Medina sentence example

medina
  • His illness did not, however, prevent his seeing and recording everything of interest in Medina with the same care as at Mecca, though it compelled him to cut short the further journey he had proposed to himself, and to return by Yambu and the sea to Cairo, where he died only two years later.
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  • Arabian manuscripts describe an eruption on the harra near Medina in A.D.
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  • From this point of vantage he began depredations on the Red Sea (1182), building a fleet, and seeking to attack Medina and Mecca - a policy which may be interpreted either as mere buccaneering, or as a calculated attempt to deal a blow at Mahommedanism in its very centre.
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  • of Portugal, and of Louisa de Gusman, daughter of the duke of Medina Sidonia, was born on the 15/25 of November 1638 at Villia Vicosa.
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  • Ibn Batuta went by land from Tangier to Cairo, then visited Syria, and performed the pilgrimages to Medina and Mecca.
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  • About this time, inspired by a heavenly voice (which he pretends to have heard in a dream), he abjured all the luxuries of life, and resolved upon a pilgrimage to the holy shrines of Mecca and Medina, hoping to find there the solution of all his religious doubts.
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  • Turkey's Arabian possessions comprise, besides El-Hasa on the Persian Gulf, the low-lying, hot and insalubrious Tehama and the south-western highlands (vilayets of Hejaz and Yemen) stretching continuously along the east side of the Red Sea, and including the two holy cities of Mecca and Medina.
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  • Jose Toribio Medina >>
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  • In January 1815 he travelled to Medina by the western or coast route, and arrived there safely but broken in health by the hardships of the journey.
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  • He, too, travelling as a Moslem pilgrim, noted the whole ritual of the pilgrimage with the same keen observation as Burckhardt, and while amplifying somewhat the latter's description of Medina, confirms the accuracy of his work there and at Mecca in almost every detail.
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  • Burton's topographical descriptions are fuller, and his march to Mecca from Medina by the eastern route led him over ground not traversed by any other explorer in Hejaz: this route leads at first south-east from Medina, and then south across the lava beds of the Harra, keeping throughout its length on the high plateau which forms the borderland between Hejaz and Nejd.
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  • On his arrival at Hofuf, Sadlier found that Ibrahim had already left Deraiya, but still hoping to intercept him before quitting Nejd, he followed up the retreating Egyptians through Yemama, and Wushm to Ras in Kasim, where he caught up the main body of Ibrahim's army, though the pasha himself had gone on to Medina.
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  • Sadlier hesitated about going farther, but he was unable to obtain a safe conduct to Basra, or to return by the way he had come, and was compelled reluctantly to accompany the army to Medina.
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  • After a stay in Hail, where he had every opportunity of observing the character of the country and its inhabitants, and the hospitality and patriarchal, if sometimes stern, justice of its chief, he travelled on to Medina and Mecca, and returned thence to Cairo to report to his patron.
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  • Both are generally bare and unproductive, the uplands, however, contain the fertile valleys of Khaibar and Medina, draining to the Wadi Hamd, the principal river system of western Arabia; and the Wadi Jadid or Es Safra, rising in the Harra between Medina and Es Safina, which contain several settlements, of which the principal produce is dates.
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  • The only ports of importance are Yambu and Jidda, which serve respectively Medina and Mecca; they depend entirely on the pilgrim traffic to the holy cities, without which they could not exist.
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  • The midday temperatures recorded by Huber at Hail during January and the first half of February average about 65° F., and water froze on several nights; at Medina the winters are cold and night frosts of frequent occurrence, and these conditions prevail over all the western part of the Nejd plateau.
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  • A hundred kinds of date are said to grow at Medina, of which the birni is considered the most wholesome; the halwa and the jalebi are the most delicately flavoured and sell at very high rates; the khulas of El Hasa is also much esteemed.
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  • Safra between Yambu and Medina.
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  • In the present day the Syrian pilgrim route, or Darb el Haj, from Damascus to Medina and Mecca is the most used.
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  • From Medina the route usually followed descends the W.
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  • In the west and south the principal routes, other than those already mentioned, are from Yambu to Medina, from Jidda to Mecca, Hodeda to Sana, Aden to Sana, and from Mukalla to the Hadramut valley.
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  • Railway construction has begun in Arabia, and in 1908 the Hejaz line, intended to connect Damascus with Mecca, had reached Medina, Soo m.
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  • A part of the same tribe inhabited Yathrib (Medina) at the time of Mahomet.
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  • Yet so long as the caliphs lived in Medina, the capital of Arabia was the capital of the expanding Arabian empire.
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  • After some years of growing dissatisfaction deputies from these places came to Medina, and the result was the murder of the caliph.
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  • The Egyptian rebels managed to gain most influence, and, in accordance with their desire, 'Ali was appointed caliph by the citizens of Medina.
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  • When 'Ali left Medina to secure Basra, he abandoned it as the capital of the Arabian empire.
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  • With the success of Moawiya Damascus became the capital of the caliphate (658) and Arabia became a mere province, though always of importance because of its possession, of the two sacred cities Mecca and Medina.
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  • The final blow to any political pretensions of Medina was dealt by the caliph when he had his son Yazid declared as his successor, thus taking away any claim on the part of the citizens of Medina to elect to the caliphate.
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  • Medina was besieged and sacked by the troops of Yazid (682) and Mecca was besieged the following year.
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  • A more local `Alyite revolt in Mecca and Medina was crushed in 785.
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  • In g06 the court at Bagdad learned that these sectaries had gained almost all Yemen and were threatening Mecca and Medina.
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  • In 1804 Medina was taken and with its fall all resistance ceased.
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  • Medina and subsequently Mecca were eventually taken by the Egyptians, but in spite of continual reinforcements they could do little more than hold their own in Hejaz.
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  • The Porte now made another effort to assist its protégé two columns were despatched from Medina and Basra respectively, to relieve Hail, and drive out the Wahhabis.
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  • Arrangements were accordingly made with the Wahhabis, and on the 10th of April Ahmad Feizi Pasha left aina, ostensibly with the object of protecting the pilgrim road, and joined the Medina column by the end of the month.
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  • Farazdaq of the Bani Tamim, a good Moslem but loose in morals, lived chiefly in Medina and Kufa, and was renowned for his command of language.
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  • Where could this be better learned than at Medina, where he had lived so long and where the majority of his companions continued to live ?
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  • So at Medina a school was gradually formed, where the chief part of the traditions about Mahomet and his first successors took a form more or less fixed.
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  • Samhudi's History of Medina is known through the excerpts of Wiistenfeld (1861).
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  • Unable to garrison the island with a large force, the Arabs cleared a zone between the central stronghold, Medina, and the suburb called Rabat, to restrict the fortified area.
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  • His zeal prompted him to undertake an embassy to the king of Ethiopia, in order to stimulate him against the converts whom he had taken under his protection, but he returned a convert to the Mahommedan faith and joined the fugitive prophet at Medina.
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  • The era in use among the Turks, Arabs and other Mahommedan nations is that of the Hegira or Hejra, the flight of the prophet from Mecca to Medina, 622 A.D.
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  • The departure from the cave and setting out on the way to Medina is assigned to the ninth day of the third month, Rabia I.
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  • RUSSELL ALEXANDER ALGER (1836-1907), American soldier and politician, was born in Lafayette township, Medina (disambiguation)|Medina county, Ohio, on the 27th of February 1836.
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  • The western boundary claimed by the republic was the Rio Grande to its source and the meridian of longitude from that point to the forty-second parallel, although as a political division of Mexico its limits never extended farther west than the Nueces and the Medina.
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  • Great wealth, gained from the Moslem conquests, was pouring into Medina, and a system of business management and administration became necessary.
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  • The old town (Medina), the walls of which have in great part disappeared, lies between two suburbs, the Ribat-elSowika on the north and the Ribat Bab-el-Jezira on the south.
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  • An outer wall, however, encloses the Medina and its suburbs..
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  • Medina sandstones occur throughout a belt averaging about 10 m.
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  • In Arabia were the Holy Cities of Mecca and Medina, governed by the Sherif of Mecca, a dignitary and ruler of great influence in the Mahommedan world.
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  • While still a youth he was taken by his father on the pilgrimage to Mecca and Medina and to the tomb of Sidi Abd-el-Kader El Jalili at Bagdad - events which stimulated his natural tendency to religious enthusiasm.
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  • She died at Medina del Campo on the 24th of November 1504, and was succeeded by her daughter Joanna "la loca" (the "Crazy") and her husband, Philip of Habsburg.
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  • A thoroughly French town, it dates from 1835, when General Drouet d'Erlon established there an entrenched camp on a hillock in the midst of a pestilential swamp. Soon afterwards Marshal Clausel began to build a regular city, which was at first called Medina Clausel in his honour.
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  • Medina shales (?) - 50 150
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  • The Mahommedan Era, Or Era Of The Hegira, Used In Turkey, Persia, Arabia, &C., Is Dated From The First Day Of The Month Preceding The Flight Of Mahomet From Mecca To Medina, I.E.
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  • JOSE DE ACOSTA (1539?- 16-00), Spanish author, was born at Medina del Campo about the year 1539.
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  • Medina, Los aborjenes de Chile (Santiago, 1882); A.
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  • Northward and far back in the foot-hills is the Ptolemaic temple of Deir el Medina, and beyond under the cliffs of Deir el Bahri the terrace temple of Queen Hatshepsut, the walls of which are adorned with scenes from her expedition to Puoni (Somaliland) in search of incense trees, and many other subjects.
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  • After Mecca and Medina Kairawan is the most sacred city in the eyes of the Mahommedans of Africa, and constant pilgrimages are made to its shrines.
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  • Hence it is probable that in Mecca, where the art of writing was commoner than in Medina, he had already begun to have his oracles committed to writing.
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  • In Medina it called forth the admiration of the Faithful to observe how often God gave them the answer to a question whose settlement was urgently required at the moment.
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  • In Medina, where he had the opportunity of becoming acquainted with Jews of some culture, he learned some things out of the Mishna, e.g.
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  • Of Christianity he can have been able to learn very little, even in Medina; as may be seen from the absurd travesty of the institution of the Eucharist in v.
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  • It is actually used of the religion of the Jews and Christians (once), of the heathen (5 times), but mostly (8 times) of the religion of Abraham, which Mahomet in the Medina period places on the same level with Islam.
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  • it is an interesting fact that of these a few have come over from the Abyssinian; such as hawariyun " apostles," maida " table," munafig " doubter, sceptic," ragun " cursed," mihrab " temple "; the first three of these make their first appearance in suras of the Medina period.
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  • 622), partly to the period commencing with the migration to Medina (from the autumn of 622 to 8th June 632).
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  • Mahomet's position in Medina was entirely different from that which he had occupied in his native town.
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  • The Medina pieces, whether entire suras or isolated passages interpolated in Meccan suras, are accordingly pretty broadly distinct, as to their contents, from those issued in Mecca.
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  • In the great majority of cases there can be no doubt whatever whether a piece first saw the light in Mecca or in Medina; and for the most part the internal evidence is borne out by Moslem tradition.
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  • And since the revelations given in Medina frequently take notice of events about which we have fairly accurate information, and whose dates are at least approximately known, we are often in a position to fix their date with at any rate considerable certainty; here again tradition renders valuable assistance.
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  • Even with regard to the Medina passages, however, a great deal remains uncertain, partly because the allusions to historical events and circumstances are generally rather obscure, partly because traditions about the occasion of the revelation of the various pieces are often fluctuating, and often rest on misunderstanding or arbitrary conjecture.
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  • According to this, Ibrahim, after the controversy with the Jews, first of all became Mahomet's special forerunner in Medina, then the first Moslem, and finally the founder of the Ka'ba.
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  • But at all events it is far easier to arrange in some sort of chronological order the Medina suras than those composed in Mecca.
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  • They are in an altogether different strain from many others, and in their whole composition they show least resemblance to the Medina pieces.
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  • At the opposite extreme from them stands another cluster, showing quite obvious affinities with the style of the Medina suras, which must therefore be assigned to the later part of the Prophet's work in Mecca.
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  • When we reach the Medina period it becomes, as has been indicated, much easier to understand the revelations in their historical relations, since our knowledge of the history of 1 Since in Arabic also the root itr >) signifies " to have pity," the Arabs must have at once perceived the force of the new name.
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  • Mahomet in Medina is tolerably complete.
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  • There still remains, however, a remnant, of which we can only say that it belongs to Medina.
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  • There are frequent outbursts, ever increasing in bitterness, against the Jews, who were very numerous in Medina and its neighbourhood when Mahomet arrived.
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  • He has much less to say against the Christians, with whom he never came closely in contact; and as for the idolaters, there was little occasion in Medina to have many words with them.
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  • A part of the Medina pieces consists of formal laws belonging to the ceremonial, civil and criminal codes; or directions about certain temporary complications.
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  • The Caliph laid the duty on Zaid ibn Thabit, a native of Medina, then about twenty-two years of age, who had often acted as amanuensis to the Pro het in whose service Zaid s First p ?
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  • These brought together as many copies as they could lay their hands on, and prepared an edition which was to be canonical for all Moslems. To prevent any further disputes, they burned all the other codices except that of IIaf sa, which, however, was soon afterwards destroyed by Merwan the governor of Medina.
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  • These three manuscripts will therefore be those which the caliph, according to trustworthy tradition, sent in the first instance as standard copies to Damascus, Basra and Kufa to the warriors of the provinces of which these were the capitals, while he retained one at Medina.
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  • The extremely primitive writing of those clays was quite incapable of rendering such minute differences as can have existed between the pronunciation of Mecca and that of Medina.
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  • Of the four exemplars of Othman's Koran, one was kept in Medina, and one was sent to each of the three metropolitan cities, Kufa, Basra, and Damascus.
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  • In 941, after the death of Ibn Raiq, the Ikshid took the opportunity of invading Syria, which the caliph permitted him to hold with the addition of the sacred cities of Mecca and Medina, which the TUlunids had aspired to possess.
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  • Before his death he was acknowledged as caliph in Mecca and Medina, as, well as Syria, Egypt and North Africa as far as Tangier.
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  • He brought Medina, which had previously been governed by independent sherifs, to acknowledge his authority.
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  • In the following year Tflsn, having received reinforcements, again assumed the offensive, and captured Medina after a prolonged siege.
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  • in length from Lahun, at the entrance of the gap in the hills, to Medina, several canals branch off and by these the province is irrigated, the drainage water flowing into the Birket el Kerun.
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  • Medinet el-Fayum (or Medina), the capital of the province, is a great agricultural centre, with a population which increased from 26,000 in 1882 to 37,320 in 1907, and has several large bazaars, mosques, baths and a much-frequented weekly market.
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  • Besides Medina there are several other towns in the province, among them Senuris and Tomia to the north of Medina and Senaru and Abuksa on the road to the lake, all served by railways.
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  • As it exists in Spanish, Amadis de Gaula consists of four books, the last of which is generally believed to be by the regidor of Medina del Campo, Garci Rodriguez de Montalvo (whose name is given as Garci Ordonez de Montalvo in all editions of Amadis later than that of 1508, and as Garci Gutierrez de Montalvo in some editions of the Sergas de Esplandian).
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  • This was undertaken in 2901 to connect Damascus with Mecca; in 1906 it was finished as far as Ma'an, and in 1908 the section to Medina was completed.
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  • Only nine years after Mahommed's announcement of his mission they heard of the new prophet, and sent to Medina a deputation headed by a wise and holy man called Kais, to make inquiry.
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  • Mahomet, the founder of Islam, died at Medina in A.D.
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  • The choice lay with the community of Medina; so much was understood; but whom were they to choose?
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  • The natives of Medina believed themselves to be now once more masters in their own house, and wished to promote one of themselves.
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  • Islam suddenly found itself once more limited to the community of Medina; only Mecca and Taff (Tayef) remained true.
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  • In the first place, he allowed the expedition against the Greeks, already arranged by Mahomet, quietly to set out, limiting himself for the time to the defence of Medina.
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  • The holy spirit of Islam kept the men of Medina together, and inspired in them an all-absorbing zeal for the faith; the Arabs as a whole had no other bond of union and no better source of inspiration than individual interest.
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  • The capital of Islam continued indeed for a while to be Medina, but soon the Hejaz (Hijaz) and the whole of Arabia proper lay quite on the outskirt of affairs.
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  • Even when in process of time they did accept the religion of the prophet, they leavened it thoroughly with their own peculiar leaven, and, especially, deprived it of the practical political and national character which it had assumed after the flight to Medina.
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  • He himself did not take the field, but remained in Medina with the exception of his visit to Syria in 638; he never, however, suffered the reins to slip from his grasp, so powerful was the influence of his personality and the Moslem community of feeling.
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  • After the administration of justice he directed his organizing activity, as the circumstances demanded, chiefly towards financial questions - the incidence of taxation in the conquered territories,' and the application of the vast resources which poured into the treasury at Medina.
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  • In the mosque at Medina he was stabbed by a Kufan workman and died in November 644.
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  • In point of fact they felt a closer connexion with these than, for example, with the natives of Medina; nature had not been expelled by faith.
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  • Even in the list of the slain at the battle of Honain the Emigrants are enumerated along with the Meccans and Koreish, and distinguished from the men of Medina.
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  • In bands they came from the provinces to Medina to wring concessions from Othman, who, though his armies were spreading terror from the Indus and Oxus to the Atlantic, had no troops at hand in Medina.
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  • In the following year (656) the leaders of the rebels came once more from Egypt and Irak to Medina with a more numerous following; and the caliph again tried the plan of making promises which he did not intend to keep. But the rebels caught him in a flagrant breach of his word, 4 and now demanded his abdication, besieging him in his own house, where he was defended by a few faithful subjects.
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  • Among these there were many men of great ability and influence, and he was so eager to conciliate them or, as the Arabic expression has it, "to mellow their hearts" by concessions and gifts, that his loyal helpers (Ansar) at Medina became dissatisfied and could only with difficulty be brought to acquiesce in it.
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  • Mahomet was a practical man; he realized that the growing state needed skilful administrators, and that such were found in much greater number among the antagonists of yesterday than among the honest citizens of Medina.
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  • The puzzled Moslem doctors explain this fact on the ground that the Hashimites were regarded as too noble to hold ordinary administrative offices, and that they could not be spared at Medina, where their counsel was required in all important affairs.
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  • When, ten weeks before the murder, some hundreds of men came to Medina from Egypt and Irak, pretending that they were on their pilgrimage to Mecca, but wanted to bring before the caliph their complaints against his vicegerents, nobody could have the slightest suspicion that the life of the caliph was in danger; indeed it was only during 1 Ma'ad is in the genealogical system the father of the Moelar and the Rab`ia tribes.
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  • Abi Arta made his expedition against Medina and Mecca, whose inhabitants were compelled to acknowledge the caliphate of Moawiya.
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  • When these negotiations became known, a mutiny broke out in Hasan's camp. Hasan himself was wounded and retired to Medina, where he died eight or nine years afterwards.
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  • It is remarkable withal that this rumour circulated, not in Horns (Emesa), where Abdarrahman died, but in Medina.
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  • This only seems to be certain, that the succession of Yazid was generally acknowledged before the death of his father, except in Medina.
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  • All the evidence shows that, during the reign of the Omayyads, life in Damascus and the rest of Syria was austere and in striking contrast to the dissolute manners which prevailed in Medina.
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  • `Otba, the governor of Medina, he enclosed a private note charging him in particular to administer the oath to Hosain, Abdallah b.
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  • In the month Ramadan this Omar was made governor of Medina and sent an army against Ibn Zobair.
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  • Yazid was very sorry for the issue, and sent the prisoners under safe-conduct to Medina.
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  • Though he named himself publicly a refugee of the House of God, he had himself secretly addressed as caliph, and many of the citizens of Medina acknowledged him as such.
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  • At the same time he received a number of the chief men of Medina, sent by the prefect, with great honour and loaded them with gifts and presents.
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  • A characteristically Arabic ceremony took place in the mosque of Medina.
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  • Medina lies between two volcanic hills, called harra.
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  • Omar had likewise abstained, but they had left Medina for Mecca.
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  • About Medina also false statements have been made.
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  • In no city of the empire, during the reign of the Omayyads, lived more singers and musicians than in Medina.
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  • A number of the citizens of Medina had come to the aid of the Holy City, as well as many Kharijites from Yamama under Najda b.
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  • The Omayyads, who had returned to Medina, were again expelled.
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  • was encamped at Wadi '1-Qora with 5000 men, to make himself master of Medina and thence to rejoin Hajjaj.
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  • Medina and Mecca, though they continued to be the holy cities, had no longer their old political importance, which had already been shaken to its foundations by the murder of Othman and the subsequent troubles.
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  • A fierce battle took place in the plain of Barbata on the little river of Guadaleta (north of Medina Sidonia), in which Roderic was completely routed.
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  • Walid also caused the mosque of Medina to be enlarged.
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  • For this purpose, the apartments of the Prophet and his wives were demolished, which at first caused much discontent in Medina, some crying out that thereby a verse of the Book of God (S.
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  • With this exception, the citizens of Medina had nothing to complain of.
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  • Hayyan at Medina and Khalid al-Qasri at Mecca.
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  • The governors of Medina and Mecca were dismissed; Mahommed b.
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  • He seems not to have had the firmness of character nor the frugality of Walid; but he was very severe against the looseness of manners that reigned at Medina, and was highly religious.
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  • His body was crucified in Kufa, his head sent to Damascus and thence to Medina.
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  • This Abu Salama seems to have had scruples against recognizing Abul-Abbas as the successor of his brother Ibrahim, and to have expected that the Mandi, whom he looked for from Medina, would not be slow in making his appearance, little thinking that an Abbasid would present himself as such.
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  • In Medina and Mecca Da`ud b.
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  • Obaidallah governor of Medina, with orders to lay hands on Mahommed and his brother Ibrahim, who, warned betimes, took refuge in flight.
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  • In 758 Mansur, informed that a revolt was in preparation, came himself to Medina and ordered Abdallah to tell him where his sons were.
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  • On the same day Mahommed was to raise the standard of revolt in Medina, Ibrahim in Basra.
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  • 762 Mahommed took Medina and had himself proclaimed caliph.
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  • Musa, received orders to march against him, entered Arabia, and captured Medina, which, fortified by Mahommed by the same means as the Prophet had employed against the besieging Meccans, could not hold out against the well-trained Khorasanians.
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  • He had just made choice of the admirable site of the old market-town of Bagdad when the tidings came of the rising of Mahommed in Medina.
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  • His infant son was sent to Medina and delivered to his family.
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  • From Mecca Mandi went to Medina, where he caused the mosque to be enlarged, and where a similar distribution of gifts took place.
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  • Irene took alarm, sued for peace, and obtained a truce for three years, but only on the humiliating terms of paying an annual 2 The first citizens of Medina who embraced Islam were called Ansar ("helpers").
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  • raised an insurrection at Medina with the support of numerous adherents, and proclaimed himself caliph.
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  • Ja`far, surnamed al-Kazim, who enjoyed great consideration at Medina, and had already been arrested and released again by Mandi.
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  • Mecca, Medina and Yemen also were mastered by the Alids, who committed all kinds of atrocities and sacrilege.
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  • The only other event of importance in the reign of Wathiq was a rising of the Arabian tribes in the environs of Medina, which the Turkish general Bogha with difficulty repressed.
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  • Yemen had been subjected, and at Mecca and Medina his name was substituted in the public prayers for that of the Fatimite caliph.
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  • Medina, Les Aborigenes de Chile (1882), 28 sqq.; D.
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  • In 1811 the massacre of the Mamelukes left Mehemet Ali without a rival in Egypt, while the foundations of his empire beyond were laid by the war against the Wahhabis and the conquest of the holy cities of Mecca and Medina.
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  • 20) (1900); C. Medina, Le Nicaragua en 1900 (Paris, 1900); J.
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  • He then made the pilgrimage to Mecca and Medina, and visited the shrine of Ali at Mashhad-Ali, travelling thence to Basra, and across the mountains of Khuzistan to Isfahan, thence to Shiraz and back to Kufa and Bagdad.
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  • Wide tracts of waste land were planted with pinewoods by the ducal house of Medina Sidonia.
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  • The city's industrial establishments include smelting works and a large number of reduction works, among which are some of the largest and most important in the republic. It was here that Bartolome de Medina discovered the "patio" process of reducing silver ores with quicksilver in 1 557, and his old hacienda de beneficio is still to be seen.
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  • Medina's Coleccion de documentos Para la historia de Chile (Santiago, 1888), a collection of despatches and official documents; his Cosas de la colonia (Santiago, 1889), an accumulation of undigested information about life in the colonial period; and Historiadores de Chile (21 vols., Santiago, 1861), a collection of ancient chronicles and official documents up to the early part of the 17th century.
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  • For about 150 years it was governed, first from Medina and afterwards from Bagdad, by officers of the Mahommedan caliphs whose principal aim it was to destroy the old nationality by the suppression of its religion.
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  • MALIK IBN Anas (c. 718-795), the founder of the Malikite school of canon law, was born at Medina about A.D.
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  • In 795 Harun al-Rashid made the pilgrimage, came with two of his sons to Medina, and sat at the feet of Malik as he lectured in the mosque.
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  • He died in Medina, A.D.
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  • On this side the Medina estuary opens northward, and those of the Newtown and the Yar north-westward into the strait.
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  • 768), Arabic historian, lived in Medina, where he interested himself to such an extent in the details of the Prophet's life that he was attacked by those to whom his work seemed to have a rationalistic tendency.
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  • He consequently left Medina in 733, and went to Alexandria, then to Kufa and Hira, and finally to Bagdad, where the caliph Mansur provided him with the means of writing his great work.
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  • Having secured his chair for his brother he went to Damascus, Jerusalem, Hebron, Mecca, Medina and Alexandria, studying, meditating and writing in these cities.
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  • West Cowes is separated from East Cowes by the picturesque estuary of the river Medina, the two towns (each of which is an urban district) lying on opposite sides of its mouth at the apex of the northern coast of the island.
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  • A steam ferry and a floating bridge across the Medina,.
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  • The towns owe their origin to two forts or castles, built on each side of the mouth of the Medina by Henry VIII.
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  • A fine broad street, the Riviera di Chiaja, begun in the close of the 16th century by Count d'Olivares, and completed by the duke de Medina Celi (1695-1700), runs for a mile and a half from east to west, ending in the quarter of Mergellina and Piedigrotta at the foot of the hill of Posilipo.
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  • In front of it is the fine 16th-century Fontana Medina.
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  • Here a cross-road, running over the hill to join the main Medina road from the western gate, turns off to the west by the pass of Kada, the point from which the troops of the Prophet stormed the city (A.H.
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  • This is the way to Wadi Fatima and Medina, the Jidda road branching off from it to the left.
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  • This is the spot on the Medina road .now called the Omra, from a ceremonial connected with it which will be mentioned below.
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  • The length of the sinuous main axis of the city from the farthest suburbs on the Medina road to the suburbs in the extreme north, now frequented by Bedouins, is, according to Burckhardt, 3500 paces.
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  • and Irak, the pilgrims who reach Medina from Yanbu and go on to Mecca, and those from all parts of the peninsula.
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  • BALTASAR ALAMOS DE BARRIENTOS (1555-1640), Spanish scholar, was born at Medina del Campo in 1555.
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  • At length the armada sailed in July under the incompetent duke of Medina Sidonia; its object was to secure command of the narrow seas and facilitate the transport of Parmas army from the Netherlands to England.
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  • The caliphate was thought only to belong to the prince who ruled over the sacred cities of Mecca and Medina.
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  • Convents were founded at Medina, Malaga, Valladolid, Toledo, Segovia and Salamanca, and two at Alva under the patronage of the famous duke.
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  • Ibrahim landed at Yembo, the port of Medina, on the 30th of September 1816.
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  • east of Medina, and the courage of their opponents, made the conquest a very arduous one.
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  • In 1900 trouble again arose through the agency of Fodi Kabba, who had fixed his residence at Medina, in French territory.
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  • Suankandi was captured and, the French co-operating, Medina was also captured, Fodi Kabba being killed on the 23rd of March 1901.
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  • On the I9th of July 711 he met Roderic near the Lago de la Janda between Medina Sidonia and Vejer de la Frontera.
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  • Root Co., Medina, Ohio, U.
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  • Root Co., Medina, Ohio, U;S.
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  • Root Co., Medina, the combs for reversing after Ohio, U.S.A,) one side had been emptied of its contents.
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  • Root, of Medina, Ohio, who suggested the substitution of embossed rollers in lieu of flat plates, in order to increase the output of foundation and lessen its cost to the bee-keeper.
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  • Root Co., Medina, Ohio, U.S.A.) into extensive use in the United States of America and afterwards in Great Britain.
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  • Root Co., Medina, Ohio, U.S.A.) his hives, but to overlook nothing that tends to be of advantage to the bees at all seasons.
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  • The prophet of Islam was now, however, building up his power in Arabia, and although Heraclius paid no heed to the letter demanding his adhesion which he received from Medina (628), and the deputation of fifteen Rahawiyin who paid homage in 630 were not Edessenes but South Arabians, a few years later (636 ?) Heraclius's attempts, from Edessa as a centre, to effect an organized opposition to the victorious Arabs were defeated by Sa`d, and he fell back on Samosata.
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  • DJ's Contrast from House of Lords and chunky Cold Medina from Vivid will be providing funky house and chunky beats.
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  • emissary of peace he sent from Medina back to Mecca was a polytheist.
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  • Evolution of Form and Function The first masjid in Medina served as both a place of communal prayer as well as a socio-cultural center.
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  • Sights & Sounds Sightseeing: Sousse For a real flavor of North African culture head north to Sousse and explore the old medina.
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  • No holiday to Morocco would be complete without visiting a medina in one of the cities like Fez or Marrakech.
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  • Even in the city, one can go to the ancient medina, or get to know the Moroccan people, who are wonderful.
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  • In Tunisia stroll around an ancient walled medina or perhaps sink your toes into the silky white sands that hug the coastline.
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  • medina close to the Royal Palace, this is a great base for exploring.
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  • medina walls.
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  • medina cities in Morocco.
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  • This entire sura is generally regarded as one of the earliest after Muhammad emigrated from Mecca to Medina in AD 622.
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  • Throughout his life in Medina, he was more than willing to conquer any tribe or city that stood in his way.
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  • venerated islamic site - the third most important after Mecca and Medina - the Hala Sultan Tekke.
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  • Eufemia, a station on the line along the General Medina and other officers were tried by a Nicaraguan court-martial for the murder of Grace and Cannon, but were acquitted on the -28th of January 1910.
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  • The midday temperatures recorded by Huber at Hail during January and the first half of February average about 65° F., and water froze on several nights; at Medina the winters are cold and night frosts of frequent occurrence, and these conditions prevail over all the western part of the Nejd plateau.
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  • This work, scarcely begun in Mecca, was really started after the migration to Medina by the formation of a party of men - the Muhajirun (Refugees or Emigrants) and the Ansdr (Helpers or Defenders) - who accepted Mahomet as their religious leader.
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  • But Medina itself was being corrupted by the constant influx of captives, who, employed at first as servants, soon became powerful enough to dictate to their masters.
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  • The Porte now made another effort to assist its protégé two columns were despatched from Medina and Basra respectively, to relieve Hail, and drive out the Wahhabis.
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  • Citta Vecchia was called Civitas Melita by the Romans and oldest writers, Medina (i.e.
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  • After the migration to Medina (A.D.
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  • Meccan suras, interpolated in Medina revelations, arose (e.g.
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  • But the Emigrants (see Mahomet) asserted their opposing claims, and with success, having brought into the town a considerable number of outside Moslems, so as to terrorize the men of Medina, who besides were still divided into two parties.
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  • Not unnaturally, the Alids in Medina were indignant at being supplanted by the Abbasids, and Mansur's chief concern was to get Mahommed into his power.
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  • 762 at Medina against the 'Abbasids, Malik gave a fatwa, or legal opinion, that the oath of allegiance to the `Abbasids was invalid, as extorted by force.
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  • On the opposite side of the Medina a broad carriageway leads to East Cowes Castle, a handsome edifice built by John Nash, the favourite architect of George IV., in 1798, and immediately beyond it are the grounds surrounding Osborne House (see Osborne), built in 1845 after the property had been purchased by Queen Victoria, the church of St Mildred, Whippingham, lying a mile to the south.
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  • They make the trip to Medina to get tricky test questions from the learned Jewish rabbis.
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  • We would recommend staying in the Medina view rooms for their fabulous views across the rooftops of the old city.
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  • Also on Cyprus is another highly venerated islamic site - the third most important after Mecca and Medina - the Hala Sultan Tekke.
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  • Deer Creek Adventure Camp-A Christian-oriented camp located in Medina, the Deer Creek Adventure Camp is geared toward kids ages seven to 16.
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  • Mexican men were executed after the 1813 Battle of Medina.
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  • If Senor Medina had determined on his own that there was something amiss between his son and his wife, it would have to have been because Alex was treating her so well.
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  • Albion is the centre of the Medina sandstone industry, and lies in the midst of a good farming region, of which it is the principal shipping point, especially for apples, cabbages and beans.
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  • New maps of Spain and Portugal appeared in 1560, the former being due to Pedro de Medina, the latter to Fernando Alvarez Secco and Hernando Alvaro.
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  • to 132 ft.); are paved chiefly with Medina dressed stone, brick and asphalt; and, like the parks, are so well shaded by maples, elms and other trees, that Cleveland has become known as the "Forest City."
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  • Moncey (7000) had marched towards the city of Valencia, but been repulsed in attempting to storm it (June 28); Bessieres had defeated the Spanish general Joachim Blake at Medina de Rio Seco (June 14, 1808) and Dupont (13,000) had been detached (May 24) from Madrid to reduce Seville and Cadiz in Andalusia.
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  • trans., 1885; 5th German edition, 1899; first published in 1878 as Geschichte Israels); Muhammed in Medina (Berlin, 1882); Die Komposition des Hexateuchs and .der historischen Bucher des Alten Testaments (1889, 3rd ed.
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  • The harra east of Khaibar is also of considerable extent, and the same formation is found all along the Hejaz border from Medina to the Jebel el Kura, east of Mecca.
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  • The old capital, near the centre of the island is variously called Notabile, Citta Vecchia, and Medina, with its suburb Rabat, its population in 1901 was 7515; here are the catacombs and the ancient cathedral of Malta.
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