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melt

melt

melt Sentence Examples

  • She'll melt when she sees you.

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  • This pond has no stream passing through it to melt or wear away the ice.

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  • to melt the sulphur.

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  • The rain would pack down the mud and melt the rest of the snow.

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  • I'm going to melt his brain.

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  • It was more than comforting; she wanted to melt against him and stay there.

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  • You might not melt at my feet, but you want to know more.

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  • King Sun laughed softly to himself when the delicate jars began to melt and break.

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  • His lips brushed hers, and she felt something within her melt at the simple touch.

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  • It crystallizes in yellow needles which melt at T 7 T ° C., and are only sparingly soluble in alcohol.

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  • These are washed with ammonium chloride until the filtrate is colourless, ignited, fused with caustic potash and nitre, the melt dissolved in water and nitric acid added to the solution until the colour of potassium ruthenate disappears.

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  • Never mind, she said to herself, watching the woman melt in front of Xander.

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  • It crystallizes in needles which melt at 320° C. and is soluble in caustic alkalis.

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  • You may melt your metals and cast them into the most beautiful moulds you can; they will never excite me like the forms which this molten earth flows out into.

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  • He said: "If this misfortune were to fall upon me, provided it happened without any fault of mine, even if the Society were to melt away like salt in water, I believe that a quarter of an hour's recollection in God would be sufficient to console me and to reestablish peace within me."

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  • He picked at his food while the rest of us wolfed down stacks of pancakes and melt in your mouth sausage, the finest breakfast I'd eaten in years.

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  • Several days of unseasonable melt had boiled the river to a noisy torrent of cascading water.

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  • It commonly opens about the first of April, a week or ten days later than Flint's Pond and Fair Haven, beginning to melt on the north side and in the shallower parts where it began to freeze.

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  • The gloom that enveloped the army was filled with their groans, which seemed to melt into one with the darkness of the night.

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  • He gave him a smile and a poke and Donnie's anxiety seemed to melt away.

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  • She wanted to melt against him, to let him help her shoulder the weight on her shoulders.

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  • The sheets were so fine and light they seemed to melt against her skin.

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  • There will be great outbursts of polar ice, but this will melt at higher latitudes than in the periods when the tide-generating force is minimal.

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  • It forms white prisms, which melt at 128°-219°.

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  • There will be great outbursts of polar ice, but this will melt at higher latitudes than in the periods when the tide-generating force is minimal.

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  • She might just melt at his feet like Toni did.

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  • Acridine crystallizes in needles which melt at 110° C. It is characterized by its irritating action on the skin, and by the blue fluorescence shown by solutions of its salts.

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  • She might just melt at his feet like Toni did.

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  • There is a certain limit of time in less than which no amount of heat can melt the snow.

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  • Benzamide, C6H5�Conh2,, crystallizes in leaflets which melt at 130° C. It is prepared by the action of ammonium carbonate on benzoyl chloride.

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  • It is formed by reducing diortho-dinitrodiphenyl with sodium amalgam and methyl alcohol, or by heating diphenylene-ortho-dihydrazine with hydrochloric acid to 150° C. It crystallizes in needles which melt at 156° C. Potassium permanganate oxidizes it to pyridazine tetracarboxylic acid.

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  • She flung her arms around him, the sweet smell of innocence and softness of her body making him melt.

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  • Hearing the heartbreak in her voice, Jule found his resolve to keep his distance melt.

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  • She emerged into the bright light of a warm December afternoon and began to melt.

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  • The truth of his words made her last meager attempt at resistance melt.

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  • He took a jar lid from the cupboard and lit a match, holding it on the bottom of the candle until it began to melt.

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  • Xander licked his fangs and lips clean, enjoying her taste while she stared at him with far too much emotion for him to determine what she'd do: freak out or melt.

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  • Phenylpropiolic acid, C 6 H 5 C:C CO 2 H, formed by the action of alcoholic potash on cinnamic acid dibromide, C 6 H 5 CHBr CHBr CO 2 H, crystallizes in long needles or prisms which melt at 136-137° C. When heated with water to 120° C. it yields phenyl acetylene CsH b C; CH.

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  • It crystallizes in colourless plates or needles, which melt at 99° C. Its solutions in alcohol and ether have a faint blue fluorescence.

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  • Phenanthrene-quinone, [C 6 H 4] 2 [CO] 21 crystallizes in orange needles which melt at 198° C. It possesses the characteristic properties of a diketone, forming crystalline derivatives with sodium bisulphite and a dioxime with hydroxylamine.

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  • It crystallizes from water in large rhombic crystals, which melt at 118° C. Oxidizing agents convert it into benzaldehyde.

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  • They also melt frankincense as a depilatory, and smear their hands with a paste into the composition of which frankincense enters, for the purpose of communicating to them an attractive perfume.

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  • It forms white crystals, which melt at 40° C., and are readily soluble in water, alcohol and ether.

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  • It crystallizes in octahedra which melt at 120.5° C. and boil at 290° C. Its vapour burns with a red flame.

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  • It may be solidified to rhombic crystals which melt at 5.4° C. (Mansfield obtained perfectly pure benzene by freezing a carefully fractionated sample.) It boils at 80 4°, and the vapour is highly inflammable, the flame being extremely smoky.

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  • It forms hard white rhombic prisms (with 1H 2 0), which become anhydrous at 400 and melt with decomposition at 205°.

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  • For the desulphurization of zinc blende where it is not intended to collect and save the sulphur there are many mechanical kilns, generally classified as straight-line, horse-shoe, turret and shaft kilns; all of these may be made to do good work on moderately clean ores which do not melt at the temperature of desulphurization.

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  • It crystallizes in prisms which melt at 36° C. and boil at 201 0.8 C. It is soluble in water, and the aqueous solution gives a blue coloration with ferric chloride.

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  • by fusing the mineral, very finely powdered, with six times its weight of potassium bisulphate in a platinum crucible, then extracting the melt with cold water and boiling the filtered solution for a long time.

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  • A better method is Wohler's, in which the finely powdered mineral is fused with twice its weight of potassium carbonate in a platinum crucible, the melt powdered and treated in a platinum basin with aqueous hydrofluoric acid.

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  • They are obtained by neutralizing the solution of the acid, or by fusing the oxide with potassium carbonate and treating the melt with hydrofluoric acid.

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  • It crystallizes in white plates, which melt at 45° C. and boil at 302° C. It is almost insoluble in water, but readily volatilizes in steam.

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  • Orthophenylene diamine, C 6 H 4 (NH2)2, crystallizes from water in plates, which melt at 102 -103° C. and boil at 256-258° C. When heated with io% hydrochloric acid to 180° C. it yields pyrocatechin (Jacob Meyer, Ber., 1897, 30, p. 2569).

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  • Metaphenylene diamine crystallizes in rhombic plates which melt at 63° C. and boil at 287° C. It is easily soluble in water and alcohol.

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  • It crystallizes in tables which melt at 140° C. and boil at 267° C. When heated with 10% hydrochloric acid to 180 C. it yields hydroquinone (J.

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  • Strontium chloride, SrC1 2.6H 2 O, is obtained by dissolving the carbonate in hydrochloric acid, or by fusing the carbonate with calcium chloride and extracting the melt with water.

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  • It forms deliquescent crystals, which are readily soluble in alcohol and melt at ioo° C. When heated for some time at 130° C. it yields fumaric acid (q.v.), and on rapid heating at 180° C. gives maleic anhydride and fumaric acid.

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  • Its ethyl ester, known as oxamaethane, crystallizes in rhombic plates which melt at 114-115° C. Phosphorus pentachloride converts it into cyan-carbonic ester, the ethyl oxamine chloride first formed being unstable: ROOC CONH2 -R000 C(C1 2) NH 2 --)CN COOR.

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  • It crystallizes in plates which melt at 220-221° C. (with decomposition).

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  • If we melt copper and add to it about 30% of zinc, or 20 of tin, we obtain uniform liquids which when solidified are the well-known substances brass and bell-metal.

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  • If we melt an alloy and chill it before it has wholly solidified, we often get evidence of the crystalline character of the solid matter which first forms. Fig.

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  • Sodium aurosulphide, NaAuS 4H 2 O, is prepared by fusing gold with sodium sulphide and sulphur, the melt being extracted with water, filtered in an atmosphere of nitrogen, and evaporated in a vacuum over sulphuric acid.

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  • Oliveri, Gazz., 1886, 16, p. 493) It crystallizes in colourless needles which melt at 50° C. It possesses a disagreeable faecal odour, sublimes readily, and turns brown on exposure to air.

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  • Weith, Ber., 1880, 13, 1300); or in the form of its acetyl derivative by heating /3-naphthol with ammonium acetate to 270-280° C. It forms odourless, colourless plates which melt at 111-112° C. It gives no colour with ferric chloride.

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  • It crystallizes in large plates, which melt at 98.5° C. and boil at 390° C. It is readily soluble in warm ether and in hot glacial acetic acid.

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  • The extraction from ores in which the bismuth is present in the metallic condition may be accomplished by a simple liquation, or melting, in which the temperature is just sufficient to melt the bismuth, or by a complete fusion of the ore.

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  • The precipitated tellurium is then fused with potassium cyanide, the melt extracted with water and the element precipitated by drawing a current of air through the solution and finally distilled in a current of hydrogen.

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  • The latter often gives birth to prodigious icebergs and ice islands, which are carried northward by ocean currents, nearly as far as the tropical zone before they melt.

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  • It forms small cubes which melt at a red heat and volatilize readily.

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  • Caesium nitrate, CsNO 3, is obtained by dissolving the carbonate in nitric acid, and crystallizes in glittering prisms, which melt readily, and on heating evolve oxygen and leave a residue of caesium nitrite.

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  • Anthraquinone crystallizes in yellow needles or prisms, which melt at 277° C. It is soluble in hot benzene, sublimes easily, and is very stable towards oxidizing agents.

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  • It is obtained as a yellowish coloured mass and can be sublimed in the form of needles which melt at 40° C. It possesses an unpleasant smell and its vapour is extremely poisonous.

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  • Troost produced crystallized zirconium by fusing the double fluoride with aluminium in a graphite crucible at the temperature of melting iron, and extracting the aluminium from the melt with hydrochloric acid.

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  • The porcelain-like melt is powdered, boiled with water, and acidified with hydrofluoric acid, and the residual potassium fluosilicate is filtered off.

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  • It usually forms a Chin syrup which on concentration in a vacuum over sulphuric: acid deposits hard, transparent, rhombic prisms which melt at 41.7°.

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  • At ordinary temperatures it crystallizes from aqueous solutions in large colourless monoclinic prisms, which effloresce in dry air, and at 35° C. melt in their water of crystallization.

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  • It crystallizes in large transparent prisms, which melt on heating and decompose, leaving a residue of metaphosphoric acid, (HP03).

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  • Moissan); it has been liquefied, the liquid also being of a yellow colour and boiling at - 187° C. It is the most active of all the chemical elements; in contact with hydrogen combination takes place between the two gases with explosive violence, even in the dark, and at as low a temperature as - 210 C.; finely divided carbon burns in the gas, forming carbon tetrafluoride; water is decomposed even at ordinary temperatures, with the formation of hydrofluoric acid and "ozonised" oxygen; iodine, sulphur and phosphorus melt and then inflame in the gas; it liberates chlorine from chlorides, and combines with most metals instantaneously to form fluorides; it does not, however, combine with oxygen.

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  • The discovery of definite laws in this region might at first sight seem hopeless; but the argument rests on an implied postulate of stability and continuity of constitution of material substances, so that after a cycle of transformations we expect to recover them again as they were originally - on the postulate, in fact, that we do not expect them to melt out of organized existence in our hands.

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  • sodium, potassium and strontium chlorides for sodium extraction), as these melt at a lower temperature than the pure chloride.

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  • In appearance it closely resembles the chloride, forming colourless cubes which readily dissolve in water and melt at 722°.

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  • It forms colourless cubes which are readily soluble in water, melt at 685°, and yield a vapour of normal density.

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  • It forms rhombic pyramids, which melt at 197°.

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  • 33 28, 3329 (1901)] prepare sodium cyanamide by melting sodium with carbons or some hydrocarbon, and passing ammonia over the melt at from 400 0 -600° C. The temperature is then raised to 700°-800° C., and the sodium cyanamide in contact with the residual carbon forms sodium cyanide.

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  • The metal as obtained in this process is lustrous and takes a polish, does not melt in the oxyhydrogen flame, but liquefies in the electric arc, and is not affected by air at ordinary temperatures.

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  • By the fusion of potassium bichromate with boric acid, and extraction of the melt with water, a residue is left which possesses a fine green colour, and is used as a pigment under the name of Guignet's green.

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  • It crystallizes from alcohol in orange red plates which melt at 68° C. and boil at 293° C. It does not react with acids or alkalis, but on reduction with zinc dust in acetic acid solution yields aniline.

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  • It crystallizes in orange-red needles which melt at 82.5-83° C. On reduction with zinc dust in dilute sal - ammoniac solution, it yields ortho-aminophenol and aniline.

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  • It crystallizes in yellow laminae,which melt at 96° C. and explode at slightly higher temperatures.

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  • Azoxybenzene, (C 6 H 5 N) 2 0, crystallizes from alcohol in yellow needles, which melt at 36° C. On distillation, it yields aniline and azobenzene.

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  • The corresponding amide, phenyl-azo-carbonamide, C6H5N2: CONH 2, also results from the oxidation of phenylsemicarbazide (Thiele, loc. cit.), and forms reddish-yellow needles which melt at 114° C. When heated with benzaldehyde to 120° C. it yields diphenyloxytriazole, (C6H5)2CN3C(OH).

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  • It crystallizes in needles (from hot water) which melt at 72° C. and boil at 180-181° C. It is moderately soluble in cold water.

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  • It crystallizes in prisms, which are soluble in water, melt at 16° C., and boil at 160 5° C. When fused with an alkali, it forms propionic acid; with bromine it yields aß-dibromisobutyric acid.

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  • H 3 C CO NH 3 CO CH 3 H3C C - NH - C CH3 On nitration it yields chiefly meta-nitro-benzaldehyde, crystallizing in needles which melt at 58° C. The ortho-compound may be obtained by oxidizing ortho-nitrocinnamic acid with alkaline potassium permanganate in the presence of benzene; or from ortho - nitrobenzyl chloride by condensing it with aniline, oxidizing the product so obtained to ortho-nitrobenzylidine aniline, and then hydrolysing this compound with an acid (Farben fabrik d.

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  • It crystallizes in yellowish needles, which are volatile in steam and melt at 46° C. It is used in the artificial production of indigo (see German Patent 19768).

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  • Some of the higher mountains are covered with perpetual snow, a luxury which is highly prized by the inhabitants of the valleys, where the summer is usually extremely hot, and in winter the snow falls only to melt when it reaches the ground.

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  • in Mesopatamia, and it was there that he saw his army melt away.

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  • If we attempt to change either the temperature or the pressure ice will melt, water will evaporate or vapour condense until one or other of the phases has vanished.

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  • Thus, if we supply heat to the mixture of ice, water and steam ice will melt and eventually vanish.

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  • If heat be added to the mixture ice will melt and salt dissolve in the water so formed.

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  • Then let us heat both ice and solution through the infinitesimal temperature range dT to the freezing point T of the solvent, melt the ice by the application of an amount of heat L, which measures its latent heat of fusion, and allow the solvent so formed to enter the solution reversibly through a semi-permeable wall into an engine cylinder, doing an amount of work Pdv.

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  • As the afternoon wore on their force began to melt away by desertion and to break up for lack of discipline.

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  • They require more draught than coke fires, but care must be taken not to give too much, as excessive heat is likely to melt or soften the fire-bars.

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  • Chemie, 1886, 25, p. 118); it forms hexagonal crystals which melt at 1.6° C.

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  • CH:C(CH 3) 2, forms yellow crystals which melt at 28° C. and boil at 197.2° C. When heated with phosphorus pentoxide it yields acetone, water and some pseudocumene.

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  • It crystallizes in yellow needles, which melt at 61° C., and are readily soluble in alcohol.

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  • It crystallizes in small yellow needles which melt at 78° C. and are volatile in steam.

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  • It crystallizes in yellow needles which melt at125° C. It sublimes readily, is volatile in steam and reduces to the corresponding dihydroxynaphthalene.

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  • It crystallizes in red needles, which melt at 115° C; it has no smell and is non-volatile (cf.

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  • It forms colourless needles which melt at 94° C.; and is readily soluble in alcohol, ether, chloroform, and caustic alkalis.

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  • 0-Naphthol, C 1 oH 7 OH, prepared by fusing sodium 0-naphthalene sulphonate with caustic soda, crystallizes in plates which melt at 122° C. With ferric chloride it gives a green colouration, and after a time a white flocculent precipitate of a dinaphthol.

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  • It forms needles which melt at 160° C. (3-Naphthoic acid, obtained b y boiling 0-methylnaphthalene with dilute nitric acid, or by hydrolysis of its nitrile (formed when formyl-0-naphthalide is heated with zinc dust), crystallizes from alcohol in needles which Nitrosonaplithols or naphthoquinone-oxames, C 1 oH 6 (OH)(NO) or melt at 184° C. C 1 oH 6 (: NOH): 0.

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  • The oxide ores of copper would be deoxidized by the savage's wood fire even more easily than those of iron, and the resulting copper would be recognized more easily than iron, because it would be likely to melt and run together into a mass conspicuous by its bright colour and its very great malleableness.

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  • The history of iron may for convenience be divided into three periods: a first in which only the direct extraction of wrought iron from the ore was practised; a second which added to this primitive art the extraction of iron in the form of carburized or cast iron, to be used either as such or for conversion into wrought iron; and a third in which the iron worker used a temperature high enough to melt wrought iron, which he then called molten steel.

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  • The second period, by converting the metal into the fusible cast iron and melting this, for the first time removed the gangue of the ore; the third period by giving a temperature high enough to melt the most infusible forms of iron, liberated the slag formed in deriving them from cast iron.

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  • This carburizing is an indispensable part of the process, because through it alone can the iron be made fusible enough to melt at the temperature which can be generated in the furnace, and only when liquid can it be separated readily and completely from the slag.

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  • The duty of the limestone (CaCO 3) is to furnish enough lime to form with the gangue of the ore and the ash of the fuel a lime silicate or slag of such a composition (1) that it will melt at the temperature which it reaches at about level A, of fig.

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  • Below this level the solid charge descends easily, because it consists of coke alone or nearly alone, and this in turn because the temperature here is so high as to melt not only the iron now deoxidized and brought to the metallic state, but also the gangue of the ore and the limestone, which here unite to form the molten slag, and run freely down between the lumps of coke.

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  • The coke thus at once supplies by its combustion the heat needed for melting the iron and keeping it hot, and by itself dissolving in the molten metal returns carbon to it as fast as this element is burnt out by the blast, so that the " refined " cast iron which results, though still rich in carbon and therefore easy to melt in the puddling process, has relatively little silicon.

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  • The lime and iron oxide melt, and, in passing up through the overlying metal, the iron oxide very rapidly oxidizes its phosphorus and thus drags it into the slag as phosphoric acid.

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  • In Great Britain the charge usually consists of blister steel, and is therefore high in carbon, so that the crucible process has very little to do except to melt the charge.

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  • to melt down very pure iron for the manufacture of the best kinds of steel, such as fine tool and spring steel, and to bring the molten metal simultaneously to the exact composition and temperature at which it should be cast into its moulds.

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  • Diazoaminobenzene, C 6 H 5 N 2 NHC 6 H 61 crystallizes in golden yellow laminae, which melt at 96°C. and explode at a slightly higher temperature.

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  • Concentrated ammonia converts it into diazoacetamide, CHN 2 CONH 2, which crystallizes in golden yellow plates which melt at 114° C. For other reactions see Hydrazine.

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  • The solid variety prepared by Staedel forms colourless, prismatic crystals which melt at -2° C.; it is decomposed with explosive violence by platinum sponge, and traces of manganese dioxide.

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  • C: (NH) NH 2, forms colourless crystals which melt at 75-80° C. When warmed it breaks down into ammonia and cyanphenine (s-triphenyl triazine).

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  • Although his resources had been so completely drained that he had been forced to melt the silver in his palaces and to debase the coinage, his energy soon brought back the national prosperity.

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  • Gaps then appear in the apposed surfaces, usually at the isthmus; the entire protoplasts either pass out to melt into one another clear of the old walls, or partly pass out and fuse without complete detachment from the old walls.

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  • The yellow crystals melt at 190°, and when cooled down assume a red colour, which changes to the original yellow on standing.

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  • Thallous sulphate, T1 2 SO 4, forms rhombic prisms, soluble in water, which melt at a red heat with decomposition, sulphur dioxide being evolved.

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  • It crystallizes in prisms, which melt at 96° C., and are easily soluble in water.

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  • It crystallizes in needles, which melt at 128-130° C., and is decomposed on long heating.

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  • Acetyl urea, NH 2 CO NH 000H 31 formed by the action of acetic anhydride on urea, crystallizes in needles which melt at 212° C. and, on heating, strongly decomposes into acetamide and cyanuric acid.

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  • It crystallizes in plates, which melt at 1 45.5° C., and is soluble in cold water.

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  • Biuret (allophanamide), NH 2 CO NH CO NH 2, is formed by heating urea; by the action of ammonia on allophanic ester; and by heating urea to 140° C. and passing chlorine into the melt at 140-150° C. (J.

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  • It crystallizes in needles which melt at 190° C. (with decomposition), and is readily soluble in hot water.

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  • It crystallizes in thick prisms which melt at 180° C. and is readily soluble in water.

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  • Freund, Ber., 1895, 28, p. 94 6; 1896, 29, p. 2501), crystallizes in long needles, which melt at 181-183° C. The addition of sodium nitrite to an aqueous solution of its hydrochloride converts it into amido-triaz / N N sulphol S< 1.

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  • It crystallizes (from water) in glistening leaflets which melt at 130° C. and boil at 288° C. Its silver salt behaves as if it were the salt of an imido benzoic acid, since it yields benzimido ethyl ether C 6 H 5 C(:NH) OC 2 H 5 with ethyl iodide (J.

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  • Manganous Nitrate, Mn(NO 3) 2.6H 2 0, obtained by dissolving the carbonate in nitric acid and concentrating the solution, crystallizes from nitric acid solutions in long colourless needles, which melt at 25.8° C. and boil at 129.5° C. with some decomposition.

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  • Or again, the process of scientific induction is a threefold chain; the original hypothesis (the first unification of the fact) seems to melt away when confronted with opposite facts, and yet no scientific progress is possible unless the stimulus of the original unification is strong enough to clasp the discordant facts and establish a reunification.

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  • Before the mass has reached that point the sulphides still present have been destroyed, either by the addition of solid nitrate of soda or by blowing air through the red-hot melt.

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  • The dibrominated product so obtained was then fused with caustic potash, the melt dissolved in water, and on the addition of hydrochloric acid to the solution, alizarin was precipitated.

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  • The melt is dissolved in water and the dyestuff is liberated from the sodium salt by hydrochloric or sulphuric acid, or is converted into the calcium salt by digestion with hot milk of lime, then filtered and the calcium salt decomposed by acid.

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  • These melt between 91° and 95° C. The addition of cadmium gives still greater fusibility; in Wood's metal, for instance, which is Darcet's metal with half the tin replaced by cadmium, the melting point is lowered to 66°-71° C.; while another described by Lipowitz and containing 15 parts of bismuth, 8 of lead, 4 of tin and 3 of cadmium, softens at about 55° and is completely liquid a little above 60°.

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  • By suitable modification in the proportions of the components, a series of alloys can be made which melt at various temperatures above the boiling point of water; for example, with 8 parts of bismuth, 8 of lead and 3 of tin the melting point is 123°, and with 8 of bismuth, 30 of lead and 24 of tin it is 172°.

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  • Gallium crystallizes in greyish-white octahedra which melt at 30.15° C. to a silvery-white liquid.

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  • Gillmeister, Ber., 18 97, 3 o, P 28 44) It forms colourless crystals which melt at 116.5° C. and boil at 319° C. (773 mm.).

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  • It forms practically colourless needles which melt at 89.7° C., and boil at 302.8° C. It is used for the preparation of meta-phenylene diamine.

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  • It crystallizes in colourless needles, which melt at 171°-172° C. It is only slightly soluble in cold water and cold alcohol.

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  • It forms yellow crystals, which melt at 57.5° C. When boiled with dilute aqueous caustic soda it yields 2.4 dinitrophenol.

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  • It crystallizes in prisms which melt at 121° C. It yields addition compounds with aniline and naphthalene, and combines directly with potassium methylate, sodio-malonic ester and hydrocyanic ester.

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  • (2) The Latent Heat Unit, Or The Quantity Of Heat Required To Melt Or Vaporize Unit Mass Of A Standard Substance Under Given Conditions.

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  • For example cobalt gives Co(CO) 4, as orange crystals which melt at 51°, decomposing at a higher temperature, giving Co(C0) 3 and CO at 60°; Co(C0) 3 forms jet black crystals.

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  • This substance forms crystals resembling iodine, which melt at 276° and boil at 333°.

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  • The monoxybromide forms brownish-black needles, which melt at 277° and boil at 3 2 7.5; it is decomposed by water.

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  • It crystallizes in shining leaflets, which melt at 52° C. and boil at 245° C. (with decomposition), and is volatile in a current of steam.

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  • It crystallizes in prisms or plates which melt at 185° C. and boil at 235° C. with partial conversion into the anhydride.

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  • It crystallizes in plates which melt at 120° C., and distils without decomposition.

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  • It crystallizes in colourless octahedra which melt at 125-126° C., and is easily soluble in water.

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  • Succinamide, C 2 H 4(CONH2)2, best obtained by the action of ammonia on diethyl succinate, crystallizes in needles which melt at 242243° C., and is soluble in hot water.

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  • It crystallizes in small prisms which melt at 112° C. and are soluble in water.

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  • It crystallizes in prisms which melt at 120° C. (T.

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  • During heavy rains and when the snows on the hills melt, thousands of streams flow from all directions into the innumerable depressions of inner Persia, or help to swell the perennial rivers which have no outlet to the sea.

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  • It crystallizes from water in large prisms which melt at 168-170° C., and on further heating gives an anhydride and finally chars, emitting a characteristic odour and forming pyroracemic and pyrotartaric acids.

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  • It crystallizes from benzene in colourless needles which melt at 119° C. and boil at 276.5° C. (L.

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  • Skeat has connected it with Old English lcietan, to let, which is very doubtful, though this is the origin of the use of the word in such expressions as "two-" "three-way leet," a place where cross-roads melt.

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  • Benzidine crystallizes in plates (from water) which melt at '22' C., and boil above 360° C., and is characterized by the great insolubility of its sulphate.

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  • Thymol crystallizes in large colourless plates, which melt at 44° and boil at 230°.

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  • Pyrocatechin crystallizes in white rhombic prisms, which melt at 104° and boil at 245°; it is readily soluble in water, alcohol and ether.

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  • At least two pieces are taken from each melt or blow at the mill, and are stamped or marked, and all the various sections rolled from the melt or blow are required to bear a similar stamp or mark for identification.

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  • It can be condensed to a liquid, which boils at - 64.9°C. (under a pressure of 738.2 mm.), and, by still further cooling, gives colourless crystals which melt at - 88.5° C. It is readily soluble in water, forming the aqueous acid, which when saturated at 0° C. has a specific gravity of 1.78.

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  • It forms crystals, apparently monoclinic, which melt at 22.5° to a clear, colourless, mobile liquid of boiling-point 173-i°.

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  • The crystals melt at 70°.

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  • Thiophosphoryl bromide, PSBr3, obtained after the manner of the corresponding chloride, forms yellow octahedra which melt at 38°, and have a penetrating, aromatic odour.

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  • Soc., 1905, 2 7, p. 1 444), whilst the second forms dark-red hexagonal plates which melt at 55°.

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  • It forms light yellow crystals from benzene, which melt at 1725 °jand boil at 407°-408° with slight decomposition.

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  • It forms small, slightly yellow prisms, which melt at 310° and boil at 523°.

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  • The corresponding intensity at the sun's surface is 4.62 X Io 4 as great, or 6.79 X Io 4 kilowatts per square metre = 7.88 X Io 4 horse-power per square yard - enough to melt a thickness of 13.3 metres (=39.6 ft.) of ice, or to vaporize 1.81 metres (=5.92 ft.) of water per minute.

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  • It crystallizes from benzene in prisms, which melt at 97° C. Sodium nitrite in the presence of excess of acid converts it into the corresponding hydroxylic compound flavenol.

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  • It crystallizes in needles, which contain two molecules of water of crystallization, and melt at 156° C. When heated above the melting-point it loses carbon dioxide and yields quinoline.

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  • when it separates in the form of white crystals, which melt at 10 .

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  • A second hydrate, H 2 SO 4, H 2 0, may be obtained as rhombic crystals, which melt at 7° and boil at 205 °, by diluting the strong acid until it has a specific gravity of 1.78, and cooling the mixture; this compound is sometimes known as glacial sulphuric acid.

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  • By recrystallization from hot benzene, the a form is obtained in large prisms which melt at 157° C., and at their boiling-point decompose into hydrochloric acid and trichlorbenzene.

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  • [3], 27, p. 39 2), crystallizes in colourless prisms which melt at 234° C. When heated in vacuo to 240° C. it yields hydroquinone, quinone and pyrogallol.

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  • It crystallizes in prisms, which melt at 218° C. With ferric chloride it gives a dark violet coloration.

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  • It crystallizes in small plates which melt at 30-31° C. and boil at 232-233° C. (J.

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  • The anhydride of the cis-I.2 acid, obtained by heating the anhydride of the trans-acid, forms prisms which melt at 192° C. When heated with hydrochloric acid it passes into the trans-variety.

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  • It was equally favorable to the growth of national unity: it was in his time that Norman and English began to melt together: intermarriage in all classes became common, and only thirty years after his death a contemporary writer could remark that it was hard for any man.

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  • The whole expedition seemed likely to melt away from want and disease.

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  • The wheat region is a country of heavy snows, and of severe, dry cold; but when March comes the snows begin to melt away, and by April the ploughed land is dry enough for the harrow.

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  • Rosin is a brittle and friable resin, with a faint piny odour; the melting-point varies with different specimens, some being semi-fluid at the temperature of boiling water, while others do not melt till 220 or 250° F.

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  • Then when an outbreak occurs the snow and ice melt, and in that way they sometimes give rise to serious catastrophes (jokulhlaup), through large areas being suddenly inundated by great floods of water, which bear masses of ice floating on their surface.

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  • Again, such tribal forces were only levies gathered together for a few weeks at most, unprovided with military stores or the means of transport, and consequently generally unprepared to attack fortifications of any kind,' and liable to melt away as quickly as they were gathered together.

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  • Arsenic tribromide, AsBr3, is formed by the direct union of arsenic and bromine, and subsequent distillation from the excess of arsenic; it forms colourless deliquescent prisms which melt at 20 0 -25° C., and boil at 220° C. Water decomposes it, a small quantity of water leading to the formation of the oxybromide, AsOBr, whilst a large excess of water gives arsenious oxide, As4O6.

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  • This "regelation" is due to the increased pressure at the various points of contact causing the ice there to melt and cool.

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  • Thus Jansen's theories of conversion melt into predestination; although, in doing so, they somewhat modify its grimness.

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  • It crystallizes in hyacinth-red prisms, which are very hygroscopic and melt at 320° C.

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  • The fatty (fixed) oils and fats form a well-defined and homogeneous group of substances, passing through all gradations of consistency, from oils which are fluid even below the freezing-point of water, up to the hardest fats which melt at about 50° C. Therefore, no sharp distinction can be made between fatty oils and fats.

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  • This is not only due to the fact that they are mixtures of several glycerides, but also that even pure glycerides, such as tristearin, exhibit two melting-points, a so-called "double melting-point," the triglycerides melting at a certain temperature, then solidifying at a higher temperature to melt again on further heating.

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  • The crudest method of rendering oils from seeds, still practised in Central Africa, in Indo-China and on some of the South Sea Islands, consists in heaping up oleaginous fruits and allowing them to melt by the heat of the sun, when the exuding oil runs off and is collected.

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  • It crystallizes in large monoclinic prisms which melt at 97.5° C., and distils between 302° and 304° C., practically without decomposition.

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  • 158), as true frankincense, or olibanum; from this, however, it differs in its softness, and tendency to melt into a mass' (Birdwood, loc. cit., p. 146).

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  • The average annual snowfall is about 8 in., and the snowfalls are usually light and melt within a few days.

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  • The earthy matters form a fusible glass or slag melt, and collect at the lowest point of the hearth, whence they are removed by opening a hole pierced through the front wall at the bottom.

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  • He picked at his food while the rest of us wolfed down stacks of pancakes and melt in your mouth sausage, the finest breakfast I'd eaten in years.

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  • The sheets were so fine and light they seemed to melt against her skin.

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  • She flung her arms around him, the sweet smell of innocence and softness of her body making him melt.

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  • Hearing the heartbreak in her voice, Jule found his resolve to keep his distance melt.

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  • She emerged into the bright light of a warm December afternoon and began to melt.

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  • His lips brushed hers, and she felt something within her melt at the simple touch.

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  • She felt the tension within him melt, and the restless shadows wrap around her, cocooning them before retreating.

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  • The truth of his words made her last meager attempt at resistance melt.

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  • The lingering rage at being so unceremoniously busted, and by a snippy woman storm trooper to boot, was only now beginning to melt away in the peace of his quarters.

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  • It was more than comforting; she wanted to melt against him and stay there.

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  • He gave him a smile and a poke and Donnie's anxiety seemed to melt away.

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  • Several days of unseasonable melt had boiled the river to a noisy torrent of cascading water.

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  • She'll melt when she sees you.

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  • It was a good twenty degrees warmer than when they got up this morning and the snow was even beginning to melt - a sure thing to bring on kidding.

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  • The rain would pack down the mud and melt the rest of the snow.

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  • She suspected even his promise to sacrifice her if it meant saving their world would melt in the furnace of his fury.

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  • She wanted to melt against him, to let him help her shoulder the weight on her shoulders.

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  • He took a jar lid from the cupboard and lit a match, holding it on the bottom of the candle until it began to melt.

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  • She didn't melt when their bodies brushed, and she appeared completely immune – or ignorant – of the affect he normally had on women.

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  • Xander licked his fangs and lips clean, enjoying her taste while she stared at him with far too much emotion for him to determine what she'd do: freak out or melt.

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  • Never mind, she said to herself, watching the woman melt in front of Xander.

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  • You might not melt at my feet, but you want to know more.

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  • I'm going to melt his brain.

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  • A column rushing forward with charged bayonets almost seemed to reach the enemy's ramparts, but then to melt away.

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  • NEVER melt beeswax over an open flame or hot plate.

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  • Melt the low fat spread over a gentle heat and mix the crushed biscuits into the melted fat.

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  • Half an hour after starting the beef broth cooking, melt a tablespoon of butter in a pan.

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  • melt the butter over a low heat in the frying pan.

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  • Only a fraction of it has to melt to trigger a cataclysm.

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  • Is it really possible to melt off fat, or massage cellulite away?

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  • concentrates sunlight on the LNB cap, it will melt!

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  • However, there has been less work on phase transitions from oriented melt phases to crystal phases in block copolymers.

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  • Do you have a voice that could melt the heart of the harshest opera critic?

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  • Become crushed into shards or melt as I speak rusty hooks, jeweled daggers, dark candy.

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  • If you're getting married in a very hot climate, a three-tiered wedding cake can very quickly melt and start to look droopy.

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  • The electrical conducting solution or melt of ions is called the electrolyte.

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  • As a child I adored this delicious caramel filling topped with chocolate on its ' melt in the mouth ' shortbread base.

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  • Turn the omelet on to a plate, melt the remaining butter in the pan and slide the frittata back into the pan.

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  • The weather was improving, and the sun beginning to melt the slight frost which could be seen glinting off the grass blades.

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  • To make the ganache; melt the chocolate in a bowl set over a pan of simmering water.

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  • We were now in the water, with all our scuba gear, ready to melt into the blue world below.

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  • melt the ghee and use to grease a 1 liter ovenproof dish.

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  • gigglegraphics will melt your eyes and the immature toilet humor of the game will have you giggling like a schoolgirl.

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  • Then use a dab of hot melt glue to secure the LED to the front panel.

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  • Sheets of paper String PVC hot melt glue Glue stick.

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