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meissen

meissen

meissen Sentence Examples

  • Later it belonged to Meissen and to Saxony, passing to Prussia in 1814.

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  • In 1865 he was made a counsellor to the consistory, in 1871 canon of Meissen cathedral, and in 1887 a privy councillor to the church.

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  • castle, at one time a residence of the bishops of Meissen and now utilized as law courts, several schools and an agricultural.

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  • Wurzen was founded by the Sorbs, and was a town early in the 12th century, when Herwig, bishop of Meissen, founded a monastery here.

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  • MEISSEN, a town of Germany, in the kingdom of Saxony, on both banks of the Elbe, 15 m.

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  • The Franciscan church is now used as a museum of objects connected with the history of Meissen.

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  • Since 1710 Meissen has been the seat of the manufacture of Dresden china.

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  • Meissen also contains iron foundries, factories for making earthenware stoves and pottery, sugar refineries, breweries and tanneries.

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  • From 968 to 1581 Meissen was the seat of a line of bishops, who ranked as princes of the empire.

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  • Colin on the right bank of the Elbe was incorporated with Meissen in 1901.

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  • See Reinhard, Die Stadt Meissen, ihre Merkwiirdigkeiten (Meissen, 1829); Loose, Alt-Meissen in Bildern (Meissen, 1889); Jaschke, Meissen and seine Kirchen (Leipzig, 1902); and Gersdorf, Urkundenbuch der Stadt Meissen (Leipzig, 1873).

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  • Meissen, Saxony >>

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  • MEISSEN, a German margraviate now merged in the kingdom of Saxony.

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  • The mark of Meissen was originally a district centring round the castle of Meissen or Misnia on the Middle Elbe, which was built about 920 by the German king Henry I., the Fowler, as a defence against the Sla y s.

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  • After the death of Gero, margrave of the Saxon east mark, in 965, his territory was divided into five marks, one of which was called Meissen.

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  • bestowed the office of margrave upon Ekkard I., margrave of Merseburg, and, the district comprising the marks of Meissen, Merseburg and Zeitz was generally known as the mark of Meissen.

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  • died in 1046 it was divided, and Meissen proper was given successively to William and Otto, counts of Weimar, and Egbert II., count of Brunswick.

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  • and died under the imperial ban in 1089, when Meissen was bestowed upon Henry I., count of Wettin, whose mother was a sister of the margrave Ekkard II.

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  • When Henry died without issue in 1123 Meissen was given by the emperor Henry V.

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  • Conrad, called the Great, extended the boundaries of Meissen before abdicating in 1156 in favour of his son Otto, known as the Rich.

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  • As Albert left no children, Meissen was seized by the emperor Henry VI.

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  • In 1243 Henry's son Albert was betrothed to Margaret, daughter of Frederick II.; and Pleissnerland, a district west of Meissen, was added to his possessions.

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  • Having gained Thuringia and the Saxon palatinate on his uncle's death in 1247, he granted sections of his lands to his three sons in 1265, but retained Meissen.

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  • About this time he sold his portion of Meissen to his nephew Frederick Tutta, who held the title of margrave and ruled the greater part of the mark until his death in 1291.

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  • Albert's two remaining sons, Frederick and Dietrich or Diezmann, then claimed Meissen; but it was seized by King Adolph of Nassau as a vacant fief of the empire, and was for some time retained by him and his successor King Albert I.

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  • In this year Dietrich died and Frederick became reconciled with his father, who, after renouncing his claim on Meissen for a yearly payment, died in 1314.

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  • During these years the part of Meissen around Dresden had been in the possession of Frederick, youngest son of the margrave Henry the Illustrious, and when he died in 1316 it came to his nephew Frederick.

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  • Surrendering lower Lusatia he was released, but it was only after Waldemar's death in 1319 that he obtained undisputed possession of Meissen.

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  • in 1381 a division was made by which Meissen fell to his youngest son William I.

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  • As Meissen was relieved from the attacks of the Sla y s by the movement of the German boundary to the east, its prosperity increased.

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  • Posse, Die Markgrafen von Meissen and das Haus Wettin (Leipzig, 1881); F.

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  • von PosernKlett, Zur Geschichte der Verfassung der Markgrafschaft Meissen im 13.

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  • See also Urkunden der Markgrafen von Meissen and Landgrafen von Thuringen, edited by E.

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  • It was the residence of Benno, bishop of Meissen, in the 1 i th century, and the "Bishop's Road" still runs from here to Meissen.

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  • At Pirna the Elbe leaves behind it the stress and turmoil of the Saxon Switzerland, rolls through Dresden, with its noble river terraces, and finally, beyond Meissen, enters on its long journey across the North German plain, touching Torgau, Wittenberg, Magdeburg, Wittenberge, Hamburg, Harburg and Altona on the way, and gathering into itself the waters of the Mulde and Saale from the left, and those of the Schwarze Elster, Havel and Elde from the right.

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  • In this respect the greatest efforts have naturally been made by Hamburg; but Magdeburg, Dresden, Meissen, Riesa, Tetschen, Aussig and other places have all done their relative shares, Magdeburg, for instance, providing a commercial harbour and a winter harbour.

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  • The Elbe is crossed by numerous bridges, as at KOniggratz, Pardubitz, Kolin, Leitmeritz, Tetschen, Schandau, Pirna, Dresden, Meissen, Torgau, Wittenberg, Rosslau, Barby, Magdeburg, Rathenow, Wittenberge, Ddmitz, Lauenburg, and Hamburg and Harburg.

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  • Meissen has a railway bridge, in addition to an old road bridge.

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  • In the 10th century Naumburg was a stronghold of the margraves of Meissen, who in 1029 transferred to it the bishopric of Zeitz.

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  • When his father died in 1381 some trouble arose over the family possessions, and in the following year an arrangement was made by which Frederick and his brothers shared Meissen and Thuringia with their uncles Balthasar and William.

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  • A further dispute then arose, but in 1410 a treaty was made at Naumburg, when Frederick and his brother William added the northern part of Meissen to their lands; and in 1425 the death of William left Frederick sole ruler.

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  • Returning to Saxony, Frederick died at Altenburg on the 4th of January 1428, and was buried in the cathedral at Meissen.

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  • Frederick's importance as an historical figure arises from his having obtained the electorate of Saxe-Wittenberg for the house of Wettin, and transformed the margraviate of Meissen into the territory which afterwards became the kingdom of Saxony.

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  • He took part in the war against the Hussites, but became estranged from Sigismund when in 1423 the king invested Frederick of Wettin, margrave of Meissen, with the vacant electoral duchy of Saxe-Wittenberg.

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  • Reuss, and, after holding various teaching posts, was made instructor in French and Hebrew at the Landesschule of Meissen, receiving in 1852 the title of professor.

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  • Schmidt, Arpinum, eine topographisch-historische Skizze (Meissen, 1900).

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  • A castle is said to have been founded on the site of Wolfenbuttel by a margrave of Meissen about 1046.

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  • After the death of the elector Frederick in 1464, Albert and Ernest ruled their lands together, but in 1485 a division was made by the treaty of Leipzig, and Albert received Meissen, together with some adjoining districts, and founded the Albertine branch of the family of Wettin.

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  • He was buried at Meissen.

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  • After a short stay at Meissen he was entered at the celebrated school at Pforta, near Naumburg.

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  • Wegele, Friedrich der Friedige, Markgraf von Meissen, and die Wettiner seiner Zeit (NOrdlingen, 1820); F.

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  • Tittmann, Geschichte Heinrich des Erlauchten Markgraven zu Meissen (Leipzig, 1863).

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  • Meissen, Germany >>

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  • in Saxony, and his son, taking the same attitude, assisted Egbert II., margrave of Meissen, in the rising of 1088.

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  • After the defeat by Lothair of Henry's forces at Welfesholz on the 11th of February 1115, events called Henry to Italy; and Lothair appears to have been undisturbed in Saxony until 1123, when the death of Henry II., margrave of Meissen and Lusatia raised a dispute as to the right of appointment to the vacant margraviates.

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  • The emperor seconded the efforts of his vassals, Albert the Bear, margrave of the Saxon north mark, and Conrad I., margrave of Meissen and Lusatia, to extend the authority of the Germans in the districts east of the Elbe, and assisted Norbert, archbishop of Magdeburg, and Albert I., archbishop of Bremen, to spread Christianity.

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  • The following table shows the area and population of the whole kingdom and of each of the five chief governmental districts, or Kreishauptmannschaften, into which it is divided The chief towns are Dresden (pop. 1905, 514,283), Leipzig (502,570), Chemnitz (244,405),(244,405), Plauen (105,182), Zwickau (68,225), Zittau (34, 6 79), Meissen (32,175),(32,175), Freiberg (30,869), Bautzen (29,372), Meerane (24,994), Glauchau (24,556), Reichenbach (24,911),(24,911), Crimmitzschau (23,340), Werdau (19,476), Pirna (19,200).

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  • But in 1834 a law was passed providing for the union of the scattered lands belonging to each proprietor, and that may be considered the dawn of modern Saxon agriculture., The richest grain districts are near Meissen, Grimma, Bautzen,.

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  • Wine is said to have been grown here in the iith century; the Saxon vineyards, chiefly on the banks of the Elbe near Meissen and Dresden, have of late years, owing to the ravages of the phylloxera, become almost extinct.

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  • Fine porcelain clay occurs near Meissen, and coarser varieties elsewhere.

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  • Stoneware and earthenware are made at Chemnitz, Zwickau, Bautzen and Meissen, porcelain (" Dresden china ")") at Meissen, chemicals in and near Leipzig.

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  • The endowed schools (Fiirstenschulen) at Meissen and Grimma have long enjoyed a high reputation.

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  • In 1423 Meissen and Thuringia were united with Saxe-Wittenberg under Frederick of Meissen, and gradually the name of Saxony spread over all the lands ruled by this prince and his descendants.

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  • A new era in the history of Saxony dates from 1423, the year when the emperor Sigismund bestowed the vacant electoral duchy of Saxe-Wittenberg upon Frederick, margrave of Meissen.

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  • The new and more honourable title of elector of Saxony now superseded his other titles, and the name Saxony gradually spread over his other possessions, which included Meissen and Thuringia as well as Saxe-Wittenberg, and thus the earlier history of the electorate and kingdom of Saxony is the early history of the mark of Meissen, the name of which now lingers only in a solitary town on the Elbe.

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  • Ernest, the elder brother, obtained Saxe-Wittenberg with the electoral dignity, Thuringia and the Saxon Vogtland; while Albert received Meissen, Osterland being divided between them.

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  • Moreover, Roman Catholic prelates were reinstated in the bishoprics of Meissen, Merseburg and Naumburg-Zeitz.

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  • To its educational advantages, already conspicuous, he added the three Fi rstenschulen at Pforta, Grimma and Meissen, and for administrative purposes, especially for the collection of taxes, he divided the country into the four circles of the Electorate, Thuringia, Meissen and Leipzig.

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  • Johann Friedrich Bbttger made his famous discovery in 1710, and the manufacture of porcelain was begun at Meissen, and in this reign the Moravian Brethren made their settlement at Herrnhut.

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  • It appears to have been united with Meissen for some time, and this was certainly the case from 1046 to 1067, when both countries were ruled by William and Otto, counts of Weimar.

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  • the Illustrious, margrave of Meissen.

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  • the Illustrious, margrave of Meissen, a maternal grandson of the landgrave Hermann I.

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  • Wachter, Thüringische and ObersÃchsische Geschichte bis zum Anfalle Thüringens an die Markgrafen von Meissen (Leipzig, 1826); T.

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  • The town is mentioned as early as 1304 and in 1398 it was purchased by the margrave of Meissen, who afterwards became elector of Saxony.

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  • The harmonious relations which subsisted between the two branches of the Wettins were disturbed by the interference of Maurice in Cleves, a proceeding distasteful to the Saxon elector, John Frederick; and a dispute over the bishopric of Meissen having widened the breach, war was only averted by the mediation of Philip of Hesse and Luther.

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  • ADAM OF BREMEN, historian and geographer, was probably born in Upper Saxony (at Meissen, according to one tradition) before 1045.

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  • of Meissen, and so brought the castle, town and countship into the possession of the Saxon house of Wettin.

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  • Their land was formed into a separate march, which for about three centuries was sometimes attached to, and sometimes independent of, the margraviate of Meissen, its rulers being occasionally called margraves of Lusatia.

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  • In the 11th and 12th centuries it was connected at different periods with Meissen, Poland and Bohemia.

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  • A collection of porcelain in the "Museum Johanneum" (which once contained the picture gallery) is made up of specimens of Chinese, Japanese, East Indian, Sevres and Meissen manufacture, carefully arranged in chronological order.

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  • To the north are the vine-clad hills of the LOssnitz commanding views of the valley of the Elbe from Dresden to Meissen; behind them, on an island in a lake, is the castle of Moritzburg, the hunting box of the king of Saxony.

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  • It became the capital of Henry the Illustrious, margrave of Meissen, in 1270, but belonged for some time after his death, first to Wenceslaus of Bohemia, and next to the margrave of Brandenburg.

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  • Early in the 14th century it was restored to the margrave of Meissen.

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  • It was captured by the landgrave of Meissen in 1476, and belonged thenceforth to Saxony, until it was ceded to Prussia in 1815.

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  • In his later years he set up the archbishopric of Magdeburg, which took in the sees of Meissen, Zeitz and Merseburg.

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  • This duchy was soon reduced to obedience and was treated with consideration, and when the third anti-king, Egbert, margrave of Meissen, was murdered in 1090 there would have been peace if Germany had followed her own impulses.

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  • The first of these centred round the restless and unruly Welfs; after a time these insurgents were joined by their former enemies, the rulers of Saxony, of Thuringia and of Meissen, who were angered by Henrys conduct.

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  • Meissen, which he claimed as a vacant fief of the Empire, and Thuringia, which he bought from the landgrave Albert II., seemed to offer a favorable field for this undertaking, and he spent a large part of his short reign in a futile attempt to carry out his plan.

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  • He secured some help from Frederick of Brandenburg, from Albert of Austria, afterwards the German king Albert II., an~ from Frederick of Meissen, to whom he granted the electoral duchy of Saxe-Wittenberg; but it was only when the Hussites were split into two factions, and when ~alka was dead, that Germany was in any way relieved from a crushing and intolerabh burden.

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  • In 1423 it was pledged by King Sigismund to the elector Frederick of Meissen, who occupied it with a Saxon garrison.

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  • Originally the Copenhagen potters imitated the Dresden china made at Meissen, but they later produced graceful original designs.

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  • Seeking at once to strengthen the royal position, he claimed Meissen as a vacant fief of the Empire, and in 1294 allied himself with Edward I., king of England, against France.

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  • This bargain was resisted by the sons of Albert, and from 1294 to 1296 Adolph was campaigning in Meissen and Thuringia.

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  • Meissen was conquered, but he was not equally successful in Thuringia, and his relations with Albert of Austria were becoming more strained.

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  • During the storm of the Peasants' War (13th of June 1525) Luther married Catherine von Bora, the daughter of a noble but impoverished family belonging to Meissen.

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  • There is more than one meaning of Meissen discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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  • In 1555 he had appointed one of his nominees to the bishopric of Meissen, in 1561 he had secured the election of his son Alexander as bishop of Merseburg, and three years later as bishop of Naumburg; and when this prince died in 1565 these bishoprics came under the direct rule of Augustus.

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  • Torgau is said to have existed as the capital of a distinct principality in the time of the German king Henry I., but early in the 14th century it was in the possession of the margraves of Meissen and later of the electors of Saxony, who frequently resided here.

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  • In the chapel, which was built in 1347 and restored in 1787, lie the remains of ten margraves of Meissen, members of the family of Wettin.

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  • At the beginning of the 14th century it was in the possession of the margraves of Meissen, from whom it passed in 1423 to the elector of Saxony.

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  • In 1785 he became assessor to the superintending board of the foundries, and in 1786 chemist to the porcelain works at Meissen.

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  • From 968 until the Reformation, it was the seat of a bishop, and in addition to being for a time the residence of the margraves of Meissen, it was a favourite residence of the German kings during the loth, fi lth and 12th centuries.

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  • In 1546 he was appointed rector of the college of Meissen, where he died on the 17th of July 1571.

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  • Having been again part of Thuringia, it fell in 1249 to Meissen, and in 1291 to Brandenburg.

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  • The district thus called Reuss was at one time much more extensive than it is at present, and for some years its rulers were margraves of Meissen.

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  • Ten years later he was made canon of Meissen.

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  • In 1300 it was burned by the margrave of Meissen.

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  • The best products of this factory are figures and groups representing contemporary life, or allegorical subjects in the rococo taste of the period, and they are surpassed only by those of the more famous factory at Meissen.

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  • In 1541 John Frederick forced Nicholas Amsdorf into the see of Naumburg in spite of the chapter, who had elected a Roman Catholic, Julius von Pflug; and about the same time he seized Wurzen, the property of the bishop of Meissen, whose see was under the joint protection of electoral and ducal Saxony.

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  • of Brabant, to defend the town against Henry III., margrave of Meissen, during the succession contest that followed the extinction of the male line of the Thuringian landgraves in 1247.

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  • Its municipal constitution dates from the 14th century, and it soon became the most important industrial centre in the mark of Meissen.

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  • On the death of Otto, Boleslaus invaded Germany, penetrated to the Elbe, occupying Stralsund and Meissen on his way, and extended his dominions to the Elster and the Saale.

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  • Under the fostering care of the margraves of Meissen, and then of the electors of Saxony they attained great popularity.

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  • In 1268 the margrave of Meissen granted a safe-conduct to all frequenters of the fairs, and in 1497 and 1507 the emperor Maximilian I.

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  • In the 11th century Leipzig is mentioned as a fortified place and in the 12th it came into the possession of the margrave of Meissen, being granted some municipal privileges by the margrave, Otto the Rich, before 1190.

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  • The district now forming the duchy of Saxe-Altenburg came into the possession of the margrave of Meissen about 1329, and later with Meissen formed part of the electorate of Saxony.

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  • Benz, Die Stellung der Bischofe von Meissen, Merseburg and Naumburg im.

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  • BENNO (ioio-1106), bishop of Meissen, was the son of Werner, count of Woldenburg, was educated at Gosslar, and in 1066 was nominated by the emperor Henry IV.

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  • to the see of Meissen.

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  • His canonization drew from Luther a violent brochure "against the new false god and old devil, who is to be lifted up at Meissen."

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  • Jahrhundert (Potsdam, 1836-1839); Leben and Taten Friedrichs des Grossen (Meissen, 1840-1841); W allensteins Prozess (Leipzig, 1844); and Preussens Heiden in Krieg and Frieden, neuere and neueste preussische Geschichte, 7 volumes (Berlin, 1849-1860).

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  • Later it belonged to Meissen and to Saxony, passing to Prussia in 1814.

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  • In 1865 he was made a counsellor to the consistory, in 1871 canon of Meissen cathedral, and in 1887 a privy councillor to the church.

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  • castle, at one time a residence of the bishops of Meissen and now utilized as law courts, several schools and an agricultural.

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  • Wurzen was founded by the Sorbs, and was a town early in the 12th century, when Herwig, bishop of Meissen, founded a monastery here.

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  • MEISSEN, a town of Germany, in the kingdom of Saxony, on both banks of the Elbe, 15 m.

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  • The Franciscan church is now used as a museum of objects connected with the history of Meissen.

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  • Since 1710 Meissen has been the seat of the manufacture of Dresden china.

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  • Meissen also contains iron foundries, factories for making earthenware stoves and pottery, sugar refineries, breweries and tanneries.

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  • Meissen was founded about 920 by Henry the Fowler (see Meissen, Margraviate).

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  • From 968 to 1581 Meissen was the seat of a line of bishops, who ranked as princes of the empire.

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  • Colin on the right bank of the Elbe was incorporated with Meissen in 1901.

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  • See Reinhard, Die Stadt Meissen, ihre Merkwiirdigkeiten (Meissen, 1829); Loose, Alt-Meissen in Bildern (Meissen, 1889); Jaschke, Meissen and seine Kirchen (Leipzig, 1902); and Gersdorf, Urkundenbuch der Stadt Meissen (Leipzig, 1873).

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  • Meissen, Saxony >>

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  • MEISSEN, a German margraviate now merged in the kingdom of Saxony.

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  • The mark of Meissen was originally a district centring round the castle of Meissen or Misnia on the Middle Elbe, which was built about 920 by the German king Henry I., the Fowler, as a defence against the Sla y s.

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  • After the death of Gero, margrave of the Saxon east mark, in 965, his territory was divided into five marks, one of which was called Meissen.

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  • bestowed the office of margrave upon Ekkard I., margrave of Merseburg, and, the district comprising the marks of Meissen, Merseburg and Zeitz was generally known as the mark of Meissen.

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  • died in 1046 it was divided, and Meissen proper was given successively to William and Otto, counts of Weimar, and Egbert II., count of Brunswick.

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  • and died under the imperial ban in 1089, when Meissen was bestowed upon Henry I., count of Wettin, whose mother was a sister of the margrave Ekkard II.

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  • When Henry died without issue in 1123 Meissen was given by the emperor Henry V.

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  • Conrad, called the Great, extended the boundaries of Meissen before abdicating in 1156 in favour of his son Otto, known as the Rich.

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  • As Albert left no children, Meissen was seized by the emperor Henry VI.

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  • In 1243 Henry's son Albert was betrothed to Margaret, daughter of Frederick II.; and Pleissnerland, a district west of Meissen, was added to his possessions.

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  • Having gained Thuringia and the Saxon palatinate on his uncle's death in 1247, he granted sections of his lands to his three sons in 1265, but retained Meissen.

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  • His second son Dietrich died in 1285, and on Henry's own death in 1288 Meissen was divided between his two remaining sons, Albert (called the Degenerate) and Frederick, and his grandson Frederick Tutta, the son of Dietrich.

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  • About this time he sold his portion of Meissen to his nephew Frederick Tutta, who held the title of margrave and ruled the greater part of the mark until his death in 1291.

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  • Albert's two remaining sons, Frederick and Dietrich or Diezmann, then claimed Meissen; but it was seized by King Adolph of Nassau as a vacant fief of the empire, and was for some time retained by him and his successor King Albert I.

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  • In this year Dietrich died and Frederick became reconciled with his father, who, after renouncing his claim on Meissen for a yearly payment, died in 1314.

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  • During these years the part of Meissen around Dresden had been in the possession of Frederick, youngest son of the margrave Henry the Illustrious, and when he died in 1316 it came to his nephew Frederick.

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  • Surrendering lower Lusatia he was released, but it was only after Waldemar's death in 1319 that he obtained undisputed possession of Meissen.

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  • in 1381 a division was made by which Meissen fell to his youngest son William I.

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  • As Meissen was relieved from the attacks of the Sla y s by the movement of the German boundary to the east, its prosperity increased.

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  • During this period the mark of Meissen lay on both banks of the Elbe, and stretched from Bohemia to the duchy of Saxe-Wittenberg, embracing an area of about 3000 sq.

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  • Posse, Die Markgrafen von Meissen and das Haus Wettin (Leipzig, 1881); F.

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  • Tittmann, Geschichte Heinrichs des erlauchten Markgrafen zu Meissen (Dresden, 1845-1846); C. F.

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  • von PosernKlett, Zur Geschichte der Verfassung der Markgrafschaft Meissen im 13.

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  • See also Urkunden der Markgrafen von Meissen and Landgrafen von Thuringen, edited by E.

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  • It was the residence of Benno, bishop of Meissen, in the 1 i th century, and the "Bishop's Road" still runs from here to Meissen.

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  • At Pirna the Elbe leaves behind it the stress and turmoil of the Saxon Switzerland, rolls through Dresden, with its noble river terraces, and finally, beyond Meissen, enters on its long journey across the North German plain, touching Torgau, Wittenberg, Magdeburg, Wittenberge, Hamburg, Harburg and Altona on the way, and gathering into itself the waters of the Mulde and Saale from the left, and those of the Schwarze Elster, Havel and Elde from the right.

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  • In this respect the greatest efforts have naturally been made by Hamburg; but Magdeburg, Dresden, Meissen, Riesa, Tetschen, Aussig and other places have all done their relative shares, Magdeburg, for instance, providing a commercial harbour and a winter harbour.

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  • The Elbe is crossed by numerous bridges, as at KOniggratz, Pardubitz, Kolin, Leitmeritz, Tetschen, Schandau, Pirna, Dresden, Meissen, Torgau, Wittenberg, Rosslau, Barby, Magdeburg, Rathenow, Wittenberge, Ddmitz, Lauenburg, and Hamburg and Harburg.

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  • Meissen has a railway bridge, in addition to an old road bridge.

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  • In the 10th century Naumburg was a stronghold of the margraves of Meissen, who in 1029 transferred to it the bishopric of Zeitz.

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  • When his father died in 1381 some trouble arose over the family possessions, and in the following year an arrangement was made by which Frederick and his brothers shared Meissen and Thuringia with their uncles Balthasar and William.

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  • A further dispute then arose, but in 1410 a treaty was made at Naumburg, when Frederick and his brother William added the northern part of Meissen to their lands; and in 1425 the death of William left Frederick sole ruler.

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  • Returning to Saxony, Frederick died at Altenburg on the 4th of January 1428, and was buried in the cathedral at Meissen.

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  • Frederick's importance as an historical figure arises from his having obtained the electorate of Saxe-Wittenberg for the house of Wettin, and transformed the margraviate of Meissen into the territory which afterwards became the kingdom of Saxony.

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  • He took part in the war against the Hussites, but became estranged from Sigismund when in 1423 the king invested Frederick of Wettin, margrave of Meissen, with the vacant electoral duchy of Saxe-Wittenberg.

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  • Reuss, and, after holding various teaching posts, was made instructor in French and Hebrew at the Landesschule of Meissen, receiving in 1852 the title of professor.

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  • Schmidt, Arpinum, eine topographisch-historische Skizze (Meissen, 1900).

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  • A castle is said to have been founded on the site of Wolfenbuttel by a margrave of Meissen about 1046.

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  • After the death of the elector Frederick in 1464, Albert and Ernest ruled their lands together, but in 1485 a division was made by the treaty of Leipzig, and Albert received Meissen, together with some adjoining districts, and founded the Albertine branch of the family of Wettin.

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  • He was buried at Meissen.

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  • After a short stay at Meissen he was entered at the celebrated school at Pforta, near Naumburg.

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  • ALBERT, surnamed THE Degenerate (c. 1240-1314), land grave of Thuringia, was the eldest son of Henry III., the Illustrious, margrave of Meissen.

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  • Wegele, Friedrich der Friedige, Markgraf von Meissen, and die Wettiner seiner Zeit (NOrdlingen, 1820); F.

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  • Tittmann, Geschichte Heinrich des Erlauchten Markgraven zu Meissen (Leipzig, 1863).

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  • Meissen, Germany >>

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  • in Saxony, and his son, taking the same attitude, assisted Egbert II., margrave of Meissen, in the rising of 1088.

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  • After the defeat by Lothair of Henry's forces at Welfesholz on the 11th of February 1115, events called Henry to Italy; and Lothair appears to have been undisturbed in Saxony until 1123, when the death of Henry II., margrave of Meissen and Lusatia raised a dispute as to the right of appointment to the vacant margraviates.

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  • The emperor seconded the efforts of his vassals, Albert the Bear, margrave of the Saxon north mark, and Conrad I., margrave of Meissen and Lusatia, to extend the authority of the Germans in the districts east of the Elbe, and assisted Norbert, archbishop of Magdeburg, and Albert I., archbishop of Bremen, to spread Christianity.

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  • The following table shows the area and population of the whole kingdom and of each of the five chief governmental districts, or Kreishauptmannschaften, into which it is divided The chief towns are Dresden (pop. 1905, 514,283), Leipzig (502,570), Chemnitz (244,405),(244,405), Plauen (105,182), Zwickau (68,225), Zittau (34, 6 79), Meissen (32,175),(32,175), Freiberg (30,869), Bautzen (29,372), Meerane (24,994), Glauchau (24,556), Reichenbach (24,911),(24,911), Crimmitzschau (23,340), Werdau (19,476), Pirna (19,200).

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  • But in 1834 a law was passed providing for the union of the scattered lands belonging to each proprietor, and that may be considered the dawn of modern Saxon agriculture., The richest grain districts are near Meissen, Grimma, Bautzen,.

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  • Wine is said to have been grown here in the iith century; the Saxon vineyards, chiefly on the banks of the Elbe near Meissen and Dresden, have of late years, owing to the ravages of the phylloxera, become almost extinct.

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  • Fine porcelain clay occurs near Meissen, and coarser varieties elsewhere.

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  • Stoneware and earthenware are made at Chemnitz, Zwickau, Bautzen and Meissen, porcelain (" Dresden china ")") at Meissen, chemicals in and near Leipzig.

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  • The endowed schools (Fiirstenschulen) at Meissen and Grimma have long enjoyed a high reputation.

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  • In 1423 Meissen and Thuringia were united with Saxe-Wittenberg under Frederick of Meissen, and gradually the name of Saxony spread over all the lands ruled by this prince and his descendants.

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  • A new era in the history of Saxony dates from 1423, the year when the emperor Sigismund bestowed the vacant electoral duchy of Saxe-Wittenberg upon Frederick, margrave of Meissen.

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  • The new and more honourable title of elector of Saxony now superseded his other titles, and the name Saxony gradually spread over his other possessions, which included Meissen and Thuringia as well as Saxe-Wittenberg, and thus the earlier history of the electorate and kingdom of Saxony is the early history of the mark of Meissen, the name of which now lingers only in a solitary town on the Elbe.

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  • and William, occasioned a destructive internecine war, a kind of strife which had many precedents in the earlier history of Meissen and Thuringia.

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  • Ernest, the elder brother, obtained Saxe-Wittenberg with the electoral dignity, Thuringia and the Saxon Vogtland; while Albert received Meissen, Osterland being divided between them.

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  • Moreover, Roman Catholic prelates were reinstated in the bishoprics of Meissen, Merseburg and Naumburg-Zeitz.

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  • To its educational advantages, already conspicuous, he added the three Fi rstenschulen at Pforta, Grimma and Meissen, and for administrative purposes, especially for the collection of taxes, he divided the country into the four circles of the Electorate, Thuringia, Meissen and Leipzig.

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  • Johann Friedrich Bbttger made his famous discovery in 1710, and the manufacture of porcelain was begun at Meissen, and in this reign the Moravian Brethren made their settlement at Herrnhut.

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  • It appears to have been united with Meissen for some time, and this was certainly the case from 1046 to 1067, when both countries were ruled by William and Otto, counts of Weimar.

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  • the Illustrious, margrave of Meissen.

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  • the Illustrious, margrave of Meissen, a maternal grandson of the landgrave Hermann I.

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  • Wachter, Thüringische and ObersÃchsische Geschichte bis zum Anfalle Thüringens an die Markgrafen von Meissen (Leipzig, 1826); T.

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  • The town is mentioned as early as 1304 and in 1398 it was purchased by the margrave of Meissen, who afterwards became elector of Saxony.

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  • The harmonious relations which subsisted between the two branches of the Wettins were disturbed by the interference of Maurice in Cleves, a proceeding distasteful to the Saxon elector, John Frederick; and a dispute over the bishopric of Meissen having widened the breach, war was only averted by the mediation of Philip of Hesse and Luther.

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  • ADAM OF BREMEN, historian and geographer, was probably born in Upper Saxony (at Meissen, according to one tradition) before 1045.

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  • of Meissen, and so brought the castle, town and countship into the possession of the Saxon house of Wettin.

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  • Their land was formed into a separate march, which for about three centuries was sometimes attached to, and sometimes independent of, the margraviate of Meissen, its rulers being occasionally called margraves of Lusatia.

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  • In the 11th and 12th centuries it was connected at different periods with Meissen, Poland and Bohemia.

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  • A collection of porcelain in the "Museum Johanneum" (which once contained the picture gallery) is made up of specimens of Chinese, Japanese, East Indian, Sevres and Meissen manufacture, carefully arranged in chronological order.

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  • To the north are the vine-clad hills of the LOssnitz commanding views of the valley of the Elbe from Dresden to Meissen; behind them, on an island in a lake, is the castle of Moritzburg, the hunting box of the king of Saxony.

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  • It became the capital of Henry the Illustrious, margrave of Meissen, in 1270, but belonged for some time after his death, first to Wenceslaus of Bohemia, and next to the margrave of Brandenburg.

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  • Early in the 14th century it was restored to the margrave of Meissen.

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  • It was captured by the landgrave of Meissen in 1476, and belonged thenceforth to Saxony, until it was ceded to Prussia in 1815.

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  • After attending the Latin school of his native town, Gotthold was sent in 1741 to the famous school of St Afra at Meissen, where he made such rapid progress, especially in classics and mathematics, that, towards the end of his school, career he was described by the rector as "a steed that needed double fodder."

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  • In his later years he set up the archbishopric of Magdeburg, which took in the sees of Meissen, Zeitz and Merseburg.

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  • This duchy was soon reduced to obedience and was treated with consideration, and when the third anti-king, Egbert, margrave of Meissen, was murdered in 1090 there would have been peace if Germany had followed her own impulses.

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  • The first of these centred round the restless and unruly Welfs; after a time these insurgents were joined by their former enemies, the rulers of Saxony, of Thuringia and of Meissen, who were angered by Henrys conduct.

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  • Meissen, which he claimed as a vacant fief of the Empire, and Thuringia, which he bought from the landgrave Albert II., seemed to offer a favorable field for this undertaking, and he spent a large part of his short reign in a futile attempt to carry out his plan.

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  • He secured some help from Frederick of Brandenburg, from Albert of Austria, afterwards the German king Albert II., an~ from Frederick of Meissen, to whom he granted the electoral duchy of Saxe-Wittenberg; but it was only when the Hussites were split into two factions, and when ~alka was dead, that Germany was in any way relieved from a crushing and intolerabh burden.

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  • In 1423 it was pledged by King Sigismund to the elector Frederick of Meissen, who occupied it with a Saxon garrison.

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  • Originally the Copenhagen potters imitated the Dresden china made at Meissen, but they later produced graceful original designs.

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  • Seeking at once to strengthen the royal position, he claimed Meissen as a vacant fief of the Empire, and in 1294 allied himself with Edward I., king of England, against France.

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  • This bargain was resisted by the sons of Albert, and from 1294 to 1296 Adolph was campaigning in Meissen and Thuringia.

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  • Meissen was conquered, but he was not equally successful in Thuringia, and his relations with Albert of Austria were becoming more strained.

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  • During the storm of the Peasants' War (13th of June 1525) Luther married Catherine von Bora, the daughter of a noble but impoverished family belonging to Meissen.

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  • There is more than one meaning of Meissen discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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  • In 1555 he had appointed one of his nominees to the bishopric of Meissen, in 1561 he had secured the election of his son Alexander as bishop of Merseburg, and three years later as bishop of Naumburg; and when this prince died in 1565 these bishoprics came under the direct rule of Augustus.

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  • Torgau is said to have existed as the capital of a distinct principality in the time of the German king Henry I., but early in the 14th century it was in the possession of the margraves of Meissen and later of the electors of Saxony, who frequently resided here.

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  • In the chapel, which was built in 1347 and restored in 1787, lie the remains of ten margraves of Meissen, members of the family of Wettin.

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  • At the beginning of the 14th century it was in the possession of the margraves of Meissen, from whom it passed in 1423 to the elector of Saxony.

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  • In 1785 he became assessor to the superintending board of the foundries, and in 1786 chemist to the porcelain works at Meissen.

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  • From 968 until the Reformation, it was the seat of a bishop, and in addition to being for a time the residence of the margraves of Meissen, it was a favourite residence of the German kings during the loth, fi lth and 12th centuries.

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  • In 1546 he was appointed rector of the college of Meissen, where he died on the 17th of July 1571.

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  • Having been again part of Thuringia, it fell in 1249 to Meissen, and in 1291 to Brandenburg.

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  • The district thus called Reuss was at one time much more extensive than it is at present, and for some years its rulers were margraves of Meissen.

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  • Ten years later he was made canon of Meissen.

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  • In 1300 it was burned by the margrave of Meissen.

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  • The best products of this factory are figures and groups representing contemporary life, or allegorical subjects in the rococo taste of the period, and they are surpassed only by those of the more famous factory at Meissen.

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  • In 1541 John Frederick forced Nicholas Amsdorf into the see of Naumburg in spite of the chapter, who had elected a Roman Catholic, Julius von Pflug; and about the same time he seized Wurzen, the property of the bishop of Meissen, whose see was under the joint protection of electoral and ducal Saxony.

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  • of Brabant, to defend the town against Henry III., margrave of Meissen, during the succession contest that followed the extinction of the male line of the Thuringian landgraves in 1247.

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  • Its municipal constitution dates from the 14th century, and it soon became the most important industrial centre in the mark of Meissen.

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  • On the death of Otto, Boleslaus invaded Germany, penetrated to the Elbe, occupying Stralsund and Meissen on his way, and extended his dominions to the Elster and the Saale.

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  • Under the fostering care of the margraves of Meissen, and then of the electors of Saxony they attained great popularity.

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  • In 1268 the margrave of Meissen granted a safe-conduct to all frequenters of the fairs, and in 1497 and 1507 the emperor Maximilian I.

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  • In the 11th century Leipzig is mentioned as a fortified place and in the 12th it came into the possession of the margrave of Meissen, being granted some municipal privileges by the margrave, Otto the Rich, before 1190.

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  • The district now forming the duchy of Saxe-Altenburg came into the possession of the margrave of Meissen about 1329, and later with Meissen formed part of the electorate of Saxony.

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  • Benz, Die Stellung der Bischofe von Meissen, Merseburg and Naumburg im.

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  • BENNO (ioio-1106), bishop of Meissen, was the son of Werner, count of Woldenburg, was educated at Gosslar, and in 1066 was nominated by the emperor Henry IV.

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  • to the see of Meissen.

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  • His canonization drew from Luther a violent brochure "against the new false god and old devil, who is to be lifted up at Meissen."

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  • Jahrhundert (Potsdam, 1836-1839); Leben and Taten Friedrichs des Grossen (Meissen, 1840-1841); W allensteins Prozess (Leipzig, 1844); and Preussens Heiden in Krieg and Frieden, neuere and neueste preussische Geschichte, 7 volumes (Berlin, 1849-1860).

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  • German-made Meissen teapots were often a fantasy of flowers, leaves, and intricately detailed vines.

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