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melting-point

melting-point

melting-point Sentence Examples

  • that of the greatest fusibility or lowest melting-point.

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  • When heated above its melting-point, it yields ammonia, cyanuric acid, biuret and ammelide.

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  • By rapidly stirring molten iron oxide into molten pig iron in a furnace shaped like a saucer, slightly inclined and turning around its axis, at a temperature but little above the melting-point of the metal itself, the phosphorus and silicon are removed rapidly, without removing much of the carbon, and by this means an extremely pure cast iron is made.

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  • Soc., 18 93, 6 3, p. 465) states, that the melting-point of any odd member of a homologous series is lower than the melting-point of the even member containing one carbon atom less.

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  • Much information as to the nature of an alloy can be obtained by placing several small ingots of the same alloy in a furnace which is above the melting-point of the alloy, and allowing the temperature to fall slowly and uniformly.

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  • The dry process is more frequently practised, for the easy reducibility of the oxide and sulphide, together with the low melting-point of the metal, renders it possible to effect a ready separation of the metal from the gangue and impurities.

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  • The phenomena were first observed without mutual transformation, aldehyde melting at - 118°, paraldehyde at 13°, the only mutual influence being a lowering of melting-point, with a minimum at - 120° in the eutectic point.

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  • lo g i op =o 6640+8.585t/e-4.70(log109/Bo-Mt/6), where t=9 -273, and M =0.4343, the modulus of common logarithms. These formulae are practically accurate for a range of 20° or 30° C. on either side of the melting-point, as the pressure is so small that the vapour may be treated as an ideal gas.

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  • Lactide, O` CH (CH 3) CO >O, a crystalline solid, of melting-point CO CH(CH3) C., is one of the products obtained by the distillation of lactic acid.

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  • He proceeds to calculate from this expression the difference of vapour-pressures of ice and water in the immediate neighbourhood of the melting-point, but does not observe that the vapour-pressures themselves may be more accurately calculated for a considerable interval of temperature by means of formula (23), by substituting the appropriate values of the latent heats and specific heats.

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  • Certain regularities attend the corresponding property of the melting-point.

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  • It is to be noted that although the correlation of melting-point with constitution has not been developed to such an extent as the chemical significance of other physical properties, the melting-point is the most valuable test of the purity of a substance, a circumstance due in considerable measure to the fact that impurities always tend to lower the melting-point.

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  • The overheating curve of rhombic sulphur extends along the curve AC, where C is the melting-point of monoclinic sulphur.

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  • Acetaldoxime, CH 3 CH: NOH, crystallizes in needles which melt at 47° C. On continued fusion the melting point gradually sinks to about 13° C., probably owing to conversion into a polymeric form.

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  • When zinc is placed on the lead (heated to above the melting-point of zinc), liquefied and brought into intimate contact with the lead by stirring, gold, copper, silver and lead will combine with the zinc in the order given.

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  • The magnetic properties of the metal at different temperatures and in fields up to 1350 units have been studied by P. Curie (loc. cit.), who found that its " specific susceptibility " (K) was independent of the strength of the field, but decreased with rise of temperature up to the melting-point, 273° C. His results appear to show the relation - K X10 6 = I'381 - O'o0155t°.

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  • Putting t°= - 182 in the equation given above for Curie's results, we get K X Io 6 = - 1.66, a value sufficiently near that obtained by Fleming and Dewar to suggest the probability that the diamagnetic susceptibility varies inversely as the temperature between-182° and the melting-point.

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  • The metal is dimorphous: by cooling molten tin at ordinary air temperature tetragonal crystals are obtained, while by cooling at a temperature just below the melting point rhombic forms are produced, When exposed for a sufficient time to very low temperatures (to - 39° C. for 14 hours), tin becomes so brittle that it falls into a grey powder, termed the grey modification, under a pestle; it indeed sometimes crumbles into powder spontaneously.

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  • Heated above its melting point it polymerizes to di-cyandiamide (CN2H2)2, which at 150° C. is transformed into the polymer n-tri-cyantriamide or melamine (CN 2 H 2) 3, the mass solidifying.

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  • de la Bastie's process of " toughening " glass consisted in dipping glass, raised to a temperature slightly below the melting-point, into molten tallow.

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  • It has in general one value for the powdery metal as obtained by reduction of the oxide in hydrogen below the melting point of the metal, another for the metal in the state which it assumes spontaneously on freezing, and this latter value, in general, is modified by hammering, rolling, drawing, &c. These mechanical operations do not necessarily add to the density; stamping, it is true, does so necessarily, but rolling or drawing occasionally causes a diminution of the density.

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  • A bath, even of very impure zinc, is allowed to stand at about the temperature of the melting-point of the metal for forty-eight or more hours, whereupon the more easily oxidizable impurities can be largely removed in the dross at the top, the heavier metals such as lead and iron settling towards the bottom.

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  • It is then separated in a centrifugal machine, the low melting-point impurities are removed by means of hot water, and the residue is finally hot-pressed.

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  • Japanese bronze is well suited for castings, not only because of its low melting-point, great fluidity and capacity for taking sharp impressions, but also because it has a particularly smooth surface and readily develops a fine patina.

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  • This agrees with the well-known fact that the presence of an impurity in a substance depresses its melting-point.

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  • The mixture C has a lower freezing or melting point than that of any other mixture; it is called the eutectic mixture.

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  • The substance AuAl 2 is the most remarkable compound of two metals that has so far been discovered; although it contains so much aluminium its melting-point is as high as that of gold.

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  • This compound melts at 350° C., a temperature far above the melting-point of either sodium or mercury.

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  • The melting-point has been variously given, the early values ranging from 1425° C. to 1035° C. Using improved methods, C. T.

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  • Its melting-point is variously given as 268.3° (F.

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  • A suboxide, Na 3 0, appears to be formed as a grey mass when a clean surface of the metal is exposed to air, or when pure air is passed through the metal just above its melting point (De Forcrand, Compt.

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  • They are mostly colourless liquids which boil without decomposition, or solids of low melting point.

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  • At intervals the current is interrupted, the cover removed, and the temperature of the vessel raised considerably above the melting-point of magnesium.

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  • At B we have the non-variant cryohydric point at which ice, the hydrate Fe2C16 12H20, the saturated solution and the vapour are in equilibrium at 55° C. As the proportion 26 of salt is increased, the melting point of the con glomerate rises, till, at the -40 maximum point C, we have the pure compound the hydrate with twelve molecules ¦¦ 0.b, E, ?

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  • addition of salt lowers the melting point again, till at D we obtain another non-variant point.

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  • Thus in two ways at least a constant melting point can be obtained in a two-component system.

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  • The freezing and melting point curves are exactly similar to theoretical curves of fig.

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  • Of the simple compounds, only the fluoride is amenable to electrolysis in the fused state, since the chloride begins to volatilize below its melting-point, and the latter is only 5° below its boiling-point.

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  • So obtained, it is a white crystalline solid, which slowly sublimes just below its melting point 094 0).

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  • In 1856 Bessemer not only invented his extraordinary process of making the heat developed by the rapid oxidation of the impurities in pig iron raise the temperature above the exalted melting-point of the resultant purified steel, but also made it widely known that this steel was a very valuable substance.

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  • In fact, the molten iron is heated so far above its melting point that, instead of being run at once into pigs as is usual, it may, without solidifying, be carried even several miles in large clay-lined ladles to the mill where it is to be converted into steel.

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  • In the hearth of the blast furnace the heat made latent by the fusion of the iron and slag must of course be supplied by some body which is itself at a temperature above the melting point of these bodies, which for simplicity of exposition we may call the critical temperature of the blast-furnace process, because heat will flow only from a hotter to a cooler object.

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  • (5) In that carburizing lowers the melting point of the iron greatly, it lowers somewhat the temperature to which the mineral matter of the ore has to be raised in order that the iron may be separated from it, because this separation requires that both iron and slag shall be very fluid.

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  • As the melting point of the metal is gradually raised by the progressive decarburization, it at length passes above the temperature of the furnace, about 1400° C., with the consequence that the metal, now below its melting point, solidifies in pasty grains, or " comes to nature."

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  • The two great essential discoveries were first that the rapid passage of air through molten cast iron raised its temperature above the melting point of low-carbon steel, or as it was then called " malleable iron," and second that this low-carbon steel, which Bessemer was the first to make in important quantities, was in fact an extraordinarily valuable substance when made under proper conditions.

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  • For making castings, especially those which are so thin and intricate that, in order that the molten steel may remain molten long enough to run into the thin parts of the mould, it must be heated initially very far above its melting-point, the Bessemer process has a very great advantage in that it can develop a much higher temperature than is attainable in either of its competitors, the crucible and the openhearth processes.

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  • That removal progressively raises the melting-point of the metal, after line Aa of fig.

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  • makes the charge more and more infusible; and this progressive rise of the melting-point of the charge must not be allowed to outrun the actual rise of temperature, or in other words the charge must always be kept molten, because once solidified it is very hard to remelt.

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  • These technical difficulties are due chiefly to the very high melting point of the metal, nearly 1500° C. (2732° F.), and to the consequent great contraction which it undergoes in cooling through the long range between this temperature and that of the room.

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  • This temperature is somewhat different from the ordinary melting-point, the latter corresponding to atmospheric pressure, the former to the maximum vapour-pressure; and so we come to a third relation for polymorphism.

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  • Just as the melting-point changes with pressure, the transition-point also changes; even the same quantitative relation holds for both, as L.

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  • From this it follows that the stable form must have the higher melting-point, since at the melting-point the vapour of the solid and of the liquid have the same pressure.

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  • Thus prismatic sulphur has a higher melting-point (120°) than the rhombic form (116°), and it is even possible to calculate the difference theoretically from the thermodynamic relations.

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  • 7°, is observed for all mixtures; this has been called the "natural melting-point."

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  • Rothe and Alexander Smith's interesting observations on sulphur, results have been obtained which tend to prove that the melting-point, as well as the appearance of two layers in the liquid state, correspond to unstable conditions.

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  • Its melting-point is below that of silver.

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  • It is a thick oil which sets at - 20° C. to a mass of crystals of melting point o C, and boiling point 236-237°C. Oxidation with ferric chloride converts it into dicarvacrol, whilst phosphorus pentachloride transforms it into chlorcymol.

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  • These melt between 91° and 95° C. The addition of cadmium gives still greater fusibility; in Wood's metal, for instance, which is Darcet's metal with half the tin replaced by cadmium, the melting point is lowered to 66°-71° C.; while another described by Lipowitz and containing 15 parts of bismuth, 8 of lead, 4 of tin and 3 of cadmium, softens at about 55° and is completely liquid a little above 60°.

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  • By the addition of mercury to Darcet's metal the melting point may be reduced so low as 45°.

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  • By suitable modification in the proportions of the components, a series of alloys can be made which melt at various temperatures above the boiling point of water; for example, with 8 parts of bismuth, 8 of lead and 3 of tin the melting point is 123°, and with 8 of bismuth, 30 of lead and 24 of tin it is 172°.

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  • By different authorities its melting-point is stated at from 1000° to 1200° C.; C. T.

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  • Its density at o° is 1.836; this regularly diminishes up to the melting-point, 44.3°, when a sudden drop occurs.

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  • It crystallizes in needles, which contain two molecules of water of crystallization, and melt at 156° C. When heated above the melting-point it loses carbon dioxide and yields quinoline.

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  • Rosin is a brittle and friable resin, with a faint piny odour; the melting-point varies with different specimens, some being semi-fluid at the temperature of boiling water, while others do not melt till 220 or 250° F.

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  • It liquefies when heated under pressure, and its melting point lies between 446° C. and 457° C. The vapour of arsenic is of a golden yellow colour, and has a garlic odour.

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  • This is not only due to the fact that they are mixtures of several glycerides, but also that even pure glycerides, such as tristearin, exhibit two melting-points, a so-called "double melting-point," the triglycerides melting at a certain temperature, then solidifying at a higher temperature to melt again on further heating.

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  • In this way the metal, owing to its high conductivity and low specific heat as compared to that of water, is kept at a temperature far below its melting point if the water is renewed quickly enough.

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  • eutectic point is the lowest possible melting point (equilibrium freezing point) that a mixture of solutes may have.

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  • One of the most mouthwatering of these has to be Cold War: Melting Point.

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  • The results show that the wetting of the lead-free alloys broadly follows that of tin-lead solder if allowance is made for the melting point.

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  • This is increasingly the case, as lead-free soldering is beginning to be introduced to the industry with its accompanying higher melting point solders.

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  • tabulated at intervals of 10 K in the range from the melting point to 0.8 of the critical temperature.

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  • The resulting surface is usually duller and less lustrous than that obtained by the use of molten zinc. Another method of forming a coating of zinc, known as "sherardizing," was invented by Sherard CowperColes, who found that metals embedded in zinc dust (a product obtained in zinc manufacture and consisting of metallic zinc mixed with a certain amount of zinc oxide) and heated to temperatures well below the melting point of zinc, become coated with a layer of that metal.

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  • It is a white crystalline solid of melting point 43° C.; it boils at 210° C., and it can be distilled without decomposition.

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  • rend., 1888, 106, p. 1357.) The gas may be liquefied by a pressure of about 17 atmospheres, the liquid so obtained boiling at - 61.8° C.; and by further cooling it yields a solid, the melting point of which is given by various observers as - 82° to - 86° C. (see Ladenburg, Ber., 1900, 33, p. 6 37).

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  • Acetaldoxime, CH 3 CH: NOH, crystallizes in needles which melt at 47° C. On continued fusion the melting point gradually sinks to about 13° C., probably owing to conversion into a polymeric form.

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  • The magnetic properties of the metal at different temperatures and in fields up to 1350 units have been studied by P. Curie (loc. cit.), who found that its " specific susceptibility " (K) was independent of the strength of the field, but decreased with rise of temperature up to the melting-point, 273° C. His results appear to show the relation - K X10 6 = I'381 - O'o0155t°.

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  • Putting t°= - 182 in the equation given above for Curie's results, we get K X Io 6 = - 1.66, a value sufficiently near that obtained by Fleming and Dewar to suggest the probability that the diamagnetic susceptibility varies inversely as the temperature between-182° and the melting-point.

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  • The metal is dimorphous: by cooling molten tin at ordinary air temperature tetragonal crystals are obtained, while by cooling at a temperature just below the melting point rhombic forms are produced, When exposed for a sufficient time to very low temperatures (to - 39° C. for 14 hours), tin becomes so brittle that it falls into a grey powder, termed the grey modification, under a pestle; it indeed sometimes crumbles into powder spontaneously.

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  • Heated above its melting point it polymerizes to di-cyandiamide (CN2H2)2, which at 150° C. is transformed into the polymer n-tri-cyantriamide or melamine (CN 2 H 2) 3, the mass solidifying.

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  • This compound melts at 350° C., a temperature far above the melting-point of either sodium or mercury.

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  • The melting-point has been variously given, the early values ranging from 1425° C. to 1035° C. Using improved methods, C. T.

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  • Its melting-point is variously given as 268.3° (F.

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  • At B we have the non-variant cryohydric point at which ice, the hydrate Fe2C16 12H20, the saturated solution and the vapour are in equilibrium at 55° C. As the proportion 26 of salt is increased, the melting point of the con glomerate rises, till, at the -40 maximum point C, we have the pure compound the hydrate with twelve molecules ¦¦ 0.b, E, ?

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  • Of the simple compounds, only the fluoride is amenable to electrolysis in the fused state, since the chloride begins to volatilize below its melting-point, and the latter is only 5° below its boiling-point.

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  • As the melting point of the metal is gradually raised by the progressive decarburization, it at length passes above the temperature of the furnace, about 1400° C., with the consequence that the metal, now below its melting point, solidifies in pasty grains, or " comes to nature."

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  • In the Bessemer or " pneumatic" process, which indeed might be called the " fuel-less " process, molten pig iron is converted into steel by having its carbon, silicon and manganese, and often its phosphorus and sulphur, oxidized and thus removed by air forced through it in so many fine streams and hence so rapidly that the heat generated by the oxidation of these impurities suffices in and by itself, unaided by burning any other fuel, not only to keep the iron molten, but even to raise its temperature from a point initially but little above the melting point of cast iron, say 1150 to 1250° C., to one well above the melting point of the resultant steel, say i soo C. The " Bessemer converter " or " vessel " (fig.

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  • These technical difficulties are due chiefly to the very high melting point of the metal, nearly 1500° C. (2732° F.), and to the consequent great contraction which it undergoes in cooling through the long range between this temperature and that of the room.

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  • Thus prismatic sulphur has a higher melting-point (120°) than the rhombic form (116°), and it is even possible to calculate the difference theoretically from the thermodynamic relations.

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  • The phenomena were first observed without mutual transformation, aldehyde melting at - 118°, paraldehyde at 13°, the only mutual influence being a lowering of melting-point, with a minimum at - 120° in the eutectic point.

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  • 7°, is observed for all mixtures; this has been called the "natural melting-point."

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  • It is a thick oil which sets at - 20° C. to a mass of crystals of melting point o C, and boiling point 236-237°C. Oxidation with ferric chloride converts it into dicarvacrol, whilst phosphorus pentachloride transforms it into chlorcymol.

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  • These melt between 91° and 95° C. The addition of cadmium gives still greater fusibility; in Wood's metal, for instance, which is Darcet's metal with half the tin replaced by cadmium, the melting point is lowered to 66°-71° C.; while another described by Lipowitz and containing 15 parts of bismuth, 8 of lead, 4 of tin and 3 of cadmium, softens at about 55° and is completely liquid a little above 60°.

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  • By the addition of mercury to Darcet's metal the melting point may be reduced so low as 45°.

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  • By suitable modification in the proportions of the components, a series of alloys can be made which melt at various temperatures above the boiling point of water; for example, with 8 parts of bismuth, 8 of lead and 3 of tin the melting point is 123°, and with 8 of bismuth, 30 of lead and 24 of tin it is 172°.

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  • lo g i op =o 6640+8.585t/e-4.70(log109/Bo-Mt/6), where t=9 -273, and M =0.4343, the modulus of common logarithms. These formulae are practically accurate for a range of 20° or 30° C. on either side of the melting-point, as the pressure is so small that the vapour may be treated as an ideal gas.

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  • By different authorities its melting-point is stated at from 1000° to 1200° C.; C. T.

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  • Its density at o° is 1.836; this regularly diminishes up to the melting-point, 44.3°, when a sudden drop occurs.

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  • It crystallizes in needles, which contain two molecules of water of crystallization, and melt at 156° C. When heated above the melting-point it loses carbon dioxide and yields quinoline.

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  • Rosin is a brittle and friable resin, with a faint piny odour; the melting-point varies with different specimens, some being semi-fluid at the temperature of boiling water, while others do not melt till 220 or 250° F.

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  • It liquefies when heated under pressure, and its melting point lies between 446° C. and 457° C. The vapour of arsenic is of a golden yellow colour, and has a garlic odour.

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  • The data are tabulated at intervals of 10 K in the range from the melting point to 0.8 of the critical temperature.

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  • Make sure if you choose these that you don't use them near your stove; they have an extremely low melting point and can be damaged by everyday cooking.

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  • Soy wax does best for container candles because it has a low melting point and is not very hard.

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  • Since soybean oil lowers the melting point of the candle, the candle burns cooler and has a faster scent dispersion.

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  • It's a great idea to use a thermometer instead of just guessing or going by what you think the melting point of the wax you're using is.

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  • Soy candles have a lower melting point then paraffin wax candles.

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  • Tallow candles have a low melting point and give off a rather unpleasant odor, so these candles weren't anything like the ones we enjoy today.

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  • The low melting point caused the candles to burn quickly, and the wax ran down the sides, pooling in large masses.

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  • The addition of soybean oil lowers the melting point of the candle.

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  • Tungsten aka wolfram is a heavy element with an atomic number of 74 and has the highest melting point of all elements.

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  • It is a white crystalline solid of melting point 43° C.; it boils at 210° C., and it can be distilled without decomposition.

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  • The cadmium molecule, as shown by determinations of the density of its vapour, is monatomic. The metal unites with the majority of the heavy metals to form alloys; some of these, the so-called fusible alloys, find a useful application from the fact that they possess a low melting-point.

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  • - Several interesting phenomena are witnessed when sulphur is heated above its melting point.

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  • Paraffin wax is tested for melting-point (or setting-point), and the semi-refined product is further examined to ascertain the percentage of oil, water and dirt present.

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