Megarian sentence example

megarian
  • Simultaneously Megarian commerce in Sicily began to be supplanted by Corinth and Corcyra.
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  • It is not quite easy to see why he abandoned this successful policy in order to hasten on a war with Sparta, and neither the Corcyrean alliance nor the Megarian decree seems justified by the facts as known to us, though commercial motives may have played a part which we cannot now gauge.
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  • It was founded by a Megarian colony, which soon subjugated the native Mariandynians and extended its power over a considerable territory.
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  • Like the rest of the Megarian school he revelled in verbal quibbles, proving that motion and existence are impossible.
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  • Apart from these verbal gymnastics, Diodorus did not differ from the Megarian school.
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  • Two main elements went to make up the Megarian doctrine.
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  • This philosopher, a man of striking and attractive personality, succeeded in fusing the Megarian dialectic with Cynic naturalism.
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  • The captious logic of the Megarian school was indeed in some cases closely related to sceptical results.
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  • Intellectually in agreement with the Megarian dialectic, he followed the practical ethics of the Cynics both in theory and in practice.
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  • Eretria was the birthplace of the tragedian Achaeus and of the "Megarian" philosopher Menedemus.
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  • For his doctrine (a combination of the principles of Parmenides and Socrates) see Megarian School.
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  • This outrageous demand was followed by three others - that the Athenians should (I) withdraw from Potidaea, (2) restore autonomy to Aegina, and (3) withdraw the embargo on Megarian commerce.
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  • Again, as the Socratics - Plato himself, when he established himself at the Academy, being no exception - were, like their master, educators rather than philosophers, and in their teaching laid especial stress upon discussion, they, too, were doubtless regarded as sophists, not by Isocrates only, but by their contemporaries in general; and it may be conjectured that the disputatious tendencies of the Megarian school made it all the more difficult for Plato and others to secure a proper appreciation of the difference between dialectic, or discussion with a view to the discovery of truth, and eristic, or discussion with a view to victory.
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  • It is probably not an accident that Dieuchidas, who attributed so much to Peisistratus, was a Megarian.
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  • It was a Megarian colony founded on a site so obviously inferior to that which was within view on the opposite shore, that it received from the oracle the name of "the City of the Blind."
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  • Four distinct philosophical schools trace their immediate origin to the circle that gathered round Socrates - the Megarian, the Platonic, the Cynic and the Cyrenaic. The impress of the master is manifest on all, in spite of the wide differences that divide them; they all agree in holding the most important possession of man to be wisdom or knowledge, and the most important knowledge to be knowledge of Good.
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  • In 449 the war was ended by a five years' truce, but after Athens had lost her mainland empire by the battle of Coronea and the revolt of Megara a thirty years' peace was concluded, probably in the winter 446-445 B.C. By this Athens was obliged to surrender Troezen, Achaea and the two Megarian ports, Nisaea and Pegae, but otherwise the status quo was maintained.
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  • Later he was diverted to philosophy by the works of Democritus, and became acquainted with the Megarian dialectic through Bryson, pupil of Stilpo.
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  • The Athenians retaliated by placing an embargo upon Megarian trade throughout their empire (432), and in the Peloponnesian War, which the Megarians had consequently striven to hasten on, reduced their neighbours to misery by blockade and devastations.
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  • A further casus belli was provided by a decree forbidding the importation of Megarian goods into the Athenian Empire,' presumably in order to punish Megara for her alliance with Corinth (spring 432).
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  • Aristotle speaks of him as uneducated and simple-minded, and Plato describes him as struggling in vain with the difficulties of dialectic. His work represents one great aspect of Socratic philosophy, and should be compared with the Cyrenaic and Megarian doctrines.
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  • The eminent teachers of the time are said to have been Aristo, Zeno's heterodox pupil, and Arcesilas, who in Plato's name brought Megarian subtleties and Pyrrhonian agnosticism to bear upon the intruding doctrine; and after a vigorous upgrowth it seemed not unlikely to die out.
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  • The more philosophic part of the circle, forming a group in which Euclid of Megara (see Megarian School) seems at first to have taken the lead, regarded this Good as the object of a still unfulfilled guest, and were led to identify it with the hidden secret of the universe, and thus to pass from ethics to metaphysics.
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