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melbourne

melbourne

melbourne Sentence Examples

  • In Australia there are three mints, Sydney, opened in 1855, Melbourne, opened in 1872, and Perth, opened in 1899.

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  • In Australia there are three mints, Sydney, opened in 1855, Melbourne, opened in 1872, and Perth, opened in 1899.

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  • From Cape Howe to Melbourne the fall may be taken at from 30 in.

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  • The rainfall of Melbourne averages 25.58 in., the mean number of rainy days being 131.

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  • The apparatus has been used with complete success at the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope, and at Melbourne, Sydney and Cordoba.

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  • Universities have been established at Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and Hobart, and are well equipped and numerously attended; they are in part supported by grants from the public funds and in part by private endowments and the fees paid by students.

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  • The Silurian system was marked by the retreat of the sea from central Australia; but the sea still covered a band across Victoria, from the coast to the Murray basin, passing to the east of Melbourne.

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  • to 40 in., Melbourne itself having an average of 25.6 in.

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  • The difference between summer and winter is, however, less at Melbourne than at any of the places mentioned, the result of a long series of observations being spring 57°, summer 65.3°, autumn 58.7°, and winter 49-2'.

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  • west from Melbourne at a height of 1400 ft.

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  • The principal cities and towns are Sydney (pop. 530,000), Newcastle, Broken Hill, Parramatta, Goulburn, Maitland, Bathurst, Orange, Lithgow, Tamworth, Grafton, Wagga and Albury, in New South Wales; Melbourne (pop. 511,900), Ballarat, Bendigo, Geelong, Eaglehawk, Warrnambool, Castlemaine, and Stawell in Victoria; Brisbane (pop. 128,000), Rockhampton, Maryborough, Townsville, Gympie, Ipswich, and Toowoomba in Queensland; Adelaide (pop. about 175,000), Port Adelaide and Port Pirie in South Australia; Perth (pop. 56,000), Fremantle, and Kalgoorlie in Western Australia; and Hobart (pop. 35,500) and Launceston in Tasmania.

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  • Howitt, Kamilaroi and Kurnai, Group Marriage and Relationship (Melbourne, 1880); H.

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  • The leading men of the party were Mr Robert O'Hara Burke, an officer of police, and Mr William John Wills, of the Melbourne observatory.

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  • The bodies of Burke and Wills were recovered and brought to Melbourne for a solemn public funeral, and a noble monument has been erected to their honour.

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  • The line crossing Australia which was thus explored has since been occupied by the electric telegraph connecting Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney, and other Australian cities with London.

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  • Melbourne,.

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  • At Melbourne there was a deputy governor, Mr Latrobe, under Sir George Gipps at Sydney.

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  • In August it was found at Anderson's Creek, near Melbourne; a few weeks later the great Ballarat gold-field, 80 m.

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  • Immigrants from Europe, and to some extent from North America and China, poured into Melbourne, where the arrivals in 1852 averaged 2000 persons in a week.

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  • The crisis was felt in the large cities more keenly than in the country districts, and in Melbourne more severely than in any other capital.

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  • The last occasion of its being called together was in 1899, when the council met in Melbourne.

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  • The immediate result was a conference at Parliament House, Melbourne, of representatives from each of the seven colonies.

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  • The third and final session was opened in Melbourne on the 10th of January 1898, but Queensland was still unrepresented; and, after further consideration, the draft bill was finally adopted on the 16th of March and remitted to the various colonies for submission to the people.

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  • Accordingly a premiers' conference was held in Melbourne at the end of January 1899, at which Queensland was for the first time represented.

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  • - For Physical Geography: Barton, Australian Physiography (Brisbane, 1895); Wall, Physical Geography of Australia (Melbourne, 1883); Taylor, Geography of New South Wales (Sydney, 1898); Saville Kent, The Great Barrier Reef of Australia (London, 1893); A.

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  • For Flora: Maiden, Useful Native Plants of Australia (Sydney, 1889); Bentham and Mueller, Flora Australiensis (London, 1863-1878); Fitzgerald, Australian Orchids (Sydney, 1870-1890); Mueller, Census of Australian Plants (Melbourne, 1889).

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  • In 1839 he took the degree of D.D., and the same year was appointed by Lord Melbourne to the deanery of Ely.

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  • He had made special inquiries of the authorities of the Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Hobart museums, and published questions in the newspapers, but no evidence has reached him that the eggs of Ornithorhyncus have ever been obtained except by the dissection of the mother.

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  • He immediately brought forward a scheme for improving the condi - tion of the poorer clergy by equalizing the incomes of the bishops, the reception of which at the time may be imagined, though it was substantially the same as that carried into effect by Lord Melbourne's government fifty years later.

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  • In 1841, after fourteen years at Rugby, Dr Arnold was appointed by Lord Melbourne, then prime minister, to the chair of modern history at Oxford.

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  • 14, Melbourne, 1916.

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  • In Australia the Jews from the first were welcomed on perfectly equal terms. The oldest congregation is that of Sydney (1817); the Melbourne community dates from 1844.

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  • After the strain of the fight with the so-called "Wee Frees" in 1904-5 his health broke down, and he went to Australia for recovery, but died at Melbourne on the 22nd of December 1906 See Lives by P. Carnegie Simpson (1909) and R.

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  • A small patch of Millstone Grit and Limestone occurs in the south of the county about Melbourne and Ticknall.

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  • There is a triple-recessed doorway, with arcade above, in the west end of Bakewell church, and there is another fine west doorway in Melbourne church, a building principally of the late Norman period, with central and small western towers.

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  • Earl Grey Viscount Melbourne Sir R.

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  • Viscount Melbourne Sir R.

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  • The herbarium at Melbourne, Australia, under Baron Muller, attained large proportions; and that of the Botanical Garden of Calcutta is noteworthy as the repository of numerous specimens described by writers on Indian botany.

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  • "ALFRED DEAKIN (1856-1919), Australian statesman, was born at Melbourne Aug.

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  • of Melbourne.

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  • His speech in 1835 in support of the motion for inquiry into the Irish Church temporalities with a view to their partial appropriation for national purposes (for disestablishment was not then dreamed of as possible) contains much terse argument, and no doubt contributed to the fall of Peel and the formation of the Melbourne cabinet.

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  • In the same year he spoke for Lord Melbourne in the action (thought by some to be a political conspiracy 3) which the Hon.

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  • Next year, as the Melbourne administration was near its close, Plunkett, the venerable chancellor of Ireland, was forced by discreditable pressure to resign, and the Whig attorney-general, who had never practised in equity, became chancellor of Ireland, and was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron Campbell of St Andrews, in the county of Fife.

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  • In 1841, Sir Robert Peel having defeated the Melbourne ministry in parliament, there was a general election, when Cobden was returned for Stockport.

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  • to a pier, whence it is shipped to Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane by a fleet of steam colliers.

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  • In 1806, when the brief "All the Talents" ministry was formed, he was given the office of secretary to the Board of Control; in 1830, when next his party came into power, Creevey, who had lost his seat in parliament, was appointed by Lord Grey treasurer of the ordnance; and subsequently Lord Melbourne made him treasurer of Greenwich hospital.

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  • The prime minister, Lord Melbourne, submitted to the king a choice of names for the chancellorship of the exchequer and leadership of the House of Commons; but his majesty announced that, having lost the services of Lord Althorp as leader of the House of Commons, he could feel no confidence in the stability of Lord Melbourne's government, and that it was his intention to send for the duke of Wellington.

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  • at the Melbourne Pub.

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  • This was followed by the Australia Felix Magazine (1849), and the Australasian Quarterly Reprint (1850-1851) both published at Geelong, the Illustrated Australian Magazine (1850-1852), the Australian Gold-Digger's Monthly Magazine (1852-1853), edited by James Bonwick, and the Melbourne Monthly Magazine (1855-1856).

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  • The Journal of Australasia (1856-1858), the Australian Monthly Magazine (1865-1867), which contained contributions from Marcus Clarke and was continued as the Colonial Monthly (1867-1869), the Melbourne Review (1876-1885) and the Victorian Review (1879-1886) may also be mentioned.

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  • An Australian edition of the Review of Reviews is published at Melbourne.

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  • The promotion was entirely the act of Lord Melbourne, an amateur in theology, who had read Thirlwall's introduction to Schleiermacher, and satisfied himself of the propriety of the appointment.

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  • - The only lengthy historical account of any note is Rusden's three-volume History of New Zealand (2nd ed., Melbourne, 1896), chiefly valuable as a statement of the grievances of the Maori race.

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  • The school of mines is the most important in Australia and is affiliated to the university of Melbourne.

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  • Africa (Melbourne, 1887); D.

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  • She, of course, retained the late king's ministers in their offices, and it was under Lord Melbourne's direction that the privy council drew up their declaration to the kingdom.

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  • The duchess of Kent had communicated her projects to Lord Melbourne, and they were known to many other statesmen, and to persons in society; but the gossip of drawing-rooms during the years 1837-38 continually represented that the young queen had fallen in love with Prince This or Lord That, and the more imaginative babblers hinted at post-chaises waiting outside Kensington Gardens in the night, private marriages and so forth.

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  • The charge having been laid before Lord Melbourne, he communicated it to Sir James.

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  • The ladies of the bedchamber were so unpopular in consequence of their behaviour to Lady Flora Hastings that the public took alarm at the notion that the queen had fallen into the hands of an intriguing coterie; and Lord Melbourne, who was accused of wishing to rule on the strength of court favour, resumed office with diminished prestige.

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  • Lord Melbourne ascertained that the queen's dis- The positions towards her cousin, Prince Albert, were un- queen's changed, and he advised King Leopold, through M.

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  • Lord Melbourne sought to effect this by a clause introduced in a naturalization bill; but he found himself obliged to drop the clause, and to leave the queen to confer what precedence she pleased by letters-patent.

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  • Lord Melbourne saw her Public g g affairs.

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  • A statesman of firmer mould than Lord Melbourne would hardly have succeeded so well as he did in making rough places smooth for Prince Albert.

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  • Lord John Russell and Lord Palmerston were naturally jealous of the prince's interference - and of King Leopold's and Baron Stockmar's - in state affairs; but Lord Melbourne took the common-sense view that a husband will control his wife whether people wish it or not.

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  • At the general election of 1841 the Whigs returned in a minority of seventy-six, and Lord Melbourne was defeated on the Address and resigned.

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  • The only temporary embarrassment was the queen's continued private correspondence with Lord Melbourne, which led Stockmar to remonstrate with him; but Melbourne used his influence sensibly; moreover, he gradually dropped out of politics, and the queen got used to his not being indispensable.

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  • On Prince Albert's position the change had a marked effect, for in the absence of Melbourne the queen relied more particularly on his advice, and Peel himself at once discovered and recognized the prince's unusual charm and capacity.

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  • There are Zoological Gardens at Melbourne (founded in 1857), Adelaide, Sydney and Perth, and small gardens at Wellington, New Zealand, supported partly by private societies and partly by the municipalities.

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  • MELBOURNE, the capital of Victoria, and the most populous city in Australia.

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  • The appearance of Melbourne from the sea is by no means picturesque.

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  • The busy shipping suburbs of Port Melbourne and Williamstown occupy the flat alluvial land at the mouth of the Yarra.

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  • are Bourke Street, Collins Street and Flinders Street - the first being the busiest in Melbourne, the second the most fashionable with the best shops, and the third, which faces the river, given up to the maritime trade.

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  • Round the city lies a circle of populous suburbs - to the north-east Fitzroy (pop. 31,687) and Collingwood (32,749), to the east Richmond (37,824), to the south-east Prahran (40,441), to the south South Melbourne (40,619), to the south-west Port Melbourne (12,176), and to the north-west North Melbourne (18,120).

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  • In spite of the value of land, Melbourne is not a crowded city.

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  • Melbourne Hospital 18.

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  • A little further on is St Patrick's Roman Catholic cathedral, the seat of the archbishop of Melbourne, a building of somewhat sombre bluestone.

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  • The Melbourne town hall contains a central chamber capable of accommodating 3000 people.

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  • The residence of the governor of the colony is in South Melbourne, and is surrounded by an extensive domain.

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  • Melbourne has numerous state schools, and ample provision is made for secondary education by the various denominations and by private enterprise.

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  • Other public buildings include the mint, the observatory, the Victoria markets, the Melbourne hospital, the general post office, the homoeopathic hospital, the custom house and the Alfred hospital.

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  • The public gardens and parks of Melbourne are extensive.

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  • Besides these parks, each suburb has its public gardens, and at Flemington there is a fine race-course, on which the Melbourne cup races are run every November, an event which brings in a large influx of visitors from all parts of Australia.

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  • Melbourne has a complete tramway system; all the chief suburbs are connected with the city by cable trams. The tramways are controlled by a trust, representing twelve of the metropolitan municipalities.

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  • Port Melbourne, originally called Sandridge, is about 21m.

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  • As a port Melbourne takes the first place in Australia as regards tonnage.

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  • The climate of Melbourne is exceptionally fine; occasionally hot winds blow from the north for two or three days at a time, but the proportion of days when the sky is clear and the air dry and mild is large.

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  • The little settlement of the year 1835, out of which Melbourne grew, at first bore the native name of Dootigala, but it was presently renamed after Viscount Melbourne, premier of Great Britain at the time of its foundation.

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  • In 1842 Melbourne was incorporated and first sent members to the New South Wales parliament.

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  • A strong popular agitation caused the Port Phillip district to be separated from New South Wales in 1851, and a new colony was formed with the name of Victoria, Melbourne becoming its capital.

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  • In 1901 Melbourne became the temporary capital of the Australian commonwealth pending the selection of the permanent capital in New South Wales.

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  • The population of the city proper in 1901 was 68,374, and that of " greater Melbourne " was 496,079.

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  • Melbourne, England >>

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  • MELBOURNE, a market town in the southern parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, 8 m.

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  • Melbourne Hall, a building of the time of William III., surrounded by formal Dutch gardens, stands in a domain owned at an early date by the bishops of Carlisle, whose tithe barn remains near the church.

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  • The title of Viscount Melbourne was taken from this town.

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  • Both in Australia (especially in Sydney and Melbourne) and at Thursday Island there is work among the Chinese.

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  • of, and suburban to, Melbourne.

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  • Other Australian localities are Echunga in South Australia; Beechworth, Arena and Melbourne in Victoria; Freemantle and Nullagine in Western Australia; the Palmer and Gilbert rivers in Queensland.

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  • At the subsequent election he was defeated, but joined the cabinet as first commissioner of woods and forests when Lord Melbourne took office in July 1834, and about the same time was returned at a by-election as one of the members for Nottingham.

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  • In Melbourne's government of 1835 he was president of the board of control, in which position he strongly supported the Indian policy of Lord Auckland; he returned to the same office in July 1846 as a member of Lord John Russell's cabinet; and in February 1851 he went to the House of Lords as Baron Broughton of Broughton Gyfford.

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  • While in gaol at Rochester he published the Caroline Almanac, the tone of which may be judged from its references to "Victoria Guelph, the bloody queen of England," and by the title given to the British cabinet of "Victoria Melbourne's bloody divan."

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  • Bluff Harbour is the port of call and departure for steamers for Melbourne and Hobart.

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  • From a discussion of the observations of Mars made in 1860 and 1862 at Greenwich and Williamstown (near Melbourne), Stone deduced for it a value of 8.932" (Mon.

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  • A celebrated beauty, a maid of honour and bridesmaid of Queen Victoria, she married, on the 10th of December 1843, Archibald, Lord Dalmeny (1809-1851), member for the Stirling Burghs, who became a lord of the adrriralty under Melbourne.

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  • O'Connell steadily supported Lord Melbourne's government, gave it valuable aid in its general measures, and repeatedly expressed his cordial approval of its policy in advancing Irish Catholics to places of trust and power in the state, though personally he refused a high judicial office.

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  • Fewer telescopes have been made of this than perhaps of any other form of reflector; but in comparatively recent years the Cassegrain has acquired importance from the fact of its adoption for the great Melbourne telescope, and from its employment in the 60-in.

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  • The process of casting and annealing, in the case of the specula of the great Melbourne telescope, was admirably described by Dr Robinson in Phil.

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  • In recent years no noteworthy refractors have been mounted on Great this plan; but type A has been chosen by Grubb for the Me!- great Melbourne reflector, of 48-in.

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  • - Melbourne Reflector.

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  • The mode of relieving the friction of the declination axis is similar to that employed in the Melbourne telescope and in the account of the Vienna telescope published by Grubb.

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  • Melbourne, on the lower slopes of which much geological work was done.

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  • Adelaide is the terminus of an extensive railway system, the main line of which runs through Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane to Rockhampton.

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  • Metternich protested against a course which would result, in his opinion, either in a war or a revolution in France; King Leopold enlarged on the wickedness and absurdity of risking a European war for the sake of putting an end to the power of an old man who could have but few years to live; Queen Victoria urged her ministers to come to terms with France and relieve the embarrassments of the "dear King"; and Lord Melbourne, with the majority of the cabinet, was in favour of compromise.

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  • The following towns were affected in Australia: Sydney, in New South Wales; Adelaide, in South Australia; Melbourne, in Victoria; Brisbane, Rockhampton, Townsville, Cairns and Ipswich, in Queensland; Freemantle, Perth and Coolgardie, in West Australia.

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  • Daily communication is maintained with Cunningham at the lakes' entrance, and ocean-going steamers ply frequently between Sale and Melbourne.

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  • In 1823 he was appointed vice-president of the board of trade; from September 1827 to June 1828 he was president of the board and treasurer of the navy; then joining the Whigs, he was president of the board of control under Earl Grey and Lord Melbourne from November 1830 to November 1834.

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  • Lord Glenelg, secretary for the colonies in Lord Melbourne's second administration, held that the Kaffirs were in the right in the quarrel, and he compelled D'Urban to abandon the conquered territory, a mistaken decision adopted largely on the advice of Dr Philip and his supporters.

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  • It found that Great Britain was legally responsible for all the depredations of the "Alabama" and "Florida" and for those committed by the "Shenandoah" after she left Melbourne.

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  • Melbourne and Sydney followed in 1854, Brisbane in 1865, Rodborough, Vict., in 1878.

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  • An Australasian conference met at Melbourne in 1881 and has continued to meet in alternate years.

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  • Parramatta, Richmond and Windsor had indeed been founded within the first decade of the colony's existence; Newcastle, Maitland and Morpeth, near the coast to the north of Sydney, had been begun during the earlier years of the 19th century; but the towns of the interior, Goulburn, Bathurst and others, were not commenced till about 1835, in which year the site of Melbourne was first occupied by Batman and Fawkner.

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  • Telegraphic communication was established between Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and Tasmania in 1859; and during the same year the Moreton Bay district was separated from New South Wales and was constituted the colony of Queensland.

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  • The railway to Melbourne was completed in 1880; and in 1883 valuable deposits of silver were discovered at Broken Hill.

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  • In 1889 the premier, Sir Henry Parkes, gave in his adhesion to the movement for Australasian federation, and New South Wales was represented at the first conference held at Melbourne in the beginning of 1890.

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  • But the " Canningites," as they were termed, remained, and the duke of Wellington hastened to include Palmerston, Huskisson, Charles Grant, Lamb (Lord Melbourne) and Dudley in his government.

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  • Lord Palmerston himself declared in a letter to Lord Melbourne that he should quit the ministry if his policy was not adopted; and he carried his point.

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  • Within a few months Lord Melbourne's administration came to an end (1841), and Lord Palmerston remained for five years out of office.

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  • WILLIAM LAMB MELBOURNE, 2ND Viscount (1779-1848), English statesman, second son of the 1st Viscount Melbourne, by his marriage with the daughter of Sir Ralph Milbanke, bart., was born on the 15th of March 1779.

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  • 1768), who made a large fortune out of the law, and married Miss Coke of Melbourne Hall; in 1770 he was made baron and in 1781 Viscount Melbourne in the Irish peerage, and in 1815 was created an English peer.

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  • William Lamb (as Lord Melbourne then was) joined the opposition under Fox, of whom he was an ardent admirer; but his Liberal tendencies were never decided, and he not infrequently supported Lord Liverpool during that statesman's long tenure of office.

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  • The influence of Melbourne as a politician dates from his succeeding to the peerage in 1829.

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  • For the duties of this office at such a critical time he was deficient in insight and energy, but his political success was independent of his official capacity; and when the ministry of Grey was wrecked on the Irish question in July 1834 Melbourne was chosen to succeed him as prime minister.

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  • He died at Melbourne House, Derbyshire, on the 24th of November 1848.

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  • Lord Melbourne was without the qualification of attention to details, and he never displayed those brilliant talents which often form a substitute for more solid acquirements.

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  • Melbourne was succeeded as 3rd viscount by his brother, Frederick James Lamb (1782-1853), who was British ambassador to Vienna from 1831 to 1841.

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  • McC. Torrens, Memoirs of Lord` Melbourne (1878); Lloyd Sanders, Lord Melbourne's Papers (1889); A.

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  • Melbourne, Australia >>

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  • Among his students were Professors Elmslie, Skinner, Harper of Melbourne, Walker of Belfast, George Adam Smith of Glasgow and W.

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  • In July the Grey ministry resigned, and on the 16th Lord Melbourne became prime minister.

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  • Lord Melbourne once more came into office, and the Municipal Corporations Act of the 7th of September was the work of a Liberal government.

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  • The Whigs, who had governed England since 1830, under Lord Grey and Lord Melbourne, were suffering from the reaction which is the inevitable consequence of revolution.

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  • Technically he was justified in adopting this course, but people generally felt that there was some hardship in compelling a young queen to separate herself from her companions and friends, and they consequently approved the decision of Lord Melbourne to support the queen in her refusal, and to resume office.

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  • But, if they had failed in this respect, Lord Melbourne had rendered conspicuous service to the queen.

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  • The Irish, under OConnell, had constantly supported the Whig ministry of Lord Melbourne.

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  • Here he married and settled down to the life of a sheep-farmer; but finding his health and eyesight greatly improved, he came to Melbourne as lecturer on history at the university.

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  • It is a regular port of call for several intercolonial lines from Sydney and Melbourne, and for lines from London to New Zealand.

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  • There is more than one meaning of Melbourne discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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  • Comus was the sire of Humphrey Clinker (1822), whose son was Melbourne (1834), sire of West Australian (1850) and of many valuable mares, including Canezou (1845) and Blink Bonny (1854), dam of Blair Athol.

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  • Melbourne: West Australian (D, L), Blink Bonny (D, 0), Sir Tatton Sykes (L).

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  • Queen Mary, who was by Gladiator out of a daughter of Plenipotentiary and Myrrha by Whalebone, when mated with Melbourne produced Blink Bonny (winner of the Derby and Oaks); when mated with Mango and Lanercost she produced Haricot, dam of Caller Ou (winner of the St Leger).

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  • Gregory, The Mount Lyell Mining Field (Melbourne, 1904).

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  • Hobart is now a place of call for several of the European steamship lines, and the state is becoming increasingly popular as a summer resort for the residents of Melbourne and Sydney.

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  • It lies near the head of a lagoon called Lake King, which is open to the sea, and affords regular communication by water with Melbourne.

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  • There is an active shipping trade with Melbourne in maize and other grain, hops, fruit and dairy produce.

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  • decathlon gold at the Commonwealth Games in Melbourne on Tuesday morning after two grueling days of competition.

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  • The manor of Melbourne was part of the ancient demesne of the crown.

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  • He was Australia's best known essayist and broadcaster and he was leader writer of a Melbourne newspaper.

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  • The only British fencer to ever win a gold medal was Gillian Sheen at Melbourne in 1956.

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  • head-to-head with the likes of Melbourne.

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  • Melbourne native Joseph grand finale the competing for the in downtown las.

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  • Melbourne International Airport lies 22 kilometers from the hotel.

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  • Within a week, mass pickets were organized in Sydney & Melbourne docks.

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  • Melbourne's lively seaside suburb of St Kilda has one of the new breed of deluxe hostels.

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  • Children and under Melbourne Sydney and enchanted isle operated onboard meals and.

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  • Of singularly lazy disposition, he yet possessed considerable tact - he was in fact an Egyptian Lord Melbourne, whose policy was to leave every= thing alone.

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  • The apparatus has been used with complete success at the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope, and at Melbourne, Sydney and Cordoba.

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  • The Silurian system was marked by the retreat of the sea from central Australia; but the sea still covered a band across Victoria, from the coast to the Murray basin, passing to the east of Melbourne.

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  • From Cape Howe to Melbourne the fall may be taken at from 30 in.

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  • to 40 in., Melbourne itself having an average of 25.6 in.

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  • Melbourne, which stands in latitude 37° 50' S., has a mean temperature of 57'3°, and therefore corresponds with Washington in the United States, Madrid, Lisbon and Messina.

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  • The difference between summer and winter is, however, less at Melbourne than at any of the places mentioned, the result of a long series of observations being spring 57°, summer 65.3°, autumn 58.7°, and winter 49-2'.

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  • The highest recorded temperature in the shade at Melbourne is 110.7°, and the lowest 27°, but it is rare for the summer heat to exceed 85°, or for the winter temperature in the daytime to fall below 40°.

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  • west from Melbourne at a height of 1400 ft.

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  • The rainfall of Melbourne averages 25.58 in., the mean number of rainy days being 131.

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  • The principal cities and towns are Sydney (pop. 530,000), Newcastle, Broken Hill, Parramatta, Goulburn, Maitland, Bathurst, Orange, Lithgow, Tamworth, Grafton, Wagga and Albury, in New South Wales; Melbourne (pop. 511,900), Ballarat, Bendigo, Geelong, Eaglehawk, Warrnambool, Castlemaine, and Stawell in Victoria; Brisbane (pop. 128,000), Rockhampton, Maryborough, Townsville, Gympie, Ipswich, and Toowoomba in Queensland; Adelaide (pop. about 175,000), Port Adelaide and Port Pirie in South Australia; Perth (pop. 56,000), Fremantle, and Kalgoorlie in Western Australia; and Hobart (pop. 35,500) and Launceston in Tasmania.

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  • Universities have been established at Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and Hobart, and are well equipped and numerously attended; they are in part supported by grants from the public funds and in part by private endowments and the fees paid by students.

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  • Howitt, Kamilaroi and Kurnai, Group Marriage and Relationship (Melbourne, 1880); H.

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  • The leading men of the party were Mr Robert O'Hara Burke, an officer of police, and Mr William John Wills, of the Melbourne observatory.

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  • The bodies of Burke and Wills were recovered and brought to Melbourne for a solemn public funeral, and a noble monument has been erected to their honour.

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  • The line crossing Australia which was thus explored has since been occupied by the electric telegraph connecting Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney, and other Australian cities with London.

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  • At Melbourne there was a deputy governor, Mr Latrobe, under Sir George Gipps at Sydney.

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  • In August it was found at Anderson's Creek, near Melbourne; a few weeks later the great Ballarat gold-field, 80 m.

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  • Immigrants from Europe, and to some extent from North America and China, poured into Melbourne, where the arrivals in 1852 averaged 2000 persons in a week.

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  • The crisis was felt in the large cities more keenly than in the country districts, and in Melbourne more severely than in any other capital.

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  • The last occasion of its being called together was in 1899, when the council met in Melbourne.

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  • The immediate result was a conference at Parliament House, Melbourne, of representatives from each of the seven colonies.

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  • The third and final session was opened in Melbourne on the 10th of January 1898, but Queensland was still unrepresented; and, after further consideration, the draft bill was finally adopted on the 16th of March and remitted to the various colonies for submission to the people.

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  • Accordingly a premiers' conference was held in Melbourne at the end of January 1899, at which Queensland was for the first time represented.

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  • - For Physical Geography: Barton, Australian Physiography (Brisbane, 1895); Wall, Physical Geography of Australia (Melbourne, 1883); Taylor, Geography of New South Wales (Sydney, 1898); Saville Kent, The Great Barrier Reef of Australia (London, 1893); A.

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  • For Flora: Maiden, Useful Native Plants of Australia (Sydney, 1889); Bentham and Mueller, Flora Australiensis (London, 1863-1878); Fitzgerald, Australian Orchids (Sydney, 1870-1890); Mueller, Census of Australian Plants (Melbourne, 1889).

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  • In 1839 he took the degree of D.D., and the same year was appointed by Lord Melbourne to the deanery of Ely.

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  • He had made special inquiries of the authorities of the Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Hobart museums, and published questions in the newspapers, but no evidence has reached him that the eggs of Ornithorhyncus have ever been obtained except by the dissection of the mother.

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  • He immediately brought forward a scheme for improving the condi - tion of the poorer clergy by equalizing the incomes of the bishops, the reception of which at the time may be imagined, though it was substantially the same as that carried into effect by Lord Melbourne's government fifty years later.

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  • In 1841, after fourteen years at Rugby, Dr Arnold was appointed by Lord Melbourne, then prime minister, to the chair of modern history at Oxford.

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  • 14, Melbourne, 1916.

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  • In Australia the Jews from the first were welcomed on perfectly equal terms. The oldest congregation is that of Sydney (1817); the Melbourne community dates from 1844.

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  • After the strain of the fight with the so-called "Wee Frees" in 1904-5 his health broke down, and he went to Australia for recovery, but died at Melbourne on the 22nd of December 1906 See Lives by P. Carnegie Simpson (1909) and R.

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  • A small patch of Millstone Grit and Limestone occurs in the south of the county about Melbourne and Ticknall.

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  • There is a triple-recessed doorway, with arcade above, in the west end of Bakewell church, and there is another fine west doorway in Melbourne church, a building principally of the late Norman period, with central and small western towers.

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  • Earl Grey Viscount Melbourne Sir R.

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  • Viscount Melbourne Sir R.

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  • The herbarium at Melbourne, Australia, under Baron Muller, attained large proportions; and that of the Botanical Garden of Calcutta is noteworthy as the repository of numerous specimens described by writers on Indian botany.

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  • "ALFRED DEAKIN (1856-1919), Australian statesman, was born at Melbourne Aug.

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  • He was educated at the university of Melbourne and was called to the Victorian bar in 1877; but before that date he had already worked as a journalist, and he continued to contribute frequently to the press, especially to the Melbourne Age.

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  • of Melbourne.

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  • His speech in 1835 in support of the motion for inquiry into the Irish Church temporalities with a view to their partial appropriation for national purposes (for disestablishment was not then dreamed of as possible) contains much terse argument, and no doubt contributed to the fall of Peel and the formation of the Melbourne cabinet.

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  • In the same year he spoke for Lord Melbourne in the action (thought by some to be a political conspiracy 3) which the Hon.

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  • Next year, as the Melbourne administration was near its close, Plunkett, the venerable chancellor of Ireland, was forced by discreditable pressure to resign, and the Whig attorney-general, who had never practised in equity, became chancellor of Ireland, and was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron Campbell of St Andrews, in the county of Fife.

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  • In 1841, Sir Robert Peel having defeated the Melbourne ministry in parliament, there was a general election, when Cobden was returned for Stockport.

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  • Williams, The Diamond Mines of South Africa (New York, 1902); Periodical Publications - A nnales des mines de Belgique (Brussels, quarterly); Australian Mining Standard (Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane, weekly); Engineering and Mining Journal (New York, weekly); Gliickauf (Essen, weekly); Mines and Quarries; General Report and Statistics (London, annually); with details from official reports of colonial and foreign mining departments; Mines and Minerals (monthly, Scranton, Pennsylvania); The Mineral Industry (New York, annually); Transactions of the American Institute of Mining Engineers (New York); The Mining and Scientific Press (weekly, San Francisco); Transactions of the Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (London); Transactions of the Institution of Mining Engineers (Newcastle-on-Tyne).

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  • to a pier, whence it is shipped to Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane by a fleet of steam colliers.

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  • In 1806, when the brief "All the Talents" ministry was formed, he was given the office of secretary to the Board of Control; in 1830, when next his party came into power, Creevey, who had lost his seat in parliament, was appointed by Lord Grey treasurer of the ordnance; and subsequently Lord Melbourne made him treasurer of Greenwich hospital.

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  • The prime minister, Lord Melbourne, submitted to the king a choice of names for the chancellorship of the exchequer and leadership of the House of Commons; but his majesty announced that, having lost the services of Lord Althorp as leader of the House of Commons, he could feel no confidence in the stability of Lord Melbourne's government, and that it was his intention to send for the duke of Wellington.

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  • at the Melbourne Pub.

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  • This was followed by the Australia Felix Magazine (1849), and the Australasian Quarterly Reprint (1850-1851) both published at Geelong, the Illustrated Australian Magazine (1850-1852), the Australian Gold-Digger's Monthly Magazine (1852-1853), edited by James Bonwick, and the Melbourne Monthly Magazine (1855-1856).

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  • The Journal of Australasia (1856-1858), the Australian Monthly Magazine (1865-1867), which contained contributions from Marcus Clarke and was continued as the Colonial Monthly (1867-1869), the Melbourne Review (1876-1885) and the Victorian Review (1879-1886) may also be mentioned.

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  • An Australian edition of the Review of Reviews is published at Melbourne.

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  • The promotion was entirely the act of Lord Melbourne, an amateur in theology, who had read Thirlwall's introduction to Schleiermacher, and satisfied himself of the propriety of the appointment.

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  • - The only lengthy historical account of any note is Rusden's three-volume History of New Zealand (2nd ed., Melbourne, 1896), chiefly valuable as a statement of the grievances of the Maori race.

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  • The school of mines is the most important in Australia and is affiliated to the university of Melbourne.

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  • Africa (Melbourne, 1887); D.

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  • She, of course, retained the late king's ministers in their offices, and it was under Lord Melbourne's direction that the privy council drew up their declaration to the kingdom.

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  • The duchess of Kent had communicated her projects to Lord Melbourne, and they were known to many other statesmen, and to persons in society; but the gossip of drawing-rooms during the years 1837-38 continually represented that the young queen had fallen in love with Prince This or Lord That, and the more imaginative babblers hinted at post-chaises waiting outside Kensington Gardens in the night, private marriages and so forth.

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  • The charge having been laid before Lord Melbourne, he communicated it to Sir James.

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  • The queen's conduct towards Lady Flora was kind and sisterly from the beginning to the end of this painful business; but the scandal was made public through some indignant letters which the marchioness of Hastings addressed to Lord Melbourne praying for the punishment of her daughter's traducers, and the general opinion was that Lady Flora had been grossly treated at the instigation of some private court enemies.

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  • The ladies of the bedchamber were so unpopular in consequence of their behaviour to Lady Flora Hastings that the public took alarm at the notion that the queen had fallen into the hands of an intriguing coterie; and Lord Melbourne, who was accused of wishing to rule on the strength of court favour, resumed office with diminished prestige.

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  • Lord Melbourne ascertained that the queen's dis- The positions towards her cousin, Prince Albert, were un- queen's changed, and he advised King Leopold, through M.

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  • Lord Melbourne sought to effect this by a clause introduced in a naturalization bill; but he found himself obliged to drop the clause, and to leave the queen to confer what precedence she pleased by letters-patent.

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  • Lord Melbourne saw her Public g g affairs.

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  • A statesman of firmer mould than Lord Melbourne would hardly have succeeded so well as he did in making rough places smooth for Prince Albert.

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  • Lord John Russell and Lord Palmerston were naturally jealous of the prince's interference - and of King Leopold's and Baron Stockmar's - in state affairs; but Lord Melbourne took the common-sense view that a husband will control his wife whether people wish it or not.

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  • To confer on Prince Albert every honour that the crown could bestow, and to let him make his way gradually into public favour by his own tact, was the advice which Lord Melbourne gave; and the prince acted upon it so well, avoiding every appearance of intrusion, and treating men of all parties and degrees with urbanity, that within five months of his marriage he obtained a signal mark of the public confidence.

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  • At the general election of 1841 the Whigs returned in a minority of seventy-six, and Lord Melbourne was defeated on the Address and resigned.

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  • The only temporary embarrassment was the queen's continued private correspondence with Lord Melbourne, which led Stockmar to remonstrate with him; but Melbourne used his influence sensibly; moreover, he gradually dropped out of politics, and the queen got used to his not being indispensable.

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  • On Prince Albert's position the change had a marked effect, for in the absence of Melbourne the queen relied more particularly on his advice, and Peel himself at once discovered and recognized the prince's unusual charm and capacity.

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  • There are Zoological Gardens at Melbourne (founded in 1857), Adelaide, Sydney and Perth, and small gardens at Wellington, New Zealand, supported partly by private societies and partly by the municipalities.

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  • MELBOURNE, the capital of Victoria, and the most populous city in Australia.

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  • The appearance of Melbourne from the sea is by no means picturesque.

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  • The busy shipping suburbs of Port Melbourne and Williamstown occupy the flat alluvial land at the mouth of the Yarra.

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  • are Bourke Street, Collins Street and Flinders Street - the first being the busiest in Melbourne, the second the most fashionable with the best shops, and the third, which faces the river, given up to the maritime trade.

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  • Round the city lies a circle of populous suburbs - to the north-east Fitzroy (pop. 31,687) and Collingwood (32,749), to the east Richmond (37,824), to the south-east Prahran (40,441), to the south South Melbourne (40,619), to the south-west Port Melbourne (12,176), and to the north-west North Melbourne (18,120).

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  • In spite of the value of land, Melbourne is not a crowded city.

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  • Melbourne Hospital 18.

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  • A little further on is St Patrick's Roman Catholic cathedral, the seat of the archbishop of Melbourne, a building of somewhat sombre bluestone.

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  • The Melbourne town hall contains a central chamber capable of accommodating 3000 people.

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  • The residence of the governor of the colony is in South Melbourne, and is surrounded by an extensive domain.

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  • Melbourne has numerous state schools, and ample provision is made for secondary education by the various denominations and by private enterprise.

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  • Other public buildings include the mint, the observatory, the Victoria markets, the Melbourne hospital, the general post office, the homoeopathic hospital, the custom house and the Alfred hospital.

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  • The public gardens and parks of Melbourne are extensive.

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  • Besides these parks, each suburb has its public gardens, and at Flemington there is a fine race-course, on which the Melbourne cup races are run every November, an event which brings in a large influx of visitors from all parts of Australia.

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  • Melbourne has a complete tramway system; all the chief suburbs are connected with the city by cable trams. The tramways are controlled by a trust, representing twelve of the metropolitan municipalities.

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  • Port Melbourne, originally called Sandridge, is about 21m.

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  • As a port Melbourne takes the first place in Australia as regards tonnage.

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  • The climate of Melbourne is exceptionally fine; occasionally hot winds blow from the north for two or three days at a time, but the proportion of days when the sky is clear and the air dry and mild is large.

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  • The little settlement of the year 1835, out of which Melbourne grew, at first bore the native name of Dootigala, but it was presently renamed after Viscount Melbourne, premier of Great Britain at the time of its foundation.

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  • In 1842 Melbourne was incorporated and first sent members to the New South Wales parliament.

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  • A strong popular agitation caused the Port Phillip district to be separated from New South Wales in 1851, and a new colony was formed with the name of Victoria, Melbourne becoming its capital.

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  • In 1901 Melbourne became the temporary capital of the Australian commonwealth pending the selection of the permanent capital in New South Wales.

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  • The population of the city proper in 1901 was 68,374, and that of " greater Melbourne " was 496,079.

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  • Melbourne, England >>

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  • MELBOURNE, a market town in the southern parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, 8 m.

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  • Melbourne Hall, a building of the time of William III., surrounded by formal Dutch gardens, stands in a domain owned at an early date by the bishops of Carlisle, whose tithe barn remains near the church.

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  • The title of Viscount Melbourne was taken from this town.

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  • Both in Australia (especially in Sydney and Melbourne) and at Thursday Island there is work among the Chinese.

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  • of, and suburban to, Melbourne.

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  • Other Australian localities are Echunga in South Australia; Beechworth, Arena and Melbourne in Victoria; Freemantle and Nullagine in Western Australia; the Palmer and Gilbert rivers in Queensland.

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  • At the subsequent election he was defeated, but joined the cabinet as first commissioner of woods and forests when Lord Melbourne took office in July 1834, and about the same time was returned at a by-election as one of the members for Nottingham.

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  • In Melbourne's government of 1835 he was president of the board of control, in which position he strongly supported the Indian policy of Lord Auckland; he returned to the same office in July 1846 as a member of Lord John Russell's cabinet; and in February 1851 he went to the House of Lords as Baron Broughton of Broughton Gyfford.

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  • While in gaol at Rochester he published the Caroline Almanac, the tone of which may be judged from its references to "Victoria Guelph, the bloody queen of England," and by the title given to the British cabinet of "Victoria Melbourne's bloody divan."

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  • Bluff Harbour is the port of call and departure for steamers for Melbourne and Hobart.

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  • From a discussion of the observations of Mars made in 1860 and 1862 at Greenwich and Williamstown (near Melbourne), Stone deduced for it a value of 8.932" (Mon.

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  • A celebrated beauty, a maid of honour and bridesmaid of Queen Victoria, she married, on the 10th of December 1843, Archibald, Lord Dalmeny (1809-1851), member for the Stirling Burghs, who became a lord of the adrriralty under Melbourne.

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  • O'Connell steadily supported Lord Melbourne's government, gave it valuable aid in its general measures, and repeatedly expressed his cordial approval of its policy in advancing Irish Catholics to places of trust and power in the state, though personally he refused a high judicial office.

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  • Fewer telescopes have been made of this than perhaps of any other form of reflector; but in comparatively recent years the Cassegrain has acquired importance from the fact of its adoption for the great Melbourne telescope, and from its employment in the 60-in.

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  • The process of casting and annealing, in the case of the specula of the great Melbourne telescope, was admirably described by Dr Robinson in Phil.

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  • In recent years no noteworthy refractors have been mounted on Great this plan; but type A has been chosen by Grubb for the Me!- great Melbourne reflector, of 48-in.

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  • - Melbourne Reflector.

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  • The mode of relieving the friction of the declination axis is similar to that employed in the Melbourne telescope and in the account of the Vienna telescope published by Grubb.

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  • Melbourne, on the lower slopes of which much geological work was done.

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  • Adelaide is the terminus of an extensive railway system, the main line of which runs through Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane to Rockhampton.

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  • Metternich protested against a course which would result, in his opinion, either in a war or a revolution in France; King Leopold enlarged on the wickedness and absurdity of risking a European war for the sake of putting an end to the power of an old man who could have but few years to live; Queen Victoria urged her ministers to come to terms with France and relieve the embarrassments of the "dear King"; and Lord Melbourne, with the majority of the cabinet, was in favour of compromise.

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  • The following towns were affected in Australia: Sydney, in New South Wales; Adelaide, in South Australia; Melbourne, in Victoria; Brisbane, Rockhampton, Townsville, Cairns and Ipswich, in Queensland; Freemantle, Perth and Coolgardie, in West Australia.

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  • Daily communication is maintained with Cunningham at the lakes' entrance, and ocean-going steamers ply frequently between Sale and Melbourne.

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  • In 1823 he was appointed vice-president of the board of trade; from September 1827 to June 1828 he was president of the board and treasurer of the navy; then joining the Whigs, he was president of the board of control under Earl Grey and Lord Melbourne from November 1830 to November 1834.

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  • Lord Glenelg, secretary for the colonies in Lord Melbourne's second administration, held that the Kaffirs were in the right in the quarrel, and he compelled D'Urban to abandon the conquered territory, a mistaken decision adopted largely on the advice of Dr Philip and his supporters.

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  • It found that Great Britain was legally responsible for all the depredations of the "Alabama" and "Florida" and for those committed by the "Shenandoah" after she left Melbourne.

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  • Melbourne and Sydney followed in 1854, Brisbane in 1865, Rodborough, Vict., in 1878.

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  • An Australasian conference met at Melbourne in 1881 and has continued to meet in alternate years.

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  • Parramatta, Richmond and Windsor had indeed been founded within the first decade of the colony's existence; Newcastle, Maitland and Morpeth, near the coast to the north of Sydney, had been begun during the earlier years of the 19th century; but the towns of the interior, Goulburn, Bathurst and others, were not commenced till about 1835, in which year the site of Melbourne was first occupied by Batman and Fawkner.

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  • Telegraphic communication was established between Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and Tasmania in 1859; and during the same year the Moreton Bay district was separated from New South Wales and was constituted the colony of Queensland.

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  • The railway to Melbourne was completed in 1880; and in 1883 valuable deposits of silver were discovered at Broken Hill.

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  • In 1889 the premier, Sir Henry Parkes, gave in his adhesion to the movement for Australasian federation, and New South Wales was represented at the first conference held at Melbourne in the beginning of 1890.

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  • But the " Canningites," as they were termed, remained, and the duke of Wellington hastened to include Palmerston, Huskisson, Charles Grant, Lamb (Lord Melbourne) and Dudley in his government.

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  • Lord Palmerston himself declared in a letter to Lord Melbourne that he should quit the ministry if his policy was not adopted; and he carried his point.

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  • Within a few months Lord Melbourne's administration came to an end (1841), and Lord Palmerston remained for five years out of office.

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  • WILLIAM LAMB MELBOURNE, 2ND Viscount (1779-1848), English statesman, second son of the 1st Viscount Melbourne, by his marriage with the daughter of Sir Ralph Milbanke, bart., was born on the 15th of March 1779.

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  • 1768), who made a large fortune out of the law, and married Miss Coke of Melbourne Hall; in 1770 he was made baron and in 1781 Viscount Melbourne in the Irish peerage, and in 1815 was created an English peer.

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  • William Lamb (as Lord Melbourne then was) joined the opposition under Fox, of whom he was an ardent admirer; but his Liberal tendencies were never decided, and he not infrequently supported Lord Liverpool during that statesman's long tenure of office.

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  • The influence of Melbourne as a politician dates from his succeeding to the peerage in 1829.

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  • For the duties of this office at such a critical time he was deficient in insight and energy, but his political success was independent of his official capacity; and when the ministry of Grey was wrecked on the Irish question in July 1834 Melbourne was chosen to succeed him as prime minister.

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  • He died at Melbourne House, Derbyshire, on the 24th of November 1848.

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  • Lord Melbourne was without the qualification of attention to details, and he never displayed those brilliant talents which often form a substitute for more solid acquirements.

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  • Melbourne was succeeded as 3rd viscount by his brother, Frederick James Lamb (1782-1853), who was British ambassador to Vienna from 1831 to 1841.

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  • McC. Torrens, Memoirs of Lord` Melbourne (1878); Lloyd Sanders, Lord Melbourne's Papers (1889); A.

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  • Melbourne, Australia >>

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  • Among his students were Professors Elmslie, Skinner, Harper of Melbourne, Walker of Belfast, George Adam Smith of Glasgow and W.

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  • In July the Grey ministry resigned, and on the 16th Lord Melbourne became prime minister.

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  • Lord Melbourne once more came into office, and the Municipal Corporations Act of the 7th of September was the work of a Liberal government.

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  • The Whigs, who had governed England since 1830, under Lord Grey and Lord Melbourne, were suffering from the reaction which is the inevitable consequence of revolution.

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  • Technically he was justified in adopting this course, but people generally felt that there was some hardship in compelling a young queen to separate herself from her companions and friends, and they consequently approved the decision of Lord Melbourne to support the queen in her refusal, and to resume office.

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  • But, if they had failed in this respect, Lord Melbourne had rendered conspicuous service to the queen.

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  • The Irish, under OConnell, had constantly supported the Whig ministry of Lord Melbourne.

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  • Here he married and settled down to the life of a sheep-farmer; but finding his health and eyesight greatly improved, he came to Melbourne as lecturer on history at the university.

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  • It is a regular port of call for several intercolonial lines from Sydney and Melbourne, and for lines from London to New Zealand.

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  • There is more than one meaning of Melbourne discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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  • Comus was the sire of Humphrey Clinker (1822), whose son was Melbourne (1834), sire of West Australian (1850) and of many valuable mares, including Canezou (1845) and Blink Bonny (1854), dam of Blair Athol.

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  • Melbourne: West Australian (D, L), Blink Bonny (D, 0), Sir Tatton Sykes (L).

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  • Queen Mary, who was by Gladiator out of a daughter of Plenipotentiary and Myrrha by Whalebone, when mated with Melbourne produced Blink Bonny (winner of the Derby and Oaks); when mated with Mango and Lanercost she produced Haricot, dam of Caller Ou (winner of the St Leger).

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  • Guiccioli (1823) Sultan (,8,6) 'Muley (,8,o), Clare (1824) BlairAthol*: (1861) Comus (1809) Humphrey Clinker (1822) Clinkerina (1812) Melbourne (1834) Daughter of (1825) Daughter of (1818) Blink Bonny*t (1854) Partisan (1811) Gladiator (1833) Pauline (1826) Queen Mary (:843) Plenipotentiary* (1831) Daughter of (1840) Myrrha (1830) * Winner of the Derby.

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  • Gregory, The Mount Lyell Mining Field (Melbourne, 1904).

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  • Hobart is now a place of call for several of the European steamship lines, and the state is becoming increasingly popular as a summer resort for the residents of Melbourne and Sydney.

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  • It lies near the head of a lagoon called Lake King, which is open to the sea, and affords regular communication by water with Melbourne.

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  • There is an active shipping trade with Melbourne in maize and other grain, hops, fruit and dairy produce.

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  • The airline is based at Melbourne and initially serves 13 eastern seaboard cities.

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  • Melbourne 's lively seaside suburb of St Kilda has one of the new breed of deluxe hostels.

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  • Melbourne swamped by flash floods Perched on the roofs of their cars, they look out bewildered on a city inundated with flash floods.

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  • Children and under melbourne sydney and enchanted isle operated onboard meals and.

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  • Cate Blanchett was born in Melbourne, Australia and is the middle of three children.

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  • Cate Blanchett began acting while she was attending the Methodist Ladies College in Melbourne, Australia, appearing in many productions including The Odyssey of Runyon Jones.

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  • After that, Blanchett decided she wanted to pursue acting as a career and headed back home to Melbourne.

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  • They told Lea they were from Sydney, to which she snippily replied that she preferred Melbourne to Sydney.

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  • The school was established in 1960 and has four campuses in Cocoa, Melbourne, Palm Beach and Titusville.

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  • The 2,000 seat center on the Melbourne campus is a popular hub for cultural art shows and performances.

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  • Whether you are traveling for business or for pleasure, nothing can be more convenient than being able to use the same cellular phone whether you find yourself in Melbourne, Milan, or Montana.

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  • The company's National Office is located in Mulgrave, Melbourne and there are more than 180 stores in New Zealand and Australia.

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  • In 1956, Australians John Devitt and Dawn Fraser won big at the Melbourne games in their Speedos, and Devitt even went on to work for Speedo.

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  • All of the sites will allow you to narrow your search down to specific areas such as Sydney or Melbourne.

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  • Depending on which shop you are interested in, it seems the only way to purchase the shoes is to be either in Telluride or Melbourne.

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