concentrated sulphuric acid, and even then the free diazonium sulphate is not stable, readily passing in the presence of water to a-oxypyridine.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 64° C. and boils at 250-252° C. The aminopyridines are readily soluble in water, and resemble the aliphatic amines in their general chemical properties.

    0
    0
  • Nitric acid oxidizes it to all the fatty acids from acetic to capric. Nitrous acid gives the isomeric elaidic acid, C $ H 17 CH: CH (CH 2] 7 CO 2 H, which is crystalline and melts at 51°.

    0
    0
  • The acid crystallizes in hexagonal prisms and melts at 58° C. It dissolves in water and yields a hydrate of composition H 2 SeO 4 H 2 O.

    0
    0
  • elektrochem., 1906, 55, p. 537) electrolyse a mixture of bromide and chloride which melts at 520°.

    0
    0
  • Its specific gravity is 0.59, and it melts at r80° C. It burns on ignition in air, and when strongly heated in an atmosphere of nitrogen it forms lithium nitride, Li 3 N.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 28° and boils at 250°.

    0
    0
  • It forms a colourless syrup, of specific gravity 1.2485 (1 5°/4°), and decomposes on distillation under ordinary atmospheric pressure; but at very low pressures (about i mm.) it distils at about 85° C., and then sets to a crystalline solid, which melts at about 18° C. It possesses the properties both of an acid and of an alcohol.

    0
    0
  • Stock (Ber., 1909, 42, 4510), who points out that ordinary red phosphorus melts at 605°-610°, whilst Hittorf's melts at 620°; moreover, the latter is less reactive than the former at high temperatures.

    0
    0
  • Deliquescent, rectangular tablets of H 4 P 2062H 2 O separate out on concentrating a solution in a vacuum, which on drying further give the acid, which melts at 55°, and decomposes suddenly when heated to 70° into phosphorous and metaphosphoric acids with a certain amount of hydrogen phosphide.

    0
    0
  • It sublimes when heated, but under pressure it melts at 148°, giving a normal vapour density, but on further heating it dissociates into the trichloride and chlorine; this dissociation may be retarded by vapourizing in an atmosphere of chlorine.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless liquid,boiling at 107.2°, and when solidified it melts at o 8°.

    0
    0
  • It boils at 139°, melts at - 54°, and has a specific gravity of o 8812.

    0
    0
  • It boils at 138°, melts at 15°, and has a specific gravity of o 8801 at 0°.

    0
    0
  • It melts at about 200° C., and at 210° to 255° it is resolved into carbon dioxide and pyrogallol, C 6 H 3 (OH) 3.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes from water in needles or prisms and in the anhydrous state melts at 253-254° C. Potassium permanganate oxidizes it to pyridine tricarboxylic acid (234).

    0
    0
  • It melts at 22-23° C. and boils at 240° C., and behaves in most respects similarly to quinoline.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 154-156° C., losing carbon dioxide and passing into cyclo-butane carboxylic acid, C 4 H 7 CO 2 H.

    0
    0
  • It forms white needles (from alcohol), melts at 95° and boils at 278°.

    0
    0
  • In the amorphous condition it can be obtained by condensing the vapour of the oxide at as high a temperature as possible, when a vitreous mass is produced, which melts at 200° C., has a specific gravity of 3.68-3.798, and is more soluble in water than the crystalline variety.

    0
    0
  • The temperature at which water freezes, and also at which ice melts, is so readily determined that it is employed as one of-the standard temperatures in the graduation of ordinary thermometer scales, this temperature being the zero of the Centigrade and Reaumur scales, and 32° of the Fahrenheit (see Thermometry).

    0
    0
  • It melts above 300°, and dissolves in 7800 parts of cold water and in 460 of boiling.

    0
    0
  • I t is deliquescent, and melts at 23° C. (M.

    0
    0
  • This is that portion, also, where in the spring, the ice being warmed by the heat of the sun reflected from the bottom, and also transmitted through the earth, melts first and forms a narrow canal about the still frozen middle.

    0
    0
  • When the snow melts they'll sink in the Polish swamps.

    0
    0
  • The measurement of extrudate swell of polymer melts using capillary extrusion rheometers is specified by the standard ISO 11443 [6 ].

    0
    0
  • Photo: Polar bear © Heather Crawford As Arctic sea ice melts, polar bears and seals are finding that their habitats are disappearing.

    0
    0
  • The paper is heated, the powder melts, and a raised ink surface is produced which you can feel with your fingers.

    0
    0
  • As more ice melts the methane contained in the ice crystals is released in greater quantities.

    0
    0
  • The heat melts the frozen basil, allowing the contents to mix into your recipe.

    0
    0
  • Luxury Bath Melts - Bath melts contain moisturizers and essential oils, and melt exquisitely in hot water for a luxurious bath.

    0
    0
  • The creamy pencil melts on contact with the lips, so as you apply it you're wearing it down slightly.

    0
    0
  • Stir gently with a whisk until the chocolate melts.

    0
    0
  • Bake a white chocolate soufflé by using white chocolate or white chocolate wafer melts colored with flesh tone food dye.

    0
    0
  • Remove the pot from the heat and stir in the cheddar cheese until it melts.

    0
    0
  • As butter melts, brush it up onto the sides of the pan.

    0
    0
  • As the oven heats and the butter melts, put the eggs in a food processor or a blender and blend for one minute.

    0
    0
  • You have to do something when the snow melts.

    0
    0
  • Use candles, wax melts, or scent diffusers to distribute the aromas.

    0
    0
  • Hold the image a few inches above the heat source until the powder melts.

    0
    0
  • Whether you're looking for readymade, tinted fondant, or candy melts to complete a cake, you may find the perfect source through the same site that inspired you.

    0
    0
  • You do not want to overheat or burn the soap, so check often until you know how quickly it melts.

    0
    0
  • The moment the snow melts it glows into solid sheets of purplish-rose color.

    0
    0
  • When the first hint of warmth melts winter's chilly mantle, gardeners across the land start asking, "When, oh when do you plant strawberries?"

    0
    0
  • The flavor is exceptional and when sliced hot with butter, it practically melts in your mouth.

    0
    0
  • You'll have to buy ice everyday, because it melts.

    0
    0
  • Cash is crass, flowers wilt and chocolate melts.

    0
    0
  • As the snow melts away and the days become a little longer, we can look forward to all sorts of Spring cell phones to usher in the new season, along with the blooming flowers and singing birds.

    0
    0
  • One ganache recipe (6 ounces of chocolate and 6 ounces of cream heated over a Bain Marie until the chocolate melts.

    0
    0
  • It exists as a solid at room temperature but melts easily and quickly at temperatures slightly higher than room temperature.

    0
    0
  • Check every few minutes until the sandwich is completely grilled; it won't take long before the grill toasts both sides of the sandwich and melts the cheese.

    0
    0
  • It won't take long before the grill toasts both sides of the sandwich and melts the cheese.

    0
    0
  • Each time the ice melts down by about two inches, add more ice and two more cups of salt.

    0
    0
  • You're looking for 15 fluid ounces of wax, so if yours melts to less than that, add some more.

    0
    0
  • They're somewhat less complicated than paraffin candles, especially because the wax melts in the microwave and only requires one pour.

    0
    0
  • There are even aroma melts, sachets, and simmers.

    0
    0
  • Wax melts are highly scented and perfect for use in a simmer pot and the fragrances last up to ten hours.

    0
    0
  • Scent in candles is released when the wax melts and pools at the top of the candle.

    0
    0
  • The bars themselves are made of food grade petroleum based wax, which is quite soft and melts easily using a low heat source.

    0
    0
  • Instead, it melts into a pool and releases its scent.

    0
    0
  • Even the wax never gets extremely hot, as it melts at such a low heat.

    0
    0
  • The wax melts slowly and evenly, releasing vibrant scent into your home or office.

    0
    0
  • As the wax melts, fragrance is released into the home.

    0
    0
  • The wick contains the flame that slowly burns and melts the wax, allowing the candle to last several hours.

    0
    0
  • If the wax melts too quickly, the result is a pool of hot, runny, liquid wax that tends to pool and then spill over the sides of the candle.

    0
    0
  • The solid wax melts as it is heated and is changed into a liquid state of matter.

    0
    0
  • This occurs because softer wax contains more oil and melts at lower temperatures.

    0
    0
  • The mayor tricks Frosty and leads him to go ice skating, where he falls through a patch of thin ice and melts.

    0
    0
  • The Cargo Pro Series 900 Hybrid Cover is marketed as being able to withstand "over 2000 lbs. or crushing force", though it probably melts into an acid pool at the touch of a toddler.

    0
    0
  • They escape to the swamp, where the girls face promptly melts away.

    0
    0
  • Literally melts away, like into peanut butter consistency.

    0
    0
  • Then the paper is heated until the powder melts, resulting in a raised ink which you can feel with your fingertips when you rub the surface of the card.

    0
    0
  • Heat from a fuser unit melts the toner onto the page, creating a copy or printout.

    0
    0
  • Techniques covered include making cold-process soap bars, liquid soap, clear soap, massage melts, and bath bombs.

    0