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melrose

melrose

melrose Sentence Examples

  • Originally a village built for the accommodation of pilgrims to Melrose Abbey (4 m.

  • In particular, the Roman "North Road" which ran from York through Corbridge and over Cheviot to Newstead near Melrose, and thence to the Wall of Pius, and which has largely been in use ever since Roman times, is now not unfrequently called Watling Street, though there is no old authority for it and throughout the middle ages the section of the road between the Tyne and the Forth was called Dere Street.

  • Berzelius; and ten years later he accepted the office of principal of the university of Edinburgh, the duties of which he discharged until within a few months of his death, which took place at Allerly, Melrose, on the 10th of February 1868.

  • In fulfilment of a vow to visit the Holy Sepulchre, which he could not accomplish in person, Bruce requested Douglas to carry his heart there, but his faithful follower perished on the way, fighting in Spain against the Moors, and the heart of Bruce, recovered by Sir William Keith, found its resting-place at Melrose.

  • According to the extant Lives he was led to take the monastic vows by a vision at the death of bishop Aidan, and the date of his entry at Melrose would be 651.

  • Bede gives a glowing picture of his missionary zeal at Melrose, but in 664 he was transferred to act as prior at Lindisfarne.

  • of Melrose, about equidistant from Melrose and St Boswells stations on the North British railway.

  • According to General William Roy (1726-1790) Trimontium - so called, according to this theory, from the triple Eildon heights - was Old Melrose; other authorities incline to place the station on the northern shore of the Solway Firth.

  • of Melrose, marks the spot where the Fairy Queen led him into her realms in the heart of the hills.

  • of Melrose, Roxburghshire, Scotland, and nearly 1 m.

  • A certain king, Alchfrith, is said to have given the site of the town to Eata, abbot of Melrose, to found a monastery, but before it was completed Eata was deposed for refusing to celebrate Easter according to the Roman usage, and St Wilfrid was appointed the first abbot.

  • One, known in medieval times as Dere Street and misnamed Watling Street by modern antiquaries, ran from Corbridge on the Tyne past Otterburn, crossed Cheviot near Makendon Camps, and passed by an important fort at Newstead near Melrose, and another at Inveresk (outside of Edinburgh), to the eastern end of the wall.

  • In Scotland excavation has been more active, in particular at the forts of Birrens, Newstead near Melrose, Lyne near Peebles, Ardoch between Stirling and Perth, and Castle Cary, Rough Castle and Bar Hill on the wall of Pius.

  • of Melrose.

  • MELROSE, a city of Middlesex county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., about 7 m.

  • of broken, hilly country, in which is a part of the state park of Middlesex Fells; it includes the villages of Melrose, Melrose Highlands, Wyoming and Fells.

  • The principal products are rubber shoes (at the village of Fells), skirts (at the village of Wyoming), and leather and silverware (at Melrose Highlands).

  • The water supply of Melrose, like that of Stoneham and of Medford, is derived from the metropolitan reservoir called Spot Pond in Stoneham, immediately west of Melrose.

  • 2, "Melrose," by E.

  • Melrose was settled about 1633, and was a part of Charlestown until 1649, and of Malden until 1850.

  • The name is said to be due to a resemblance of the scenery to that of Melrose, Scotland.

  • Melrose, Scotland >>

  • MELROSE, a police burgh of Roxburghshire, Scotland.

  • In consequence of the beauty of its situation between the Eildons and the Tweed, the literary and historical associations of the district, and the famous ruin of Melrose Abbey, the town has become residential and a holiday resort.

  • The original Columban monastery was founded in the 7th century at Old Melrose, about 22 m.

  • The bishoprics erected by him, and his many Lowland abbeys, Holyrood, Melrose, Dryburgh, Kelso, Jedburgh and others, confirmed the freedom of the Scottish church from the claims of the see of York, encouraged the i mprovement of agriculture and endowed the country with beautiful examples of architecture.

  • GEORGE LOCKHART (1673-1731), of Carnwath, Scottish writer and politician, was a member of a Lanarkshire family tracing descent from Sir Simon Locard (the name being originally territorial, de Loch Ard), who is said to have accompanied Sir James Douglas on his expedition to the East with the heart of Bruce, which relic, according to Froissart, Locard brought home from Spain when Douglas fell in battle against the Moors, and buried in Melrose Abbey; this incident was the origin of the "man's heart within a fetterlock" borne on the Lockhart shield, which in turn perhaps led to the altered spelling of the surname.

  • Of the renowned group of Border abbeys - Jedburgh, Melrose, Dryburgh and Kelso - that of Jedburgh is the stateliest.

  • He is said also to have carried out six invasions of Northumbria, in the course of which he burnt Dunbar and took Melrose.

  • Bruce's heart rests in Melrose, but his bones lie in Dunfermline Abbey, where (after the discovery of the skeleton in 1818) they were reinterred with fitting pomp below the pulpit of the New church.

  • (For early history see Lothian; Northumbria; Strathclyde.) In the 12th century were founded the abbeys of Hexham and Alnwick, the priory church of Lindisfarne and the cathedral of Carlisle on the English side, and on the Scottish the abbeys of Jedburgh, Kelso, Melrose and Dryburgh.

  • This is set to get its first public airing in the border town of Melrose in an art cinema called The Wynd.

  • David founded many new bishoprics and abbeys including Melrose, Kelso and Jedburgh and endowed many of the monasteries.

  • Melrose Abbey is unusual tho not unique in having the cloister to the north of the church.

  • distance footpath which begins in Melrose in the Scottish borders.

  • fireball XL5 Who left Melrose Place to star as Charlotte York in Sex and the City?

  • leaden casket in Melrose Abbey.

  • I need to make a sponge, and I might try a banana and walnut loaf for melrose [sorry Katy!

  • Having been extremely cautious throughout the fight, McIlroy was again urged by his trainer Arthur Melrose to engage the scrapper from Swansea.

  • sensational at the time and can be seen in Edinburgh and Melrose today.

  • Melrose Station: Cllr Chisholm confirmed that no retrospective planning application has yet been received in respect of the unauthorized signage.

  • He guards a large house in the wealthy suburb of Melrose in Johannesburg.

  • walnut loaf for melrose [sorry Katy!

  • Originally a village built for the accommodation of pilgrims to Melrose Abbey (4 m.

  • In particular, the Roman "North Road" which ran from York through Corbridge and over Cheviot to Newstead near Melrose, and thence to the Wall of Pius, and which has largely been in use ever since Roman times, is now not unfrequently called Watling Street, though there is no old authority for it and throughout the middle ages the section of the road between the Tyne and the Forth was called Dere Street.

  • Berzelius; and ten years later he accepted the office of principal of the university of Edinburgh, the duties of which he discharged until within a few months of his death, which took place at Allerly, Melrose, on the 10th of February 1868.

  • In fulfilment of a vow to visit the Holy Sepulchre, which he could not accomplish in person, Bruce requested Douglas to carry his heart there, but his faithful follower perished on the way, fighting in Spain against the Moors, and the heart of Bruce, recovered by Sir William Keith, found its resting-place at Melrose.

  • According to the extant Lives he was led to take the monastic vows by a vision at the death of bishop Aidan, and the date of his entry at Melrose would be 651.

  • Bede gives a glowing picture of his missionary zeal at Melrose, but in 664 he was transferred to act as prior at Lindisfarne.

  • of Melrose, about equidistant from Melrose and St Boswells stations on the North British railway.

  • According to General William Roy (1726-1790) Trimontium - so called, according to this theory, from the triple Eildon heights - was Old Melrose; other authorities incline to place the station on the northern shore of the Solway Firth.

  • of Melrose, marks the spot where the Fairy Queen led him into her realms in the heart of the hills.

  • of Melrose, Roxburghshire, Scotland, and nearly 1 m.

  • A certain king, Alchfrith, is said to have given the site of the town to Eata, abbot of Melrose, to found a monastery, but before it was completed Eata was deposed for refusing to celebrate Easter according to the Roman usage, and St Wilfrid was appointed the first abbot.

  • One, known in medieval times as Dere Street and misnamed Watling Street by modern antiquaries, ran from Corbridge on the Tyne past Otterburn, crossed Cheviot near Makendon Camps, and passed by an important fort at Newstead near Melrose, and another at Inveresk (outside of Edinburgh), to the eastern end of the wall.

  • In Scotland excavation has been more active, in particular at the forts of Birrens, Newstead near Melrose, Lyne near Peebles, Ardoch between Stirling and Perth, and Castle Cary, Rough Castle and Bar Hill on the wall of Pius.

  • of Melrose.

  • MELROSE, a city of Middlesex county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., about 7 m.

  • of broken, hilly country, in which is a part of the state park of Middlesex Fells; it includes the villages of Melrose, Melrose Highlands, Wyoming and Fells.

  • The principal products are rubber shoes (at the village of Fells), skirts (at the village of Wyoming), and leather and silverware (at Melrose Highlands).

  • The water supply of Melrose, like that of Stoneham and of Medford, is derived from the metropolitan reservoir called Spot Pond in Stoneham, immediately west of Melrose.

  • 2, "Melrose," by E.

  • Melrose was settled about 1633, and was a part of Charlestown until 1649, and of Malden until 1850.

  • The name is said to be due to a resemblance of the scenery to that of Melrose, Scotland.

  • Melrose, Scotland >>

  • MELROSE, a police burgh of Roxburghshire, Scotland.

  • In consequence of the beauty of its situation between the Eildons and the Tweed, the literary and historical associations of the district, and the famous ruin of Melrose Abbey, the town has become residential and a holiday resort.

  • The original Columban monastery was founded in the 7th century at Old Melrose, about 22 m.

  • The bishoprics erected by him, and his many Lowland abbeys, Holyrood, Melrose, Dryburgh, Kelso, Jedburgh and others, confirmed the freedom of the Scottish church from the claims of the see of York, encouraged the i mprovement of agriculture and endowed the country with beautiful examples of architecture.

  • GEORGE LOCKHART (1673-1731), of Carnwath, Scottish writer and politician, was a member of a Lanarkshire family tracing descent from Sir Simon Locard (the name being originally territorial, de Loch Ard), who is said to have accompanied Sir James Douglas on his expedition to the East with the heart of Bruce, which relic, according to Froissart, Locard brought home from Spain when Douglas fell in battle against the Moors, and buried in Melrose Abbey; this incident was the origin of the "man's heart within a fetterlock" borne on the Lockhart shield, which in turn perhaps led to the altered spelling of the surname.

  • Of the renowned group of Border abbeys - Jedburgh, Melrose, Dryburgh and Kelso - that of Jedburgh is the stateliest.

  • He is said also to have carried out six invasions of Northumbria, in the course of which he burnt Dunbar and took Melrose.

  • Bruce's heart rests in Melrose, but his bones lie in Dunfermline Abbey, where (after the discovery of the skeleton in 1818) they were reinterred with fitting pomp below the pulpit of the New church.

  • (For early history see Lothian; Northumbria; Strathclyde.) In the 12th century were founded the abbeys of Hexham and Alnwick, the priory church of Lindisfarne and the cathedral of Carlisle on the English side, and on the Scottish the abbeys of Jedburgh, Kelso, Melrose and Dryburgh.

  • Having been extremely cautious throughout the fight, McIlroy was again urged by his trainer Arthur Melrose to engage the scrapper from Swansea.

  • His finds in the numerous pits and wells were sensational at the time and can be seen in Edinburgh and Melrose today.

  • Melrose Station: Cllr Chisholm confirmed that no retrospective planning application has yet been received in respect of the unauthorized signage.

  • He guards a large house in the wealthy suburb of Melrose in Johannesburg.

  • Many of these patterns include sumptuous floral prints like Bloomfield, Cassandre, Juliette, Cherrington, Queens Gate, Serafina, or Melrose.

  • He appeared on both Beverly Hills 90210 and Melrose Place.

  • Me and Ro Jewelry is available from their retail locations on Elizabeth Street in New York, Melrose Place in Los Angeles, and The Shore Club in Miami.

  • I started to cut mostly men's hair when I became a stylist at Rudy's barber shop on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles.

  • In the early 1970s, the Atlantic City Commissioner of Public Works proposed to change the names of Baltic and Mediterranean Avenues to Fairmont and Melrose Avenues.

  • Soon after, another Betsey Johnson boutique sprang up in Los Angeles along trendy Melrose Avenue.

  • Surprisingly enough, quality gothic leather boots are difficult to find for most goths who don't live near a Hot Topic store or Hollywood's infamous Melrose shopping district.

  • Egglesfield left AMC in 2009 for a stint on the short-lived reboot of Melrose Place.

  • Not one to easily walk away from the spotlight, she focused her attention on acting instead, and was soon appearing on Falcon Crest and Melrose Place.

  • Peyton Place blazed the trail that would eventually feature television programming such as Dallas, Dynasty, Falcon Crest, Knots Landing, 90210, Melrose Place, Grey's Anatomy, and Brothers and Sisters.

  • Prior to joining the Desperate Housewives cast list, Doug Savant was most widely recognized for his groundbreaking role as Matt Fielding on Melrose Place.

  • Her parents (Josie Bissett of Melrose Place and John Schneider of Smallville and The Dukes of Hazard) give her a promise ring when she makes a vow of chastity until marriage.

  • Aaron Spelling, producer of Charlie's Angels, Beverly Hills 90210, Melrose Place and many other soap operas, produced the Camden family drama.

  • Marcia Cross is a seasoned soap opera actress who has appeared on Knots Landing, One Life to Live, Melrose Place, and Everwood.

  • Actor Doug Savant is well known by soap fans for playing Matt Fielding, the only regular gay character on Melrose Place.

  • When Jack Wagner joined the show, many General Hospital and Melrose Place fans sought out updates to find out what one of their favorite actors was doing.

  • References to Melrose Place actors include the stars of the 2009 series which aired on The CW and the original Melrose Place which debuted in 1992 and ran for seven seasons.

  • In 1992, Melrose Place debuted on the fledgling Fox network.

  • Developed as a more adult fare to the popular teen drama 90210, Melrose Place actors steamed up the screens with their sexy liaisons, plots, and more.

  • In September 2009, producers for The CW's Melrose Place announced that Locklear would be joining the new series where they hoped she would work her Spelling magic.

  • Desperate Housewives Bree made waves at the water cooler when she joined other Melrose Place actors as Dr. Kimberly Shaw.

  • While the series experienced a small measure of success, the network announced plans to add a new Melrose Place to the lineup.

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