Measles sentence example

measles
  • A terrible epidemic of measles in that year swept away 40,000, or about one-third of the Fijians.
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  • Rhazes is deservedly remembered as having first described small-pox and measles in an accurate manner.
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  • Dr. Waring said the child had measles which was the main factor in the case.
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  • Complications can be brought on by measles.
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  • The marriage of Mary and Darnley was now a question of practical politics, and the queen, having nursed her new suitor through an attack of measles, soon made up her mind to wed him, saying he "was the properest and best proportioned long man that ever she had seen."
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  • One common local cause of confusion is the use of the single antigen measles vaccine in France.
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  • Q - I became partially deaf as a result of the german measles at the age of eleven.
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  • Children with german measles should be kept away from pregnant women.
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  • Treating childhood illnesses with homeopathy (e.g. measles, mumps, chickenpox, impetigo, molluscum and whooping cough ).
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  • There is no source of single licensed measles or mumps vaccines in this country.
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  • The country is France which gives a single measles vaccination only in the event of a serious measles vaccination only in the event of a serious measles crisis.
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  • You cannot get mumps, measles or rubella from the vaccine.
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  • Three companies have licenses for single antigen measles vaccine and one for single antigen mumps vaccine.
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  • Mr Shattock believes that low levels of IAG may be caused by increased gut permeability resulting from the presence of measles virus.
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  • In the UK, these include rubella, mumps, measles (usually given together as MMR ), BCG and yellow fever.
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  • We know this from case studies of patients who have had rubella (German measles ).
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  • Whilst she is reinforcing the MMR scare, hundreds of children are going unprotected from the measles.
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  • Typhoid, pneumonia, tuberculosis, measles and scarlatina, and influenza are the commonest illnesses.
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  • Other destructive agencies were epidemics, such especially as measles and small-pox, which swept away 30,000 Fijians in 1875; the introduction of strong drinks, including, besides vile spirits, a most pernicious concoction brewed in Tahiti from oranges; Maori Religion and Mythology, p. 26.
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  • In the UK, these include rubella, mumps, measles (usually given together as MMR), BCG and yellow fever.
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  • We know this from case studies of patients who have had rubella (German measles).
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  • None of the clinically diagnosed cases of measles, mumps and rubella formally notified have been confirmed by the salivary antibody test.
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  • That is why persons who have had measles and rubella vaccination before, are less likely to develop side effects from the MMR vaccine.
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  • None of the infants had received separate measles, mumps and rubella immunisations.
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  • Most people in the UK are vaccinated against measles.
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  • Around 21 per cent of the children do not receive vaccinations against both tuberculosis (BCG) and measles.
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  • Though there is no one test to determine whether a person has Kawasaki disease, doctors generally make the diagnosis by evaluating the patient and ruling out other diseases such as the measles and Scarlet fever.
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  • In children, ITP is usually triggered by a virus infection, most often rubella, chickenpox, measles, cytomegalovirus (CMV), or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV).
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  • If the child has had a recent childhood illness (measles, chickenpox) or a virus, the risk for ITP is greater, and this fact will be considered along with diagnostic testing results.
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  • The disease has been linked to a variety of disease agents, including parvovirus B19, HIV infection, measles, influenza viruses, rotaviruses, adenoviruses, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae.
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  • Croup may also be caused by influenza A and B, adenovirus, measles, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).
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  • Hyperthyroidism, whooping cough, chickenpox, measles, and Hib disease (a bacterial infection) may cause mental retardation if they are not treated adequately.
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  • Immunization against diseases such as measles and Hib prevents many of the illnesses that can cause mental retardation.
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  • Rubella-A mild, highly contagious childhood illness caused by a virus; it is also called German measles.
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  • It has been associated with mothers who had German measles (rubella) while pregnant.
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  • The occurrence of some infections during pregnancy, including viral infections such as rubella (German measles), can cause congenital cardiovascular defects.
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  • Measles is an infection caused by a virus, which causes an illness displaying a characteristic skin rash known as an exanthem.
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  • Measles is also sometimes called rubeola, five-day measles, or hard measles.
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  • Measles is a very contagious disease primarily characterized by cough, runny nose, red eyes (conjunctivitis), and a characteristic rash on the skin and inside of the cheeks.
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  • Measles is fatal (due to complications) in about two out of every 1,000 cases.
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  • Measles infections appear all over the world.
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  • Prior the effective immunization program used in the early 2000s, large-scale measles outbreaks occurred on a two to three-year cycle, usually in the winter and spring.
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  • Babies up to about eight months of age are usually protected from contracting measles, due to immune cells they receive from their mothers in the uterus.
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  • Once someone has had measles infection, he or she can never get it again.
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  • Measles is caused by a type of virus called a paramyxovirus.
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  • About 95 percent of those people infected with the virus will develop the illness called measles.
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  • The most contagious time period is the three to five days before symptoms begin through about four days after the characteristic measles rash has begun to appear.
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  • The first signs of measles infection are fever; extremely runny nose; red, runny eyes; and a cough.
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  • These are called Koplik's spots and are unique to measles infection.
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  • A couple of days after the appearance of the Koplik's spots, the measles rash begins.
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  • Called encephalitis, this condition can occur up to several weeks after the basic measles symptoms have resolved.
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  • Long-term problems following recovery from measles encephalitis may include seizures and mental retardation.
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  • A very rare complication of measles can occur up to ten years following the initial infection.
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  • It is most common among people who had measles infection prior to the age of two years.
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  • Measles during pregnancy is a serious disease, leading to increased risk of a miscarriage or stillbirth.
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  • Measles infection is almost always diagnosed based on its characteristic symptoms, including Koplik's spots, and a rash which spreads from central body structures out towards the arms and legs.
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  • If there is any doubt as to the diagnosis, then a specimen of body fluids (mucus, urine) can be collected and combined with fluorescent-tagged measles virus antibodies.
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  • Antibodies are produced by the body's immune cells that can recognize and bind to markers (antigens) on the outside of specific organisms, in this case the measles virus.
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  • Once the fluorescent antibodies have attached themselves to the measles antigens in the specimen, the specimen can be viewed under a special microscope to verify the presence of measles virus.
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  • As of 2004 there are no treatments available to stop measles infection.
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  • Children with measles should never be given aspirin, as aspirin is correlated with the fatal disease Reye's syndrome.
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  • The prognosis for an otherwise healthy, well-nourished child who contracts measles is usually quite good.
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  • Although only one in 1,000 patients with measles will develop encephalitis, 10 to 15 percent of those who do will die, and about another 25 percent will be left with permanent brain damage.
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  • Measles is a highly preventable infection.
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  • A very effective vaccine exists, made of live measles viruses that have been treated so that they cannot cause actual infection.
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  • Immune cells called antibodies are produced, which in the event of a future infection with measles virus quickly recognize the organism and kill it off.
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  • Measles vaccine should not be given to pregnant women, however, in spite of the seriousness of gestational measles.
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  • The reason for not giving this particular vaccine during pregnancy is the risk of transmitting measles to the unborn child.
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  • Exanthem-A skin eruption regarded as a characteristic sign of such diseases as measles, German measles, and scarlet fever.
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  • These spots consist of minuscule white dots (like grains of salt or sand) set onto a reddened bump and are characteristic of measles.
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  • New cases of measles began being reported in some countries-including Great Britain-in 2001 because of parents' fears about vaccine safety.
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  • The combined vaccine for measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) was claimed to cause autism or bowel disorders in some children.
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  • Parents in Britain began demanding the measles vaccine as a separate dose, and scientists were exploring that option as an alternative to the combined MMR vaccine.
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  • Unfortunately, several children died during an outbreak of measles in Dublin because they had not received the vaccine.
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  • Child mortality due to measles is considered largely preventable, and making the MMR vaccine widely available in developing countries is part of WHO strategy to reduce child mortality by two-thirds by the year 2015.
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  • Several maternal-fetal infections are known to increase the risk for CP, including rubella (German measles, now rare in the United States), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and toxoplasmosis.
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  • Rubella, also called German measles or three-day measles, is a highly contagious viral disease that in most children and adults causes mild symptoms of low fever, swollen glands, joint pain, and a fine red rash.
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  • The rash lasts about three days, which is why rubella is sometimes called the three-day measles.
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  • Rubella vaccine is usually given in conjunction with measles and mumps vaccines in a shot referred to as MMR (mumps, measles, and rubella).
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  • Although not as contagious as measles or chickenpox, mumps was once quite common.
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  • The vaccine preparation (MMR) is usually given as part of a combination injection that helps protect against measles, mumps, and rubella.
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  • Conjunctivitis may be caused by a viral infection, such as a cold; acute respiratory infection; or other disease such as measles, herpes simplex, or herpes zoster.
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  • Also, some vaccines, including those for influenza, measles, and mumps, are grown in the laboratory in fluids of chick embryos, and should not be given to children who are allergic to eggs.
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  • Women should avoid becoming pregnant for three months after taking rubella vaccine, measles vaccine, mumps vaccine, or the combined measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) as these vaccines may cause problems in the unborn baby.
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  • Secondary encephalitis may occur with measles, chickenpox, mumps, rubella, and EBV.
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  • Avoiding the use of vaccines made from live viruses (measles, poliovirus, mumps, rubella).
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  • Vaccines possibly linked to AP include those for typhoid, measles, cholera, and yellow fever.
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  • It is recommended that babies receive a single-dose injection of Varivax between the ages of 12 and 18 months, usually at the same time that they receive their first measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine.
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  • An extremely serious complication of measles infection is swelling of the brain.
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  • Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR vaccine)-These are given by injection in two doses.
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  • Viruses, such as those that cause mumps, measles, influenza, and colds may reach the inner ear following an upper respiratory infection.
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  • The most effective preventive strategy includes prompt treatment of middle ear infections, as well as monitoring of patients with mumps, measles, influenza, or colds for signs of dizziness or hearing problems.
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  • Perinatal transmission of group beta streptococcus causes neonatal infection in one to five out of every 1,000 live births, and rubella (German measles), 0.02 out of every 1,000 live births.
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  • Rubella is a virus that causes German measles, an illness that includes rash, fever, and symptoms of an upper respiratory tract infection.
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  • Children should not be vaccinated against measles or chickenpox (varicella) for four months after being treated with RIG.
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  • Before vaccination, epidemics of measles peaked in the spring every two to four years.
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  • Measles is an endemic disease in many undeveloped countries and in countries where measles immunization levels are low.
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  • Because the risk of contracting measles in other countries is greater than in the United States, infants and children should be as well protected as possible before traveling.
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  • Measles is caused by a virus that grows in the nose, mouth, throat, and the eyes, and in their secretions.
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  • Measles begins with slight temperature rise and a runny nose and eyes.
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  • These pimples grow larger and in groups, giving a blotchy appearance, which is an important difference between measles and scarlet fever.
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  • Treatment is limited to combating the symptoms of measles because antiviral drugs as of 2004 are ineffective.
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  • Immune globulin injections help prevent or reduce measles infection if given within six days of exposure.
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  • The symptoms are like measles but are not nearly as severe, and spots never appear on the mucous membranes of the mouth.
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  • The greatest risk of German measles is fetal malformations which occur when a mother is infected in the early months of pregnancy.
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  • When the measles vaccine is needed a single-antigen measles vaccine is given.
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  • Infants under 12 months of age should receive a dose of monovalent (single antigen) measles vaccine before departure.
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  • Infants who receive the monovalent measles vaccine or MMR before their first birthday are vulnerable to all three diseases and should be revaccinated with two doses of MMR.
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  • An infant less than six months of age is usually protected against measles, mumps, and rubella by maternal antibodies.
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  • As a rule, the infant does not need added protection unless the mother is diagnosed with measles.
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  • Most fetuses receive some natural immunity to measles from their mothers in utero.
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  • This passive immunity fades over time and is less effective in children of immunized mothers than in children of mothers who had the measles.
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  • Women who have had the disease have higher measles antibody titers than women who have not had measles but have been vaccinated.
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  • Women who have not had measles nor vaccination have no measles antibodies.
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  • Antibodies to German measles (also called rubella) and chickenpox.
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  • German measles (Rubella) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) are examples of maternal infections that may cause birth defects in the unborn child.
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  • In underdeveloped nations where vitamin A deficiency is prevalent among children, death and disease often result from severe infections caused from common childhood illnesses such as measles and diarrhea.
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  • After the introduction of the MMR vaccine, the incidence of measles declined by 99 percent in the USA.
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  • As a result, the measles rate has increased in both the UK and USA.
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  • A University of Michigan study found that exposure to the measles virus could interfere with the proper development of myelin, a protein found in the area that protects the nerve fibers in the brain.
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  • The panic led to many parents in both the UK and the USA choosing not to vaccinate their children for measles, mumps and rubella or many other required childhood vaccinations.
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  • At one time, proponents of a link between autism and vaccines believed that the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination was the most likely autism trigger for many autistic children.
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  • As a result, the rate of measles outbreaks, especially in the UK, grew significantly.
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  • The study's results suggested that the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine played a role in the development of the gastrointestinal disorder and autism.
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  • The measles outbreak rate has grown significantly in the UK since many parents have refused the MMR vaccine.
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  • In the US, there has been a sevenfold increase in measles outbreaks due to parents refusing the vaccine for their children.
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  • Perhaps the most well-known environmental suspect is the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine.
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  • The MMR vaccine is a single inoculation that protects children from measles, mumps and rubella.
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  • Each of the diseases are very serious, and children who contract measles can develop pneumonia, which is a potentially fatal combination.
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  • The controversy started in the 1990s when a UK doctor published a study indicating that there might be a link between the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine and autism.
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  • This has caused outbreaks of measles, pertussis (whooping cough), and other illnesses throughout the United States, and it has resulted in the deaths of some children.
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  • In most cases, onset of symptoms was after measles, mumps, and rubella immunisation (sic).
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  • A measles outbreak in California was triggered by an unvaccinated child who caught the disease while visiting Europe.
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  • The Center for Disease Control and Prevention 2010 Measles Update states, "Measles is a leading cause of vaccine-preventable deaths among young children."
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  • Not every rash outbreak is allergy related, such is the case with the measles or chicken pox.
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  • If a rash is accompanied by high fever, fatigue and cold symptoms, measles or chicken pox may be present.
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  • Measles start as a rash on the face that slowly spread downwards on the body and is usually accompanied be a fever or sore throat.
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  • No matter their age, anyone can get measles, although it is most common amongst children whom have not yet built up immunity to the illness.
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  • According to the Center for Disease Control, the roseola rash looks much like the measles rash.
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  • In 1824 the king and queen of the Hawaiian Islands paid a visit to England, and both died there of measles.
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  • They distinguished themselves at Civita Castellana, a little town which they took; but the Austrians arrived in force, and during the retreat Napoleon Louis, the elder son, took cold, followed by measles, of which he died.
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  • Human membrane cofactor protein (CD46) acts as a cellular receptor for measles virus.
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  • This group includes canine distemper which infects carnivores, rinderpest which is a disease of artiodactyls and the human measles virus.
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  • However, you can catch measles at any age.
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  • However, Mr Sharp is unsympathetic, blaming the Briggs children for his son contracting German measles.
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  • You can have a vaccination to stop you getting measles.
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  • For example, unvaccinated children risk neurological problems if they develop measles or whooping cough.
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  • It organized trials of poliovirus and measle vaccines and more recently the very successful combined measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine.
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  • No child has died of acute measles in the UK for more than a decade.
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  • The resistance may be lowered temporarily by trauma or infectious disease such as measles, and skeletal tuberculosis or miliary tuberculosis may supervene.
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  • Parents or adults who travel or live abroad with infants less than 12 months old should have evidence of immunity to rubella and mumps, as well as measles, to avoid becoming infected if the infants are exposed to the diseases.
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  • Measles vaccines are usually given to children at about 15 months of age; prior to that age, the baby's immune system is not mature enough to initiate a reaction strong enough to insure long-term protection from the virus.
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  • This condition, called lymphoid hyperplasia, may also be associated with a variety of inflammatory and infectious diseases, such as Crohn's disease, gastroenteritis, respiratory infections, mononucleosis, and measles.
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  • On February 12, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims Office of Special Masters found that the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine did not cause autism in Michelle Cedillo, Colton Snyder and William Yates Hazelhurst.
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  • It is on clinical grounds that beriberi, scarlet fever, measles, &c., are recognized as belonging to the same class, and evolving in phases which differ not in intimate nature but in the more superficial and inessential characters of time, rate and polymorphism; and the impression is gaining strength that acute rheumatism belongs to the group of the infections, certain sore throats, chorea and other apparently distinct maladies being terms of this series.
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