Mazarin sentence example

mazarin
  • The second brief visit, in 1647, partly on literary, partly on family business, was signalized by the award of a pension of 3000 francs, obtained from the royal bounty by Cardinal Mazarin.
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  • In 1646 she accompanied her husband to Minster, where he was sent by Mazarin as chief envoy, and where she charmed the German diplomatists who were making the treaty of Westphalia, and was addressed as the "goddess of peace and concord."
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  • The duke of Sully carried out a revision in 1604, and other attempts were made by Mazarin and Colbert, but the extravagarces of Louis XV.
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  • In 1730 he entered the Mazarin College under the Jansenists, who soon perceived his exceptional talent, and, prompted perhaps by a commentary on the Epistle to the Romans which he produced in the first year of his philosophical course, sought to direct it to theology.
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  • Marca now interested himself in the fortunes of Mazarin, and remained faithful to him even during the xvn.
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  • The place was dismantled in 1652 by order of Cardinal Mazarin.
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  • This influence he gradually turned against Mazarin.
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  • A special envoy, sent by Louis XIV., to make inquiries and demand reparation, was treated with studied insult; and the result was that Mazarin abandoned the Turkish alliance and threw the power of France on to the side of Venice, openly assisting the Venetians in the defence of Crete.
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  • Still more ominously, the elector of Brandenburg, perceiving Sweden to be in difficulties, joined the league against her and compelled Charles to accept the proffered mediation of Cromwell and Mazarin.
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  • Servien lived at Angers or on his estates at Sable until the death of Louis when Mazarin entrusted him with the conduct, conjointly with the comte d'Avaux, of French diplomatic affairs in Germany.
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  • He received the title of minister of state on his return to France in April 1649, remained loyal to Mazarin during the Fronde, and was made superintendent of finances in 1653.
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  • He was an adviser to Mazarin in the negotiations which terminated in the treaty of the Pyrenees (1659) He amassed a considerable fortune, and was unpopular, even in court circles.
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  • Mazarin, in spite of all disadvantages, triumphed alike over his domestic and his foreign opponents.
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  • The peace of the Pyrenees was a decisive event in his personal history as well as in that of France, for one of its most important stipulations referred to his marriage, He had already been strongly attracted to one of the nieces of Mazarin, but reasons of state triumphed over personal impulse; and it was agreed that the new friendship with Spain should be cemented by the marriage of Louis to his cousin, the Infanta Maria Theresa.
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  • Mazarin died in the next year; but so strong was the feeling that the kings of France could only rule through a first minister that it was generally expected that Mazarin would soon have a successor.
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  • In the autumn of 1660 Schumacher visited Paris, shortly after Mazarin's death, when the young Louis XIV.
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  • He was brought up at Paris, where he completed his studies at the College Mazarin.
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  • After the death of Richelieu, he attached himself to Mazarin, whom he served faithfully throughout the Fronde.
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  • The earliest is the Mentz edition of 1452-1456 (the Mazarin or " 42-line;' Bible), but the earliest of a critical nature were those of Robert Etienne in 1528 and 1538-1540.
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  • The Society also gained ground steadily in France; for, though held in check by Richelieu and little more favoured by Mazarin, yet from the moment that Louis XIV.
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  • On the 4th of December 1642 Cardinal Richelieu died, and on the very next day the king sent a circular letter to all officials ordering them to send in their reports to Cardinal Mazarin, as they had formerly done to Cardinal Richelieu.
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  • Mazarin was thus acknowledged supreme minister, but he still had a difficult part to play.
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  • Now that the queen was all-powerful, it was expected she would at once dismiss Mazarin and summon her own friends to power.
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  • One of them, Potier, bishop of Beauvais, already gave himself airs as prime minister, but Mazarin had had the address to touch both the queen's heart by his Spanish gallantry and her desire for her son's glory by his skilful policy abroad, and he found himself able easily to overthrow the clique of Importants, as they were called.
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  • Mazarin had inherited the policy of France during the Thirty Years' War from Richelieu.
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  • During the last five years of the great war it was Mazarin alone who directed the French diplomacy of the period.
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  • This celebrated treaty belongs rather to the history of Germany than to a life of Mazarin; but two questions have been often asked, whether Mazarin did not delay the peace as long as possible in order to more completely ruin Germany, and whether Richelieu would have made a similar peace.
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  • Cheruel, prove a complete negative, for in them appears the zeal of Mazarin for the peace.
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  • At home Mazarin's policy lacked the strength of Richelieu's.
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  • The irritation of the latter was greatly Mazarin's own fault; he had tried consistently to play off the king's brother Gaston of Orleans against Conde, and their respective followers against each other, and had also, as his carnets prove, jealously kept any courtier from getting into the good graces of the queen-regent except by his means, so that it was not unnatural that the nobility should hate him, while the queen found herself surrounded by his creatures alone.
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  • Events followed each other quickly; the day of the barricades was followed by the peace of Ruel, the peace of Ruel by the arrest of the princes, by the battle of Rethel, and Mazarin's exile to Briihl before the union of the two Frondes.
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  • It was while in exile at Briihl that Mazarin saw the mistake he had made in isolating himself and the queen, and that his policy of balancing every party in the state against each other had made every party distrust him.
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  • The new party grew in strength, and in January 1652, after exactly a year's absence, Mazarin returned to the court.
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  • In order to promote a reconciliation with the parlement of Paris Mazarin had again retired from court, this time to Sedan, in.
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  • Long had been the trial, and greatly had Mazarin been to blame in allowing the Frondes to come into existence, but he had retrieved his position by founding that great royal party which steadily grew until Louis XIV.
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  • As the war had progressed, Mazarin had steadily followed Richelieu's policy of weakening the nobles on their country estates.
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  • The Fronde over, Mazarin had to build up afresh the power of France at home and abroad.
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  • Cheruel's having been able to prove from Mazarin's letters that the cardinal himself had never taken more than the minor orders, which could always be thrown off.
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  • To concede that the master was the greater man and the greater statesman does not imply that Mazarin was but a foil to his predecessor.
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  • Mazarin was not a Frenchman, but a citizen of the world, and always paid most attention to foreign affairs; in his letters all that could teach a diplomatist is to be found, broad general views of policy, minute details carefully elaborated, keen insight into men's characters, cunning directions when to dissimulate or when to be frank.
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  • Mazarin's Lettres, which must be carefully studied by any student of the history of France, have appeared in the Collection des documents inedits, 9 vols.
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  • Then exiled by Mazarin to Blois in 1652 he remained there until his death on the 2nd of February 1660.
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  • Released when Mazarin went into exile, he wished to marry Mademoiselle de Chevreuse (1627-1652), daughter of the famous confidante of Anne of Austria, but was prevented by his brother, who was now supreme in the state.
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  • He was concerned in the Fronde of 1651, but soon afterwards became reconciled with Mazarin, and in 16J4 married the cardinal's niece, Anne Marie Martinozzi (1639-1672), and secured the government of Guienne.
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  • But his conservative opinions rendered him more and more unpopular, and after the 10th of August 1792, when he took the side of the king, he was forced to lie concealed for some weeks in the observatory of the Mazarin College, from which he contrived to escape to the country.
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  • It was the period of the wars of the Fronde; and in 1651 the triumph of the Conde family drove Cardinal Mazarin from Paris.
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  • Colbert obtained, besides, the higher object of his ambition; the confidence of Mazarin, so far as it was granted to any one, became his, and he was entrusted with matters of the gravest importance.
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  • His earliest tentative was the drawing up of a memoire to Mazarin, showing that of the taxes paid by the people not one-half reached the king.
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  • The paper also contained an attack upon the superintendent Nicholas Fouquet, and being opened by the postmaster of Paris, who happened to be a spy of Fouquet's, it gave rise to a bitter quarrel, which, however, Mazarin repressed during his lifetime.
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  • In 1661 the death of Mazarin allowed Colbert to take the first place in the administration, and he made sure of the king's favour by revealing to him some of Mazarin's hidden wealth.
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  • He trafficked in public offices for the profit of Mazarin and in his own behalf.
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  • Voltaire, in his Siècle de Louis XIV (1751), told the story of the mysterious masked prisoner with many graphic details; and, under the heading of "Ana" in the Questions sur l'encyclopedie (Geneva, 1771), he asserted that he was a bastard brother of Louis XIV., son of Mazarin and Anne of Austria.
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  • The Breviary rightly so called, however, only dates from the nth century; the earliest MS. containing the whole canonical office is of the year 1099 and is in the Mazarin library.
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  • The premature royalist rising, however, in August 1659 was defeated, and Charles, who had awaited the result on the coast of Brittany, proceeded to Fuenterrabia on the Spanish frontier, where Mazarin and Luis de Haro were negotiating the treaty of the Pyrenees, to induce both powers to support his cause; but the failure of the attempt in England ensured the rejection of his request, and he returned to Brussels in December, visiting his mother at Paris on the way.
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  • But great anxiety was caused by a plot to restore Spanish rule, in which the duke of Caminha and the archbishop of Braga were implicated; and especially by the action of Mazarin, who had assumed control of French foreign policy in 1642.
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  • He was rewarded by admission to the Academy and the appointment of mathematical professor in Mazarin college, where he worked in a small observatory fitted for his use.
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  • On his return to Paris in 1754 Lacaille was distressed to find himself an object of public attention; he withdrew to Mazarin college, and there died, on the 21st of March 1762, of an attack of gout aggravated by unremitting toil.
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  • But thanks to Mazarin, who completed his work, France gathered in the harvest sown by Richelieu.
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  • At the outset no one believed that the new cardinal would have any Mazarin, success.
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  • Whilst others were triumphing openly, Mazarin, in the shadow and silence of the interregnum, had kept watch upon the heart of the queen; and when the old party of Marie de Medici and Anne of Austria wished to come back into power, to impose a general peace, and to substitute for the Protestant alliances an understanding with Spain, the arrest of Francois de Vendme, duke of Beaufort, and the exile of other important nobles proved to the great families that their hour had gone by (September 1643).
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  • Mazarin justified Richelieus confidence and the favor of Anne of Austria.
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  • Mazarin had stood his ground notwithstanding the treachery of the duke of Bavaria, the defection of the United Provinces, the resistance of the Germans, and the general confusion which was already pervading the internal affairs of the kingdom.
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  • Mazarin had not been so fortunate in Italy, where in 1642 the Spanish remained masters.
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  • Venice, the duchy of Milan and the duke of Modena were on his side; the pope and the grandduke of Tuscany were trembling, but the romantic expedition of the duke of Guise to Naples, and the outbreak of the Fronde, saved Spain, who had refused to take part in the treaties of Westphalia and whose ruin Mazarin wished to compass.
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  • It was, however, easier for Mazarin to remodel the map of Europe than to govern France.
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  • Thus regular obedience to an abstract principle was under Mazarin as incomprehensible to the idle and selfish nobility as it had been under Richelicu.
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  • Richelieu had been able to surmount these difficulties because he governed in the name of a king of full age, and against isolated adversaries; while Mazarin had the latter against Richelicu him in a coalition which had lasted ten years, with aria, the further disadvantages of his foreign origin and a royal minority at a time when every one was sick of government by ministers.
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  • It was the fiscal question that arrayed against Mazarin a coalition of all petty interests and frustrated ambitions; this was always the Achilles heel of the French monarchy, Financial which in 1648 was at the last extremity for money.
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  • At a period when all the world was a little mad, the parlement The had imagined a loyalist revolt, and, though it raised Fronde an armed protest, this was not against the king but of the against Mazarin and the persons to whom he had Parlenient.
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  • Fronde The victor of Lens and Charenton imagined that every of the one was under an obligation to him, and laid claim to a dictatorship so insupportable that Anne of Austria and Mazarin assured by Gondi of the concurrence of the parlement and peoplehad him arrested.
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  • Unfortunately, after his custom when victor, Mazarin forgot his promises above all, Gondis cardinals hat.
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  • A union was effected between the two Frondes, that of the Petits Maitres and that of the parlements, and Mazarin was obliged to flee for safety to the electorate of Cologne (February 1651), whence he continued to govern the queen and the kingdom by means of secret letters.
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  • Owing to Mazarins exile and to the kings attainment of his majority (September 5, 1651) quiet was being restored, when the return of Mazarin, jealous of Anne of Austria, nearly brought about another reconciliation of all his opponents (January 1652).
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  • A general weariness of civil war gave plenty of opportunity after this to the agents of Mazarin, who in order to facilitate peace made a pretence of exiling himself for a second time to Bouillon.
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  • The nobles who had hoped to set up the League again, half counting upon the king of Spain, were held in The check by Mazarin with the golden dowries of his adminisnumerous nieces, and were now employed by him in tration of warfare and in decorative court functions; while Mzasin.
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  • A victory in the Dunes by Turenne, now reinstalled in honor, and above all the conquest of the Flemish seaboard, were the results (June 1658); but when, in order to prevent the emperors intervention in the Netherlands, Mazarin attempted, on the death of Ferdinand III., to wrest the Empire from the Habsburgs, he was foiled by the gold of the Spanish envoy Peflaranda (1657).
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  • When the abdication of Christina of Sweden caused a quarrel between Charles Gustavus of Sweden and John Casimir of Poland, by which the emperor and the elector of Brandenburg hoped to profit, Mazarin (August 15, 1658) leagued the Rhine princes against them; while at the same time the substitution of Pope Alexander VII.
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  • Mazarin, in his later years, at last taught him his trade as king by admittinghim to the council, and by instructing him in the, details of politics and of administration.
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  • He went in 1651 to Paris, where he formed a friendship with Gabriel Naude, conservator of the Mazarin library.
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  • She was just of age when the Fronde broke out, and, attributing as she did her disappointments to Mazarin, she sympathized with it not a little.
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  • Louis, who liked Lauzun, and who had been educated by Mazarin in the idea that Mademoiselle ought not to be allowed to carry her vast estates and royal blood to anyone who was himself of the bloodroyal, or even to any foreign prince, gave his consent, but it was not immediately acted on, as the other members of the royal family prevailed with Louis to rescind his permission.
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  • Power lay for some time in the hands of the queen-mother and in those of her minister, Cardinal Mazarin, who found it difficult to maintain the power of the throne and the integrity of French territory during the domestic troubles of the Fronde and the last stages of the Thirty Year's War.
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  • His avarice and unscrupulous plundering of the revenues of the realm, the enormous fortune which he thus amassed, his supple ways, his nepotism, and the general lack of public interest in the great foreign policy of Richelieu, made Mazarin the especial object of hatred both by bourgeois and nobles.
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  • Voltaire, in his Siècle de Louis XIV (1751), told the story of the mysterious masked prisoner with many graphic details; and, under the heading of "Ana" in the Questions sur l'encyclopedie (Geneva, 1771), he asserted that he was a bastard brother of Louis XIV., son of Mazarin and Anne of Austria.
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